Bell Introduces Super 2R Helmet - Press Release

Aug 26, 2014
by Bell Bike Helmets  


Bell Helmets, a company that since 1954 has delivered purpose-built helmets marked by industry-leading design and performance technologies, today unveiled its “Super 2R” – a groundbreaking all-mountain helmet for riders, setting a new standard for helmet versatility and performance. Building off the success of the Super, Bell raised the bar with Super 2R, addressing the increasing demands of all-mountain riders with a category-defying helmet that bridges the gap between trail riding and downhill thanks to a removable, protective chin bar that can be easily attached and detached throughout the course of a ride.

The Super 2R was designed to serve the needs of a new generation of mountain bikers who are riding faster and farther than ever, and are taking on varying trail terrains and downhill situations. Bell’s Wraparound Protection technology addresses the need for added adaptability by delivering a protective chin bar that can be removed and carried on climbs, then quickly and easily snapped into place for the descent. The chin bar utilizes buckles with proven technology inspired by ski boots along with removable and adjustable cheek pads. These features add stability, comfort and protection to help improve performance on the downhill portion of rides and eliminate the need to carry an extra helmet along the way.

Bell Super2

bigquotesWith the Super 2R, we wanted to introduce a helmet that could address the various situations that a serious all-mountain rider might encounter. For avid mountain bikers, escalated downhill speeds call for enhanced protection in a full-face helmet. Until now, there was a choice between wearing an open-face or full-face helmet, or carry both to swap back and forth. We felt it was time for one helmet that effectively achieves all of that. The Super 2R is a single helmet that offers adaptable protection and comfort to address the riders' headgear needs. - Azul Couzens, Director of Marketing, Bell Helmets

Everything about the new Super 2R was designed for all-mountain riding. In addition to its Wraparound Protection technology, the helmet is fully loaded with essential elements for riding across varying terrain. Overbrow Ventilation channels cool air through the helmet to prevent overheating on long rides. The Super 2R’s Twin Axis Gear (TAG) fit system provides a comfortable perch on the occipital lobe, while a newly designed camera mount features improved breakaway capability. Additionally, the GoggleGuide System lets riders easily adjust and stow goggles under the visor. From Enduro to XC, this host of performance features was designed to deliver more of what the all-mountain rider needs and positions the Super 2R as the new standard in all-mountain helmet performance.

Bell Helmets Super 2

The Super 2R is an upgrade from Bell’s original Super helmet, and the chin bar will only be compatible with the new Super 2R and Super 2. The Super 2R will be available in three sizes, is CPSC and CE EN1078 certified, and will also come equipped with ICEdot emergency identification and notification service; a label with a unique code that the user can activate at no charge. After setting up a user profile, first responders will be able to access emergency contact info and any special health conditions via SMS text through a standard mobile device. It will be available in five standard color ways. Super 2R is priced for retail at $200 and will be available at Bell dealers in November.

www.bellhelmets.com


205 Comments

  • 484 16
 Notable that there's no full-face specific certification or crash testing for this helmet. No DOT, no ASTM 1952. Basically nothing to say the chin guard is anything but decoration.
  • 56 14
 So glad someone else noticed this. Upvote this man for common sense.
  • 183 12
 Don't tell me what to do.
  • 26 4
 Very true. I would like to see real world tests and their results. There's a reason why the full face is one piece
  • 93 16
 Surly some kind of chin guard is better than nothing.... id much rather be using this during a dirt munching stunt than a open face lid... top job bell......
  • 3 2
 My buddy and I were just talking about this yesterday on these same trails
  • 7 5
 @kylesligo no, t really isn't. it gives under researched people the un based confidence that the helmet will protect you from an impact where its mostly just going to be a threat to your chin... or god forbid, jugular.
  • 43 5
 If your face is about to be smashed into the dirt and you had the power to pause time.......What would you pick? A open face lid or this. Serious question......
  • 12 5
 "some kind of chin guard is better than nothing"....On the surface, this would seem reasonable...but true story, (don't recall names/model)...about a decade ago there was a 2-piece skid lid...some Dude bails, chin piece snaps off and in the process sliced his face bad
  • 18 7
 so endurOoOooooOO....
  • 13 8
 Who cares, it's enduro specific!
  • 21 19
 I figure if you can afford the carbon rig, the race expenses, etcetcetc, you can afford two decently priced and well safe helmets. One full face, one open. Boom, problem solved without needing a hospital stay.
  • 9 6
 This thing has about as much of a usefulness factor and a coolness factor as maybe a fannypack
  • 8 0
 I'd race Enduro in an open face anyway so I'm sold.
  • 10 6
 @SomGuy222 Are ye not getting the point? this is a open face lid with the option of strapping on a chin guard to help protect you on a dh section or a timed dh stage during a enduro event!! You dont need to put it on all the time ffs! But now and then its nice to be able the grab it, and bomb on down... and if you dont find yourself in that off the bike situation maybe you should go harder...........
  • 13 6
 When I need to climb with a full face, I just strap it to my backpack. With this, you still have to stop, take off your backpack and take the chinguard out. So where the hell is the advantage? Why not just take a full face and know that your head is properly protected?
  • 12 2
 @its-joe Fair point but for me 80% of the time a open helmet is fine. This is a light weight pack-able alternative that can be wipped out for the other dodgy 20%
  • 2 5
 yes I thought a helmet was supposed to protect your head. well fashion before functionality I suppose.
  • 41 1
 I'm just going to leave this here... www.pinkbike.com/photo/670343
  • 6 2
 @loopie the helmet mangling the guy's face was urge's archienduro and that's exactly the accident that comes to my mind when I see those helmets. The usefulness of certifications is often debated but to me, no certification can possibly mean that even the manufacturer doesn't even know what's really going to happen when you crash. Relying on protection that might not be there when you crash is risky business. At least you know what to expect with a full/open face and should ride accordingly.

