Bike Check: Gee Atherton's Custom Quarry Hucking Atherton Bikes DH

Apr 6, 2021
by James Smurthwaite  


If you're going to be hucking 80+ foot gaps down a quarry with razor-sharp slate ready to slice you to ribbons at the slightest mistake, you probably want a bike that's designed especially for the task. Thanks to its additive manufacturing design, Gee could do exactly that with the Atherton Bikes DH he used for the Slateline edit. Using his namesake brand's custom carbon tubing, he went for a mullet set up with a 480mm reach and 450mm chainstays. Gee says the mullet design allows him to get off the back more easily on the super steep sections, which means that the bike can move around more underneath him.

The big deviation from his regular World Cup setup is the inclusion of a coil shock. This is the 12th iteration of the DW6 DH bike in the past year so Gee understands the characteristics of the setup pretty well by now. Normally he'll run an air shock for racing but he went for a softer coil shock on this freeride build to optimise small bump sensitivity. He ran it with a 525 lb/in spring but he pushed up the high-speed compression so it still held up in the bumps.
Gee Atherton Quarry Slate Line Bike Check
Rider Name // Gee Atherton
Age: 36
Height: 185cm / 6'1"
Weight: 85kg / 187 lb
Instagram: @gee_atherton

The final change came from the pressure in his prototype Continental Kaiser tires. Gee went right down to 18psi so they would have as much compliance as possible on a constantly shifting surface. Despite the low pressures, the tires held up well and he says he spent the entire 7-day shoot on the same pair.

Gee Atherton Quarry Slate Line Bike Check

Gee Atherton Quarry Slate Line Bike Check
Atherton DH Details
Frame: Atherton Bikes DH
Shock: Fox DHX Coil, 525lb spring
Fork: Fox 40 Factory, 95psi, 7 tokens
Wheels: Stans, mullet set up
Tires: Continental Kaiser prototypes, 18psi
Brakes: Trickstuff Maxima. 203 mm rotors
Cockpit: Renthal 31.8 alloy 785mm wide
Size: Custom - 480mm reach, 450mm chainstay
More info: athertonbikes.com

Gee Atherton Quarry Slate Line Bike Check
A coil shock took over suspension duties for Gee's freeride bike and he ran it with a 525lb spring.

Gee Atherton Quarry Slate Line Bike Check
The tires are prototype Continental Kaisers run at super-low pressures. Expect to hear more about them soon.

Gee Atherton Quarry Slate Line Bike Check
Gee's fork was run fairly similar to his World Cup set up - 95 psi with 7 spacers.

Gee Atherton Quarry Slate Line Bike Check
Gee's high front end is a hangover from his BMX days.

Gee Atherton Quarry Slate Line Bike Check
Gee's clipless pedals are also unusual for a freerider but he used them for both Ridgeline and Slate Line as he prefers the increased feedback they offer. Gee also wanted to give special mention to his MRP chain guard that took one hell of a beating over 7 days of filming.

Gee Atherton Quarry Slate Line Bike Check
Ready to head back up for one more run of the terrifying track...

Editor's Note: Some factual corrections have been made to this article since its initial publication. We apologize for any confusion.



206 Comments

  • 52 0
 "A coil shock took over suspension duties for Gee's freeride bike and he ran it with a 525lb spring and 3 spacers."

Spacers in a coil shock?
  • 22 0
 it seems Gee went full Chuck Norris
  • 41 0
 ctrl c + ctrl v strikes again. Thanks for the heads up!
  • 7 1
 @jamessmurthwaite: there is also no drivetrain
  • 14 0
 @jmtbf: ctrl + x
  • 5 43
flag artistformlyknowasdan (Apr 6, 2021 at 10:12) (Below Threshold)
 @jamessmurthwaite: what kinda of savage picks that over dragging and right clicking with the mouse?!
  • 35 0
 @artistformlyknowasdan: An efficient one
  • 25 2
 Notice most fox athletes are running a ton of tokens in their 40s. I suspect the next “innovation” from fox will be multiple stage air springs that are found in Ohlins and Manitou forks, along with hydraulic bottom out units.
  • 6 2
 Or just a smaller volume main air chamber.
  • 2 5
 Ohlins doesn't have multiple stage air springs. They use one to control main air chamber volume.
  • 9 0
 @makripper: I don’t own one and I think I may have incorrectly using the word “stage.” I’m more referring to using air rather than fixed plastic spacers (tokens). From PB’s article on the release of the updated DH38 last summer:

“On the air side, Öhlins use a three-chamber design. The normal positive and negative chambers are present, but so too is a third ramp up chamber adjustable with air pressure, which negates the need for volume spacers.”
  • 5 0
 @diegosk: that's fair.
  • 2 1
 @diegosk: Not sure I really see much difference between that and what you said tbh - other than semantics, what is the difference between a multi-stage spring and a spring with two chambers running different pressures to increase ramp up?

Technically dual-stage rather than multi-stage maybe, but still more than one.
  • 1 6
flag makripper (Apr 6, 2021 at 12:28) (Below Threshold)
 @sargey2003: multi stage means more than one stage. Like an old grip damper. It was 2 different shapes of the bladder. One is larger volume and one is smaller. Single stage is like a charger damper. One volume of bladder.

It's 100% not 2 stage. Your just changing the volume of the air chamber. Literally all it does. And by doing this decreases space in said chamber so it ramps up earlier and uses a little less air doing so. Making it so you can fine tune when ramp up begins and use less psi so it has better small bump for your liking. Not sure why I have to explain this. There are loads of information out there on the internet about it
  • 2 0
 @makripper: so on the Öhlins, it works more like MRP ramp control rather than a DSD runt, correct? But Manitou’s IRT/DSD Runt is actually two chambers where one controls initial stroke and the IRT/Runt controls mid stroke, correct?

