Bike Check: The 100% European Bike Project Build With an Unreleased Fork - Across the Pond Beaver 2020

Sep 3, 2020
by James Smurthwaite  
Crossworx Dash 29
Photos: Kilian Reil

One of the best things to come out of Europe's lockdown is the European Bike Challenge (EBC). With factories shut or running at low capacity and bike parts from the Far East getting more sparse, a group of bike nerds decided to celebrate everything great about European manufacturing by building and assembling some dream builds with homegrown parts at their core.

Crossworx Dash 29

We've already featured Ralf Holleis's homemade steel-on-steel Moorhuhn trail bike and next up is Alex's Crossworx Dash 29. Alex, who asked for his surname not to be published, is the man behind the European Bike Project Instagram account and the enthusiast who first laid down the gauntlet for the EBC. Unlike Ralf, Alex didn't build his own frame but for his project he believes he's managed to create a bike that's not 98 or 99% European like his fellow competitors, but 100% built in Europe. Everything from the frame to the sealant to the moto foam that came together in this build is European manufactured - a full list of parts is below:

Spec
Frame: Crossworx Cycles Dash 29 (made in Germany)
Fork: Unknown
Shock: EXT Storia Lok V3 (Italy)
Shock Bushings: Huber (Germany)
Stem: Intend Grace FR (Germany)
Handlebar: Beast Carbon Riser15mm (Germany)
Endcaps: Opn Bar (France)
Topcap: Unite (UK)
Spacer: Intend (Germany)
Grips: Ceetec (Switzerland)
Headset Intend Stiffmaster (Germany) / Reset Racing Flatstack (Germany)
Drivetrain: Rotor 1x13 with 12 speed cassette (Spain)
Chain: SRAM Eagle XX1 (Portugal)
Pedals: Unite Instinct (UK)
Bottom Bracket: Rotor BSA 30 (Spain)
Seat Clamp: Intend Corona (Germany)
Dropper post: Vecnum Nivo 182mm (Germany)
Saddle: Selle Italia SLR Boost Super Flow (Italy)
Rims: Truebc Trail Cabron 32.5mm (Germany)
Hubs: Hope Pro 4 (UK) & Erase (Belgium)
Spokes: DT Swiss Aerolite (Switzerland)
Spoke Nipples: DT Swiss Squorx (Switzerland)
Tires: Hutchinson Griffus (France)
Inserts: Rimpact (UK)
Sealant: Effetto Mariposa Caffe Latex (Italy)
Valves: Milkit (Germany)
Front axle: Unknown
Rear axle: Crossworx Cycles (Germany)
Brakes: Magura MT7 (Germany) with Galfer Wave Rotors and pads (Spain)
Bolts: Extralite Ti (Italy)
Bashguard: 77 Designz Crashplate 32 (Germany)
Cables and casings: Fibrax (UK)
Motofoam: DT-1 (Belgium)
Lube: Veloplus Petrus (Switzerland)
Grease: Motorex Bikegrease 2000 (Switzerland)

The heart of this bike is the 155mm aluminum German Crossworx Dash 29 frame. It's a recently updated enduro bike that now features a 65° head angle, super-steep 79° seat tube angle and a 450mm reach on this medium frame. It's a stunning frame and its beautiful welds and CNC'd parts, especially around the linkage, are exactly what we've come to expect from entrants in the EBC.

Crossworx Dash 29
Crossworx Dash 29

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The rest of the European spec is filled with a mixture of both familiar parts and some smaller manufacturers. Alex's aim was for his build to not exceed the price of top-tier bikes by other brands so he set himself a budget of around €10,000 for the full build. With that price tag, you'd expect plenty of sweet kit and this build certainly isn't a letdown. The steampunk EXT Storia shock, carbon TrueBC wheels and 182mm Vecnum dropper are all familiar highlights, but there are also some less well known parts here too including a Beast carbon Riser bar, Ceetec grips and Unite pedals. One final interesting choice is the Rotor hydraulic 1x13 drivetrain. Rather than go for the full 13 speeds though, Alex opted for the 12 speed cassette as it can be mounted on any Shimano HG body, allowing Alex to fit an Erase rear hub that's made in Belgium.

