Behind the Scenes: Developing the New Canyon Torque

Jan 10, 2018
by Ross Bell  



The Torque has been laying dormant in the Canyon lineup since the 2016 introduction of the Sender, its bigger, more modern sibling. With the launch of that gravity sled Canyon signalled a change in their design language, brought on by lead mountain bike designer Peter Kettenring, and now we’ve seen this philosophy carry through to the recently introduced Spectral and Torque.

The engineers at Canyon's Koblenz, Germany headquarters have long been working towards the idea of a ‘family’ of bikes. From as far back as 2012, the blueprints were in place. Bikes were added, others dropped, the Strive was born, the then-unnamed Sender continued to shape up, while the Torque flew under the radar until it slapped its way into public view last month. The market has changed a lot since the previous Torque was designed—there is a new wave of long travel ‘do it all’ big hitters coming through with more capability than ever. The gap between enduro and downhill had been narrowing. Bikes like the Torque look set to blur that even further.
Canyon
Late last year Mike Kazimer headed to Portugal for the press launch of the 175mm-travel Torque. See what he thought after his very rainy First Ride.


Canyon Torque
The Torque and the idea of a 'lightweight' long travel bike has been in Canyon's roster for sometime, the 'Projekt S5' is one of their first forays into that concept and could be seen as a predecessor to the new Torque.

Canyon Torque

Canyon Torque


Canyon Torque

Canyon Torque



The Idea and Development

The plans for the Torque gained momentum with the influence of the Sender. Starting off on sketches and drawings, Peter Kettenring and the design team had decided that the old Nerve and Spectral “looked more or less the same” and “needed more separation design-wise, even if the kinematics are close.” They clearly are very aware of industrial design trends and work hard to give their bikes unique silhouettes, introducing something they refer to internally as ‘Platform Signature’ that examines the way frame lines and radiuses interact with light. Canyon strives [see what I did there?] to be an individualistic brand, and the design team wanted the bikes to follow suit.

bigquotesOur kids bike we have in comparison to the Spectral of course has a different kind of line flow... but I'd say they fit together very well. This is what we want to achieve, so you can have a silhouette on cars for example and you can identify the brand just by the way the sunlight reflects. So you can tell, no it's not a Volkswagen but a Ferrari or whatever…Peter Kettenring


Canyon Torque
The new bikes Canyon are bringing to the market are a big departure from their previous designs.

Canyon Torque
A key overlay which led to deciding on which kinematic concept to pursue.


Canyon Torque
Some of the key and long standing Canyon designers and engineers. From left to right: Daniel Oster, Peter Kettenring and Vincenz Thoma.

Canyon Torque
Moritz Stroer, the lead engineer on the Torque project.


bigquotesIn the sketches you see the top tube for example has a kink, or is straight, or has a small gusset in the upper-right area. Also the BB area is very fat and bulky in some parts with a few different ideas…I really liked the upright shock position, maybe because we started with it in 2012, but here we really figured out how much higher it is in the end, and this was a good point for the new linkage design.Peter Kettenring

By 2014 there were two iterations of the bike’s kinematics in the depths of Canyon’s engineering servers, an upright and a flat shock layout. They’d initially concentrated on the upright design, but overlaying the designs showed how much higher the shock would sit given the travel and length of the shock, especially with the introduction of metric shocks. The new linkage design was optimized to be as low as possible. The longer metric shocks coming in also posed a new design challenge on the frame, gaining almost 3cm in eye-to-eye length. The solution was to push into the downtube, which also “looked more integrated and [the engineers] liked it more.” The Torque’s suspension kinematics were built around air shocks, not only because Canyon believe they have achieved a “similar sensitivity” to coil and a lighter package, but because as a direct-selling brand it's critical that the customer be able to easily fine tune their air shock to their body weight and tracks.


Canyon Torque
A rough evolution of the Torque. The old DHX on the left, the Sender test mule in the center gave strong direction to the concept, and the Torque prototype right helped fine tune the kinematics they were aiming for.