I'm sure that those helmets can potentially be better than an open face in some situations but if they're going to mangle your face, there's no point... but then again, maybe the dude who got his face mangled would have had his face caved in if he wore an open face instead... Which is really the problem of not having a certification stating that the helmet is safe. It creates uncertainty and a lot of people are not willing to put their safety in that grey zone when their life is concerned.
  • 8 6
 Do you know how difficult it would be to create a certification program for a mountain bike helmet that is truly meaningful? the only reason it would be attempted is to gain the sales of whoever thinks it is worthy of their skull solely since it has that fancy sticker with the certification number on it. Its a mountain bike helmet for god sakes, not a moto helmet - it doesn't need to be massive or uber strong for high speed impacts.

It looks pretty sweet to me, if I had $200 for a helmet.
  • 6 2
 its-joe simply said it all.... im dont need to wear a helmet when going uphill.... but when im going downhill, i want a real fullface. an open helmet is really dangerous
  • 11 0
 I was really excited about this until i learned that the chin bar is removable. Wouldn't this be awesome as just as super well vented single piece full face? Bell can call it the Super 1R (or 1S as i think R means Removable or something).
  • 6 0
 Lots of opinions, but as usual we need some data. Opinions are so much fun without data, you can't be wrong...
  • 2 0
 The open had it right, it wasn't "opinion". I like the idea but imo this seems more hassle than just strapping a full face to the backpack for the ride up to have ful face for the ride down that has been tested to not rip open my jugular when it detaches and becomes a projectile during a crash. Without proper testing it is speculative at best if this works a d if it doesnt then you are far better off without. What I thought I came here to see was a full face helmet that looked lighter and very well ventilated. I want sold on that more than the removeable face guard.
  • 1 0
 ^was supposed to say OP




... stupid auto correct.
  • 5 16
flag scandal667 (Aug 26, 2014 at 19:48) (Below Threshold)
 Oh man it hasn't gone through a testing agency that makes me feel safe. You can wear every piece of certified equipment made and gone down wrong and die, Shut UP and RIDE
  • 3 0
 This is perfect for so many whose local trails are xc-ish, but travel to more gnarly trails.
I've seen more Supers this year than A1s, I think because they are understated compared to the A1.
Good job Bell. How bout some MIPS and a Kashima stripe?
  • 1 0
 What I was thinking
  • 2 0
 @Bodomterror Certification bodies are usually independent of the company selling the product. The company chooses to submit their product for testing to gain certification. Yes, sales could be a factor in submitting their product to a certification body but if the product fails to meet the requirements, the product doesn't gain certification/approval. I highly doubt a "certification program" is created just to boost sales because that would be considered fraud. And I believe that many of the existing standards are highly effective in ensuring safety of the product and there is no reason why there can't be some effective safety standards developed for mtn bike helmets.
  • 5 3
 Anyone complaining about it not being as sturdy as a proper full face does not get the point. Sometimes the trail your climbing requires some up and down before you get to the top so it's a good idea to have a helmet on even while climbing depending on the trail. It's for riders who don't want to have a 2 and half pound helmet strapped to their backpack. It wasn't intended to fill the needs of a full on downhiller or freerider but for someone who doesn't mind climbing but likes to let it all hang out on the way back down all in one helmet. Some protection is better than none even if the chin guard crumpled on my face; plastic is softer than rock.
  • 2 0
 I never had an issue with putting the full face on my bars for the climb and just going without a helmet on the way up but my climbs are mostly fire road so realistically you probably won't crash...
  • 1 10
flag nojzilla (Aug 26, 2014 at 21:28) (Below Threshold)
 I can only strongly disagree bud I wear moto because I'm not worried about slow speed impacts. Most of the time at low speeds an by that I mean sub 25-30mph I can get my hands out or roll out the crash What I am worried about are high speed offs, in rough terrain.where getting my hands out could result in injury to my hands or arms.high speed Crashes that happen so fast I don't have the time to react... Crashes into hard objects like trees or rocks... So for me moto all the way,
  • 9 0
 Wow your slow speeds are faster than most peoples top speed. You should Get a red bull helmet.
  • 9 0
 My god. I regret commenting up top. So many notifications.
  • 3 1
 It is better than no chin. What part of bridging the gap flew over your head? If you need a DH or DOT helmet, get one.
  • 5 1
 And I see the legend of broken Met Parachute lives on. If only people could turn their brains on and figure out that that dude would have been worse with an open face.
  • 2 0
 Understanding that the chin guard only makes a helmet safer if it is strong enough to withstand an impact; is there any good way to compare helmets? Besides the obvious relative ratings of how people perceive certain brands (TLD, POC, SixSixOne, etc.) is there any true regulated comparison? I have a full face Rudy Koyna, but I like my head and particularly the brain inside of it currently and want to know is there is a valid reason to invest in a different, more protective brand. I have always been extremely impressed with Rudy through countless first hand examples of their durability at trade shows and such, but is there enough difference in protection to warrant an upgrade to some other helmet? I love the helmet and have never doubted it-- it does meet the safety requirements-- however one can never be too safe when the brain and their future is on the line. I'd much rather spend $300 now then write another Diving Bell and the Butterfly.
  • 20 2
 Bunch of Pinkbike twats is how I see it. Beg for a product then curse it when it comes to reality
  • 4 2
 @bOObdesign @its-joe ... so you couldnt slip on a climb & smash your face into the ground ??
  • 6 0
 Really? You dont need a helmet going uphill? Yeah if your shuttling your local dh/fr line that's fine, but what about the growing number of red graded loops with black options? I currently often have to decide which lid to take with me wherever I go, and some days suffer climbing in a full facer and others feel a little nervous abouty faces safety. I like the idea of this, and will probably buy one for those days I really could do with both.The fact theyre snowboard style buckles says its done properly, and a company like bell wont produce a helmet thats dangerous. Yeah, its not gonna be as sturdy as my full face, but I know id rather have this than an open face lid if im eating shit in a rock garden
  • 3 0
 to expand your point, 2 sorts of climb DH fire road and trail climbs mostly up with some down open face will be history in a few years trails and bikes getting so fast now
  • 2 0
 @Drew-O Bro, I KNOW WHAT THIS IS! It is a mud guard for your face!
  • 2 1
 What the f*ck are you always complaining about?
Want a helmet with ASTM-F1952-2032 certificate? Buy the MET Parachute, but you won't get a removable chin guard:
www.pinkbike.com/news/helmets-hardtails-and-more-eurobike-2014.html

Want a helmet with a removable chin guard? Go for the BELL, but you won't get the certificate.

