Bike Check: Geoff Kabush's Enduro-fied Yeti SB130

Sep 10, 2018
by Mike Levy  



Three-time Olympian. Fifteen-time National Champ. World Cup winner. BC Bike Race winner... Enduro racer? Geoff Kabush has a résumé that any cross-country athlete would happily trade their power-meter for, but the Canadian is again branching out to a very different kind of racing aboard Yeti's new SB130, a 130mm-travel trail bike that he's spec'd to fit his enduro needs.

Geoff's machine has been built to suit his strengths: fitness and covering ground as fast as possible. That means that rather than going for a longer travel, slacker, and heavier enduro-specific setup like the equally-new SB150, Kabush's SB130 has been assembled with a mix of relatively lightweight but enduro-friendly parts. Total weight: Geoff doesn't give a damn.


Bike Details

Intended use: trail / enduro
Travel: 130mm
Fork travel: 160mm
Wheel size: 29''
Frame construction: carbon fiber
Head angle: approx. 65-degrees
Seat tube angle: 77-degrees
Size: extra-large
www.yeticycles.com

Geoff Kabush
Kabush's SB130 is setup for the Trans-Cascadia, an enduro race in the Pacific Northwest that sends riders down timed stages that they've never seen before.


With over two decades of top-level cross-country racing behind him that kicked off in 1995 with his first World Championship event as a junior, the forty-one-year-old Kabush likely has far more racing experience than most of the people reading this. That sort of practical knowledge led him to choose the SB130 platform over the more enduro-focused SB150 for the Trans-Cascadia, a four-day enduro stage race that sees competitors fly down trails they've never seen before. If it were me who was racing blind, I'd want some squishy, slack, and forgiving to save my ass.

But not Geoff.

''There's the option to get the big SB150, but the SB130 is a nice compromise in general,'' he said of his bike choice. ''It's been a bit more physical pedaling down in Oregon, and I don't really know where we're going, but this will likely be a good compromise.'' Sure, but with a motor that can probably push out more watts for longer than most, if not all, of his enduro competitors, why not take the weight penalty for a bit of extra travel, more relaxed geometry, and more room for error? ''I guess I'm not as confident in my fitness advantage,'' he replied with a laugh. ''I've always enjoyed that part of racing, the figuring out of equipment and taking risks. I mean, there's going to be some super-high-level guys there; Francois Bailly-Maitre is coming, and his performance at the BC Bike race was... It's no joke how fit that guy is.''

Bailly-Maitre usually focuses on enduro events but finished second overall behind Kabush at this year's BC Bike Race, and Kabush is the two-time Trans-Cascadia defending champ, so we might be treated to a hell of a battle.


Geoff Kabush
Geoff Kabush
The new SB130 still uses Yeti's Switch Infinity system, but a revised shape to the frame allows riders to mount a bottle under the shock. I assume that Geoff is happy about this.


Geoff might have chosen a shorter-travel bike than many other racers will be on, but he has made one important change: The SB130 sells with a 150mm-stroke Fox 36 up front, but he's gone for 160mm slider instead. ''Yeah, a little more forgiveness,'' he said of the reasoning for his fork choice. ''Typical of their lunch ride, a lot of guys at Yeti put a little more travel up front, and I'm going to be racing it at a blind enduro at Trans-Cascadia. So it's always nice to have a little more on the front-end, and I've got the big 203mm rotor up front for those emergencies, too.''

The SB130 is rocking a 65.5-degree head angle with the stock 150mm 36, but the extra 10mm up front will slacken it out by a bit less than half of a degree, which isn't exactly a bad thing when you're blindly tossing yourself into roots, rocks, and God knows what. Out back, there's a Fox DPX2 with the stock tune, although Kabush did mention that he's looking forward to trying the SB130 with the more adjustable Float X2 shock as well.