Crossworx Dash 29
There's very little carbon on this bike but Alex made an exception for these TrueBC wheels.
Crossworx Dash 29
CNC'd Unite pedals from Wales.
Crossworx Dash 29
Magura are one of just a few big brands that still manufacture in Europe

Crossworx Dash 29
Crossworx Dash 29
Rotor's 1x13 drivetrain, but with a 12 speed cassette. The chain is from SRAM as they are made in Portugal

It's definitely an admirable project and another stunning entrant to the Challenge, although Alex is the first to point out some of the limitations of his 100% European approach. He says: "Of course one should not forget that making bike parts is much more than welding, CNC-machining and so on. The different metals come from mines in countries that are far away, have to be melted and transported to Europe. Usually, not even the manufacturers know where their raw materials come from. So from a consumer perspective, it’s only possible to control the very last part in the supply chain. But that’s a good point to start with – maybe manufacturers will eventually start asking how and where their raw materials were made to ensure a fair and sustainable supply chain."

The last thing that grabs the attention about this bike is that unmarked fork mounted on the front. Alex won't tell us anything about it but we can only think of one brand that uses two white o-rings on its forks, Intend. If it is from Intend, it's something a bit different from the German brand. Intend is best known for its inverted forks, but this looks to be more traditional than its other offerings.

Crossworx Dash 29

We don't have any details on whether this fork uses the same air spring and semi-open bath as the Intend Hero, but it does look to use the brand's Royal Flush coating. The only other thing we know is that there is a neat integrated cable guide on the bridge. Apparently some more information on the fork will be coming when it is released in the near future.

Crossworx Dash 29
Crossworx Dash 29

For more info on Alex's bike and the European Bike Challenge by following the European Bike Project, here. A North American partner page has also been set up, here.

Across the Pond Beaver 2020






122 Comments

  • 196 0
 When do they Intend to release the fork?
  • 305 0
 Maybe Intendays.
  • 17 1
 All parts of this fork literally scream "intend"
  • 4 0
 @blackthorne: excellent :-)
  • 46 0
 was the pun intendent?
  • 3 0
 @fracasnoxteam: Id go with Trickstuff because iirc they are working on a fork.
  • 1 0
 @blackthorne: HAHAHAHAHAHA
  • 1 0
 @Freerider-09: judging on the fact the stem and headset are both Intend I'd say the fork probably is too.
  • 2 1
 @mhoshal: Judging by the fact that Kornelius is making USD forks only and he was working previously for Trickstuff I wouldn´t say this is Intend fork even though he most likely did have something to do with it..
  • 1 0
 @Mondbiker: the ibisfidlock team are running this fork too, along with an intend shock (and previously ran the USD intend stuff...)
  • 3 0
 Looks a lot like a White Brothers Fluid or Magic, from 15+ years ago when MRP still machined the lowers and crowns in-house and before they dropped the WB name
  • 1 0
 @Mondbiker: well even with the prototype seen in March they said intend in the article and then they say it again here I'm just putting 2 and 2 together. Time will tell I guess.
  • 4 1
 @mhoshal: Intend (Cornelius) and Trickstuff are working together in a way, i even think he had something to do with the direttissima and piccola brakes. Cornelius is also a big fan of upsidedown forks and i don't think he'd change his running system, he might work with trickstuff together but in the end it wouldn't be an "intend", maybe with internals.
Edit: www.mtb-news.de/news/gefraester-federgabel-prototyp Thats a german article about it, not much info but on a bike with trickstuff parts.
  • 1 0
 @mhoshal: K i was wrong, Check out Intend/Ibisfodlockracing on Instagram.
  • 1 0
 @Freerider-09: It's definitely his design work, the dropouts are darn near identical to the USD forks.
  • 2 0
 From vital,

