Bike Check: Comparing Trek Factory Racing's Supercaliber Setups

Jul 7, 2020
by Ross Bell  




Last year Trek introduced a new thoroughbred XC race machine, the Supercaliber. It was first spotted in the hands of the XC team early in the 2019 season albeit with a wrap over the shock layout that left us to ponder just what the Trek engineers and designers had created. Once the covers were taken away the 'IsoStrut' was revealed, a 60mm travel rear shock that is built into the construction of the frame which certainly helps the Supercaliber cut a unique figure in the World Cup race pits.

Coming into 2020 Trek acquired the services of inform Frenchman Stephane Tempier who joined Anton Cooper, Emily Batty, Evie Richards, and Jolanda Neff to make a 5 strong squad who are all ready and capable to challenge for more than just the podium. With a variety of different heights, builds, and riding styles we thought it'd be interesting to see just where the differences lay in the teammates' setups:



The Bike



The 5 racers vary in height and frame sizes. Batty, Richards, and Cooper are all on a 15.5 (S) frame whilst Neff is on a 17.5 (M) and Tempier on a 19.5 (L).

The new Rock Shox SID SL Ultimate is upfront with 100mm of travel. All the riders are within 10PSI when it comes to fork pressure.
The 'IsoStrut' features a rear shock that is integrated into the frame construction.

How good is that paint job though? The new look for TFR in 2020.

The cockpit is perhaps where the most difference between the riders comes with a variety of different bar widths, stem lengths, and stem rises.

Dropper posts have become increasingly popular in XC racing, Jolanda Neff is a big advocate for them whilst Anton Cooper has only them once in Mont Sainte Anne last year. They all make use of Rock Shox's Twist Loc system for suspension lockout duties.

SRAM Levels take care of the stopping duties, 160mm rotors are most common but a few of the riders opt for 140mm on the rear.

No cables here. SRAM AXS all round for drivetrain duties with everyone running a 10-50T cassette.

There's a big variance in chainring size not only from rider to rider but race to race. Everyone runs an MRP chainguide for extra safety.
Crankbrothers Eggbeater 11s are the most popular choice of pedals but interestingly Stephane Tempier prefers the slightly bigger Candy which gives him a little extra support for downhill sections.

No surprise to see Bontrager's Kovee XXX spinning round on all the racer's bikes.
There's a big variance in tire choices and pressures depending on the terrain and weather conditions.



The Riders





Rider Emily Batty
Height 160cm
Weight 48kg
Frame Size 15.5


Any customizations or areas on the bike that you are particular about when it comes to set up?


I'm pretty fussy when it comes to my brakes being set up, and my shifting has to be perfectly tuned. As I get closer to race day, my senses become heightened and more aware, so everything has to be dialed.

How much do you change setup through a race weekend or even race to race?


Not too much, really. Mostly tires, tire pressure, suspension setup, chainring size.

Are there any ways your riding style demands a certain setup on the bike?


I think I'm naturally strong and smooth on the bike, which allows me to run a stiffer suspension setup. I feel I can really push my tires and traction too, which forces me to run higher tire pressure to prevent the tire folding, or rolling in the corners, or even bumping rim.

Any apparent differences in setup to that of your teammates?


Yeah, interestingly enough, some are riding heavier and more aggressive tires. The trade-off for me is the rotational weight, which I prefer to keep as low as possible while not sacrificing traction.


Cockpit
Handlebar Width 690mm
Stem Length 90mm
Stem Rise - 25 degrees
Spacers Below Stem None
Grip Choice ESI Grip Fit XC
Lever Position 45 degrees
Bite Point 15% into the stroke
Rotor Size 160mm front and 140mm rear
Dropper Length (if using) 100mm
Remote Lockout Rock Shox Twist Loc
Suspension
Fork Pressure 95 PSI
Fork Rebound 17 from closed
Spacers/Tokens 2
Shock Pressure 125 PSI
Shock Rebound 9 from closed
Spacers/Tokens Small (green)





Drivetrain
Cassette Range 10-50T
Chainring Size 34-36T
Crank Length 165mm
Pedal choice Crank Brothers Eggbeater 11
Chain guide MRP


Wheels & Tires
Model Bontrager Kovee XXX
Dry Tire Choice XR1
Wet Tire Choice XR2 for wet XR3 for intermediate
Pressures Front 19PSI - Rear 23PSI
Tire insert? Sometimes depending on course



Rider Jolanda Neff
Height 1.69 m
Weight 53kg
Frame Size 17.5

Any customizations or areas on the bike that you are particular about when it comes to set up?