Canyon Torque
The Sender was released early in 2016 and signaled a change in Canyon's design language.

Canyon Torque
The functional prototype of the Torque took strong cues from its bigger brother.


Canyon Torque
These prototypes are pretty cut and shut with tubes they have in the factory but really help with dialling in the kinematics.

Canyon Torque
Experimenting with pivot points to optimise the suspension characteristics.


Canyon Torque
Downtube sections show the integrated shock mount which was brought on by the introduction of the longer metric shocks in the middle of the project.

Canyon Torque
Canyon can produce small 3D printed models in house which is more efficient and cost effective than sourcing full sized versions.


bigquotesYou don't necessarily need to be a World Cup rider or crazy freerider to need this sort of progressiveness. In the end it is also very playful, it's not only about the overall progressiveness, but also about how the kinematics behave in a certain section of travel. So, for example, at the beginning you want to have it very sensitive, that's the reason why we have a high leverage at the beginning, but at the end you want to have that bottomless feeling, that's the reason why you have a lower leverage at the end.Moritz Stroer

Canyon's main goal for the Torque is a familiar refrain—to combine downhill-esque capabilities with good pedalling efficiency. They feel that the learning process of the Sender gave them a strong direction to follow with the Torque. Experimenting with various linkages on the Sender led to their ‘MX-Link’, and while this layout does not feature on the Torque, there are definite parallels from the engineers' pursuit of their so-called ‘Triple Phase Suspension’ feeling. According to engineer Moritz Stroer, the Torque's suspension ramps up for those going big, while remaining supple for small bump absorption, and having a mid stroke firmness which feels “more direct” than competitors' bikes who might be more linear.

Canyon Torque
The Torque is designed around an air shock.

Canyon Torque
No 'MX-Link' like the Sender, instead a yoke splits around the seat-tube.

Canyon Torque
Focus was put into bearings and shock mounting points to reduce friction and increase reliability, and therefore decrease maintenance.

bigquotesThe Sender was the beginning for a new direction in design you could say, but it was also important for a new direction in kinematics and the whole feeling of the bike, so we worked a lot on the exact leverage curve. I would say this is the character of all our bikes that are coming now. You can say 'this is the feeling of a Canyon bike'. This was really key to having a character on the bike.Daniel Oster

According to the engineers a bike can be designed 90-95% on a computer, but when it comes to testing, nothing beats hitting the trails. To do that, they butcher up their functional aluminium prototype from “parts that are already available to make it as quickly as possible.” The majority of testing and feedback was done in conjunction with multiple Downhill World Champ Fabien Barel on his home trails in the south of France, as well as on the rugged stages of San Romolo and Finale Ligure. During the testing of their aluminum test mules a lot of focus was spent on the kinematics, playing with the main pivot position to accurately adjust the pedal kickback and anti-squat of the bike, as well as the linkages to optimize the kinematics curve and shock rate. This offered up marked changes the previous model; despite being less progressive and sensitive in its suspension curve, the previous generation of Torque was less efficient to pedal. Extra attention was put into the shock mount pivot points to try and prevent them from moving at too great an angle, reducing friction and improving the reliability of the eyelet bushings.

bigquotesBasically our goal was to transfer a lot of things we learned in the Sender project. So we wanted to have the bike more sensitive, we wanted the bike to be more stable in the middle of the sections to make it really precise to ride but also fun to ride in the bike park if you want to hit berms and jumps. But at the same time we wanted to combine these downhill characteristics from the Sender project we really knew exactly where we wanted to go. We wanted to combine it with very good pedalling efficiency. These were the biggest two goals we had during the development of the kinematics on the Torque.Moritz Stroer


Canyon Torque
The Torque alongside the Spectral which share similar DNA and features.

Canyon Torque
One feature carried over from the Spectral is the integrated cable channelling on the down tube.

