Bike & Gear Check with EWS Photographers Matthew DeLorme & Dave Trumpore

Jul 4, 2019
by Matthew DeLorme  
Matthew DeLorme s set up for a typical day of shooting EWS. NYA EVO Fjord 36 camera bag. NYA EVO is a relatively new bag company. Their philosophy is to make a rugged bag with as little environmental impact. The pack rides well and doesn t push up on the back of the helmet when the going gets steep. Inside Sony A7III Sony 70-200 2.8 G Master Zeiss Batis 18 2.8 Zeiss Batis 25 2 Rocket Air ProBar Meal Bar ProBar Siracha Peanut Butter electrolyte tabs electrical tape quick link brake pads batteries Co2 head zip tie tape towel lens coat rain cover. If the weather looks iffy I ll bring rain gear as well.

We noticed a couple of comments in the Val di Fassa EWS preview wondering what Dave and Matthew bring along to shoot EWS, and for some photographer bike checks so we decided to roll the two things in one post.

On top of being able to shoot in what are at times miserable conditions, often while jetlagged, on minimal sleep, then staying up to edit and upload photos all night for several days on end, photographers on the circuit are all incredibly strong riders as well.

With Dave and Matthew, there are two big differences - camera setups and bikes. Dave shoots Nikon, and Matthew shoots Sony. Dave's bike is a Yeti SB150 Truq and Matthew is on a Trek Slash.

Both guys prefer to try to keep their bags as light as possible and weather conditions play a huge roll in how heavy the bags get. They have to carry everything needed for a day of riding and shooting including water and food.



Dave Trumpore



Nikon D850 with 70-20 2.8 mounted Nikon D750 with 24-70 2.8 mounted 15mm fisheye collecting dust as it only gets used sparingly Not shown Nikon 300 f4 awesome lens that is tack sharp and smaller lighter than a 24-70 so super versitial Pro Bars suncream Band-Aids Euro coins - for Cappuccino ice cream and beers between stages Lens wipes and blower Spare bateries UCI photo bid and rainbow pass - because if I ever took these out of the bag I d forget them Not shown - rain cover and mesh bug mask only for Fort William
Nikon D850 with 70-20 2.8 mounted

Inside: Nikon D750 with 24-70 2.8 mounted, 15mm fisheye (collecting dust as it only gets used sparingly) ** Not shown is the Nikon 300 f4 (an awesome lens that is tack sharp and smaller/lighter than a 24-70 so super versatile)

Other items in the bag include Pro Bars, sunscreen, Band-Aids, Euros for cappuccino, ice cream, and beer between stages, a lens wiper and blower, spare batteries, and UCI photo badge and rainbow pass - because if they ever leave the pack, they would be forgotten. **Not shown are the rain cover and mesh bug mask (only for Fort William).

How Dave s gear fits in his Shimoda Shimoda Exlpore 30 30 litre .
How Dave's gear fits in his Shimoda Shimoda Explore 30 (30 litre).

2019 Yeti SB150 Turq - Medium - 30.5 pounds
2019 Yeti SB150 Turq - Medium - 30.5 pounds

Dave's Medium SB150 tips the scale at 30.5 pounds. His rear shock is a Fox Float X2 with 165 psi, 2 volume reducers, LSC 14/HSC14, LSR 15/HSR 17 (from closed.)

Fox Factory 36 Fork - 170mm travel 70psi one volume spacer. LCS 12 HSC 16 LSR 6 HSR 6 all counted from fully closed
Fox Factory 36 Fork - 170mm travel, 70psi, one volume spacer. LCS 12, HSC 16, LSR 6, HSR 6 (from fully closed)
170mm travel FOX Factory 36 out front.
170mm travel FOX Factory 36.