INTEND BC Ebonite - All-New Enduro/Freeride Fork

This fork is a cnc-machined dream out of 7075 aluminum and probably the best fork you can buy for money. The result of 5 years of experience of suspension technology. The result is the Ebonite fork. It can take any loads you submit it to. The friction of the whole system is as low as possible, the best seals and air spring design are combined with a chassis made out of high quality 7075 aluminum. Bolted together with high strength stainless steel bolts.

Features of the Intend Blackline Ebonite:

29” wheelsize only, no 27,5“ version
Black, no other colors, the silver forks are limited to team rider
Travel 180-140mm (all necessary parts for later converting are in the package)
Air sprung, adjustable progression with 3in1 volume spacer
Oil damped, adjustable in Lowspeedcompression and -rebound
110x15mm Boost axle
44mm Offset
Brakemount: 180mm
Max rotor size: 223mm
ATC: 592mm @ 180mm…
Steerer length: 215mm (longer on request)
Royal Flush Coating for extreme sensitivity
SKF seals D35 with out collar
  • 62 0
 Loks like the love child of a Banshee and Ancielotti. Not a bad thing.
  • 41 1
 One of the nicest looking bikes I've ever seen. Those forks are a thing of beauty, so clean looking.
  • 7 31
flag BenPea (Sep 3, 2020 at 0:51) (Below Threshold)
 It also looks kind of broken.
  • 9 5
 Ok, let me rephrase. It looks pre-bottomed out. Maybe it's me.
  • 3 1
 That fork*

FTFY
  • 1 0
 Thanks!
  • 32 1
 Looks like an Ancilotti
  • 6 0
 My thoughts exactly. Immediately reminded me of the Scarab Evo aswell
  • 3 11
flag kyytaM (Sep 3, 2020 at 4:36) (Below Threshold)
 shoddy welds?
  • 12 1
 Such a gorgeous frame - nothing beats the purposeful, industrial aesthetic of raw aluminium. I also quite like how neatly the shock linkage is tucked into the bottom bracket area. And more brands should start to use modular shock mounts aswell.
  • 8 0
 The welds are beautiful as well.
  • 16 1
 > nothing beats the purposeful, industrial aesthetic of raw aluminium

raw titanium with unpolished welds

cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/1366/5247/files/Brakes_2048x2048.jpg?v=1499196831
  • 5 1
 @f00bar: Oh boy, I think I've just discovered an entirely new kind of stupidly expensive hobby thanks to you Big Grin Been looking up custom titanium bikes for the last 30 minutes
  • 1 0
 @streetfighter848: That they are indeed. The scales on the headtube welds are so incredibly nice and even
  • 1 1
 @f00bar: no thanks to both. If you work with those materials all the time I don't want to see them also on my Bike...
  • 1 0
 @BenTheSwabian: those Kingdom bikes are actually very competitively priced - a HT frame starts at €1,249.00
  • 2 0
 @f00bar: and I can tell you that it rides like a dream...and you get the best customer service with Kingdom.
  • 2 0
 @f00bar: As pretty as colourful titanium welds are, that upper caliper bracket weld is bordering on oxygen contamination.
  • 11 2
 Truly a nice bike. But its a shame, why is it so hard for companies to invent (or intend to have) a nice sounding name? I mean… crossworx? Does not sound good, does not look good - in my opinion. Fortunately selfmade graphics could solve that.
  • 5 0
 Yeah, sounds like some home exercise equipment
  • 9 0
 That is one seriously good looking bike. Would love to ride it.... no just look at it for a while!
  • 6 0
 @jamessmurthwaite Novyparts (suspension tuner and suspension service center) makes front axle designed and made in France. You also have a mad scientist named Richard from CRConception with the best inverted fork I've tried (better than the Intend). He makes everything in house and if not he outsources in France. You could write a great article about him !
  • 7 1
 That suspension video really needs a euro pop sound track overlay (and ideally a sliding whistle every time it moves - www.youtube.com/watch?v=auuy5drtfp4)
  • 6 3
 I'll bet there's a set of ball bearings from Taiwan or a lip seal from China in there somewhere. Even European manufacturers use the odd tiny bit here or there for cost effectiveness sometimes. I'd be impressed if it genuinely is 100% eurofile... Not to belittle the effort as it's clearly a stellar build.
  • 2 1
 And most of the materials will be sourced Worldwide.
  • 1 0
 Probably skf bearings, Swedish.
  • 1 0
 @kipvr: SKF MTRX bearings, made in Sweden.
  • 1 0
 A product that has a "made in (country)" label can still contain some parts which are not made in this country. All parts on this bike have a "made in (European country" label, but at the same time, some o-rings and so on come from overseas. Still the vast majority of work, machining, design and so on was done in Europe.
  • 5 0
 What does BC refer to in Germany? I was super confused that "TrueBC" rims aren't made in Canada.
  • 22 0
 It rhymes with Micycle Pomponents
  • 3 0
 I was similarly confused. Turns out "BC" is just the abbreviation for "bike components".