Kabush might be far from the gram-geek that a lot of pro-level cross-country bandits are, but his roots still show in the carbon Stan's Arch CB7 29er rims (26mm internal width, 475-grams) that were on his SB130 when I shot it during Crankworx. ''I've been running carbon wheels on all my bikes,'' the Yeti racer explained before this caveat: ''Because it's four days of racing at the Trans-Cascadia, I might put on some aluminum rims. I might take the conservative option for a four-day race.'' Remember, you can usually pull the dents out of an alloy rim, whereas a carbon hoop might need less attention but can also turn into a bunch of pieces of useless carbon fiber in a worst-case scenario.


bigquotesThroughout my career, I've always been more concerned with stuff that works, whether it was being an early adopter to thru-axle forks, or disc brakes. My biggest concern is that it works and is reliable, and I know the guys are making it as light as they can.Geoff Kabush
Geoff Kabush
Kabush will be racing with a 160mm-travel 36 rather than the stock 150mm fork. That extra 10mm might be a life saver when racing blind.

How does one choose tires for a race where they don't know the trails? You go with what you do know, of course, and that sees Kabush on Maxxis' Aggressor out back and a Minion DHF up front, both in the mid-weight EXO casing. In my mind, a lot of enduro events call for true downhill rubber, but the Canadian isn't so sure: ''Right now, I'm running EXO [casing tires]. That's usually good enough for me, but I've been talking to the Maxxis guys and they've just released the EXO+, so I'm looking at the timeline to see if I could get a couple of those for enhanced protection.''

The '+' designation means that there's about 80-grams more protection in the tire's sidewall, whereas a Double Down can add between 200 and 250-grams over an EXO casing tire.


Geoff Kabush
Geoff Kabush
The Canadian racer had a set of Stan's Arch CB7 carbon rims on when I shot the bike, but he'll likely be running a set of aluminum Flow MK3 rims at the Trans-Cascadia.


But what if the course points riders down some seriously rocky shit? ''Probably the Double Down [casing],'' he answered, nixing the idea of using tire inserts. ''Coming from my cross-country background, I'm used to managing my tires and, generally, at the blind enduros you're not pushing as hard, just because you never know what's coming. Especially because I'll probably be running the 2.5s, which have the air volume, so if it gets a bit rocky, I might just adjust the pressures.'' Geoff will run anywhere between 20psi and 25psi, depending on the terrain and conditions.

With the Trans-Cascadia still a ways out when I cornered Geoff and his SB130, the bike's spec could change come race day. For now, Kabush is running last year's XTR group with a tiny bolt-on guide from OneUp for some extra insurance, as well as OneUp's EDC tool stashed in the steerer tube of his fork.


Geoff Kabush
Geoff Kabush
It's last year's XTR all around for Kabush, including a 200mm rotor up front. The new XTR 9100 is rarer than barends on an enduro bike.


So, how much does all that add up to? Geoff isn't sure, and he's not too fussed about weight, either. ''Throughout my career, I've always been more concerned with stuff that works, whether it was being an early adopter to thru-axle forks, or disc brakes,'' he said, countering my weight weenie jokes. ''My biggest concern is that it works and is reliable, and I know the guys are making it as light as they can.''

Kabush knows that his days of World Cup action are behind him, and he's switched his focus to multi-day stage races like the BC Bike Race and the upcoming Trans-Cascadia. But does that mean his training has been switched up, too? ''I'm racing a ton and adding stage races to the mix, so I'm obviously still working hard in the winter, but once the seasons comes on, the racing is training. I can count on one or two hands the number of specific workouts I've done since the season started. These days, I'd rather jump into some fun events for my training.'' Fewer intervals and more fun for Kabush, it seems, which is in-line with his ''Keep riding until the fun stops'' motto.
Geoff Kabush
Kabush spends some of his time in Squamish, BC, a location where the SB130 makes a lot of sense as an everyday cross-country bike.

What about some enduro specific training? ''No, I think it's mostly just getting as comfortable as I can on the bike, and especially for the blind races. You want to be really comfortable and know how the bike is going to react. When I come back to BC, I'll just do a lot of trail riding; there's not a lot of road riding here. I don't even have a curly-bar bike up here right now. These days, it's just about trying to stay fresh and healthy between races.''