FOX Float X2 handles rear suspension duties. 165 psi 2 volume reducers LSC 14 HSC14 LSR 15 HSR 17 all clicks counted from fully closed .
FOX Float X2 handles rear suspension duties. 165 psi, 2 volume reducers, LSC 14/HSC14, LSR 15/HSR 17 (all clicks counted from fully closed).

Dave prefers a stiffer fork and a softer back end with a bit heavier compression and slower rebound, especially on steep terrain and when carrying quite a bit of weight on his back. He finds it quite similar to the setup I would run when racing or riding high-speed rough trails or bike parks/DH type tracks. For more mellow trails he will adjust the compression and rebound to be 1-2 clicks lighter on the rear shock and take a few psi out of the fork.

Industry Nine s new Hydra hubs - The sweetest sound
Industry Nine's new Hydra hubs - The sweetest sound
The SRAM Eagle cassette is a life saver when pedaling a camera pack up steep climbs at altitude. I also HATE hiking so will pedal up as long as physically possible even if it is slower.
The SRAM Eagle cassette is a lifesaver when pedaling a camera pack up steep climbs at altitude. Dave also HATES hiking so he will pedal up as long as physically possible even if it is slower.

Cockpit is ENVE M6 bars cut down to just under 29 ENVE M7 35mm stem 1 of headset spacers ODI TLD grips SRAM Code RSC brakes SRAM XO shifter Wolf Tooth dropper lever.
Cockpit is ENVE M6 bars cut down to just under 29", ENVE M7 35mm stem (1" of headset spacers), ODI TLD grips, SRAM Code RSC brakes, SRAM XO shifter, Wolf Tooth dropper lever.

SRAM Code RSC levers
SRAM Code RSC levers
Strong brakes like SRAM Code RSC are a must on a long travel 29 er. These are set up with one organic and one metallic pad and a 200 180 front and rear rotor diameter.
Strong brakes like SRAM Code RSC are a must on a long travel 29'er. These are set up with one organic and one metallic pad and a 200/180 front and rear rotor diameter.

SRAM XO carbon cranks 32t chainring and Eagle Chain
SRAM XO carbon cranks, 32t chainring and Eagle Chain
SRAM Eagle XO Derailleur keeping thew chain in line.
SRAM Eagle XO Derailleur keeping the chain in line.

Good old Shimano XT pedals with the tension one turn from fully tight.
Good old Shimano XT pedals with the tension one turn from fully tight.

FOX Transfer post with 175mm travel
FOX Transfer post with 175mm travel
A Wolf Tooth lever integrates perfectly into SRAM brakes and control the FOX Transfer post.
A Wolf Tooth lever integrates perfectly into SRAM brakes and control the FOX Transfer post.

Wheels are Enve M730 with proprietary rim strip. Laced to Industry nine hubs and with Maxxis Assegai 2.5 tires.
Wheels are Enve M730 with proprietary rim strip. Laced to Industry nine hubs and with Maxxis Assegai 2.5 tires.
Maxxis Assegai front and rear - 2.5 Double Down casing 23 psi MaxGrip compound.
Maxxis Assegai front and rear - 2.5" Double Down casing, 23 psi, MaxGrip compound.

The ENVE wheels have been super reliable and Dave loves that you don't have to use rim tape. He's had no issues mounting Maxxis 2.5 tires by hand and also can remove them without tire levers, even with the stiffer Double down casings. He says, "Maxxis tires for life and the MaxGrip compound is simply unbeatable." This is his first time riding the Assegai and he loves it claiming there's almost too much traction out back at times.

SRAM does all drivetrain and braking duties for both photographers with XO Eagle groupsets and Code Brakes. SRAM's tech support at races is second to none at the races so should they run into any issues or break something, they're quickly taken care of and back to shooting.