I don't think it's very likely to manufacture a helmet with a removable chin guard that will get the certificate, but the choice is here, choose what's more important for you.
  • 2 2
 You can't actually sell or produce protective equipement without passing some standarts. I am sure Easton Bell Sport are smart enough to do tests for their helmets since they own Giro, Bell, Riddell and Easton for helmets making. Sure this helmet won't pass DOT because it's main purpose is open face helmet and the shell is not biult for the same purpose as a real full-face helmet. It's like a conversion kit for a Xc bike to be a Dh...Will never work 100% in both purpose but will do some of the job.


Oh and I think this helmet looks weird and I won't buy one. I'll stick with both a real full-face and an open face helmet just because I am a lazy and picky dude who likes to have lots of stuff to show off.
  • 2 0
 No ASTM-1952 is why I went through the trouble of getting my MET Parachute from Germany.
  • 1 0
 It's an XC helmet with an attachable chin guard, not a full face helmet with a removable chin guard. Good for racers I guess, if the chin thing is certified for races, but I don't get it as a mass-market product. Why not just ride with a fullface and strap it to your bag for climbs?
  • 1 0
 @savemeister yes, that will not happen! im more afraid when riding my bike in the city than when pedaling up a rocky trail
  • 2 0
 @TheOriginalTwoTone: But the previous version of MET Parachute with removable chin guard didn't have the certification either. The new one does, but it's not a comparable product, it's a single purpose full face helmet that's slightly lighter than the other ones and has more vents.
  • 3 0
 Why isn't it? We've all seen the crash pics of older detachable ones that failed. If Bell is saying this is safe- prove it.

The MET may not detach, but it the same weight as the Bell when the chin bar is attached, so why bother with the Bell.

I think as more people get the MET, they are going to be surprised by how cool it is. I didn't find it that much warmer than my Giro Hex when climbing.
  • 3 1
 Why bother with Bell? Because I don't want to wear a full face helmet when cycling to work 1 km down a road and I don't want to own two helmets if I can own one.
Btw I live in Ireland, if a helmet is warm, it's a feature, not a bug. The weather forecast says it's currently 31 Celsius degrees in Damascus, MD. Here in Dublin it's 15.
  • 1 1
 It's nice to know I wont have to worry about bashing my teeth in when I cartwheel a double.
  • 5 0
 Who remembers that article about DOT helmets being more dangerous for mountain bikers? The gist of it said that DOT helmets are designed for freeway speeds, and are too stiff for the slower speeds that mountain bikers crash at.
  • 2 1
 Yeah @hamncheez I just looked at bells proper full face and the troy lee full face and none of them say dot approved just atsm, cpsc and the other ones that aren't dot. So idk why people are complaining about it not being dot if no other real full faces aren't even dot.
  • 1 1
 Yeah @hamncheez I just looked at bells proper full face and the troy lee full face and none of them say dot approved just atsm, cpsc and the other ones that aren't dot. So idk why people are complaining about it not being dot if no other real full faces aren't even dot.
  • 1 1
 Yeah @hamncheez I just looked at bells proper full face and the troy lee full face and none of them say dot approved just atsm, cpsc and the other ones that aren't dot. So idk why people are complaining about it not being dot if no other real full faces aren't even dot.
  • 2 1
 It depends entirely on where you live. Where I live, last week we rode up 1400 a metre climb and jumped on a lift a bit and rode techy single trails back down and during that ride there is nice flowing meadows and views and then bang steep as hell rocky ledgy downhills with 600 metre drops each side and lots of sharp edges everywhere. Way I see it you can never have too much protection on and I'm not super fit but if I can climb that with a full face then so can you. Wearing a full face wasn't even noticed. I don't know what the issue is. A removable helmet gadget is like getting a dropper post and then having an uphill and downhill saddle and having to stop and change them to make hardly any difference rather than just getting on with it! Enjoy your ride. If your hot. Stop and have a drink. You'll appreciate it when you face plant. I certainly did!
  • 4 4
 Would I add some wood to the fire by saying that I remember very well a discussion on PB where people were bashing the way bicycle helmets are tested and that those standards are totaly useless? Same tests that many if you call for?
  • 4 0
 Waki - not all tests are the same are they?
  • 1 0
 In reply to the first comment - re certification - there are many full face helmets which do not conform to a standard which tests the chin bar.
  • 1 0
 The helmet did not mangle the guys face a stick went through the mouth opening. The Helmet stayed intact but like a lot of helmets in my opinion the chin sticks out too far and acts as a scoop pushing debris into your face.
  • 56 6
 PB seems to be the most negative place ever. This helmet is designed to fit the HUGE gap between your typical trail lid and a true full face, which is a great thing. Of course it won't offer the same level of protection as a true full face. But, most of us don't take a full face on our local trail rides. There are lots trail rides we all do where we would appreciate the protection of a full face but just don't bring one because its not practical. This helmet is perfect for those rides. Oh, and for those of you that think the industry testing standards have much if anything to do with brain protection are totally fooling yourselves. The standards are predate nearly everything that current science knows about brain injuries.
  • 16 11
 I think this is more negative than noting it fails to pass certification in the realms it claims to protect you.

There's a difference between being negative, and just being realistic. This helmet doesn't seem to comply with safety codes for full faced helmets, but it's claiming to offer safety. It would be enormously more negative to state an item is good; when it has a glaring fault.

People don't want the same level of protection as a full face, they just want to know their face is safe, so some assurance, in the form of certification, goes a loooooooong way. This lacks that. That is an issue. Fullstop.