140 Comments

  • + 68
 I like these combo advertising where it's no longer sufficient to announce a product and write positively about it, but now we get featured testimonials by pro riders and few days of completely unrelated stories featuring the bike.
  • + 15
 Marketing Puke Attack. What happens when you drink too much of your own kool aid.
  • + 44
 Nice to see all the PB cmmenters in full form, first thing on Monday morning.
  • + 9
 @codypup: That should be a note taken. That companies should not do releases for public on a monday.
  • + 19
 will Brian Lopes be there too?
  • + 24
 Water bottle cage also accepts half empty champagne bottles just in case you feel like receiving a post-race chest punch.@powderturns:
  • + 2
 @codypup: we don't take breaks just because its monday
  • + 8
 @powderturns: Ali and Frazier, Harding and Kerrigan, Lopes and Kabush...
  • + 6
 Right? Part of the reason weight matters is because it's one of the few things that isn't subjective. When you're paying a gazillion dollars for a carbon wonderbike, you better sure as hell care how much it weighs.
  • + 3
 It worked. That SB130 is pure bike porn.
  • + 7
 PB, thanks for showing us Kabush’s bike on Monday morning along side the release of the bike. It’s a great way to get some insight from a very seasoned pro who rips. It looks killer and I’d love to have one.

I’ll take a 150 though cuz I want a little extra cushion when I get off line going faster than I should be or blindly launching down some rocks deep in the high country a long long way from help. I have a wife and kids to support and I’ll give up a little snap in favor of a little more room for foolishness, laughing all the way!
  • + 53
 I call horsesh*t! You claim Kabush doesn't care about the weight of this bike, but use the word "light" repeatedly in the article, and describe all the stuff he uses for additional weight savings after chosing a lighter, short-travel chassis for an enduro. Drop the fake nonchalance & hang the d*mn thing on a scale already!
  • + 10
 Agreed. I dont buy this "I dont know or care what it weighs" If he didnt care he would take the 150 bike unless Yeti have told him to use this frame and then beef the hell out of it.
  • + 4
 If he wouldn´t care the wheight he would opt straight for DoubleDowns and 2 piston calipiers... For me saving weight here is no point cause it affects so much the riding that is a next step of skills you only can develop with those on full time...
  • + 24
 @CM999: The 150 is not gonna be much heavier if any heavier at all. They are both in the 27-28lb. range built like he would ride them. He didn't "beef the hell out of it". He put a 160mm 36 on it instead of a 150mm 36. The 130 is going to pedal better than the 150, and that's why he chose it, and he was pretty clear about that. Same choice most would make out in Oregon. There's plenty of pedaling, and this bike is the 5.5 replacement.
  • + 18
 How I read him not caring about weight is that he's not in his garage obsessively shaving down every last part to it's lowest, possible thickness tolerance before failure in order to save weight.
  • + 12
 @rkstar: agreed. I'm sure he cares about not being heavier than necessary, but i doubt he cares what the final weight measurement of his bike is. I like that attitude. It weighs what it weighs to do the job it needs to do. Whether it turns out to be 27 lbs or 31 lbs, he knows he has strength where he needs it and light weight where he can afford it.
  • + 5
 A bunch of years ago one of Kabush's Kona race bikes was dropped off at my local bike shop(it was stolen out of a trailer, insurance paid, bikes were found and were handed out to Kona dealers). The owner of the shop thought I should grab this bike since I was at the time racing XC.
The most notable item that had to be replaced was the seatpost which had been cut as short as could still work...and milled out to remove material. Yeah, I think he cared about weight, ha ha. This was XC however and they tend to be a bit more obsessive I think.
I ended up doing a pretty sweet custom paint job on the bike and fork then snapped the top tube bunny hopping a curb.
  • + 2
 They guy who doesn't care about weight used to rave about his 345-gram tires: www.youtube.com/watch?v=qC6MsoeoiHM
  • - 1
 @dualsuspensiondave: it will given he's put the girls from the 150 on it and the wheels. The only difference is some carbon in the frame and the different weight if the rear shocks
  • + 2
 yeah also two piston brakes on an enduro brake would not be my choice unless I was feeling particularly weight weenie, or I suppose I if was a better rider and not planning on using brakes anyway
  • + 3
 @Veloscente : He might not care what it weighs, but he knows what it weighs.
  • + 15
 ATTENTION AVERAGE TRAIL WARRIORS. You do not need 160MM enduro monster bikes to rip your local trails unless you are as fast as Rude or as Rude as Maes. Geoff preaches what many of us already know, ok he is an exceptional example but sometimes less is more.
  • + 23
 Except Geoff can ride a bike and doesn't need error margin. I've been riding a down country bike in the park and no thanks. Except no2 he is using full on Enduro heavy altillery on that frame so sorry, get back to me with those high fly puristic ideas when you put on a 130 fork and Ikons. Aggressors at best. Now Geoff aside, speaking to regular riders: Given the identical setup, particularly tyres, 150 climbs just as well as 130. Why then use a detrimental product? Because it takes more balls and skill to push a long travel bike than a short travel bike to their limit? Because the limit of a 130 bike lies closer? Give me a break... Down Country pile of awake as fuk bullsht. If you really want to show what you can and want a more capable bike in terms of eating miles and feedback, put on a 120 fork on Yeti 100.