I love to have the exact same setup of my position every time. On my training bike, on my race bike, everywhere. This includes handlebar heights, saddle angle, saddle height.

How much do you change setup through a race weekend or even race to race?


I usually test different tires on different tracks and find the best one for the current conditions. Also, chainring size is something that varies with steep xco tracks and for short track races which are mainly flat.

Are there any ways your riding style demands a certain setup on the bike?


I always, always ride with a dropper post. I started using it back in 2017 and never went back to a rigid post anymore. It’s absolutely essential to my riding style. Also I love to have rear suspension, so the Supercaliber bike is my bike of choice and I never ride the hardtail anymore.

Any apparent differences in setup to that of your teammates?


I guess my love for the dropper post. Not all of my teammates are using it, while I couldn’t even imagine riding without one anymore. Also, my love for suspension seems to be higher. I never go back and forward to the hardtail. Other than that, I would say with tire setups and most other things we are pretty similar.

Cockpit
Handlebar Width 690mm
Stem Length 80mm
Stem Rise - 13 degrees
Spacers Below Stem None
Grip Choice Esi Fit XC
Lever Position25 degrees, 15cm inboard from bar end
Brake Lever Reach 6.7cm
Rotor Size 160mm front and rear
Dropper Length (if using) 100mm
Remote Lockout Rock Shox Twist Loc
Suspension
Fork Pressure 89 PSI
Fork Rebound 10 clicks
Spacers/Tokens 1 spacer
Shock Pressure 112 PSI
Shock Rebound 9 clicks
Spacers/Tokens Small spacer






Drivetrain
Cassette Range 10-50T
Chainring Size 32-34T
Crank Length 175mm
Pedal choice Crank Brothers Eggbeater 11
Chain guide MRP


Wheels & Tires
Model Bontrager Kovee XXX
Dry Tire Choice XR1 or XR3
Wet Tire Choice XR2 or XRMUD for rain
Pressures Front 16-19PSI - Rear 18-22PSI (depending on track and if running inserts)
Tire insert? Sometimes depending on course




Rider Evie Richards
Height 164cm
Weight 63.5kg
Frame Size 15.5


Any customizations or areas on the bike that you are particular about when it comes to set up?


A large colourful bell, a handlebar bag made by me and a stem cap with a groovy quote!

How much do you change setup through a race weekend or even race to race?


I just get on the bike and ride it! I will maybe change the tyres If I'm pushing the boat out but that only happened once last year... Actually I change the stem cap!

Cockpit
Handlebar Width 680mm
Stem Length 75mm
Stem Rise - 25 degrees
Spacers Below Stem None
Grip Choice Esi Fit XC
Lever Position30 degrees, 15cm inboard from bar end
Brake Lever Reach 6.8cm
Rotor Size 160mm front and 140mm rear
Dropper Length (if using) 100mm
Remote Lockout Rock Shox Twist Loc
Suspension
Fork Pressure 85 PSI
Fork Rebound 12 clicks
Spacers/Tokens 2 tokens
Shock Pressure 115 PSI
Shock Rebound 9 clicks
Spacers/Tokens Small spacer






Drivetrain
Cassette Range 10-50T
Chainring Size 32-34T
Crank Length 170mm
Pedal choice Crank Brothers Eggbeater 11
Chain guide MRP

Wheels & Tires
Model Bontrager Kovee XXX
Fork Rebound 17 from closed
Dry Tire Choice XR1 and XR3
Wet Tire Choice XR3 or XR2
Pressures Front 18-20PSI - Rear 20-22PSI
Tire insert? Yes depending on course




Rider Stephane Tempier
Height 183cm
Weight 63kg
Frame Size 19.5

Any customizations or areas on the bike that you are particular about when it comes to set up?


-Angle of the saddle (negative angle) / angle of the handlebar/brake lever very close to the handlebar.
-Tires choice and pressure
-Fork and shock pressure, compression button --Token inside the fork and shock
-Dropper seatpost or not
-Chainring size

How much do you change setup through a race weekend or even race to race?


At World Cups the things I change during practice are:
1. Tyre choice (choose after 2 laps)
2. Dropper seatpost or not (choose after 2 laps)
3. Chainring size (38T or 36T)
4. Fork and shock pressure as well as the tokens inside (soft, medium or hard)
5. Playing with tyre pressure (to search for the limit and to find security in a race scenario)

Are there any ways your riding style demands a certain setup on the bike?


A big chainring (38T for 90% of the races, 36T for steep races) and I also ride with the fork/shock pressure on the low end. I like it to be smooth

Any apparent differences in setup to that of your teammates?