Also bare in mind the certification is constantly changing. As we learn more about head injuries, we do more to prevent them in the future. This helmet is not one of those preventative measures, it just looks cool. Note other companies are doing work to certain plans of movement within the helmet to reduce neck injury, brain trauma from concussive force, and otherwise.

Alternatively, you can get a backpack with a helmet holder, toss your full face on it, ride to the top with the open face, and switch for the DH. You have to stop to swap out the chin piece anyway, so why not just run two helmets, be safer, and deal with the whopping extra KG on the climb? Doesn't sound to negative to me!
  • 6 1
 if you feel you need a fullface helmet then buy a proper one, not this contraption
  • 4 4
 Oh by all means.. now, can I interest you I some new seatbelts for your truck? See what I do is I cut halfway through the seatbelt material so it feels more like the freedom of not wearing a belt whilst at the same time giving you the protection of wearing a seatbelt AND you get a whiney gold stitching to tidy up the frayed ends where I cut the original seatbelt...


..... different than this helmet...... how?
  • 14 1
 Our Giro/Bell rep came by the shop today and showed us this masterpiece of a helmet. once the chin guard is attached, the helmet is solid! no wiggle room or play between the two parts. so many people hating on this and they haven't even tried it. i see this helmet as half shell for riding to top of your trail then attach the chin part once youre ready to go back down. i wouldnt use it for full downhill or freeriding but definitely technical trail or all mountain use.
  • 6 2
 Certification is not constantly changing. This is part of the problem. Do some more reading on brain science and helmet standards. Helmet standards are antiquated at best and companies feeling the need to design helmets to meet the certification standards are part of the hinderance to designing new helmets that actually may reduce concussion risk. Now, I am not saying that this new Bell is one of those helmets. But it is also completely improper to assume that having a full face will offer better protection against concussions. They don't. Virtually all bike helmets are, at their basic level, an expanded polystyrene foam bonded to a plastic or carbon fiber shell. That goes for your $500 D3 all the way to your $25 Walmart special. There are some really new interesting designs coming out in the market, including what Leatt is working on, which may actually improve concussion resistance. But the certification standards will not tell you one thing about whether those new designs are actually effective. Until the certification standards evolve, you are really on your own to do the background research to figure out what is actually a better helmet. You can't just say a helmet isn't good because of its certification status, its not that simple.
  • 3 1
 sure, but I can say that this exact company made this exact ( almost ) helmet many years ago and it destroyed a persons face for the very reasons I dislike it. that's around when they stopped making it.

Giro switchblade.
  • 3 0
 Katmai- depends on what your talking about. The US CPSC is a joke, a standard from 1999. However,ASTM does change and modify it's standards as needed. Here is something I found when research helmets for my kids. ASTM has published the improved version of F1447, Standard Specification for Helmets Used in Recreational Bicycling or Roller Skating. The new version is the first ASTM helmet standard to use variable mass headforms for impact testing. The drop assembly that includes the smallest child headform now weighs 3.1 kg, while the assembly for the largest headform weighs 6.1 kg. Formerly all sizes weighed 5.0 kg, a convenience for the test technician but woefully unrepresentative of head weights in the real world. The greatest significance of the change is that helmets made for toddlers will have to have less dense foam in their liners. The lighter headform will not crush very dense foam, and would just stop immediately on impact, with a spike in g levels that represents brain injury. The less dense foam in child helmets will hopefully reduce the incidence of concussion. The less dense foam will occur in three other sizes as well, but the drop assembly for the large and extra-large headforms will weigh more than the old 5.0 kg. For those sizes manufacturers will have to either use denser foam or thicker helmets, or a combination of both. Although there was concern about the denser foam option, those helmets will be better able to handle the impact energy of a real-world large head. Very few manufacturers now certify to ASTM F1447. All who sell in the US market use the legally-mandated CPSC standard. We hope that CPSC will follow suit on the variable mass headform change, improving protection for the youngest helmet users
  • 1 0
 Safety is in ur head. not only in ur eqmt.. we must weigh in the level of risk for a given condition. U wont need multiple level of safety for a low level risk, and vice versa. Factor the likelihood to the consequences pls. SURELY, they didnt market this to replace FF helmet period. They are filling the gap. SO, if ur ride is not so DH, FR and yet not so xC, yep call it in many names, this helmet is for you. This is not for retards who will use it for wrong application..
  • 41 8
 Bell introduces the new Bell switchblade! The ultimate recycled idea based gimmick!
  • 13 2
 is everyone else too young to remember that abortion of a helmet?
  • 8 0
 Nope. Switchblade is the first thing I thought of when I saw it. Glad they were able to make the Super 2R look slightly less awful.
  • 2 0
 I wouldn't say it's a matter of being young, that thing is legendary (notorious). I heard about those right when I started riding.
  • 33 3
 Not bad looking at all... sick idea. Although the visor reminds me of the mini fender on Ronnie Mac's bike Wink
  • 22 2
 This is pretty awesome I'm definitely down to buy one. I always hate making the decision between full face and open and hate carrying around an extra helmet. Even if this is an old idea it's still the best time to try to bring it back with the am/enduro scene bigger than ever.
  • 1 0
 I wear the full face because my Giro Cipher has an integrated GoPro mount. Decision for me is made Smile
  • 6 1
 Then you are a goon - although a logical and likely resourceful goon - still a goon.
  • 4 0
 ^ ^ your comment made me laugh.

But in all seriousness, it really depends on the trails I plan to ride that day. Said trails will determine whether I wear a fullface or open helmet.
  • 1 0
 @mickmart: The Bell Super and Super 2 both have integrated GoPro mounts as standard.
  • 18 2
 What's old is new again. Say hello to the 2015 Giro Switchblade.
  • 3 0
 Exactly my thought. I used to have one 15 years ago. Damn....I'm old!
i1026.photobucket.com/albums/y326/enzo038/giro_switchblade1.jpg
  • 4 0
 Or the TLD Edge that I used to have nearly 20 years ago: www.pricepoint.com/blog/?p=376
  • 10 0
 I really don't get the hate in here. I owned a giro switchblade and I crashed twice in a way that my face was about to hit the ground. In my books the helmet did protect ny face against bruising. These were off course minir crashes. I also crashed in a open face helmet and completely scratched my face. Now if I an about to do something involving high speeds, I put on a TLD D2. Last year my front wheel went off the edge of a berm. Again my face was scratched even though i had D2 on.