So well you are still an Average Trail warrior whatever you ride and changing it to a smaller bike doesn't make you any less average. it just makes you a dude with a bike that has less travel. Might as well have kept the big bike.
  • + 24
 Wow, @WAKIdesigns. If you are doing more than just climbing to descend, a smaller travel bike is actually pretty damn versatile, and in the hands of a skilled pilot the increase in response, acceleration, and precision is more fun than trying to monster truck your local XC trails. Yeah, you have to work harder on technical downhills, but it is more than made up for on literally EVERY other terrain you would ride. Not everyone wants a monster truck.
  • + 9
 @WAKIdesigns: Quite dramatic since we are talking about the 5.5 replacement. The 150 was added as a big bruiser EWS bike. Not many need a bike that big for enduro races in the U.S. and definitely not in Oregon. There are big trails there, but most include a lot of pedaling. There's no question that the 130 is going to pedal better on flat sections and be easier to maneuver than the 150. Seated fire road climbing may be negligible between the two bikes, but that's not the type of pedaling we're talking here.
  • - 1
 @Garrathustra: acceleration, sorry, most people put exact same tyres and wheels on their short travel bikes as on their enduro bikes. There is no difference in acceleration. Then there is the case of the shock you are using. My 160 bike with ccdb provides more feedback, more support that my previous 125 bike with fkng float. And I really do not understand where 160 being a big bike comes from? Because suddenly people race Enduro on them? Well those guys racing Enduro on 160 bikes is like XC folks riding down those WC tracks without droppers. They ride bikes which are too small what they are being thrown at. They ride those bikes as a compromise to pedalling sections. Nobody in their right mind would race down Garbanzo on Enduro bike if he didn’t need to be there all day.