Matthew DeLorme



Matthew DeLorme s set up for a typical day of shooting EWS. NYA EVO Fjord 36 camera bag. NYA EVO is a relatively new bag company. Their philosophy is to make a rugged bag with as little environmental impact. The pack rides well and doesn t push up on the back of the helmet when the going gets steep. Inside Sony A7III Sony 70-200 2.8 G Master Zeiss Batis 18 2.8 Zeiss Batis 25 2 Rocket Air ProBar Meal Bar ProBar Siracha Peanut Butter electrolyte tabs electrical tape quick link brake pads batteries Co2 head zip tie tape towel lens coat rain cover. If the weather looks iffy I ll bring rain gear as well.
Matthew DeLorme's set up for a typical day of shooting EWS. NYA EVO Fjord 36 camera bag. NYA EVO is a relatively new bag company. Their philosophy is to make a rugged bag with as little environmental impact. The pack rides well and doesn't push up on the back of the helmet when the going gets steep.

Inside: Sony A7III, Sony 70-200 2.8 G Master, Zeiss Batis 18 2.8, Zeiss Batis 25 2, Rocket Air ProBar Meal Bar, ProBar Siracha Peanut Butter, electrolyte tabs, electrical tape, quick link, brake pads, batteries, Co2 head, zip tie, tape, towel, lens coat rain cover. If the weather looks iffy, he'll bring rain gear as well.

How it fits in there. I also have a couple 12lb rated small DMM carabiners and a bird call for when things get slow.
How it fits in there. There are also a couple of 12lb rated small DMM carabiners and a bird call for when things get slow.

Matt s Trek Slash.
Matt's Trek Slash.

Matthew rides a 19.5 inch Trek Slash. He runs a 35mm Deity Copperhead stem and Deity Carbon Mowhawk bars. The drivetrain is all SRAM XO, with a 32 tooth chainring up front. The RockShox Lyrik has 3 tokens, with 82 psi. The RockShox Super Delux is at 183 psi.

32 teeth in the front. SRAM XO cranks and XTR pedals.
32 teeth in the front. SRAM XO cranks and XTR pedals.
Eagle to make the climbs better.
Eagle to make the climbs better.

SDG Squid bikes saddle because squidding.
SDG Squid bikes saddle, because, squidding.

Bontrager Line Elite wheels and Code stoppers.
Bontrager Line Elite wheels and Code stoppers.
Code brakes.
Code brakes.

Just in case SRAM was nice enough to put my name on my levers. I m not pro.
Just in case he forgets, SRAM was nice enough to put his name on his levers. "I'm not pro."

SE5 2.6 rubber.
Bontrager SE5 2.6 rubber.

Tires are Bontrager SE5 with a 2.4 front and 2.6 rear, 23 psi front and 25 rear. The code brakes have 200mm rotors. Matt says, "I honestly don't fuss about bike set up, I just kinda run it and hope everything comes out ok on the other end."

Reverb.
RockShox Reverb.

Rock Shox Super Delux and spare tube lever and Co2.
Rock Shox Super Delux and spare tube lever and Co2.
High Above strap to keep the tube and Co2 in place.
A High Above strap keeps the tube and Co2 in place.

Diety bars. I m currently playing around with my stem height.
Diety bars. He's currently playing around with different stem heights.
Deity Copperhead stem Mako shark stem cap and the ever so important Media Recce sticker.
Deity's Copperhead stem, Mako shark stem cap, and the ever so important Media Recce sticker.

EWS Squid sticker.
EWS Squid sticker.



And there you have it. That's how some of the magic happens on an EWS race weekend.


58 Comments

  • + 20
 Mind blown by imperial measurement of bar width. 29". Who knew!
  • + 7
 I had to look it up. Apparently, that is 736.6mm wide.
  • + 2
 @Pixels42: thanks, I couldn't be bothered but that is interestingly narrow by today's standards.
  • + 9
 Two cameras AND a Yeti Turq! Be honest, you're shaking it for dollar bills on the side aren't you mate...