For sure I have different pedals. I am the only one riding with the Crankbrothers Candy. I prefer it because I have more support, especially in the downhill sections.

Cockpit
Handlebar Width 720mm
Stem Length 110mm
Stem Rise - 13 degrees
Spacers Below Stem 1.5cm
Grip Choice ESI GRIP RACER EDGE
Lever Position40 degrees, close to bar
Bite Point Quickly
Rotor Size 160mm front and rear
Dropper Length (if using) 125mm with Blip switch
Remote Lockout Rock Shox Oneloc
Suspension
Fork Pressure 85 PSI
Fork Rebound 12 from closed
Spacers/Tokens 2 tokens
Shock Pressure 80 PSI
Shock Rebound 10 from closed
Spacers/Tokens Medium spacer





Drivetrain
Cassette Range 10-50T
Chainring Size 38T
Crank Length 175mm
Pedal choice Crank Brothers Candy 11
Chain guide MRP

Wheels & Tires
Model Bontrager Kovee XXX
Dry Tire Choice XR1 or XR3
Wet Tire Choice XR2
Pressures Between 18PSI and 20PSI
Tire insert? In the rear wheel in a technical race


Anton Cooper locked and loaded for the start.

Rider Anton Cooper
Height 167cm
Weight 64kg
Frame Size 15.5

Any customizations or areas on the bike that you are particular about when it comes to set up?


I'm very fussy with all aspects of my setup, cleat position, Brake lever rotation, seat height/tilt angle, making sure my bars are perfectly straight, etc.

How much do you change setup through a race weekend or even race to race?


Bike choice and suspension setup often change between races and courses. I might run a volume reduction spacer or two in my fork on some courses and zero on others. Doing this forces you to change the air pressure and sometimes other settings on your fork to get the most out of it. I often shift my seat tilt angle downwards if the course features lots of steep climbing and not many flat sections.

Are there any ways your riding style demands a certain setup on the bike?


I would say I have quite a smooth and calculated riding style so I do well on a hardtail. This riding style translates well to when I'm on the Supercaliber also, however. Precision and smart line choices are important for whatever bike you ride!

Any apparent differences in setup to that of your teammates?


I run my stem a bit more slammed then the others, on my Procal I have a -40deg 90mm stem and on my Supercaliber, a -25deg 105mm stem which sits directly on the top head tube bearing. I have short legs so my seat height still only ends up being about a similar height to my handlebars with this setup.

Cockpit
Handlebar Width 680mm
Stem Length 105mm
Stem Rise - 25 degrees
Spacers Below Stem 0
Grip Choice ESI Grip Fit XC
Lever PositionSlightly downward
Bite Point Slight pull in
Rotor Size 160mm front and 140mm rear
Dropper Length (if using) I don't use one, only once in MSA last time out
Remote Lockout Rock Shox Oneloc
Suspension
Fork Pressure 87-90 PSI
Fork Rebound Around 6 clicks from fastest from memory on the new Sid SL Ultimate damper
Spacers/Tokens 0
Shock Pressure 122 PSI
Shock Rebound /
Spacers/Tokens 1 small




Drivetrain
Cassette Range 10-50T
Chainring Size 34-38T most commonly 36T or 38T for racing, generally 34T for training
Crank Length 170mm
Pedal choice Bontrager
Chain guide MRP
Wheels & Tires
Model Bontrager Kovee XXX
Dry Tire Choice XR1
Wet Tire Choice XR3
Pressures 18psi - 24psi depending on ground surface, moisture and tyre volume
Tire insert? No



126 Comments

  • 92 2
 wonder how it feels with a coil?
  • 56 3
 Slap a coil on, some how, put on a 190mm Zeb. And Just like that, you have a bike that even god would try to exterminate.
  • 40 1
 Put a Zeb lowered to 130mm, some DD assegias, 210mm dropper and some codes to make it into a downcountry thing
  • 8 1
 Swap the rear tire to a 26 and make the coil metric to get yourself up to 130 mm travel. @chillrider199:
  • 13 0
 @felimocl: I only Downcountry with a Cane Creek Thudbuster - with the extra firm elastomer!!
  • 4 0
 seriously, I would really love to do a hardcore softtail project
  • 1 0
 2 kilos heavier
  • 2 0
 @dllawson819: only as long as you get a sleeping bag handle bar storage pack.