The points of reference of folks who constantly look for a new reason to buy a new bike, is completely skewed. No 160 bije is not too big and no 130 bike will never make you a pedalling God, at least not as long as you keep the same setup as on 160 bike which is vast majority of cases. If you really want “feedback” and live as far from EWS style trails as it gets, then get a XC bike and upfork it slightly. Maybe get a hardtail.
  • - 1
 @dualsuspensiondave: there is no doubt that a bike with minions will not sprint or climb faster than another bike with minions regardless whether it has 130 or 160m mm of travel. I didn’t ride the Yeti but I rode all iterations of Enduro 29 and nearly all Stumpy 29 and with right choice of tyres one has to be insane to go for smaller bike as the one bike. If you have a dh rig then yeah it makes more sense. But short travel fullies are rarely a good choice for primary bike. Unless your terrain is like Keira Knightleys chest
  • + 4
 @WAKIdesigns, sounds like there might be more of a difference between your 160 bike and your 125 than just 35mm of travel. In my experience, shorter travel bikes tend to be a little quicker on the getup and go than longer travel bikes. Also the associated geometry changes between the typical enduro and trail rigs makes for slightly snappier handling. There is no question that when you point your bike down an EWS track, you should probably have an EWS bike. How many of us are pointing our bikes down EWS tracks? Are you saying everyone should just make Downhill, Enduro, and hardtail bikes from now on? Is there really no use for the mid travel “trail” bike that is actually more suited for the riding most people do? My SB5 feels like a 5” travel hardtail, and I’ve got it built up like one of the Yeti 4Xs of old. I love the way this bike goes anywhere. I do believe it pumps, jumps, and accelerates faster than a heavier longer travel bike. But I guess that is just my experience. I don’t think I could race it on the EWS, but Yeti has and does. Kabush is an XC guy who went with the super capable trail bike instead of the super capable mini-DH bike. I’m sure he will be fine. Could even win.
  • + 6
 @WAKIdesigns: It's actually quite a substantial difference these days. I've had a Nomad, Bronson, Recluse, and now a Primer. The Recluse pedaled significantly better on flat trails than both the Bronson and Nomad, and the Primer pedals better than all of them. All with the same tires. It's not the amount of travel, it's the suspension ratios differ for shorter travel bikes.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: I agree and disagree with parts of what you're saying, like the topic though. I agree that at times those bigger bikes are NOT overkill. Having ridden bike parks and steep/technical trails on my 120/130 bike vs. my longer/slacker/heavier 140/160 bike, the margin for error is much bigger on the larger bike. One thing to also mention here is weight and suspension. One has Fox34/DPS, the other has Fox36/X2. Things that bounce me around on steep/technical terrain with the smaller bike, i can just let the brakes go on the bigger bike and smile right through. Need to be sharp on the small bike not to get bounced offline and hit a tree. However, I've had minion/rekon on the XC bike and minion/rekon on the big bike...and the XC bike is definitely a faster climber. It weights 2lbs less, firmer suspension and steeper/shorter geometry. I'm not sure if your point relates to bikes of identical weight/geometry, just different travel? Then yes, probably those would climb very similarly depending on suspension setup. But overall I agree, to say average folks should just climb up and descend down on 120mm XC bikes because we aren't Richie Rude I do not agree with. I've seen steel SS guys ride technical XC trails faster than me, even steep downhill. But that's because they are amazing riders. Put me on that bike and I'm miserable and probably crash. Bikes and setup depend on the rider.
  • + 11
 Attention all of you condescending a*sholes who think they know how all of us ride and what’s best for us. Some of us actually get out there and hit bigger jumps, natural features, and drops when we ride, so we do need the full 160mm.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: "Unless your terrain is like Keira Knightleys chest" - Bwahahahaha!
  • + 5
 @WAKIdesigns: please Waki, tell me more of what kind of bike I should be riding!
  • + 4
 @WAKIdesigns: Pick a weight,tire,travel or wheel size and be a dick about...lol. Who the f*ck cares! Be glad you're able to stand upright and pedal a bicycle. 2 WHEELS 1 LOVE! GO RIDE YA BUNCH OF NANCYS. Geoff would smoke our asses on a 12" Murry from 86' so why you worried about his bike weight. I ride an 07' p1 chr-mo, single speed with 100mm fork and maxxis holy rollers, 31.5lbs,its my trail,dj,dh bike...in case you were worried. Sometimes you run what ya brung and have more fun then someone worrying about pointless shit...like weight, tires,settings or bike size.
  • - 1
 @Beez177 @MikeGruhler: you have obviously missed the first post in this comment thread. Average trail warrior checks out.
  • + 7
 The funny part is that Rude would probably ride a 130mm bike on terrain that most is us would grab a 160mm bike for... While a 160mm bike may not be needed, sometimes it's your only option... Been considering either a Slash or a Remedy lately... My boss insists that it's too much bike for pur local trails... And he's right... But, this will also be what I ride at the bike park and other areas that I would want more travel for... In a perfect world, I would have several bikes... But, for now, I'm lucky to be getting one at some point...
  • + 1
 amen, brother. Problem is, it's just not that cool to show up with a bike that is under 160mm. I've been on a Remedy for 3 seasons now and I think my next bke will be a Fuel or something in the 130 range.
  • + 2
 @telemarc67: The Fuel is a fun bike... It would be a perfect 90% bike for me... But, I don't want to rent a bike for the bike park days... Meanwhile, put the Slash into the steep setting and it feels alot like a Fuel in the slack setting... So, if I'm limited to one bike, I'd go Slash and work a little harder in the uphills.. If going to the park was no longer an option, I'd go for a Fuel... But, the idea of a 27.5 bike is still in my head because I love the 29er and want to spend some time with the smaller wheels...
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: ehhh, same thing applies to that comment as well. My comment was directed at all thess above with bike advise on what is what and why.We all love riding regardless of how we do it. Shit comment up top, cause you're on a free site and don't need to say anything close to that. Do any of us, unless we buy swag from them help with there bills?and ads running on the page don't count as you helping....They did that.Sorry any they may be offended..Salty today, just talking shit in the shop. GOOOOO PINKBIKE!
  • + 1
 I had the chance to demo a 160mm enduro slayer and my 120mm rear travel steed right after, it confirmed me right away how more fast and agile my shorter travel bike was. This was on Seymour trails where some people ride their downhill sled... Ride whatever you like who cares
  • - 5
flag Beez177 (Sep 10, 2018 at 8:28) (Below Threshold)
 @WAKIdesigns: you missed the point that everyone thinks your annoying. I would ride circles around you on any trail dbag.
  • + 3
 @McNubbin: Thats exactly right mate, I need all of my 215mm. Don't judge what other individuals ride based on your own abilities. Most comments about what you should ride come from complete KOOKS....
CHEERS McNubbin
  • + 7
 @Beez177: u gotta prove it prove it, u gotta prove it prove it, u gotta prove it prove it, until then... rub it! I am planning to buy an ebike so you’ll have a problem with that.
  • + 8
 @Beez177: wow you sound so fast mate I'm impressed by how you seem skilled for days
  • - 1
 @WAKIdesigns: shut up waki. I called you out to a race at least half a dozen times. Chicken. As the saying goes and per your usual you are just provoking people. You must be the most deprived person on pinkb.
  • + 1
 True, but that's what every brand and bike shop had crammed down casual riders throats for a decade. I see it all day everyday.
  • + 1
 @Keit: we can race if you come to Gothenburg. You must be a total idiot to expect me to come to you wherever you live mr anonymous hero. I won’t pay your travel, won’t give you a bed to sleep in and you better do it this year. You have a lot to learn about dick swinging online and your superior Joeymetry won’t help you.
  • - 4
flag Keit (Sep 10, 2018 at 11:49) (Below Threshold)
 @WAKIdesigns: French Alps. Only place..les Gets. See you next season? Would be fair for both to travel. But we have had this conversation before. PS your rethoric about this bike would imply all hardtail riders are....