Canyon Torque
Canyon wanted this bike to a cater for a wide audience and so it comes in various guises, such as an aluminium frame, a women's version, and an XS model.

bigquotesWe tried it with the coil shock but then you are missing end progression, especially with the new air shocks like the X2 from FOX for example and the special leverage curve we have with it dropping so much in the beginning, it also has a lot of sensitivity so you can have a lighter complete package with a similar sensitivity than a coil shock. For us as a direct selling brand it is easier for the customer to work with an air shock because they can adjust it to their body weight easily, otherwise they have to send the spring back to us, we have to send a new spring and it's also never so precise.Daniel Oster

The Torque was originally aimed at being an aluminum-only, “entry level bike that makes the sport accessible”; the carbon version was added to the design plan later. To facilitate that goal the bike was kept relatively simple, with the like of Canyon’s Shapeshifter technology being ruled out early in the process.

With the launch of the two new bikes this winter Canyon have left a 29” sized hole in their portfolio unaddressed. Quizzing the engineering team on this they continued to stress their belief that 27.5 is the “fun” wheel size, and while 29” may indeed be faster for racing, that was not their goal with these bikes. Despite having the high technology Strive available to them, it sounds like their existing and new EWS recruits are keen to pilot the ‘fun and not for racing’ Torque next year… We wouldn’t be surprised to see the Strive next up for a face lift - 29er or not - to bring it more in line with the rest of Canyon's mountain bike lineup.

bigquotesIn the beginning we also planned to just produce in aluminium because we thought we need a package that is not so high priced and interesting to a variety of riders, also younger people who can't buy a downhill and an enduro bike but want to have the platform. In the first step we just made an aluminium concept but then afterwards we decided afterwards it would be cool to have it as a higher priced carbon version too and then we did this afterwards, so the shapeshifter doesn't fit in this concept with keeping it simple.Daniel Oster


Off-Track Testing and Production

Before the first prototypes hit the trails, an impact test and functional tests are done to check clearance of tires and other components, essentially to make sure it ‘works’. If the on-track testing is positive and the clearance tests get the go ahead, the engineers continue to work on the layup of the frame until they reach the target weight and stiffness. From there they begin a pilot run of frames and start to put them through the wringer is the test lab. Each frame has a different layup and obviously cannot simply be transferred over from the old model, the new Torque and Spectral have very different tube designs and shock mounts which brings new loads to the frame.

Canyon Torque
bigquotesIf you look at the ISO standard they only speak about mountain bikes. Here at Canyon we have different categories. We start with this category in the development stage so test it in accordance to the specific loads. The Spectral and Torque for example, are tested in accordance with category 4 and 5, with 5 being the highest level. They are really, really hard testing for these frames. Mountain bike testing starts at level 3, enduro and so on is 4, and downhill is 5. It could happen that we would have to start a totally new layup. Sometimes it works directly with the first loop, other times we need 2,3,4,5,6,7 loops – it's totally different each time.Gordon Koenen

Canyon Torque
Canyon Torque

Canyon Torque
When the frames first come into the test lab they are measured for dimensions and tolerances before being subject to static load testing which is non-destructive and gives them insight into the performance characteristics of the bike such us weight, comfort, and stiffness.

Canyon Torque
This is where the bikes really start to earn their keep with a frame having to survive a life cycle in each test rig.
Canyon Torque
Each model has a different testing procedure, the Torque receives Canyon's highest level of lab punishment - the same as the Sender.

After measuring the dimensions and tolerances of the frame the testing begins with non-destructive loads to check the performance characters like the weight, comfort, and stiffness. The bikes then get punished. Hard. Canyon’s procedure sees every frame put through a life cycle on each of the destructive test rigs. They say their tests push the frames much further than the ISO standards require. Carbon frame are subject to a CT scan both pre and post testing to seek out any potential imperfections in the layup. They also do a full inspection of each mass production carbon fork and handlebar, given their safety implications - they aren't assembled onto bikes before a CT scan gives the all clear. The Torque is tested at Canyon’s highest level and on par with the Sender which, once cleared, means it’s time to move onto production.