And wear jorts.
  • 34 0
 Fantastic bike checks and details. Bravo!
  • 10 0
 Now let’s see the same for some enduro bikes/riders!
  • 26 1
 Even when I know it's coming.. "38T ring" always surprises me
  • 17 1
 Tempier also rides at like 40-50 RPM the whole race, which hurts my knees just to watch.
  • 16 0
 38T front with a 50T cassette is the same as if I would fit a 30T chain ring with my 40T cassette. Suddenly it doesn't sound heavy anymore.
  • 5 1
 Indeed 30T front and 42T rear is like 36/50

38/50 is like 32/42 which is what most people would have used on SRAM XX1 11 speed for example.

Not so crazy Smile
  • 2 2
 Never had a 20-22lb bike, but I'd be interested in knowing what ring I would be able to use. Pushing a 28-30lb enduro rig up climbs is not the same.
  • 6 0
 @tacklingdummy: I'm more curious what it would bel like pedaling up a hill without my 30 extra lbs of beer on me.
  • 3 0
 @BeardlessMarinRider: exactly. I remember when Eagle came out, the bros said it was for pu$$ies. Quite the opposite, Eagle was originally designed for XC racers to get a super high gear while maintaining climbing capability.
  • 1 0
 @rmclarke: Try drinking BudLite...it'll turn you off beer and then...BAM...you're losing weight...JUST...LIKE...THAT!!!
  • 21 2
 Evie Richards is now my favorite racer. In a world of marginal gains and fretting about cleat/brake/shifter/saddle positions it's awesome to see her not giving a f'.
  • 6 0
 Evie is rad.
  • 8 5
 Maybe she's just a millenial.
  • 20 4
 Big Emily fan, but she's running ~20% more tire pressure than Nino Schurter at 50 lbs less weight, and she's running way stiffer suspension than any of her teammates. This feels like the old "harsh is fast" fallacy.
  • 7 0
 They might be on the 35mm SID with those numbers. It looks like Neff is, but it's hard to tell for sure.
  • 8 0
 @clink83: Could be. Emily also has been known to race a hardtail at MSA and was one of the last XC riders to use 27.5" wheels, so she's definitely got a history of unconventional equipment choices
  • 10 29
flag ReformedRoadie (Jul 7, 2020 at 19:02) (Below Threshold)
 Well, she’s “naturally strong and smooth on the bike”, so there’s that...



If there was a Karen in mountain biking...
  • 10 4
 @ReformedRoadie: I'd like to speak to the race manager.
  • 2 0
 @nattyd: on a 32mm sid I use 80-90psi and 0 volume spacers...thats still a pretty nuts setup. I'm 210lbs or so lol
  • 5 0
 @ReformedRoadie: Don't get me wrong—Emily is a definitely a baller. She's legitimately one of the best technical riders on the World Cup circuit, hence how she can ride a hardtail at MSA. Just have to wonder if she would be faster with a less brutal setup.
  • 10 0
 @nattyd: but do you honestly believe she has never tried different settings?
  • 3 0
 Emily weighs the same as 1-2 e-bikes?
  • 3 0
 Different tyre widths? Nino's on 2.4s, Emily's on 2.2? 2.0? Would be interesting to see what width Bontrager tyres they're all using.
  • 2 1
 I can hardly believe that she runs this setup...
  • 2 0
 Emily is one of the fastest women XC racers on the planet, so she is always testing and thinking about how to get faster. I'm sure she found that setup is fastest for her.
  • 7 0
 @tacklingdummy: There are lots and lots of examples of pros running setups that turn out not to be fast. If you follow road bike tech, it wasn't long ago that everyone was running 105 psi in 23 mm tires. Now it's been well-proven to not be fast. Pro road racers STILL run non-aero bikes and end up in situations where it costs massive power (e.g. the front of the breakaway, where an aero setup is worth >40 W at race speed).

Or, if you want to keep it to XCO, look at the fact that racers are now running 2.4" tires, when not that long ago 2.0", or even 1.8" was the norm, on the same courses. They can't both be right.

Ultimately, it's really tough to distinguish what feels fast vs what IS fast. While personal preference counts for something, EB is running 25% to 30% more pressure than Nino Schurter and Kate Courtney, and they're both subject to the same physics. Somebody has it right, and somebody has it wrong. I know who my money is on.
  • 3 0
 @RonSauce: See comments below. I think it's common to test lots of things and come to incorrect conclusions about what is and isn't fast, because, to give just a few reasons: there are lots of variables, what feels fast isn't necessarily actually fast, conventional wisdom is strong, etc.