Understand there is a lot of information on the internet but why Google stuff when we have you? Only being halfway smart ass... you seem to actually know what you’re talking about and it’s easier than trying to read engineering jargon regarding air springs for other applications outside of mtb.
  • 2 5
 @diegosk: yeah thats a fair point. it can be hard to dig through multitudes of to find something that you can understand.

the 3 all have the same end result. adjusting volume in the main chamber. mrp changes volume by reducing or increasing space. the runt does the same thing via air instead of a mechanical method. they are both similar to a volume spacer but in theory easier to fine tune volume size for preferred characteristics.

basically all methods do the same thing. reduce volume of the main chamber. pretty simple idea but gives great results for tuning preferred characteristics.

you can add some spacers/air volume to another chamber or wind down a mechanism to reduce volume for a bunch of different reasons. for sure mid stroke support is part of it as is small bump and final ramp up at end stroke.

its kind of cool really, if you dont have enough mid support and or blowing through travel at recommended sag, but feel like your losing your small bump, add a token, reduce psi until you get your sag back. you should have a little more small bump sensitivity and better mid support/faster ramp up near end of stroke.

sorry for the book. i hope it helps make sense.
  • 1 0
 @makripper: don’t apologize for the book. Appreciate the detailed response. Thanks dude
  • 8 1
 @makripper: If you're talking about the DH38.1 then you're incorrect. That Ohlins fork has two positive chambers in series (main chamber and ramp chamber) as well as one negative chamber. All three can have their volume adjusted with spacers as well as their pressure changed. The ramp chamber piston starts moving once the pressure of the main chamber (under the compression stroke) exceeds the pressure in the ramp chamber.

MRP ramp control is a hybrid between a high speed compression damping circuit using air as the damping medium and volume spacers on an air spring - the higher the shaft speed the lower the spring volume.

The DSD Runt works like the Ohlins dual chamber positive spring but you can't vary the volume of each chamber, only the pressures.
  • 5 1
 @threehats: Thanks for saving me the trouble!

Yep, some (all?) Öhlins air springs are two-stage, similar to the Manitou IRT, DSD Runt, etc.

Spot-on about the MRP Ramp Control acting as both a damper and volume reducer (compared to the same spring without the Ramp Control, rather than compared to an equal volume of reducers).

@makripper, It's also incorrect that reducing volume improves mid-stroke support. This is the opposite. For the same "total support", reducers shift the balance toward more end-stroke support, while larger volume makes a more linear spring, which has more support in the middle. Have a look at this chart to help you understand it. The chart compares various springs with constant work done during compression, which is a fair approximation of how a rider would set up the suspension to maintain comparable access to the full stroke.
  • 1 6
flag makripper (Apr 6, 2021 at 16:30) (Below Threshold)
 @threehats: I'm not familiar with that cartridge.
  • 1 7
flag makripper (Apr 6, 2021 at 16:30) (Below Threshold)
 @threehats: the ramp chamber decreases volume in the maim chamber... So it's still the same.
  • 8 1
 @makripper: It's not the same. The point in the travel at which the second piston begins to move can be varied by the ratio of pressures in the two chambers. This variable "break point" significantly changes the shape of the spring curve in the mid-stroke.
  • 1 9
flag makripper (Apr 6, 2021 at 18:23) (Below Threshold)
 @R-M-R: it's not actually a second "piston" it changes volume amount. It has a bit of movement but not much.
  • 1 8
flag makripper (Apr 6, 2021 at 18:25) (Below Threshold)
 @R-M-R: yeah.. you can actually feel it. You are wrong. Less volume gets you better mid to end support. You are literally splitting hairs lmao
  • 10 1
 @makripper: No, you are wrong. Again. As you have been throughout this discussion. You clearly didn't even look at the chart - either that or you didn't understand it.

If you're comparing the same pressure in a fork or shock with and without reducers, then yes, the same pressure with less volume will create a little more support in the mid-stroke and a lot more support at the end stroke. But that's the wrong way to think of it because it's not comparing two good, but different, set-ups, it's comparing one that wasn't good to one that is.

When comparing two, equally viable, set-ups that use different compression ratios (via reducers), the one with a lower compression ratio (fewer reducers) has more support in the mid-stroke. As I said, look at the link I provided and let me know if you continue to struggle with it.
  • 1 11
flag makripper (Apr 6, 2021 at 19:09) (Below Threshold)
 @R-M-R: it's one of many charts lmao. You are wrong. I'm not struggling. You literally 180'd on your last point to. Do you need help with anything?
  • 1 10
flag makripper (Apr 6, 2021 at 19:13) (Below Threshold)
 @R-M-R: seems like you have zero practical experience with any of these scenarios. Maybe get a fork with any volume adjustment for the main air cartridge chamber, do some testing and get back to me. I'm actually interested in the runt because it should take the edge off and smooth out fork movement transitions. Sort of a buffer. I'll have to dig in more to see if it's does a good enough job to notice. Cheers!
  • 7 1
 @makripper: I did not 180. Let's review, but I can do only so much for you.

Comparison 1: Same pressure, with and without reducers.
In this case, the reducers add a small amount of mid-stroke support, but this comparison is invalid because one of the two is inherently inappropriate for the rider.
• If the rider has enough bottom-out support without the reducers, the rider cannot access full travel with the reducers. Obviously the wrong way to add mid-stroke support if the suspension no longer works properly.
• If the rider can access full travel with the reducers, then the set-up without reducers is incorrect because the rider will bottom out too easily. Again, not a valid comparison when one set-up doesn't work.
Clearly, this comparison is invalid, so let's move on to a valid comparison.

Comparison 2: Different pressures, with and without reducers, such that the rider is equally able to use full travel with both set-ups.
In this case, the set-up with reducers creates less mid-stroke support.
• This comparison is valid because both scenarios allow the rider to use full travel appropriately. They are different, but both actually work for the rider, unlike in Comparison 1.
• The mid-stroke support is significantly different between these options, with less support from the set-ups with reducers.