Really good article : )
  • + 3
 since they are inside the industry and probably they take photos for that brand they probably get the parts for free, as payment or in the worst of the situations with a huge discount. they are not that much guys on the circuit, and it is not uncommon for you to see theirs bikes, so i wold say it's a pretty good deal for both. As for the cameras, even if they pay full price witch is the most certain, they can right it off as a business expense, so it's not like it's a toy, it's their work tools
  • - 3
 This might be industry changing stuff... I mean, dentists who?
  • + 9
 They must keep the weed in a secret pocket.
  • + 5
 If they are some of the best in the business, and taking photos is their income business they need to have the best tools. Most professional photographers have got top end cameras as budget entry consumer cameras just don't cut it when your livelihood depends on it. You wouldn't see Sam Hill riding a Halfords bike on a race..

As for bikes.. well, again, if you are in the business of taking photos of bikes and are riding EWS courses, you will probably get the best bike you can and you love the most.. (probably with a discount since they also work for these brands).
  • + 1
 I'd bet the best mtb photographers make a pretty good cut. Maybe not dentist money but still good. I know there are some other photographers in other action sports like snowboarding, surfing, etc that are very successful.
  • + 3
 @tacklingdummy: Indeed, but maybe only the most successful ones (we forget to look at all the rest that didn't get selected to work for the top teams).

But I also think also sometimes people don't realise how much work it goes into it. We see them at trackside and think how much fun they are having (because we love to take photos, right?). We forget it takes them 3-4 days+ to process all the photos and all the hours (day and night) involved in the process (while we snooze and have post-ride beers with mates). They are paid for 1 weeks's work + weekend and night work in one lump.
  • + 1
 yeah can everyone calm their tits. I don't actually wanna know how he makes his money...
  • + 4
 @jorgeposada: I keep mine all rolled up in my oneup edc and a couple strike anywhere matches...
  • + 2
 They could be living in cardboard boxes too. Priorities.
  • + 9
 how many kilometers do they ride and how many meters do they climb on a typical ews stage day? And how much do these bags with all that camera equipment weight?
  • + 5
 Surprised to see actually, they aren't running E-Bikes for that purpose.
  • + 28
 Kilometers, meters, (kilograms)... That's the spirit, your name should be 2m08
  • + 1
 @FloImSchnee: - cant fly on a plane with an ebike battery
  • + 6
 Dave is the best race photographer, hands down. Any plans for a book release of some sort?
  • + 3
 I use the A7iii as a newspaper photographer, I am surprised to see he doesn't use the A9, waiting for A9ii maybe? The A7iii is badass and meets all my needs, even in my side hustle in marketing for a small outdoor clothing company, but again, shooting World Cup and EWS, just surprised he doesn't use the faster camera.
  • + 4
 Huge $$ difference, especially when a professional needs to budget for two bodies.

Judging by his work, the A7III is working just fine for him.
  • + 2
 To be honest, unless you need the big resolution of the A7RIII, the A7III is more than enough for a pro or amateur. A true massive leap from the previous generation.
  • + 6
 @almacigatrailrider: A9 has more advanced autofocus and can shoot I think nearly 3 times as many raw files to the buffer with continuous shooting, and 20fps vs 10fps.

For MTB action shooting, to me, the faster shooting speed isn't a big deal. 20fps just means more photos to cull. If you can get a good image in 10fps, likely there wasn't an image to capture to begin with. The buffer/speed size is nice with the A9, but how often to you need to Shoot several hundred photos in continuous?! The A7 has a large enough capacity for MTB I think, where you are shooting in pretty shorts bursts. The biggest attraction to me, would be the autofocus. The a9 seems to have some of the best autofocus going right now, and that can make or break your shot.
  • + 6
 This was real sick. More of these please
  • + 2
 None of them use the backpack camera clip? www.peakdesign.com/products/capture , I use it and it's a GREAT CHOICE to ride and shot quickly on every corner.
  • + 2
 Even going down Enduro/Downhill Tracks? Is it secured in there or does it only depend on gravity to keep the camera in place?
  • + 2
 @jmjr: It locks into place once you slide it in. The button to slide it out can also be locked for additional security. I've ridden down Pikes Peak with one and held up very well.
  • + 2
 Shooting with an A6500, I would love a A7iii.
I came from Canon (5D) to Sony and wouldn't go back, but would love a FF Sony with the latest eye AF.
  • + 1
 Suspension setup: "stiffer fork and a softer back end with a bit heavier compression and slower rebound, especially on steep terrain and when carrying quite a bit of weight"