At least I have a penis. You just have holes like Trump. Bum holes to be precise. Best keep the top level one shut.
  • + 4
 @WAKIdesigns: hahaha joeymetry thats a good one. I understand your points for not wanting to meet with Keit to settle your beef, but why don't you jump on Leo's offer to fly you to Finland all expenses paid and ride a Pole bike with him? I would jump on that opportunity
  • + 1
 @mollow: because he is all keymouthboard and hasn't got the minerals.
  • + 1
 @yupstate: No the SB130 is specced with a Fox 36. Both at retail and, fairly obviously, in the article above on Geoff's bike.
  • + 0
 double
  • + 1
 @Keit: it’s “depraved”
  • - 4
flag WAKIdesigns (Sep 11, 2018 at 5:07) (Below Threshold)
 @Keit: I wouldn’t spend a dime on a dick swinging contest and I am unable to respect anyone who would. Alps are not in my travel plans for a few years to come. My travel plans involve Norway, Poland, Malverns in UK, potentially Canada. You have to excuse me, I mean you better do because the choice is growing bitter.
  • - 2
 @mollow: I wouldn’t. I am considering paying guys from sick a visit if only to have a beer in a bathtub with them.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: ok so you do not want to come and race in one of the best mtb resorts; a number of prominent mtb extraordinaires would agree, and place your investment behind your rethoric. To summarise once more: you are pro doping, against the idea of enforcing protection of investment; body armour for an expensive race team, and negative towards pro racer choice of equipement, without professional experience, nor a real pedigree academic background in the field of all terrain bicycles. Also a rude and um compromising individual....so what exactly is your point?
  • - 1
 @Keit: No I don't. You are childish and have to be genuinely messed up to think your "challenge" would make me change my plans. But I like that since it is always me being called out for being egocentric. Unless... you are under 25? I hope you are. Your "trying to be a good boy" for not being rude on the internet and idea that there is a bike design university (that one made me laugh) acadamia, Jesus... that points at a teenager or student. If you are one you get a pass, if not... Jesus... We can talk about it PM, you need help.
  • - 2
 Also if you do care so much just send me a video of you riding and I can tell you right away whether I have any chance or not.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: nah I'll just stop here and every time you write something offensive and nonsense and I happen to see it I'll just post your pm to me. But I get it, and you being polish, I'll leave you with your cats.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: I normally kinda wayside your comments and move on with my life.