Before the bikes begin hitting the trails in the hands of customers, the final hurdle that Canyon faces is integrating the new model into the assembly lines. Reportedly the new Torque's assembly line is relatively complex in comparison to the old model and other models they offer. New tools are needed and the employees need to be brought up to speed on new workflows. New models and intricate designs like the Torque are assembled on what is called the ‘flex-line,’ which is more time intensive and smaller in volume until the quality and efficiency allows them to take it to the bigger and faster main production line. From there, the new bike is boxed up and shipped out direct to the customer.

Canyon Torque
Frames are CT scanned pre and post testing to look for any imperfections.
Canyon Torque
Canyon also scan every single carbon handlebar and fork destined for the mass production assembly lines.

Canyon Torque
An example of what a CT scan can reveal to the engineers.

Canyon Torque
It'll be a good few months before the Torque reaches this main production line...
Canyon Torque
...instead Canyon will wait until the quality and efficiency of assembly is there before turning it to 11.

Canyon Torque
The last step in a long process...

114 Comments

  • + 110
 As an owner of a canyon, I think the next development should be customer support.
  • + 6
 The worst in the world.
  • + 62
 @SniperWZ: Don't say that, Tony Ellsworth will take it as a challenge.
  • + 3
 There is no better support than the win-win relationship you build with your local bike shop Smile
  • + 9
 @jackwdean: Token LBS response, not 'always' the most financially beneficial solution for everyone...
  • + 7
 @george11: I agree with you, and brands like Specialized and their new pricing structure for 2018 agree with you too and show that they are listening to the cycling community by offering better prices, while still maintaining their commitment to supporting the locally owned bike shop and the philanthropic work they do in those communities Smile

I work in a small bike shop in Colorado, USA that prides itself on delivering an incredibly high level of customer service that in my opinion is yet to be matched by brands that sell directly to the customer. Nothing gets me or other employees more excited than to see someone come into the shop, have a really awesome experience, nerd out about bikes( listen to a few of my corny dad jokes), layout every option, and help them make a purchase that's right for them and their budget and then see them out on the trails with a goofy smile on their face! That my friends is what cycling is all about; to me at least Smile
  • + 4
 @jackwdean: Jack I wish you worked at my local bike shop. People are people, I've had some great relationships with bike shops and more often, less than stellar. A great bike shop can absolutely be the focal point of a tight community. Or it can be another place to part you of your money. I think coming years will see the great shops shine through and many fall by the way. Times change.
Funnily enough, think I'm about to buy a bike from a bike shop because they've dropped last years bike to a price that can compete with the Germans and I can justify.
Thanks for your stoke.
  • + 2
 @CanBLine: Happy to hear that you're gonna be out on a new sled soon, what did ya get?
  • + 1
 @jackwdean: GENERAL HYPE IS ALIVE
  • + 1
 @george11: just grow weed and give it to them for goods and service. then its mutually financially beneficial for everyone
  • + 1
 @jackwdean: looking at a 2017 Norco Sight. Competition is the Jeffsy and Spectral. TBH, the bike shop involved are completely uninspired/uninspiring. (In their defense, dealing with customers... I’m sure there’s ups and downs) It’s all about the bike. But cheers heaps, new sleds are super awesome! (It’s been a while!)
  • + 1
 @george11: You know it!
  • + 1
 @CanBLine: The Norco Sight is a rad shred sled, and congrats!
  • + 2
 @jackwdean: Cheers! Deal is done, the passionate bike nerd salesman got it over the line. It's good to deal with good people.
  • + 1
 @jackwdean: Great idea. Your local bike shop will love your Direct-To-Consumer bike!
  • + 1
 @michibretz: If they are smart they will! If you make someone with a direct to consumer bike a happy service customer and make sure they always leave thinking " wow, I just can't get that experience online and the savings I get from the direct model isn't worth more than the relationship with that bike shop that's gonna look out for me and save me more money in the long term ", their next bike 9/10 times will be from you!