Most of the people buying this helmet are fully aware what this helmet is about so no need for btchn. If someone wants to buy, then please let him be. Don't behave as if Bell tried to sell it to your kid, lying about the safety.

I am currently at Lake Garda, the Mecca of Lycra, I see plenty of adults between 30 and 50 in full body armor and XC helmets. Do you think people able of composing such outfit would care?

Common sense - if you lack it, even D3 and neck brace won't help you
  • 1 0
 Wait, you mean I can't huck that 100' cliff to flat with a neck brace and D3? And hear I thought it was certified!
  • 1 0
 Man, as funny as it sounds, I've been told more than once by people qualifying as adults, that body armor protects bones from breaking...
  • 9 2
 Although I agree that the chin guard should be tested and rated per standard, this appears to be an option that is better than nothing. Many crashes are not perfectly straight on with the chin guard, so it really would work well as a deflection device, even if it does break. I'm willing to check it out as soon as it's in my LBS. Can't say much else till I get my hands on one.
  • 4 1
 Good point, hard to see other than some bizarre rock hit one that would be straight on the chin guard.
  • 6 0
 while it may not be full face certified...

I myself (foe what it's worth...$?) think the helmet does serve a purpose AND... y'know, Bell probably doesn't want to make a helmet that will kill it's customer base. this ain't 2001 anymore.

so I'm gonna hazard a guess that this face guard is pretty solid--at least...more solid than my lips and teeth.
  • 9 2
 I know it's a recycled idea but congrats Bell, really well executed, looks great with and without the chin bar. Beats carrying round a seperate full face.
  • 3 5
 haha might as well just not have the chin guard at all, it is literally just fo' sho'
  • 1 0
 Can't spell assumption without "ass".
  • 9 1
 next level enduro right there!
  • 8 1
 Its come full circle aka the switchblade. What next enduro specific biopace
  • 3 0
 or hite-rite
  • 3 0
 This is different than a Giro Switchblade because the removable chin guard has cheek pads that add overall helmet stability. the whole helmet is much more substantial since full coverage open face helmets have been developed. I wear my open face waaay too often due to the heat and a DH helmet yanks on my janky huckneck. Id wear this often. Id still wear my DH helmet for shuttle and lift served riding.
  • 3 0
 I like the idea, but will wait to see how it works. I got to see one thru our Easton rep a month ago and it seems good for what it is. I definitely wouldn't lean on it for actual DH, but for days where you have a mix of XC and FR it would be ideal. It's an all-mtn full-face.
  • 3 0
 I want to like it, but when there is a chin bar certification, I want to hear Bell explain why they didn't (or couldn't) certify to it. I won't hold my breath. I'm more likely to go with the MET. I wish more companies would step into this niche, because there is definitely a market for a more ventilated FF. By and large, I don't take my POC on trail rides, but I would take something like this or the MET about half the time.

Also, posting "Giro Switchblade" is an abbreviation for "I'm old and only half paying attention."
  • 3 0
 Having held this helmet in my hands, I can say this is a solid piece of equipment functional in the arena it was designed for. I would have loved to have this at any enduro I've done this year with a serious transition. Additionally, per a very reputable source from inside Bell, the chin bar meets or exceeds ASTM full-face testing yet the rest of the helmet does not for direct impact. Because of this, they aren't able to advertise this standard.
  • 2 0
 I for one like the concept and could see a lot of use for it IF IT WORKS. And yes I have a full face and half dome and I'd buy an Archie, but would never use it cuz it would suck on the climbs. If this design could survive actual full face mtn bike specific testing I'd pay top dollar for it! I hate riding burly commiting lines with my half dome....I mean I love em of course, but damn if something went wrong like that time my front tire debeaded on the second tier slab of the gouranga chute.....full face woulda been real nice then. I'll never climb xc with a full face nor would I attach this most of the time, but there is a ton of use it would see out here on the more consequential trails.
  • 1 0
 exactly @greguar. exactly.
  • 3 1
 To all you haters out there. Just because this isn't some crazy expensive European bike helmet company that spends millions testing one helmet does by mean that you need to hate on a new and innovative helmet design. Ya you might not be as protected. But bell is thinking out side the box. Great job Bell!
  • 2 1
 Did you actually read your post?

Yea who gives a shit about showing it will actually do what it's implying - certs are for pussies.

Yea really outside the box, no one ever made a XC helmet with a removable chin guard.
  • 2 0
 Regarding lack of full face certification, i believe those standards require that the chin guard is permanently attached to the helmet. so by definition this helmet cannot achieve the relevant certifications (ASTM F1952-00, ASTM F2032-06, etc). The helmet may or may not meet the remainder of the requirements of these standards.
  • 3 0
 Sick idea but... It's not really a full face helmet. In one fall you can probably brake it or worse, it will go in your face. I remain with the one solid unit of a helmet.
  • 2 1
 Can't spell assumption without an ass.
  • 1 0
 I will be buying three of these, or the new Met parachute. My, son, wife and I each currently have downhill helmets for Northstar and Mammoth and trail helmets for other riding. These fill a perfect gap for places like Downieville. For me, I can not afford to show up in court with a broken face. For my 10 year old son, his Mom files a motion for sole custody if he comes home with a scratch. For wife 2.0, she can manage a faceplant at 2 m.p.h.
  • 2 0
 It solves some problems, In enduro races like the ews In whistler you were required to wear a full face helmet and wear a helmet at all times. So for racing enduro this does help
  • 1 0
 its clearly not as solid as the standard fullface helmet but it's a nice idea though. Especially for those who are uphilling more than downhilling. Anyway remember that most of the bike helmets are designed to take the impact and broke to disperse the energy, this particular one is probably very good in it ;-)
  • 1 0
 Is there a video available of someone raising it above their head and smashing the chin guard in to a solid object?

i think given the opportunity to do something like that i would be more confident in purchasing one.