Mid-stroke support is not the main change the reducers create. The change in mid-stroke support is small, while the change in bottom-out support is large. The main effect produced by reducers is bottom-out support. When comparing set-ups with appropriate bottom-out support, the set-up with a lower compression ratio (fewer reducers) has more mid-stroke support.

Once again, refer to this chart that illustrates Comparison 2 and shows how this works.
  • 3 1
 @makripper: there are substantial tuning capabilities found within a separate high-pressure chamber, which does indeed have its own internal floating piston. I’ve had the runt throughout a couple of runs (lyrik and 36), and I’m on a manitou mezzer pro with IRT right now. The IFP is located a fair ways down at its lowest point, giving the midstroke support. Pressure from the main chamber then forces the IFP up, increasing pressure in its own chamber. This creates bottom out resistance, but it isn’t as harsh as tokens. Your prior argument about multi stage forks etc is baseless, as you were referring to the damper instead of air spring. @R-M-R is quite right, you should dig into some more data before misleading people.
  • 1 12
flag makripper (Apr 6, 2021 at 21:07) (Below Threshold)
 @R-M-R: just give it up lol you don't know what you are talking about. It gives increased mid stroke and end ramp up. you can write all the books on semantics you want but you attempts to prove me wrong have failed. Yet again. Must be a slow night in Calgary lmao p.s. please don't come to bc we don't want more visitors spreading covid around.
  • 1 7
flag makripper (Apr 6, 2021 at 21:10) (Below Threshold)
 @chuckobike: I was using them as a difference in 2 stage vs single stage. Definitely not baseless. You missed the point entirely lmao.
And we weren't talking about ifp at all. That's a whole other subject.
  • 1 5
flag makripper (Apr 6, 2021 at 21:13) (Below Threshold)
 @chuckobike: here read about what an ifp is and does. bikerumor.com/2017/07/06/suspension-tech-whats-ifp
Thats the basics.
  • 4 1
 @makripper: IFP is precisely what is found in multi stage (let’s be clear, I’m speaking about air) forks. There’s an IFP in the Ohlins goodies, IFP in DSD runts, IFP in the manitou IRT.
  • 7 1
 @makripper: If something adds support everywhere, then that wouldn't be changing the shape of the curve, it would be just raising the curve, which would be the same as just adding more air pressure, which implies the alternative (without tokens) simply had inadequate pressure.

The comparison is valid only if both set-ups are viable, which is not the case if one set-up only adds support. There has to be a trade-off: add some support in one part of the stroke and give up some support elsewhere. That's how tuning of the spring curve works.
  • 1 8
flag makripper (Apr 6, 2021 at 21:16) (Below Threshold)
 @chuckobike: now you are just attempting to troll. Please read up on what an ifp is and it's primary function.
  • 3 1
 @makripper: while everyone else was talking air, you threw in your two cents about damper differences. I’m all for thinking through everything, but it was a bit off topic for the moment.
  • 4 1
 @makripper: not trolling. Think about the basics here. Internal. Floating. Piston. That second chamber has an internal floating piston. Just because IFPs are used elsewhere doesn’t mean I don’t know what I’m talking about...
  • 1 8
flag makripper (Apr 6, 2021 at 21:22) (Below Threshold)
 @chuckobike: you seriously don't know what an ifp is. Like I said before that was a comparison between a 2 stage vs single stage system. A 2 stage bladder vs a single stage air cartridge. It definitely was on topic. With the air cartridge you are just modifying volume with spacers or other mechanical or pneumatic means to change ride characteristics.

Then here comes rmr for some reason trying to say it's not true? Then here you are knowing nothing about suspension and trying to talk down to me? Get a life.
  • 1 3
 @R-M-R: it doesn't add support everywhere. What are you talking about??
  • 1 7
flag makripper (Apr 6, 2021 at 21:25) (Below Threshold)
 @chuckobike: as it's doesn't pertain to this conversation whatsoever, yes. Troll away kid.
  • 4 1
 @makripper, You claim volume reducers add support in the mid-stroke and the end-stroke. So, that leave the top of the stroke. What do you think reducers do to the spring curve in this part of the stroke?
  • 4 0
 @makripper: LOVE the way you talk down to people. Sooooo fun. There doesn’t seem to be a way out of this one, so I’ll let you carry on. Side note - get a DSD runt, they are the bees knees!
  • 1 8
flag makripper (Apr 6, 2021 at 21:35) (Below Threshold)
 @chuckobike: if you wanted to be constructive I'm all for it. But you and rmr definitely haven't been. You've been attempting to talk down to me.
  • 11 1
 @makripper: If you review the messages, you were the one who started talking down. Don't play the victim card after being belligerent. Don't expect people to treat you better than you've treated others. When three people are all telling you you're incorrect, it's still possible you're right, but it should be a red flag and a queue to carefully consider the situation.

Thank you for providing that chart from Fox. It helps me understand where your misunderstanding comes from, regarding tokens increasing mid-stroke support.

That chart shows what would happen if the pressure was held constant and reducers were installed. The chart is accurate, but it is not relevant. I'll explain why.

It does not compare appropriate set-ups for a given rider. If the yellow line actually worked for our rider, the orange and red lines would not work because our rider could no longer use full travel. Similarly, if the red line worked for our rider, the yellow line would by a clattering festival of bottom-outs. These are not equivalent set-ups.

I strongly encourage you to watch Vorsprung's video on air springs, which is where I got the chart. After that, I recommend Episodes 15, 16, 27, and 28, in that order. I've even linked them for you to make it easier. After watching all five, you'll see why the constant energy chart is a fairly good model for comparing viable options and how volume reducers reduce mid-stroke support.