But if you treat them like trash, they won't. So people who work at bikes shops like me, please..... make sure you give people with direct to consumer bikes a great experience. I can speak from experience when I say the feeling of converting someone back onto a model from your shop's floor feels way better than the 15 seconds of being jaded towards someone does.
  • + 66
 As someone who owns 2 @Canyon-PureCycling bikes I cannot believe that your customer service is so appalling. Even when I signed up to be part of your customer feedback group you couldn't manage to arrange the interview. What a shambles.
  • + 82
 Sorry, I couldn't hear you over the sound of my LBS owner replacing a couple bearings free of charge on the bike I bought from him...
  • + 157
 Lol, your guy must be doing it wrong, pressing in bearings should make hardly any sound at all.
  • + 4
 Noted, and sorry to hear that. I have two bikes (spectral and sender), and haven't had a single issue over the years.
  • + 22
 @D-systems: Well played, sir. My mistake, it was an Onyx hub that was causing the ruckus.
  • + 21
 @D-systems: I dunno, it's always noisy as hell for me. Granted, the noise is coming out of my mouth...but it's loud.
  • + 37
 "Focus was put into bearings and shock mounting points to reduce friction and reliability" - well that's not good..
  • + 9
 it'll be fine if you don't over torque them
  • + 40
 I admire their honesty - reliability is so overrated anyway Smile
  • + 10
 @ssteve HAHA! What a typo!

It does actually say later in the article proper that it is to "reduce friction and improve reliability".
  • + 7
 @fingerbangextreme: It is just a different way to look at it. If reliability of bikes and bike components is so low that nothing lasts longer than a single season, no one would be bothered with new standards as there is nothing there to become obsolete.
  • + 2
 @vinay: Or we'll all buy second hand Nicolais.
  • + 1
 @Fix-the-Spade: Yeah obviously this only works if everyone agrees to make unreliable gear. I'm sure Nicolai could do this too if they really wanted but I don't trust them there...

This is the whole issue right? Producers of "new year, new bike" equipment may not even be too bothered with their old stuff being obsolete in a few years. It are the quality brands who are stepping up now because they see people are becoming reluctant to invest in a Chris King headset that is so good it could last you several frames. A headset that will last you several frame. It used to make sense back in the day. Nowadays it sounds kind of silly.
  • - 4
flag WAKIdesigns (Jan 10, 2018 at 13:20) (Below Threshold)
 @Fix-the-Spade: how can such thing as second hand Nicolai exist?! It is undisputably the best bike out there, why would anyone sell it? WIth this geometry you could beat Aaron Gwin himself. Then you can buy Pole which is even more extreme and you are a moral human being to top it all. SO FKNG KEEP IT REAL, it is realer than real. the ultimate truth. An act of ultimate monetary heorism, you are so awake as fk that If God existed such purchase would grant you immortal life in heavens.
  • + 5
 @WAKIdesigns: Second hand Nicolais exist because their owners sell them to fund their Nicolai habit, just look at the classifieds, it's full of addicts who bought a Nicolai, then bought another Nicolai so they have to sell the first Nicolai because Nicolais can cross-Nicolai and you'll wake up one day to find a middle aged German dude machining bearing seats in your toaster.
  • + 4
 @Fix-the-Spade: No no no no, you don't understand. It is geometry, The best geometry. And the most moral, most keep it real way of making bikes. It cannot be better. No marketing, designer bullsht, the realest real thing. You just can't say that a Nicolai is outdated. It would be like buying ENVE wheels and telling your wife and friends that you don't like them. It's like coming out gay after years of broadcasting homophobia. Emperor's New Clothes effect. Possibly my favorite fable. I hope you do understand that I am not criticizing companies and their products...
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: You're scaring the kids Wakidesigns, please, please stop. Hey, I do like Nicolai bikes though
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: The Emperor does not need new clothes, he wears the same expensive black robes every day and any suggestion they need updating will end with you getting struck by lightning or cut in half by Lord Vader.
  • + 18
 Am I the only one who thinks "Projekt S5" looks quite a lot like the Liteville 601?
  • + 1
 www.hai.at/st-hai/media/products/original/torque-ex-01-perspective.png It's just the prototype of the old Torque EX, which the Liteville did somewhat resemble.
  • + 18
 We decided not to use the shape-shifter *BECAUSE THEY ALL BREAK
  • + 1
 i have never broken mine or heard of one breaking within the other ones my mates and people in town have
  • + 0
 And, of course, it was totally pointless. Amusingly, my friend's one broke before the bike even got to him. In Canyon's defence though, his bike has been totally hassle free otherwise and he does very little maintenance
  • + 2
 @George-k: may I direct you here, just for example. Included is Canyon's admission emails that it breaks commonly and their suggestion of how to bypass it