We KNOW this is true, because if you've followed XCO for even 2-3 years, there has been massive changes to equipment approaches, with pressures going way down, tires getting much wider, headtubes getting slacker, 26" wheels dying, 27.5" wheels coming and then dying, dropper posts becoming common, and hardtails being used less and less. Some of these changes have been driven by different courses, but a lot of the courses have stayed the same. Ultimately, even pros had a lot of things wrong, and probably they still do. I was just surprised to see that EB's setup seems to be 3-4 years behind that of her teammates and some of her most successful competitors.

There's this idea that a setup can be right for a specific person, and to some degree that must be true, but ultimately a lot of these choices just come down to physics. The Scott-SRAM team says that running 2.4" tires at 16-19 psi is faster than running 2.0" or 2.2" at 20+. Ultimately that will come down to the rolling and impedance losses of the tires and the cornering grip. Someone's got it right and someone's got it wrong, and I'm guessing Nino ain't wrong.
  • 2 0
 @nattyd: Just because its faster for one athlete doesn't mean its the best setup. the big 2.4s may be faster for Nino doesn't mean they are faster for Emily. Shes much smaller and can't climb at 6w/kg like nino does, so a bigger volume tire will probably be slower. If you ride without a dropper you are going to need a stiffer front suspension most likely, which is also a factor in bike setup. Its not always cut and dry.
  • 1 0
 @clink83: Sure, it varies by rider. But Kate also uses the 2.4" tires, and she's intermediate in weight between Emily and Nino.

The claim that bigger volume will be slower is not true according to Scott testing, presumably because any hysteresis loss is offset by improvements in impedance losses. Regardless, Bontrager doesn't have a 2.4" XC option as far as I know. But, either way, it doesn't explain why Emily would be using higher pressure than heavier riders, her teammates or Nino. Certainly she doesn't need more support to prevent rolling/burping a tire than Anton Cooper, who is much heavier and not going any slower.
  • 1 0
 @nattyd: The debate on what is faster in regards to tire pressure is very interesting. XC pros are using all kinds of different tire pressures across the board. There is no real standard. A lot comes down to the track ridden, riding style, weight, equipment used, etc. It will be forever contested, unless there is some major breakthrough study that proves to be a game changer.
  • 1 0
 @nattyd: Bigger tires are faster over rough terrain, sure. I have 2.4 Ikons front and rear right now since the trails are all chattery. That doesn't mean they are faster in all conditions though. on smooth singletrack a lighter narrower tire rolls just as fast, and you can chop 100-150gr per tire. There is no hard and fast rules on tires really.
  • 1 0
 ^or how everyone says you have to have steep HTAs to do well on descents, yet MVDP has beat Nino on technical tracks with an "inferior" 70* HTA bike.
  • 5 0
 @clink83: MVDP definitely isn't beating Nino on any descents. He beat him last year on the climbs, in spite of Nino being a substantially better descender. MVDP was taking B-lines in some of the races. He's just so fast that it doesn't matter.

Seriously, go watch Val di Sol. MVDP drops Nino like 4 straIght laps, and Nino keeps catching on the descents. Eventually, Nino breaks.

Nino is still untouched for skills in the XCO circuit. Victor Koretzky and Mathias Fluekiger are probably next best.
  • 2 0
 @tacklingdummy: Yeah, tires are so interesting! There is for sure a course dependency, but for each course an optimum does exist, even if it's hard to figure out. I am fascinated by this question. Nino has a video where he claims that too high tire pressure is the number one mistake people are making, and he recommends having it so low that you can press the tire all the way to the rim with your thumb and all of your weight(!) It seems crazy, but it's amazing how much the extra grip helps.
  • 1 0
 @nattyd: www.youtube.com/watch?v=belBAyZmY6A
I see MVDP doing fine in front of Nino in quite a few tech sections.

Also, the Race Kings are the fastest tire on the market according to the Swiss olympic team, not the aspen.
  • 2 0
 @clink83: Dude, I've watched every WC in the last year like 5 times. Anyone who knows XCO knows that Nino is faster. MVDP is very good, but even he knows he's not as good as Nino. MVDP literally talks about it in the post Val di Sole interview.
  • 3 0
 @clink83: Here's the full Val di Sole replay if you want to see it: www.redbull.com/us-en/live/mens-xco-finals-val-di-sole

MVDP is an excellent rider. The margins are small between the top people. But he's just not better than Nino.