For carbon rims made in BC (Canada), you have to go to WAOC: www.weareonecomposites.com
  • 5 0
 A mistake here: "65° head angle, super-steep 79° head angle "
  • 5 0
 Fixed, thanks! That would be very steep to be fair...
  • 5 0
 Holy schizzle, that's a sweet, sweet inanimate object of unholy desire....
  • 1 0
 We've reached an interesting place for Seat Tube Angles. 79° effective ST on this bike at this saddle height (by my quick measurement) but then the saddle gets slammed all the way back because the angle is too steep for the rider. And you see most bikes with BS "steep 75°+ effective ST angle but not actually at saddle height", and slacker sub-70° actual ST angles, with seats slammed forward to steepen the angle. I'm thinking we've found a sweet spot with 75-77° effective ST angle at the correct saddle height for the actual rider. Props to all the frame manufacturers who measure the seat tube angle at real saddle heights, and give that info on geo charts (Ibis, Transition, etc). The companies who measure effective ST angle at the same height as the top of the head tube need to get with the times and stop false advertising their "steep" but actually slack seat tube angles.
  • 6 2
 Effective TT looks insanely short with that steep STA and short reach.
  • 1 0
 My thoughts exactly.
  • 2 0
 I thought the pic looks squashed but, wheels still look round..... Mabey we're just judging it by todays super long super slack choppered out standards
  • 5 0
 "Pushing a shopping trolley" geo is the hot new trend for '22
  • 2 0
 Maybe it's a size small with 420 reach
  • 3 0
 The article says it's a medium with 450mm reach.
  • 1 0
 @nojzilla: It actually is pretty long and slack. But the ultra steep seat angle makes it look very weird. It would need to be even longer to look "normal", e.g. more than 500mm reach in size Medium.
  • 2 0
 @wisey: Ah true.. then it must be the 79° seat angle that makes it looks a bit cramped. I like their frames, except the standover/TT looks a bit too high. Found that on the 27.5 already.
  • 1 0
 @Ttimer: That's right. It's not ultra long, but reach is decent for my size. However I have to agree that it looks short on the photos.
  • 1 0
 Fork: Unknown and two travel indicators on both stanchions. Does that mean independent suspension on both legs for better cornering? Lol. Just starting some conspiracy theories about it.
  • 3 1
 Shout out to Unite, a wee company that does some cool stuff at a great price. Worth a look!
  • 1 0
 I’m confused, isn’t Unite from the UK?..didn’t they vote to no longer be part of Europe????
  • 6 0
 @unrooted: Yes. They're in the process of moving the island of Great Britain as we speak. Word is they'll anchor it off Bermuda. (Northern Ireland move to be negotiated.)
  • 3 0
 @unrooted:
Europe - a collection of countries making up the European continent.
European Union - a political and economic group made up of a collection of countries from Europe and beyond.
We're leaving the Union, not the continent.
  • 1 0
 @gibbon-on-an-orange: I have heard from a very good authority ( @MtbSince84 ) that at least some of the British Isles are moving to near Bermuda.
  • 1 1
 For me it looks like very linear or even regressive suspension characteristics. Look how big stroke of the linkage are is at the beginning of the rear suspension movement. Dumper needs to be super progressive to compensate.
  • 1 0
 Check out the Crossworx website if you want to know more about the suspension. In the beginning it's slightly regressive and from the sag point slightly progressive.
  • 3 0
 They will need some new parts after Brexit to keep with all EU stuff!
  • 1 0
 Even after Brexit, the UK is still a part of Europe, but not part of the EU ;-) This was not an EU bike project, but an European Bike Project.
  • 1 0
 If I had a lot of extra money and time I would build bikes. I have neither. So I am left just stare in amazement. Custom is so cool.
  • 3 0
 Meh, cabron rims. I'm holding out for carne de res.
  • 1 0
 A good looking bike. Does anybody know how stiff the rear end is? Looks rather flexing
  • 2 0
 The side picure. Maybe it's a small frame, it looks squashed.
  • 2 0
 Apparently, there must be no European water bottle manufacturers :p
  • 1 0
 In fact, there are quite a few, but I chose to have the photos taken without bottle, mud fenders, and so on.
  • 1 0
 I love the machined cradle. Looks a bit like the Banshee Legend (the cradle, I mean) great looking bike, I wants one.
  • 1 0
 Try build a "euro bike" for less than 4k ( in my opinion more realitstic price for an average biker) Not gonna hapen Smile
  • 5 5
 All the inverted fork manufactures end up tucking tail and building conventional forks! Cool looking frame!
  • 6 3
 It's simply a question of consumer demand. People want to buy what is familiar. Also, everyone is moaning and fretting about torsional flex of USD designs, while simultaneously not caring one bit about horrendous fore-aft flex of conventional forks.
  • 5 2
 @Ttimer: because torsional flex and fire and aft flex affect your ride in 2 very different ways... fore and aft flex isn’t actually bad if you are seeking comfort as it really doesn’t affect ride characteristics, whilst torsional flex affects steering feel and precision in a very noticeable way. MTB never needed USD forks in the first place. The advantage of one doesn’t justify the compromises needed to make it light enough and compatible with the standards we already have
  • 2 2
 @isuckatridingbutmybikeiscool: I'd disagree. Too much fore/aft flex wears on fork and headset components and can make for a quite unsettling and uncomfortable vibrating feeling. IMHO it's universally undesireable.
  • 1 0
 @isuckatridingbutmybikeiscool: I agree that both kinds of flex feel very different. Fore-aft flex is bad because it compromises suspension performance under braking.
But none is better than the other, it is mostly a question of what is familiar. We are so used to fore-aft flex that our riding styles compensate. The same would be true for torsional flex, if most forks were USD.
  • 4 0
 My forks ALWAYS end up scratched on the lowers. While Intend's forks are the first USDs I considered putting on my bike in terms of reliability und weight, their adamant refusal of protecting the lowers put me off. This fork though...watch out FOX and RockShox!
  • 4 0
 Think about why inverted forks exist in moto... it's to get more bushing overlap to handle much more weight and possibly more travel. Right-side-up forks with the same capacities would have a large piece of the lowers below the axle, which would be terrible for clearance, so they use up-side-down forks in those applications. MTB doesn't need those large capacities for weight and travel, so RSD forks can be made with sufficient bushing overlap without hanging a ton of material below the axle, and then they gain the RSD benefits like having an arch for torsional rigidity. Unsprung weight isn't a huge issue because the lowers & axle can be lighter since they spread the torsional loads around between the axle and arch.