m.pinkbike.com/forum/listcomments/?threadid=149137&pagenum=157
  • + 3
 @ermoldaker: You clearly haven't ridden a Strive. The SS is a Godsend on the climbs. Totally transforms the bike. Going on 2 years of ownership, I've not had one single issue either.
  • + 11
 I just want the mini 3D models to play with... Yes, I am a 39yo child
  • + 4
 I thought it was a good article and the photography was spot on. My one concern: Doesn't seem like much room in the rear to accommodate wider (say 2.6) rubber. Is that a 2.35 (ish) wide tire in the photo? I love "skinny" tires but would at least like to have the option to run wider tires on occasion.
  • + 3
 Is it just me or does it feel like we people are gonna be over these super long travel bikes in the next year or two. Unless you live next to a bike park, or have a sick shuttle run within a few minutes, who gets to enjoy enough time on trails that really make these kinda bikes get fun. Especially if you only can own one nice bike.

I feel like more and more people are gonna start going back to 150ish 27.5 and 130-140mm 29ers. Bikes are more fun when you can have fun riding them everywhere. Especially when you see the 50:01 boys riding tiny smaller travel bikes, or see a lot of the downhill guys training on much more "trail oriented" bikes. Feels like these will go the way of the big SUV in america or 1000cc sportbikes in the motorcycle industry. Most people cant ride these big bikes to anywhere near their capabilities anyways, so why not enjoy something a little lighter and more playful you can enjoy everywhere.
  • + 6
 There are plenty of people in the UK who are into downhill. Jumps, rough shit and shoots are what they like to ride. However, it's not really feasible to own a DH bike here because there's so few uplift spots. Enter a bike like this or a nomad4 or a propane spindrift. Suddenly it's a bike you can ride proper DH on and not feel like you're holding back - but it's feasible to pedal it back up to the top too. I think that's the point of these. A downhill bike you can pedal. It's not really an Enduro bike.
  • + 1
 @tom666: I guess when you think about it taking the place of a dh bike, rather than taking the place of an "enduro" or trail bike that makes sense, and gives them more of a place in the market. I guess my point is that i think a lot of people just buy the most travel they can get without really thinking and then end up with more bike they can use on their daily trails. Obviously it all depends on where and how you ride, but I think there is a trend of buying too much bike right now, and that will reverse a bit in the next couple years. Especially as technology increases and you are starting to get bikes that are say 140mm of travel but ride like they have a lot more.
  • - 6
flag CarrotCorn (Jan 10, 2018 at 18:06) (Below Threshold)
 @Longroadtonowhere well i do live near a bike park and i do live near crazy shuttles, as does everyone in BC. so basically youre telling everyone in BC that its retarded to have 170-203mm suspension. u sir probably cant ride for shit compared to the children that grow up here, meaning you will probably never use all ur suspension, where as little jackson goldstone could use 8 inchs on an xc trail cause he f*cking rips.

BASICALLY, IF UR SLOW WITH NO FLOW, 130-150mm IS THE WAY TO GO. IF YOU'RE SPEEDY AND STEEZY, 180-203mm WILL FEEL BREEZEEYY.
  • + 3
 @CarrotCorn: Im not saying bikes like this shouldnt exist. I see their place for sure. I also know how to ride. I was also jumping 35+ ft jumps on a bmx bike as a teenager with zero suspension. I also spent quite a bit of time up in BC this past summer riding. I def rode some gnar trails, and def bottomed out my suspension a handful of times.