Super slowmo video if anyone does try this.
  • 1 0
 For those looking at this and the MET, here my review I posted on MTBR. I bought the MET for XC riding after getting to gashes on my face needing 9 stitches in a crash. You don't have to be downhilling to f up your face bad.
Also, I thought about the Urge Archi, but at least the MET is 1952 certified, lighter and better ventilated.


So first ride in today. So you have some background, it's a 10.5 mile loop I try to ride as often as I can at lunch. So I'm pretty familiar with how I feel riding it with my old helmet.

It was around 80 degrees and 73% humidity- I'm on the east coast, felt like I was in a rain forest today.

So on to the helmet. As I initially said, the fit for me is great and I still feel that way after the ride.

As far as the ventilation- loved it. I assuming it's the front vents, but they did a great job of pulling air in- I could definitely feel on the downs.

I will say I think it was a little warmer on climbs, but too me, it was barely perceptible and worth the trade off to be in a FF helmet.

I didn't feel as though I was getting any 'rebreathing' that you can get on 'true' FF helmets. The visibility is excellent.

It may be because I'm used to motorcycle helmets, but for all practical purposes, I couldn't feel the weight difference when actually riding.

Also, worked with my glasses perfectly.

All in all, very happy with it. One of the guys I ride with frequently, tried it and it's now on his b-day list.


The only thing I dislike and it has nothing to do with the helmet itself- I enjoyed using a water bottle and saddle bag on my short lunchtime rides.
With a FF, I'm back to a hydration pack full time.
  • 1 0
 Aren't controlled crumple zones within the fabric of any helmet a good idea as they stop the head from decelerating too quickly and minimise the brain rattling round your skull?
I have no idea if this helmet or any others are designed to do this but the principle of crumple zones is a sound one and so maybe this and other chin guards are designed to crumple in a controlled fashion? Making a helmet unbreakable is a relatively easy thing to do but this would not prevent serious head injury.
Maybe the manufcaturers can shed some light?
  • 1 0
 Aren't controlled crumple zones within the fabric of any helmet a good idea as they stop the head from decelerating too quickly and minimise the brain rattling round your skull? I have no idea if this helmet or any others are designed to do this but the principle of crumple zones is a sound one and so maybe this and other chin guards are designed to crumple in a controlled fashion? Making a helmet unbreakable is a relatively easy thing to do but this would not prevent serious head injury. Maybe the manufacturers can shed some light?
  • 1 0
 I'm going to buy this helmet and I'm pretty sure it has a 30 days warrantee. I'm going to put a 30 lbs. weight inside the helmet and drop it on top of 3 story building facing down. If the detachable chip holds up into my standard I will keep it. If not, I will return it and replace it with another one and just use this helmet as XC HELMET only. Problem solved!
  • 1 0
 If this product was certified and tested properly I'd be into it. Most enduro races require a full face and then also a half shell for the transfer stages. Carrying less is pretty rad when you're in the saddle for around 4 hours on a race or even a long alpine day where you get some gnar and would want a full face. Could be a great product just needs more refining.
  • 1 0
 Helmet like these would seriously appeal to riders like me who spend most of their trail time climbing to earn the descents. its light, its removable, its perfect. I just wish that its cheaper too and gets those safety ratings. That old MET parachute was weird and never looked safe (with those big chin vents and all) but this one does look good .
  • 1 0
 This is a great step in the right direction. The problem with full downhill helmets is that the much larger surface area, weight, and rigidity puts much more force on the neck and spine. So then neck braces come out. But then people can't move and crash because they can't see as well. And with the neck brace and a bigger helmet, tucking and rolling and other body-English maneuvers don't work and the crash gets bad in a hurry. If you bite trees and small boulders all the time, then sure, try your luck with a big heavy motorcycle full face and a Leatt. If you occasionally scratch your face on gravel and want something better than Neosporin and baid-aids, get something like this, because as the helmet rotates (as they always do), your face, temples, and forehead will get more protection than with the old-school cross-country helmet and your neck will not break. The key is having stuff crush and absorb the impact. Back in the day, Indy cars were made so strong they barely bent when they crashed and drivers died all the time because the force was translated to them. Now, they're designed to crumple and the driver walks away more often than not. It's about light, crumples, allowing rotation yet preserving protection, and balancing the damage to the head and neck in a serious crash. Over-protect one, and you're sure to not be around to talk about the other. Is it a concussion or a severed spinal cord? I think I'd take the concussion.
  • 1 0
 Oh - one more thing, it's about surface area too, keeping it not much bigger than the head, protecting the temple and cheek area and just a little out in front of the chin - not something so far away that even Mick couldn't lick it.
  • 1 0
 10 years from now, you will be able to buy it at Target. And all the science will be as old school as a modern smartphone. But who will Target be buying from? Bell? Giro? MET? Urge? or some upstart that shreds the old vendors like an iPhone on Nokia.
  • 1 0
 This is a great step in the right direction. The problem with full downhill helmets is that the much larger surface area, weight, and rigidity puts much more force on the neck and spine. So then neck braces come out. But then people can't move and crash because they can't see as well. And with the neck brace and a bigger helmet, tucking and rolling and other body-English maneuvers don't work and the crash gets bad in a hurry. If you bite trees and small boulders all the time, then sure, try your luck with a big heavy motorcycle full face and a Leatt. If you occasionally scratch your face on gravel and want something better than Neosporin and baid-aids, get something like this, because as the helmet rotates (as they always do), your face, temples, and forehead will get more protection than with the old-school cross-country helmet and your neck will not break. The key is having stuff crush and absorb the impact. Back in the day, Indy cars were made so strong they barely bent when they crashed and drivers died all the time because the force was translated to them. Now, they're designed to crumple and the driver walks away more often than not. It's about light, crumples, allowing rotation yet preserving protection, and balancing the damage to the head and neck in a serious crash. Over-protect one, and you're sure to not be around to talk about the other. Is it a concussion or a severed spinal cord? I think I'd take the concussion.
  • 1 0
 Oh - one more thing, it's about surface area too, keeping it not much bigger than the head, protecting the temple and cheek area and just a little out in front of the chin - not something so far away that even Mick couldn't lick it.
  • 1 0
 10 years from now, you will be able to buy it at Target. And all the science will be as old school as a modern smartphone. But who will Target be buying from? Bell? Giro? MET? Urge? or some upstart that shreds the old vendors like an iPhone on Nokia.
  • 1 0
 In case you are all interested
www.bellhelmets.com/en_eu/cycling/helmets/dirt/super-2r-8003
conforms to both