Basically USD forks are cool, but in MTB they are unnecessary since the biggest bonus (bushing overlap) is sufficient in RSD forks for this application.
  • 1 0
 Two fun meters. Double the fun?
  • 1 0
 Put that video on OnlyFans.
  • 1 0
 Crossworx... he's so hot right now.
  • 1 0
 Does anyone know if Sram chains are manufactured by Miranda?
  • 1 0
 Not sure about that, as far as I know they have their own factory. There's a nice photo story on the Sram chain factory in Portugal here on pinkbike, google it :-)
  • 1 0
 Am I the only one that misread the bike name as Crashworks Doss?
  • 1 0
 Get on the scene with the flex machine!
  • 1 0
 so its an intend fork, which means the stanchions come from taiwan, right
  • 1 0
 How much did it cost? I love the idea behind it.
  • 1 0
 Serious question here; Is it possible to build a quality USA complete...?
  • 2 0
 Hi, at the moment you might get to 80% US made maybe. A derailleur, shifter and tires will be your biggest concerns I think. If you want to know more about local manufacturing in the US, check out my buddy www.instagram.com/north.american.bike.project
  • 1 1
 Gorgeous bike, maybe the larger sizes get room for a water bootle?
  • 1 0
 it has a waterbottle mount unter the top tube
  • 2 0
 @FloriLori: Oh, yes. Nice.
  • 1 0
 An alloy Evil!
  • 2 0
 Evil bikes has made alloy bikes before. They were like dandelions. They blew apart into millions of pieces
  • 2 0
 @usedbikestuff: Sure 10+ years ago. Evil was pretty transparent about they issues they had back then and their current bikes are solid.
  • 1 0
 @hellbelly: indeed it was a while ago. Seems like only yesterday.... sigh
  • 1 0
 Ya they got screwed, then didnt handle it well with customers...probably should have declared bk but hindsights 2020
  • 1 3
 All this left me wondering was what the equivalent euro flag would be to the confederate flag because this feels like the bo’ duke of europe
  • 1 0
 Well since no one has directly fought a war against the EU and lost, there is no equivalent to keeping around the flag/symbol of a defeated enemy.