I also live in socal and see a shit ton of people riding trails that are probably best suited for hardtails or 130mm travel bikes, on 170mm travel bikes.

My point was more, everyone is buying enduro/freeride bikes right not, and that is where all the emphasis has been going on new bikes, when really only about 30% of people need anything more than 140/150mm.

I can just see a day a couple years down the road when less people are buying bikes like these and more people are buying bikes like a smuggler or something along those lines. I have a 170 travel bike and I loved it in whistler, and in BC in general. I kinda hate it at everything that is within an hour of my house (unfortunately).
  • + 7
 Peter KETTENRING translated is Peter CHAINRING Smile
  • + 3
 Im curious to know why Canyon has decided to move towards horizontal placement for the shock on the last 2 bikes that got rolled out. Wondering if we will see a new strive like this down the road too.
  • + 2
 Really wish they avoided the shock yolk as most are realizing it's not conducive to an air shock (side loads it) and it's being removed from most designs now (process, spartan, more soon). Other than that it looks pretty rad.

And to dig at Ross, what wheelsize won the last few years of EWS? calm down, wagon wheels will come.
  • + 1
 Agreed. Puts me right off..
  • + 1
 Ahhh yes.... "side loading".... I know plenty of people (myself included) who have never had an issue with their specialized enduros (which according to the PB comments is the king of side loading).
  • + 2
 @Timroo1: It's a fact. Ask Vorsprung about it or any other shock tuner. Facts are facts, regardless of anecdotal experience, the information is out there and is real. It's also why many makers removed them from their next design. Maybe the enduro has a stiffer yolk setup, which would reduce it, or you aren't really side loading your frame much....

It also happened to me and many others. so, yea...
  • + 2
 @atrokz: I guess everyone I know avoids side loading. Everyone will have different experiences I suppose.
  • + 3
 @Timroo1: for sure, but there is an issue for some. A few shock tuners pointed this out when I had to have my shock rebuilt twice. Looked into it and low and behold there was tons of people having the same issues. Made me stop trying to table or whip it! haha. Odly enough the cheapest RS shock it came with held up fine. Maybe it's stiffer on the Enduro, but there's a few guys in BC that lost all air in the shock on Spartans. Prob down to alignment as well, which is one main issue on the Process as the shock is essentally driven off the swingarm which flexs, thus flexing the shock and burping air, or in my case, wore the seals out in months.
  • + 4
 @atrokz: my inability to whip is paying off I guess! Haha. Good info though
  • + 4
 There are some nice design features and principles in the development of the new Torque. Big up Canyon. I'd love to work with such a forward thinking bike company.
  • + 1
 Talking about local shop: just because of customer support I bought Specialized enduro 2016 at my local shop. After 2,5 months headset went apart (they told me it is not covered and asked if I washed my bike using water), so I got to buy a new one (they gave me some discount), secondly one brake (Sram guide) faded so I went there again and they bled it and some oil got on pads so they told me that they got rid of them and put another one (replacement-not sram original) and I have to pay (discount around 20%). After 14 months I noticed that twice when the bike is full compressed seat bridge kicks seattube somehow (probably flexes some mm) and I went there again. I even found the youtube video where the guy mentions that..they told me that it is a "kids story" and it is better for me not to fill the warranty request because they (Specialized) will remember serial number and me as someone who tried to get a new frame on the "kids story"...so I went out of the shop...will try online definitely after this. I don't expect anything anymore, so it is win solution for me, worse it cannot be, as for now. It is all big industry, there will always be customers, they know that so no more branding like Mercedes, maybe Hope stands for it
  • + 1
 Love the look of this bike and that paint. However, I am going to continue to support my local (or nearby). I was super close on pulling the trigger on a YT last year and happy I didnt. Just read the YT owners threads from last spring to see why. Dont get me wrong, some of the LBS are BS operations and I like the concept and savings of direct market but the amount of issues that come up with warranties and parts is a constant that will never be solved. Especially in rural areas. Not sacrificing even a week off my bike in peak riding season!
  • + 0
 It would be great to see the new kinematics in the article @rossbellphoto @Canyon-PureCycling