You may also want to check out this thread on MTBR, dealing with essentially the same topic.
  • 1 7
flag makripper (Apr 6, 2021 at 22:03) (Below Threshold)
 @R-M-R: what exactly am I wrong about
  • 1 6
flag makripper (Apr 6, 2021 at 22:05) (Below Threshold)
 @R-M-R: oh man. Read my first comments way at the top and I explain setting up sag after installing any amount of volume spacers. I give up. You just can't read lmao.
  • 7 2
 @makripper: You said:

"its kind of cool really, if you dont have enough mid support and or blowing through travel at recommended sag, but feel like your losing your small bump, add a token, reduce psi until you get your sag back. you should have a little more small bump sensitivity and better mid support/faster ramp up near end of stroke."

There's certainly some truth to that, but it's not practical.

"what exactly am I wrong about"

I'll explain.

• To get "a little more small bump sensitivity", the rider has to reduce pressure.
• To get perceptibly "better mid support" from reducers while using lower base pressure, the spring has to be loaded with reducers - way too many reducers. By the time a rider has added enough tokens to significantly increase mid-stroke support, the end-stroke has become completely inaccessible. The rider will lose at least a quarter of their travel due to the extreme end-stroke ramp-up, probably closer to a third of the travel.

The correct tuning options for a rider who wants more a softer top, firmer middle, and accessible bottom is one or multiple of the following:
• Increase negative spring pressure and/or length
• Multi-stage spring
• Coil spring
  • 1 14
flag makripper (Apr 6, 2021 at 22:33) (Below Threshold)
 @R-M-R: lol
Yeah you are just wrong. Sorry guy!
Have you ever ridden a bike before? You never answered my questions about back to back testing using any sort of volume reduction.
  • 10 0
 @makripper: Ironic response from someone who complains about people talking down to him.
  • 13 0
 @R-M-R: I admire your patience.
  • 2 0
 @chuckobike: I wish I could get a Runt for my Boxxer - would make an awesome fork IMO
  • 1 0
 @sargey2003: yeah... it’s interesting that they aren’t made for the larger forks. I feel like it would improve ride quality from track to track, being able to tune the curve to your liking for conditions that day etc.
  • 1 0
 @chuckobike: It's a matter of market size. You're absolutely right that a multi-stage spring would be great for a DH fork, but there are a lot more AM/enduro forks than DH forks.
  • 1 0
 @R-M-R: completely agree, it’s where they can make the most. It makes sense... hopefully that becomes more of a norm in the big brands of fox and rs some day...
  • 14 1
 He's a pretty awesome advert for that bikes capabilities!
  • 8 4
 They need to sell a few!!
  • 13 1
 And it might work if they actually sold the bikes to the public.
  • 6 2
 @jmtbf: They started in 2019 by taking over Robot bikes that was actually selling bikes. It would seem that they have the tech figured out yet here we are in 2021 and still no option to buy. I wonder what the problem is.
  • 2 1
 @Konyp: it is all custom so it takes longer, they need employees to make the frames and they cost money and they need to get people to buy them and with covid, every one and their mother will want to buy one and they wont be able to provide it.
  • 4 7
 @Konyp: Yeah they need to get them out there in the general public. They need to prove that sticking carbon tubes into metal lugs with a glue gun is the right way to go. Only way to do that is having the general public out there razzing them as hard as they can and proving doubters like me wrong.
  • 10 1
 @MattP76: There is no doubt that the tech works, its not new. 3d printed titanium is used in aerospace where they are also glued together with epoxy. Robot bikes sold custom bikes that worked fine with exactly the same tech. Its not like the Atherton did not know what would be needed to start production. They can manufacture locally, no need for shipment srom the far east or long lead times. Pole was able to sell their frankly prototype bikes from the first units. What are we waiting for?
  • 4 14
flag MattP76 (Apr 6, 2021 at 9:24) (Below Threshold)
 @Konyp: I'm still not convinced. Proofs in the pudding when the public has had them for a few years. We will see if they are still stuck together then.
  • 5 0
 The technology works perfectly. We have just bought a Renishaw AM machine at work. The lug and tube glueing method will be integral to a lot of our aerospace work. Stupidly highly loaded stuff too. When the cost of the powder goes down, I plan on printing a lot of stuff out for myself. That might be a long time however, as demand is growing steadily for it.
  • 4 0
 @jmtbf: They sold 50, isn't that enough? Wink
  • 11 0
 @MattP76: Sorry but the "general public" could probably ride one of these frames for 3 years and not put the same level of abuse that Gee and the other WC riders put on it in half a season.
  • 2 15
flag MattP76 (Apr 6, 2021 at 11:18) (Below Threshold)
 @sino428: Don't be too sure of that. Let's not forget that the Athertons are going to keep changing them and also will be custom made for them. You also do not know for sure whether their bikes are the same as the publics. Like I said time will tell with the glue.

Also people please oh please stop comparing bicycles to planes and cars/F1 cars. They are completely different structures using different grades of meterials etc.
  • 9 0
 @MattP76: Yah, I mean the Atherton held up at the Quarry under Gee but will the bike hold up under me doing 10' jumps? Pfftt, not convinced.
  • 6 13
flag MattP76 (Apr 6, 2021 at 13:01) (Below Threshold)
 @SunsPSD:

You miss understand the whole thing.

It's irrelevant what he is doing on this bike. The proof in the pudding is what these bikes can do under a competent rider over 3 years of ownership. How durable they are, whether the glue will continue to hold the bike together etc.

So stop believing everything you see in a video like this it's all for marketing and selling their products. Over 30 years in Mountain Biking I've seen it all and don't fall for it.

Get these bikes out to private owners and see how they fair over time! Then we will know how their glued together bike is!?
  • 8 0
 @MattP76: they have sold 50 to the public. They are expanding and upscaling currently to start mass production. You might think it's magic and new tech but it's not. Been used in planes for a long time. Just new it's being used in bikes. If the glue and methods holds a fighter plane together, I am fine with it being used on a bike. Maybe do proper research before making silly comments.
  • 4 11
flag MattP76 (Apr 6, 2021 at 14:27) (Below Threshold)
 @endorium: OMG... STOP just STOP with the Planes!!! You cannot compare them they are totally different structures! You CANNOT compare a Plane to a Bicycle FFS!