•CE EN1078

• CPSC Bicycle
and the top of the range Fox Rampage meets
CPSC, AS/NZS 2063, ASTM, EN 1077, Ironically 1077 is for ski helmets not the specific 1078 for Bicycle helmets....... Hmmmm you take your own opinion from this
  • 1 0
 The Bell conforms to EN 1078 which It covers helmet construction including field of vision, shock absorbing properties, retention system properties including chin strap and fastening devices, as well as marking and information.

The standard's key features are:[1]
Test anvils: Flat and kerbstone
Drop apparatus: Guided free fall
Impact velocity, energy or drop height flat anvil: 5.42–5.52 m/s
Impact energy criteria: 250g
Roll-off test: Yes
Retention system strength: Force applied dynamically. Helmet supported on headform.

and the top of the range Fox Rampage meets
CPSC, AS/NZS 2063, ASTM, EN 1077, Ironically 1077 is for ski helmets not the specific 1078 for Bicycle helmets....... Hmmmm you take your own opinion from this
  • 1 0
 I have seen a few comments made that SNELL AND DOT are what you are looking for in a helmet to denote that they are TESTED however there is far more to this than you may expect. SNELL testing looks at a minimum transmission pressure to the internal structure ( youur head and im not going to bore with the figures), if you take into account MX helmets that meet DOT and SNELL these are also designed for road use (SOME) the impact you get in road use and i am assuming there is an assumption made for MX, is far harder an impact than that of DH mountainbiking or indeed Enduro, which we are talking about here. the reason behind this is not the surface that your hitting but the type of impact you get from it. Generally and that is said in terms of being a General comment, you do not go as fast as you would on a MX bike, i'l leave that open to argument Smile when riding a mountain bike. there for the flex that should be in a moutain bike helmet should be softer for slower speed impacts. Arguments for these helmets meeting DOT and SNELL as well as EU standards for ROAD use do not allow for this type of enduro helmet, however that said EN1078 and CPSC are found on this lid as well as a Fox Rampage FF.. your choice at the end of th day
  • 1 0
 I don't mean to be the devils advocate here but a lot of people are pointing out that they would prefer to ride with 2 helmets one open one full face , so when your on the decent with the full face on and wipeout landing on the other helmet that's strapped to your back . Sure you'll keep all your teeth but has no one thought to mention back injury ?.
  • 1 0
 OK so read a few comments and a lot of "bull" so thought I’d have a gander to see what the Bell Super 2R was rated too in terms of certification, would appear that it too 10 seconds to find
CE EN1078
CPSC Bicycle
Both clearly stated on the Bell web site, so to make it clearer the certification is as below;
EN 1078 specifies requirements and test methods for bicycle helmets, skateboard and roller skate helmets. It covers helmet construction including field of vision, shock absorbing properties, retention system properties including chin strap and fastening devices, as well as marking and information.
The standard's key features are:
Test anvils: Flat and kerbstone
Drop apparatus: Guided free fall
Impact velocity, energy or drop height flat anvil: 5.42–5.52 m/s
Impact energy criteria: 250g
Roll-off test: Yes
Retention system strength: Force applied dynamically. Helmet supported on headform.
  • 1 0
 CPSC 1203, are the US version of the the EN and incorporate much about such the same tests but appears to be to a more generic PPE standard
www.cpsc.gov//PageFiles/86318/10mr98r.pdf
To compare these to what is classes as one f the best DH full face helmets the Fox carbon Rampage supports CPSC 1203, ASTM F1952 A standard for DH mountain biking,
AS/NZS 2063:2008,
EN 1078
That said it also incorporates a standard for ski and snow helmets, which is mildly unusual for a mountain bike helmet.
  • 1 0
 I have also come across several mentions to SNELL and how they are the best of the best for helmet tests and as such specialised are one of the top contenders. Well in order to use SNELL you have to pay for it as a company...I am an engineer and as a company we pay for thousands of standards and included in that write the standards. Very time consuming and trick situation as what suits one company doesn't the next. so that part may get scrapped!
Paying to use SNELL is not necessarily the best, as other standards that are far higher have discrepancies, I have found them queried them and been met with shrugged shoulders and told "because that is the factor of safety picked", rather than basing it on scientific monitoring of the oil and gas industry.... numbers out of thin air come up, YES way to frequent!
And a useful rendition of what is better than what can be found here
cyclehelmets.org/papers/c2023.pdf
So I will leave it to yourselves to decide if a jaw piece with the same locking mechanism as Leatt Neck braces and Ski boots around the world for 50 years is of any benefit and seem flimsy or not, dangerous or not, likely to take your eye out or not when you face plant that rock....there is got to be some dispersant of force if it does brake, can you honestly say that some of that force wouldn't be taken up from the break of the jaw piece, would it have broken otherwise? and what would your face look like if it wasn't there? Not boasting a positive for the jaw piece or negative. just questions. Personally I have seen a SNELL branded road helmet split in two pieces and removed from a motorcyclist, miraculously they were fine, but do you expect your helmet to come off let alone split in two. there will always be a circumstance that changes the outcome.
  • 1 0
 Helmet is lightweight and very secure. Only issue is i DO NOT recommend using the included BELL GoPro mount. I lost my camera from being hit by a small low hanging tree branch. Bell customer service only offered to replace the cheap unreliable mount..No Thanks.
  • 9 4
 WTF, Really?
  • 5 1
 I do like the redesigned GoPro mount. Previous design was pretty shaky.
  • 7 4
 Doesn't seem like the chin bar is rated to any full face standard. What a fail.
  • 5 0
 You are a fail. Fail to understand the reason and purpose for a in between product.
  • 3 0
 And a roadster is less safe than a coupe, what a surprise...
  • 1 1
 I have a super, which I like because I feel more protected than in most other shorty xc helmets. I got to check one of these 2Rs out and it did fit well the full face thing felt pretty secure, but the upper part isn't beefed up or anything it appears to be really similar to the old super. This thing cant have the same level of protection as most other full face helmets out there. I guess its better than bashing your teeth in, but I wouldn't go replacing my normal FF with this.
  • 4 1
 Maybe it's just me but does the visor look a little short? Otherwise a great looking and hopefully great working lid
  • 2 0
 Saw this helmet a month ago. A friend had one for testing. It's a pretty rad "light duty" fullface for those that want extra protection.
  • 7 4
 "Sorry guys can't ride today, forgot my enduro specifically jaw protector."
  • 1 0
 No dude look its in your spare endure sash.
  • 2 0
 When I've had to use my helmet in the past, it's always been the front side of my head. In fact, all I need is an old style hockey goalie mask, like Jason wears.
  • 1 0
 I had the older version of a MET Parachute. Loved it! Lightweight, and could use both ways. Having a chinguard is better than nothing, imo. I'd have no second thoughts about buying another.
  • 1 0
 Peak looks weird, too short, more duck bill length almost use less would it even shade yr eyes, my dog will roost shit all over these short viser mtb material saving peaks. Moto size please, enough of the doozer peaks!
  • 3 0
 anyone remember the giro switch blade ? probably about 14 years ago ?
what's so "ground breaking"
  • 3 0
 Yep, the mountain bike helmet industry has come full circle with a remake of the infamous Giro Switchblade