Here's an even better case: 2017 Albstadt - MVDP and Fluekiger are both chasing Nino, and when he turns up the heat, within one lap both of them crash trying to hold his pace: www.redbull.com/us-en/replay-albstadt-xco-world-cup-2017-red-bull-bike
  • 2 0
 @nattyd: They are both good riders, my point more is that falling into the "Nino does it, so it must be the best way to do it" way of thinking isnt good or correct. If you believed pinkbikers MVDPs bike should explode on descents because of the 70* HTA on his Lux.
  • 3 0
 @clink83: Until 2018 the Epic WC had a 71.75° headtube. I owned one—it was terrifying. Jaroslav Kulhavy still won a lot of races on it.
  • 1 0
 @nattyd: When plus size tyres came out 5 years ago I could tell they offered more grip, but did not seem to drag much more, plus in down hill super tacky tyres roll a lot slower
Having never used a a watt meter, they are the proof
Could tell you an other way to make bikes more efficient, but that is an other story
  • 1 0
 @clink83: Not seen any XC riders using mullet set up yet, but smaller drive wheel can be an advantage
Here is my current test bike may not be a XC bike, but rolls well?

www.pinkbike.com/video/520028
  • 1 0
 "Big Emily fan, but she's running ~20% more tire pressure than Nino Schurter at 50 lbs less weight"

Lots of people are reading a lot in to Nino's tyre pressure comments but I reckon he is just winding up his competitors with those numbers. Lets see how many burp their tyres and lose places on him trying to copy the numbers he may or may not have made up Smile
  • 1 0
 @BeardlessMarinRider: Yeah, it could be competitive deflection. It is like the person that says they haven't been training at all, is injured, and has a cold then kicks everyone's rear in a race. Lol.
  • 1 0
 @tacklingdummy: I like this theory for how twisted it is, but I don't think Nino's going to intentionally give bad advice in videos to a bunch of amateurs who could then go out and have less fun and hurt themselves.
  • 1 0
 @nattyd: The funny thing is I had a Raliegh Skarn that had a 71 HTA and it was twitchy as shit. My last two FS bikes (Oiz and 429sl) have a 70* HTA and I cant really tell them apart from my Scale (68HTA). I suspect its the short reach more than steep HTA that makes the older bikes scary.
  • 1 0
 @clink83: I think trail matters a lot - so the HTA and fork offset both matter. The '18 Epic is 69.5° with a short offset fork (42 mm) and it's worlds better than the previous Epic. It is longer though, too.
  • 16 0
 Can we just get a slo-mo huck to flat for each of these bikes? That’s all we really need for comparison thanks PB
  • 14 0
 I couldn't imagine being over 6 foot and weighing 140 pounds.
Eve seems like super cool chick. All the Trek girls seem like really cool humans(-:
  • 1 0
 No kidding. I'm 5'7" and 140lbs and I am quite lean and skinny.
  • 11 0
 Is there a tipo inTempier's description or does he really weights 63kg for 186cm!!!!
  • 5 0
 He's like one of the cartoons from Triplets of Belleville. So skinny.
  • 1 0
 How is that possible while still being able to function as a human, let alone train hard?! He's about 1cm shorter than me and 12kg lighter! And I don't reckon I'm carrying a lot of excess.
  • 1 0
 @mountainsofsussex: he's only 1kg heavier than Cooper who is only 167cm so definitely a Tipo. Unless he recently has got some internals removed, who needs visceras anyway hehe
  • 3 0
 @freebikeur: mind you, Chris Froome is apparently 1.86m and 66kg, so for someone who needs to maximise their power/weight it might be real. But scary
  • 2 0
 @mountainsofsussex: not a lot of penalties for men to have single did get body fat.
  • 2 0
 Not a typo. Look at his arms, the guy is really skinny. I’m 178cm and my lowest weight (a loong time ago!) was 57kg, or 127lb. Of course I looked like crap.
  • 3 0
 @JackStephen: spent more time looking at the bikes than the dudes, so didn't notice his arms!
  • 9 0
 Not surprised Cooper used a dropper in 2019 at Mont Sainte Anne after his ripped scrotum there in 2018.
  • 9 2
 Well along with the bike weight you left out the coefficient of drag for the skin suits they are wearing. C'mon Trek Factory Give us the #s
  • 9 0
 Gonna try this out with those new SPD sandals!
  • 1 0
 LOL please upload some pix
  • 1 0
 You need a pair of those at the 2021 Tokyo Olympics as well as a Borat mankini !
  • 7 0
 I remember when I was fast.
  • 15 1
 Ish
  • 2 0
 fat(and I still am)
  • 4 0
 Interesting that the bike pictured has got a Bontrager Aeolus saddle, which are 250mm long. About 15mm shorter than most MTB saddles.
  • 7 0
 I put one on my Top Fuel. Love it. I've had lots of problems finding a saddle. Shop recommended it (a few of them used it as well), and it turns out something marketed as an "aero/TT" saddle actually works for MTB.
  • 4 0
 I noticed that Specialized also started putting snub-nosed Power saddles on their XC bikes.
  • 7 4
 No one is commenting about the fact that every team rider, beside Jolanda, is on bike one size smaller then they should?, really, 110 mm stems in 2021 on bikes with long FCs and decent lengths in reach?
  • 1 0
 Noticed this in the WC races. Seems like they do it for a better climbing position. Technical riders like Jolanda and Nino look to be running shorter stems.
  • 3 4
 @deadbeat:

Yes but, the same total reach(bike reach + stem length) could be achieved by using correct bike sizing and correct stem lengths.