Also, I am not seeing them as new tech in anyway whatsoever. Carbon tubes glued into lugs was done decades ago and they fell apart!
Talk about me doing research. 50 private customers is sod all! Hardly big time are they!
Fact is they have not been in the public domain long enough or in any significant quantity to see whether their bikes will stand the test of time. That is a plain(excuse the pun) fact!!
  • 9 0
 @MattP76: you called out the glue and said it won't last. Plane comparison totally valid in that sense. Serving decades ago failed so this must fail? You have some odd logic.
  • 1 12
flag MattP76 (Apr 6, 2021 at 14:33) (Below Threshold)
 @endorium: I did not say that did I??? I said time will tell whether the glue will stand the test of time. Read what I said!!
  • 8 0
 @MattP76: there are many things we have and use everyday that were not possible ‘decades ago’. Using that as some kind of argument to say that these techniques won’t work today is just silly.
  • 19 0
 @MattP76: that eye twitch inducing rage you're feeling when someone doesn't understand what you're saying? Yeah that's how everyone else feels when you post uninformed opinion about materials science.
  • 2 6
flag MattP76 (Apr 6, 2021 at 14:45) (Below Threshold)
 @sino428: As I have said over and over and over again "Time will tell".
Personally I would never buy a bike like this that has not been out there and tried and tested for a decent period of time. It's irrelevant what the Athertons do on them its when they are in the public domain we will see if they develope faults or failures. That is the real proof that these bikes are good. Not Gee launching a gap and saying "Rad", "Stoked", "Super Stoked" etc.
  • 2 10
flag MattP76 (Apr 6, 2021 at 14:49) (Below Threshold)
 @dirtyburger: Yep, You are right, 30 years of riding and racing I know jack and uninformed. Its called not believing everything you are being told and questioning things. You know the sort of thing you are (currently) allowed to do in a democracy. Unless I am to be 'Canceled' too like Piers Morgan?
  • 15 0
 @MattP76: You are allowed to believe anything you want. But if you express those beliefs in public others are allowed to tell you that your wrong or uninformed.
  • 6 0
 @MattP76: Mountain biking has barely existed for 30 years and the first 15-20 of those years nobody had a clue what they were doing (referring to geo, suspension, construction (heavy) and multi-chainrings mainly). Maybe your view is a tad skewed.
  • 10 0
 @MattP76: The "Piers Morgan defence" belongs in Friday Fails m8
  • 3 0
 @MattP76: same physics and theories apply in fatigue testing on bicycles vs air plane carbon wings. Yes the loads in frequencies are completely different. But the fatigue testing is designed to extrapolate a lifetime of use. So similar materials in a similar test environment with the same goal of keeping the parts mated to one another - id say they should probably be using the same studies and parameters for glue selection. And if its working on planes for higher loads and who knows what frequencies compared to bikes (no more that 10 hz) its probably gonna hold up. Carbon parts that dont fail the fatigue test will, for all intents and purposes, last forever if not overloaded or pinged with a surface impact.. If the lugs are titanium then they are also close to invincible in terms of fatigue life as well. So ya, i agree it will likely come down to the glue. Hopefully they did their hw and used aircraft data to find one that works? Just spiballing now, but what i think isoverlooked with this lug design is the thermal properties of a metal vs carbon fiber layup and how well that junction does under environmental changes. Metal expands and contracts more than carbon due to differences in temp. So i have a feeling its even more about what type of glue the speced over the strength/quatlity. Can it take they contraction/expansion of the metal lugs over time? does it have right the elastic properties- not just strong enough. Ive fatigue tested a few carbon tube/metal lugs frames in my lab... but dont recall them failing catastrophically and/or coming apart at the lugs....is that what happens to this design historically?
  • 7 1
 @MattP76: You are not the structural engineer that you think you are.
  • 2 2
 @sino428: Yeah but the general public isn't going to land a huck as clean as Gee. They are going case, crash and ditch all day long.
  • 3 0
 @noplacelikeloam: you don’t think Gee ever cases a jump or drop? Or crashes during races or practice for world cups? It happens all the time.
  • 1 1
 @sino428: Not as much as me. ;-)
  • 3 0
 @MattP76: I've still got a 1989 Trek 7000 that was bonded. It was used as a mountain bike until the late 90s, then as a pub bike for the next 15 years. Obviously I don't ride anywhere near as hard as Gee, but with crap brakes and no suspension it's taken a lot of hits. It's still in one piece, time has told. It's very apparent from your many posts that you don't like carbon or anything that's glued, but metal and welds fail too. If you don't like these fabrication processes, fair enough, don't buy them, but you consistently ending up below threshold indicates you aren't changing anyone else's mind by continually banging the same drum.
  • 8 0
 @MattP76: Our bikes are currently available to the public and we've sold over 50 now. You just have to drop us an email to sales@athertonbikes.com and I can walk you through the process. However, we've got some exciting announcements coming soon which will make this a whole lot easier!

- Tom
  • 4 0
 @jmtbf: Our bikes are currently available to the public and we've sold over 50 now. You just have to drop us an email to sales@athertonbikes.com and I can walk you through the process. However, we've got some exciting announcements coming soon which will make this a whole lot easier!

- Tom
  • 1 0
 @athertonbikes: Hi Tom, thanks for dropping in to answer questions here. Could you possibly give some details on what kind of adhesive is used to bond the carbon tubes to the titanium joints? How it’s been tested or other types of applications where it’s used? Some people here are worried that your glue may not be able to hold up long term abuse of riding.
  • 2 0
 If planes aren’t satisfying enough for you, how about F1 cars? The suspension and steering often uses hollow carbon bonded to metal parts. Is that application one that you can reconcile as being similar to MTB? Or will you come up with another excuse why that’s completely different?
  • 1 4
 @Afterschoolsports: Yes because an F1 car is and F1 and this is a bicycle lol! Two totally different things.