By the way I do a kinematic analysis of the Canyon Torque and you can check the results here:
mrblackmorescorner.blogspot.com.es/2017/12/canyon-torque-2018.html
  • + 1
 But I ride an enduro 29.... apparently 29 is not a fun wheel size.... all this time I thought I was having fun... Canyon has told me how wrong I really was.
  • + 2
 I hate when a brand release a new bike i want and i have to wait until april to buy it!
  • + 1
 That's why i'm a BIG fan of canyon, though I have to pay 300$ for delivery and 30% more for tax! Really hope there would be an agency like YT in China.....
  • + 2
 I bet they sell out of the new Torque.... ticks everybox of the modern MTBer....
  • + 2
 Does haven't a water bottle cage, but other than that it looks great.
  • + 3
 I thought only Transition had the ability to turn it to 11...
  • + 1
 Anyone else immediately reminded of the mega am by the looks of that frame?
  • + 2
 Canyon Torque, the rebirth of the Yeti ASR7 concept...
  • + 1
 You mean the 2009 180mm bike or something newer? Love my asr7, still rocks, but doesn't roll on the small hoops.
  • + 1
 Sounds like they care more about how the bikes look than how they actually ride...
  • - 1
 I am afraid that is something we will get used too in the future.
  • + 1
 function dictating form , perfection .only the Germans. No stupid acronyms or bullshit
  • + 1
 Peter Kettenring easily is the best name for an bike engineer ever! at least for a German engineer...
  • + 1
 Why so many new enduro bikes has almost the same suspension design as Kona Process?
  • + 1
 Wow that torque looks amazing ! oh wait, thats the old model on the left...
  • + 0
 yeah used to come with formula brakes, now its all sram and maxxis and stuff. This is why I do not buy complete bikes
  • + 0
 @Coldspringer: A gearbox would be the next value add....
  • + 0
 Ultrasounds or other imaging techniques are really important for carbon quality control. I seen't the emphasis in my industry too! I make the equivalent of 200 foot skis.
  • + 24
 For skiing centipede couples?
  • + 0
 @dougfs: Haha he meant 200 single foot skis = 200 foot skis.
  • + 2
 @dougfs: or a small Company of soldiers
  • + 2
 Sorry for the error. I make footskie's for customers. Its a massage technique. Look it up. We use the ultrasounds to help with stimulation.
  • + 1
 mine will be here by march
  • + 1
 What a load of Kinematics
  • + 0
 Why did they spend so much money on engineers when they just copied a dw link?
  • + 0
 When you pay for cheap labor , you can afford nice scanning machines to see if your made in China labor is ripping you off!
  • + 2
 Wait, and where do you think your Specialized is from?
  • + 0
 Design evolution? Looks like they just threw a horst link on there and called it a day.
  • + 2
 raw alloy looks so good
  • + 0
 Tell you what they should add the Shimano Steps motor to that badboy and make an eTorque that would be sweet.
  • + 1
 It's all good but still can't get Canyon in Canada.
  • + 1
 This article was all talk
  • + 10
 You just don't speak their "design language".
  • + 1
 Lol developing the new canyon process 167. What about the canyon jefsey?
  • + 1
 rebranded BIG S ...almost...even they Y yolk
  • + 1
 Take my money.
  • - 1
 It doesn't look like a Pivot however it does remind me of a YT Jeffsy....but slightly better looking in my opinion.
  • + 1
 Clavicula crankset!
  • + 0
 Put a 29" wheel under it, game on!
  • - 2
 Their road bikes look amazing, the MTBs are ugly as sin.
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2018. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.081105
Mobile Version of Website