Ffs, not even on gravel bikes you don't see 110mm stems. Only the roadies still downsize on bikes for higher stifness frames, lower weight and, in their minds, better position on the bike(with 120-130mm stems); but those are road bikes and these are mountain-bikes. These athletes don't have someone like a techical director or coach, some who can tell them how to efficiently use a modern geometry bike...like the F1 pilots have their own engineers with which they discuss different tech aspects of the sport.

I understand that they are racers and their set-up is very different the the ones for the average Joes here(for instance, I had 760mm bars with 70mm stem) but hey, 110mm stems and downsizing on a bike seem very roadie and a very counter-intuitive thing to do on a modern bikes. Basically, you neglect all the advantages the modern geometries bring to the game. What's next, head-sets to make the HAs steeper?
  • 3 0
 @eugenux: Generally when Pros undersize a bike, it's to keep the front end low. Given how steep everyone here has their stems pointed down (and already on the bearing), I'd guess that's why they want to stay down a size.

That said, I'd still tend to agree with you. I run a 130mm stem on a large bike on the road because wind is the main adversary where I live. I'd originally set myself up somewhat similarly off-road, but eventually moved to more of a Jenny Rissveds position, and the more open hip angle is easily better for power on the climbs (where wind rarely has any influence) and keeps the saddle even more out of the way when you're headed back down.

Seems like 2020 would be the perfect year for these old schoolers to try something new.
  • 1 0
 @eugenux I was thinking the same thing. I'm 182cm on a 21.5" and 70mm stem. I wonder how much faster/efficient the short frame/long stem combo is compared to my set-up.
  • 5 0
 @eugenux: you have to remember too, that the stems are upside down so are equivalent to a shorter stem the "right" way up- if (big if) they were able to have a "right way" up stem and get the bars low enough.

Tempier and maybe Neff aside, they are not tall so need to do everything to get the bars lower so it is all a bit of a compromise.

Add in the XCO tracks also tend to feature very steep short climbs then weight over the front (both longer and lower) is an advantage that matters and that outweighs advantages descending on shorter stem/ longer frames.

Larger frames also have higher stack so it is even harder to get the bars low enough (plus you have less stem length to work with in reducing bar height for the same frame+stem reach).

It is all a balance and I'm sure they have tried enough things to work out what produces the best end result which is all they care about.
  • 2 0
 @deadbeat: smaller bikes have shorter wheelbases too. I could ride a L or XL on most brands but go for an XL because I prefer an 80-90mm stem for descending. If I was to start racing at a higher level I would consider downsizing to a L to get a more agile bike.
  • 1 2
 @BeardlessMarinRider:

I understand what you are saying. On my old and, by the current standards, commically small reach xc HTs, I tried diff type of stem lenghts, from stock 100mm, to 70mm. I eventually set on a 80mm with a minus 6 degree angle with 720mm bars. On my 2018(2016 released) full-susp xc bike, I used a 75 mm stem, zero degree angle and 750mm bars. On my last xc full-susp(the current Oiz), I used a 70mm stem with 6 degree positive and 760mm bars.

All felt natural to me.

The modern geometry bikes put you in a much better position, up or down. We have like an urban xco course on a trail in one of the biggest parks in my city and on one of the steepest and punchiest climbs, I always struggled to keep the front wheel on the ground(towards the end, it is really-really steep). With the current Oiz, that never happened, despite the positive rise stem and the big handlebar.
I've done this course many-many years with all sorts of bikes, from xc HTs to 180mm big enduros(just for fun, as some of the downs are steep and sketchy) and I can tell you that the last two bikes I've rided there, the Oiz and the reactor 290, have no problem keeping the front wheel on the ground. That is the result of modern geometry..more reach, longer FC, longer WB, etc-etc.
As the supercaliber is more towards of a HT than a 'downcountry' full-susp, I can understand some set-up modification that work better in some races. But, that is miles away from downsizing and using road lenghts stems with 680mm bars(the 2000's called, they want their bar lenghts back).
  • 5 0
 They are forced to climb up unnatural terrain in xc WC such as ski slope faces. It's the right tool for the job
  • 11 0
 These folks spend 15-20 hours a week on their bikes. My guess is that they have a better idea what works than we do.