You cannot compare bicycle to planes, space ships, F1 cars, submarines, rockets or anything else ridiculous like that!!!
  • 4 0
 @MattP76: you really don’t have a clue, do you?
  • 1 3
 @Afterschoolsports: As I have said over and over and over again. Proof is when these bikes is when they have been out there and have been tried and tested. I've seen many many claims over the 30 odd years in this sport that don't add up to what they claim. If that is clueless then so be it!! Fact is most manufacturers don't stick their bikes together with glue. It's either welds or carbon layer up.
Time will tell!
  • 4 0
 @MattP76: Sure you can compare bicycles to those other things. You are talking about materials and how they will perform. If a material or construction technique can work under the loads and stress of one application, there is almost 100% certainty that they will hold up in an application where the known loads and stresses will be much less. Also, there are ways of simulating the stresses and impacts that a part or material will experience in a lab. These tests can simulate the stresses a part would endure well beyond its actual useful life.

I mean thinking about something like an airplane or submarine, a critical part failure would catastrophic. So you think the engineers developing these vehicles just build them and send them up in the air or to the bottom of the ocean and see if they fail? Of course they don't because that would be stupid. Science lets us know how much force and stress the construction needs to withstand and they can simulate that long before it something ever makes it to the point of real world testing. Same goes for bikes. They know exactly how much stress those carbon tubes, titanium lugs, and the adhesive that holds them together can withstand.
  • 1 6
flag MattP76 (Apr 7, 2021 at 9:57) (Below Threshold)
 @sino428: Yawn!
  • 1 0
 Oh dear, this is brilliant Big Grin Pretty much everything has been said about material science vs folk legends, but my 2p is that those bikes have already been tried and tested for many years by a lot of private owners. Just because the stickers and geometry have changed, doesn't mean the technology is new. If Robot Bike frames weren't breaking under clients left right and centre, there's no reason these will.
  • 1 0
 @Konyp: You can buy but you have to contact them directly all thee info is on their website
  • 12 0
 I'll think twice about hucking 80 inch gaps, so reckon this is the bike for me to get me up to 80 feet in one easy step.
  • 8 0
 I wish I could bet on the articles and the comments:

Bike checks = arguments over who is the most 'engineer'
E MTB articles = arguments about whether you like e-bikes
COVID related articles= arguments about whether COVID exists
Everything else = Arguments about BREXIT, Sexism, Racism, Politics and religion

Truth is it was great video by a great rider who is still pushing the limits. This article was about his bike build.
  • 9 0
 When can I get one?
  • 4 0
 Hey! You just have to drop us an email to sales@athertonbikes.com and I can walk you through the process. However, we've got some exciting announcements coming soon which will make this a whole lot easier!

- Tom
  • 6 0
 Would love to see some real world testing and legit science behind the whole 31.8 vs 35 thing.
  • 5 0
 I dont think its as simple as 31.8 vs 35mm. Companies aren't trying to just make the stiffest bar possible. Each company engineers their bars (both sizes) to perform a certain way. My understanding was that the 35mm we introduced when bars started pushing out to the 800mm widths, and it was easier and lighter to make the bar wider to achieve the needed strength to support the added width.
  • 1 0
 @sino428:
Makes sense. I know that there are some companies making a 35mm bar that say they do not compromise on rode comfort. It's just really interested ng how most pros run a 31.8. Even the ones getting close to or at 800mm
  • 2 1
 I know people that run 35s simply for the look vs 31.8
  • 2 7
flag makripper (Apr 6, 2021 at 10:01) (Below Threshold)
 I found that with 29inch wheels, 35mm gave me more solid feedback for turning and riding at speed. I just swapped a few weeks ago. The 31.8 has too much damping and flex and felt too noodly in comparison. I went from a chromag osx 31.8 to chromag osx 35. Went with a 35mm rise vs 25 mm as well
  • 1 0
 That's on my Enduro bike fyi. It all could be different on a dh bike with direct mount stem and double crown super stiff fork.
  • 2 0
 @CFR94 would be interesting as every one of my and my mates bikes that have come with 35mm bars I’ve instantly felt harsh. I’ve ebay’d the 35’s and kept my 32 stem and bars, a straight swap and the harsh feelings gone.
  • 1 1
 Until they come up with 35mm bars with decent rise (>50mm) I have absolutely no interest in them.
  • 2 0
 @Afterschoolsports: it’s probably not about developing them. I’m sure they could. It’s more likely that the demand for 50mm+ rise bars just isn’t enough to bother making them.
  • 3 1
 Just to come back on his performance, i do think ( personal thought here) that the footage doesn't give any justice back to his line ...
MacAskill filming was better for example, and also Gee's previous video on the ridge was mind blowing.
  • 4 1
 I would have to disagree with you there. Gee just rode Danny's gradient on slate with an 80ft huck at the bottom. Put Gee on a trails bike and he would look like a beginner. Danny played in Gees arena. I think lots of riders could ride that ridge, but Gees line... too loose, line too tight, too high a consequence... Not dissing Danny's line but Gee is on another level when it comes to riding the Gnarr.
  • 2 1
 @betsie: again...to me Gee's last video doesn't give any justice, and i'm SURE it's mega gnarly... but i was more impressed by Danny's slab riding
  • 1 0
 @audric: I don't think you can compare a current WC Dh racer, multiple winner, former world champ, rampage runner up on steep stuff to a youtube sensation.
Both redbull athletes and amazing at what the do for sure.