dirtmountainbike.com/uncategorized/the-15-worst-mountain-bike-products-ever.html/10
  • 1 0
 Came of my bike two days ago and broke my nose,broken bone under my eye and broken teeth and this was not a high speed crash.if only I had a helmet like this.great idea I will be getting one.
  • 6 2
 burn it with fire !!!!!
  • 3 1
 DANG IT i bought a super last week... better go crash so i can justify buying this
  • 3 0
 anyone remember the old giro switchblade. remember how safe those were.
  • 1 0
 Anyone knows if this will be an add on for the BellSuper helmet?seems like the base is the Super... That would be nice for those who already own the super...
  • 1 0
 I've read no to older Supers.
  • 1 0
 Drew-0 is exactly right. Google image Archie enduro injury and met parachute injury and you'll soon man up and wear a real helmet
  • 1 0
 And we don't need a removable chin brace - this whole thing could sell for 70 bucks and be hugely better than the x-country road bike look-alike.
  • 1 0
 And we don't need a removable chin brace - this whole thing could sell for 70 bucks and be hugely better than the x-country road bike look-alike.
  • 4 2
 Ummmmm.......didn't Troy Lee do this waaay back in the mid 90's?
  • 3 1
 Reminds me of the old giro razor helmets
  • 2 1
 The system for attaching the full face bit is what makes this interesting to me, incredibly user-friendly
  • 3 1
 I actually think that it's pretty cool for an enduro multi purpose helmet.
  • 2 0
 Its funny because I have a Giro Switchblade from like 15 years ago...lol
  • 2 0
 So what exactly stops the chin guard from shearing off in a crash?
  • 2 0
 Please feel free to join the conversation bell marketing guy.
  • 1 0
 www.casco-helme.de/product.php?id=93 Removable FF with European safety standard
EN 1078
  • 1 0
 Its been done before but this is just better. This will fly off the shelfs.
  • 2 0
 Prove me it's nearly as safe or as safe as a normal full-face then I'm in.
  • 1 0
 Is it actually comfortable to have anything perched on your occipital lobe?
  • 2 0
 There is a MIPS one coming later in year.
  • 2 0
 Casco provides a similar helmet for a long time...nothing new here
  • 1 0
 I hope all of you fuck!ng morons that ride without helmets are organ donors. Actually, I take the at back. Cull the herd!
  • 2 0
 Welcome back Giro Switchblade.
  • 3 2
 too bad Giro didn't patent the switchblade.
  • 10 2
 Giro and Bell same company. You now that right?
  • 10 1
 you win pinkbike geek. you win.
  • 1 0
 would it make sense an "original super upgrade program"?
  • 1 0
 Certifications CE EN1078 CPSC Bicycle
  • 1 0
 At least that trail is sick.......
  • 1 0
 Wouldn't trust I rather just have two different lids...
  • 2 0
 Looks like a session
  • 2 1
 Is it compatible with neck brace???
  • 1 1
 Same thing that just came to my mind.
  • 1 0
 so many comments.. enduro pffffftttt
  • 1 0
 Ronnie Mac style for 200$...
  • 1 0
 remember the switchblade!!!!
  • 1 0
 Why incompatible... So silly
  • 1 0
 looks like bell just took a crap
  • 1 0
 Does it come with airbags?
  • 3 3
 Looks pretty ridiculous Oo
  • 1 0
 BellePoc:
  • 2 1
 Perfect for Enduro..
  • 1 1
 Enduro specific, That will be my helmet
  • 1 0
 ENDURO transformers )
  • 1 1
 Awesome... but not compatible with current Bell Super. Weak.
  • 1 0
 poop E
  • 1 1
 Enduro full stride!
  • 1 1
 so enduro..
  • 1 1
 No.
  • 1 2
 OMG what the fuck is wrong with the Bell people.
  • 1 2
 So much enduros!
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2019. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.074608
Mobile Version of Website