Also. Smaller frame = lower bar height = better power = less wind resistance = more front end grip.
  • 5 0
 because their frame size matches their height
  • 1 0
 They need to race something from Chromag.
  • 1 0
 I completely agree with you eugenux, and Trek makes the SuperCaliber up to XXL with 505mm reach. They'll get beat by riders on better geometry, just like Kulhavy was, and eventually come to their senses...
  • 2 0
 @ilyamaksimov: Yes, I agree. I am 163cm and would choose the 15.5 every single time.
  • 1 2
 @rollingdip:

Pick your top 10 from last year, any WC race, and tell us how many sized down. Also, if there was a podium winner that was also on a bike, one size less, then he should be.

Just because they race in WC, does not make them geniuses. They do not know everything. Points at top 3 current fastest riders, where Bruni, in a video last year, did not have a clue how compresions work. He did knew what he wanted the bike to do and feel but, had no efin' clue about which compresions did what. I think it was a test session or smth.
  • 1 0
 @eugenux: Hey man, I tend to size up too. I believe in the gods of reach and wheelbase. But you spend that much time on a bike, you learn what you like. Ask anyone who rode Ricky Carmichael's moto...
  • 3 0
 Can't wait for the XC shootout. Very curious as to how this bike performs (I have three kids in NICA) and personally want to know if the Specialized Epic Evo is as much fun as it looks like.
  • 1 0
 Really surprises me that they race sometimes with tire inserts (rear). I would think that the rotating mass would be slower and they would just increase the tire pressure instead. I can tell I'm slower just using a slightly heavier tire.
  • 3 0
 You should try some of the light XC ones. PTN has some under 60g each that I've had on my Top Fuel for a year.
  • 1 0
 Wonder if these are some of the bikes they provide to cops?? Gonna need to hold off on trek bikes until I know it won't come after me at a protest.

www.bicycling.com/news/a33398013/trek-womens-advocates-police-bikes-protests
  • 5 0
 It's paradigm shifting
  • 4 0
 All but one run bars that are less than 700mm wide.
  • 14 0
 Not sure you'd make it out of the first turn with wide bars - XCO/XCC is a full contact sport.
  • 3 0
 Cool to see Tempier on Trek after Bianchi bit the dust!
  • 2 0
 Does anyone know if Trek will introduce their T47 threaded BBs on their carbon XC bikes for the coming year?
  • 2 0
 the new madone has t47 dunno about the mtbs but looks like lots of things are being T47d
  • 2 0
 Boone is up next...
  • 2 0
 an entire article and my only takeaway its that emily batty weighs less than my ebike..
  • 4 2
 since you ask... id go back to trek red...
  • 2 0
 I have a Supercaliber, it's awesome.
  • 2 0
 wow 48kg only..i can almost benchpress that
  • 1 0
 I had no idea that xc racers were using tire inserts. Learn something new every day.
  • 1 0
 It will be great to watch them race these bikes again in 2021 or 2022.
  • 1 0
 Riding one of these bikes (set-up for my portly 74kg) would be so fun!
  • 1 0
 i do it and im 100KG
  • 1 0
 Anyone know what chainring that is in the photos?
  • 1 0
 I think they all have Quarq power meters, surprised it wasn't mentioned since it adds weight. Great thing for training but not sure how important it is on race day.
  • 1 0
 Lol at avoiding mentioning the FOX isostrut on those sram bikes.
  • 1 0
 Imagine this as a gravel bike.
  • 1 0
 No bar end plugs?
  • 1 0
 Hard to see, but the bar has the gold colored ESI plugs in there...
  • 1 1
 Wonder how hard Sram tried to get them to ride the 10-52 cassette...
  • 1 4
 In a world or beautiful bikes, that thing is ugly. Fair play to Trek for doing their own thing though.
  • 8 11
 Evie Richards is thick! 164cm and 63.5kg? Is that weight right?
  • 13 0
 She's pretty ripped.
  • 4 0
 Probably. It's more likely that's the weight she needs to be to perform, for her body. You see it time and time again with female athletes where a coach makes them lose weight and race results drop off a cliff. I'm pretty sure Jess Varnish from the GB Track team was in that position.
  • 8 2
 Dear Lord. I thought the first rule in life was to never comment on a woman's weight. How have you made it this far?
  • 6 0
 @nattyd: Shes also pretty vocal about not being so thin you loose your period too.
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