This one always amuses me.
www.youtube.com/watch?v=nCxBeoE8EXY
  • 1 0
 @betsie: again my friend i'm just talking about their last edits not their skills or titles!!!!
  • 1 0
 @betsie: about your link i can only relate as it is my home trails.
Gee is mind blowing
  • 3 0
 Lesson one in bike promotion, make sure your bike is the same color as the background so it looks like your riders are floating through the air. This video made me want them to throw some paint on their bikes.
  • 4 0
 Good stuff, the Athertons get shit done, be it racing, riding, digging or starting a bike company (yeah yeah Robot I know) they don't sit idle. Big respect.
  • 1 0
 does anyone here own one of these Atherton Bikes? is there really demand for a size specific bike? i think Specialized has it pretty dialed with the Style sizing, most companies do not use the same nomenclature as specialized but have similar wording in their website regarding sizing and riding style.
  • 17 0
 yes and I paid for custom sizing as I fell directly between the medium and large sizes ( as I do with many brands) but my size reference points were my previous Yetis - 2015 SB6 and an SB150 - in both I rode the size large but found the SB150 a little big for me. My Atherton is the 150 enduro frame rather than the DH rig seen in this shoot.
The fit now feels perfect and although at the moment the current travel restrictions have stopped me hitting bike parks, on the local down hill trails it feels a lot more playful. On more pedally stuff, having the DW setup means it is an easy pedal, very similar to my old Ibis trail bike.
In terms of frame cost in the UK as I paid the £300 premium for a custom fit it was a little more expensive than the alternatives from Ibis, Santa cruz and Yeti. Oh and as it was made in Wales, order to delivery was about 8 weeks (including a Covid shut down at one of their paint suppliers)
  • 1 0
 @Narro2 we do bikefitting in our shop and use a www.smartfit.bike device for it. Specilized has a funny way of doing frame sizes and so I have to disagree. Every body is different and the key factor is how the lenght of arms, foot and upper body works all together. Measure first and have a look at suitable frames after is a better way of finding the "right" frame/bike for what you want to ride/do.
  • 1 0
 @Puddings: that sound pretty cool, 300 pounds might be a bit steep for me, but it is a custom fit, how did they know whats the right size for you though? or how did you know? how does it work?
  • 1 0
 @listeryu: i did a few bike fits in my XC days, and they did work perfectly, it was worth the extra buck, but XC and Road are sports focused primarily in performance. So it make sense to consider arm lenght, upper body, etc... but when you have a customer who wants to focus more on style or jumps or something like that or the other way around a customer who wants to focus on just catching speed down the hill in a straight line, how do you input that into the machine?
  • 1 0
 @Puddings: Glad you're getting on alright! When you're able to travel again be sure to drop us a few photos Smile

- Tom
  • 3 0
 @Narro2: Hey dude, we've got our own "bike fit engine"! We take a few details from you such as your inseam, arm length, height...put them into our calculator and it tells us every single custom frame measurement which is perfect for your body. The bike is really made around you! If you want, drop me an email to sales@athertonbikes.com and we can find out what size would be best for you!

- Tom
  • 1 0
 @athertonbikes, thanks for the response.
  • 1 0
 @athertonbikes: Sorry Tom, I thought the workshop had tagged @athertonbikes in the build pictures for number 37. I will get the pictures off of them and share them through
  • 1 0
 Read a review by Mike and Mike here on Pb - take an average - the. Extrapolate for your height and your done @listeryu:
  • 1 0
 If you have to ask you can't afford it haha. Wonder how much one would cost? Pretty cool idea/different take on building a bike. Definitely function over form too. Unno bikes and Antidote bikes probably my first thought if I had that kind of money!
  • 1 0
 Think closer to Yeti SB 150 Turq, Santa Cruz CC or Ibis Ripmo v2 for the frame (without custom fit)
  • 5 1
 Why a 31.8 Handlebar and not a 35? A little extra flex?
  • 8 0
 Yea I think you nailed it. Its my understanding that a lot of the pros like the 31.8 for the extra compliance. I've heard a few mention it since the 35s hit the market.
  • 14 0
 Manufacturers have said there is no difference in strength. Ask Renthal. They only started making 35s because people wanted them. They didn't "need" to make them.
  • 2 0
 Flex for a stiff dh front end.
  • 8 0
 Because most of the companies (including Renthal) with 35mm bars state that they designed it to feel like the 31.8 bar they already had. So what’s the point besides making us buy into another. We ‘standard’.

I believe Renthal even said that the only reason they even bothered making a 35mm bar was because the OEM market wanted them and not because they felt there was any performance advantage in doing it
  • 4 0
 /insert preferred it bike model it looks like here>
  • 3 0
 Looks like an Atherton...
  • 3 0
 @athertonbikes: Coming in here, making sensible rebuttals...What kind of place do you think this is?!
  • 3 1
 For such an amazing custom bike i wish they would have done more with the tooling path on the rocker link. (see absolute black chainrings) its just so....mundane...
  • 4 1
 you won't get tooling paths from a 3d printed titanium part mate
  • 2 0
 Kashima is looking closer to mocha in these pics. Got excited for a minute there.
  • 6 0
 Mokashima? (sorry, couldn't resist)
  • 1 0
 Marzocchi had an espresso coating or something haha
  • 1 0
 @makripper: espresso, yeh I had the color wrong.
  • 9 10
 “Normally he'll run an air shock for racing to optimise small bump sensitivity”