is this setup applicable for clydesdale?
  • + 1
 @mdelorme: How did you manage to take a picture of your own camera? In the metadata it says the picture is taken with a Sony too!
  • + 6
 Always have a back up body????
  • + 3
 Came to ask @mdelorme if he carries a second body. Apparently it was taking that picture. Question answered.
  • + 1
 @mdelorme: Hi Matt, curious about your thoughts on going from the A9 to the A7? Thanks!
  • + 1
 Be lightning quick after pressing the shutter? Smile
  • + 1
 Alright, so that's one more thing (not to be ignored) that goes into that same bag. I can imagine it would be a challenge to keep the time settings etc in sync so that when you use both camera bodies on the same trip, the metadata of the pictures matches.
  • + 1
 @mdelorme how often are you shooting at 2.8? I just picked up a crisp new lens but am feeling limited between the forest, evenings and fast shutters with f4.
  • + 1
 Having shot with the 70-200 f2.8 GM before there’s very little chance he’s actually shooting at f2.8 ever, that depth of field is far too small for longer focal lengths
  • + 2
 Very nice, now lets get Sven and Duncans set ups. some of us geek out on cameras also. Thanks
  • + 1
 ...up steep climbs at altitude. Dave also HATES hiking so he will pedal up as long as physically possible even if it is slower. That is the way to do it!
  • + 1
 "These are set up with one organic and one metallic pad" - Is that one of each in each caliper or does it mean organic front, metallic rear (or vice versa)?
  • + 1
 I'm guessing the former, to which my question is "what does this achieve and is it common?"
  • + 1
 @boozed: One of the WC mechanics (maybe Finns?) said he often runs an organic one side and a metal the other if he is unsure which to go for. Best of both worlds? Not sure its something us mere mortals would notice!
  • + 1
 @boozed: mettalic pads are more durable and many riders use them in the rear because it's more prone to debris and dirt, while the less durable organic pads are quieter and aren't exposed to so much yuck. at least this is what I read a couple of days ago while browsing for new pads.
  • + 3
 @sonnik: one each in each caliper. Get the best of instant but soft engagement (organic) and strong bite and heat fade resistance (metallic). The organic wears faster so you need two sets of organic per set of metallic. Old mechanics trick and it has the added bonus of quietening down SRAM brakes in dustier or damp conditions.
  • + 1
 @andrewbikeguide: sounds good, thanks for the tip!
  • + 1
 @mat-massini-media: you only really notice when the pads get really hot or really wet... One is good for one and bad for the other hence running one each
  • + 2
 ProBar Siracha Peanut Butter, what kind of sorcery is this?!?
  • + 3
 The best sorcery!
  • + 1
 @mdelorme: could only see the Siracha!!!
  • + 1
 Very interesting. How about proper food, like meals? Do you need to carry stuff or are there enough feed zones?
  • + 1
 Matt's bag costs way more than his TREK :p
  • + 1
 Rad article, always good to get a glimpse of how things happen ....
  • + 1
 where can i get the squid uci stickers?????
  • + 1
 Ayyy, thanks a ton for the awesome article!
  • + 1
 Awesome article!
  • + 1
 sweet
  • + 1
 Sick rigs.
  • - 1
 Give these photographers some eMTB’s already.
  • - 2
 A full-sized bottle on a Yeti, good for thirsty RR

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