(Except maybe the Nazis; that was before the EU, but regardless, I'm pretty sure there isn't anyone regularly displaying swastikas and trying to claim it's just their heritage and isn't the gross symbol of bigotry and genocide that both those flags are.)
  • 3 1
 @just6979: I had a feeling someone was going to go there. Fact, the nazis in Germany use the confederate flag since they can’t display swastikas. I mean I couldn’t think of an example for Europe but our us history classes don’t do a good job of telling anything but ‘Mercia is great.
  • 2 0
 @usedbikestuff: Nazis use the flag of the German Empire (Deutsches Kaiserreich) , Black,White and Red.
ATM some ass hats waved that flag at the Reichstag last weekend(equivalent to the capitol U.S.) and get kicked in the face by the Police.
  • 1 1
 @Serpentras: been to the reichstag, cool dome. Will look up videos, nothing like a good ken & ryu street fighter kick to the face
  • 1 1
 @Serpentras: "and get kicked in the face by the Police" Usually don't like to hear about anyone getting abused by police, especially with what has been going on here in the US right now, but those ARE the people who should get kicked in the face, by everyone!
  • 1 0
 Gorgeous
  • 1 1
 Seems a bit xenophobic.
  • 1 4
 A gold stanchion fork on 2021, meh(!)
  • 4 0
 Actually it looks good I think, between all the black and kashima
  • 1 0
 If it‘s only nearly as good as the Edge I wouldn‘t mind the color.
  • 1 0
 @likehell: that was a sarcasm
  • 1 0
 @Noeserd: haha.. not detected!

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