Apparently I understand suspension even less than I feared. I was always under the impression that coils had greater small bump sensitivity?
  • 3 0
 I think they probably meant tuning spring rate ramp. Soft off the top then the air spring progressing as it travels deeper in. But still you’d think that’s also be cool for his huck lines?
  • 2 0
 You're correct. The article has been edited.
  • 16 18
 Wait wait wait. When racing uses air shock for small bump sensitivity? That honestly sounds suspect. I've never found a coil setup to be less small bump sensitive compared to air. I'd be interested to hear the full "why" there.
  • 3 0
 I was confused by that too. Thinking he might mean "optimize" in that he can dial in an air shock more precisely that a coil.
  • 1 0
 @sino428: I like nerding out over that stuff. This definitely sets off the gear junkie interest.
  • 1 1
 Coil shocks are very linear, 525 lb spring is quite stiff, where you can tune air shock with high speed compression/ rebound to be softer at start & ramp up more !
  • 1 0
 @aljoburr: That’s got to be it. Just not how it was worded.
  • 2 0
 You're correct. The article has been edited.
  • 1 0
 @R-M-R: Hey thanks, I was legitimately interested. Thanks for following up.
  • 1 0
 @cougar797: Glad I could help. You're not the only one who was confused by that, compounded by several people assuming everything printed in an article is correct and trying to rationalize the error.
  • 1 0
 It has been edited to this: "Normally he'll run an air shock for racing but he went for a softer coil shock on this freeride build to optimise small bump sensitivity."
  • 1 0
 I presume he runs no inserts? There’s me at 65kg worrying that 22/24psi is too low!
  • 1 0
 Exactly! I am curious, too, whether he ran tire inserts. If he didn't, then those soon-to-be-heard-about Kaisers may be very interesting actually.
  • 1 0
 always the same built. If its not a fox couple its a rockshox couple.. We want to see more diversity bike
  • 1 0
 Gee's on our Race Team build which is made up of our sponsor parts! Our bike models for sale come with full Fox, RockShox, Ohlins, EXT...the list goes on! - Tom
  • 2 0
 Dan and Gee always look so grumpy - cheer up lads it might never happen!
  • 1 0
 Am I the only one who gets all warm and fuzzy inside when I see 203 rotors front AND back?!
  • 2 0
 The bike could look really nice, but the ugly rocker really ruins it!
  • 2 0
 (º﹃º )
  • 1 0
 Rad. Would love to demo that.
  • 1 0
 We're currently building up some demo bikes which we're stoked to share with you all! - Tom
  • 1 0
 It's a mean lean hucking machine!
  • 1 0
 clean looking set up for sure.
  • 14 16
 "Gee's high front end is a hangover from his BMX days and pretty unusual for big mountain freeride " Um, isn't that the opposite? Rampage guys typically run shorter cockpits with more stack height- riser bars and spacers?
  • 2 0
 I thought the same. Big Grin
  • 2 0
 He has no drivetrain
  • 2 1
 Drivetrain:??? mystery, new Saint?
  • 1 0
 @RMWB probably not a sponsored component ergo no mention. Not that that's an issue imho, but likely the case.
  • 1 0
 I don't think they have been sponsored by in a few years. Not sure what it is but probably not Saint. They run FSA cranks but I'm not sure they have a sponsor for the rest of the drivetrain. I had seen them running SRAM in some photos the last few years.
  • 1 0
 Crankset is an FSA Gradient.
  • 1 0
 also clearly X01 dh
  • 17 17
 ”Normally he'll run an air shock for racing to optimise small bump sensitivity”

I’m confused
  • 4 0
 I reacted at the same thing, but I guess this is the answer: Air shocks can be set up more progressive than a coil shock, thus making it possible to leave it more sensitive up top and still supply proper support and bottom out prevention.
  • 4 0
 Not sure why the neg vote parade. Mine got the same.
  • 1 0
 It has since been edited to this: "Normally he'll run an air shock for racing but he went for a softer coil shock on this freeride build to optimise small bump sensitivity."
  • 1 0
 @megatryn: good to know, my Norwegian small bump loving brother Smile
  • 2 1
 This bike is going to be like TVS's Hyper.
  • 2 0
 18 psi?
  • 1 0
 What went wrong with my last post?
Disappeared?
  • 2 0
 Probably in the below threshold section. Haha.
  • 1 1
 if it is too aggressive or rude it does get deleted.
  • 1 0
 @Narro2: More to do with badly written, but Funny that it is back now?
  • 1 0
 @aljoburr: is it?
  • 2 2
 We've been hearing about these bikes and these tires for ages. This vaporware sure gets a lot of good press.
  • 1 0
 Our bikes are currently available to the public and we've sold over 50 now. You just have to drop us an email to sales@athertonbikes.com and I can walk you through the process. However, we've got some exciting announcements coming soon which will make this a whole lot easier!

- Tom
  • 2 1
 Beautiful bikes. I wish you could actually buy them.
  • 1 0
 Our bikes are currently available to the public and we've sold over 50 now. You just have to drop us an email to sales@athertonbikes.com and I can walk you through the process. However, we've got some exciting announcements coming soon which will make this a whole lot easier!

- Tom
  • 1 0
 "Custom"

Aren't all Atherton bikes custom?
  • 1 0
 Hey! We have around 12 standard sizes which fit the majority of riders, but we also offer a custom build option which builds the bike around you! - Tom
  • 1 0
 Custom in respect that you can those angles etc?
Also custom price, which is expensive?
  • 1 0
 Looks pretty neat !
  • 6 6
 This article leaves me with more questions than answers
  • 2 0
 Ask away!
  • 1 0
 @athertonbikes: Got any cheaper frames?
Or even any bits that could use to build my own e bike frame?
  • 1 0
 @athertonbikes: It was mainly to do with the reasons for shock choice, the article has been updated now. Keep it sunny side up! Looking forward to a trip to Dyfi soon
  • 1 1
 thanks for the article PB
  • 1 1
 Is it possible to buy an Atherton bike yet?
  • 3 0
 Hey Nick! Our bikes are currently available to the public and we've sold over 50 now. You just have to drop us an email to sales@athertonbikes.com and I can walk you through the process. However, we've got some exciting announcements coming soon which will make this a whole lot easier!

- Tom
  • 1 1
 I don’t remember the last time continental made a good tire.
  • 2 0
 Kaisers are awesome rear tires for just about all conditions. And, Barons are incredible in the wet, never experienced grip on wet rocks and roots like on that tire. Their latest casings are actually pretty good too. We've had way more wobbly Maxxis and Schwalbe tires recently than Contis. personally I'm pretty excited to see the release of the new Proto tyre.
  • 1 0
 huck yeah stans rims!

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