If you've ever tried to pop off any extra credit lines on your trails, 30mm of suspension makes night and day difference. I'm glad you're happy with your bike, but can you stop bringing it up like it's the only option for the next few months? Shit got old a year ago.

You sound like someone that knows enough to be dangerous, but not enough to be helpful...
  • + 5
 Hey @WAKIdesigns:

Understand that we all ride for different reasons, and maybe some of us have far more years of experience to know what we want. I dig the fact that you feel you have to post on absolutely everything, I’m sure it makes you feel knowledgeable and empowered. But understand, I don’t know what trail conditions you have and you don’t know the trail conditions others have, so insisting any bike or piece of equipment is dumb or unneeded is kind of moronic and immature.

I think this is the first time in 5-6 years I’ve posted here. Personally, a 130/150 29er can handle just about any trail near me. Unless you’re hucking to flat off 10 foot drops I’d think a bike like this would be more than capable of anything you (or most people here) could throw at it.

At the end of the day, buy what you want. If you want me to make you feel stupid tell me about the bikes you own and the trails you ride... I’m 100% sure I have a friend nearby that has ridden them faster on an Xc bike. I also know 60 year old XC racers who will crush you up and down the mountain regardless of the trail or bike.

What is this perfect bike that you own that entitles you to trash talk literally everything else? And are you any kind of pro athlete or a guy with a sponsorship whose opinion could matter?

So, while opinions are cool and fun, don’t tell people they’re dumb for what they like in a bike. Just shut up and ride. Literally, none of your opinions have ever been valid or insightful... ever. You are a new rider, you’re probably 22 or 23, and I’d imagine you are fairly specific in the niche you ride. So, just stop. You don’t know anything kid, there’s no point in you posting on everything that doesn’t pertain to you.
  • + 4
 @biffgeiser1: nicely put about waki.... Unfortunately he is and always will be all mouth and no trousers..... Worse yet he will go on and continue to be everything a good modern person is not.
  • + 4
 @biffgeiser1: Sadly, he's not a child. He's had many years to mature into the ignorant mess he currently is.
  • + 10
 Still looks reasonably stout. Great looking bike. Don't tell my bike I said this but 480mm reach? My bike is a dinosaur with 440mm in a size large! Damn you Yeti and your lust worthy products.
  • + 5
 hi @mikelevy,
I've noticed in the last few years we've gone away from noting actual seat tube angles. It seems like manufacturers want to brag about their effective ones instead. This is a disservice to riders, but particularly to tall ones. With the recent focus returning to at least some rider's preference for steep seat tubes, can we get back to including both?
  • + 4
 I wonder why they didn't rotate the switch infinity system on the SB130 and SB150 like they did on the sb100? The sb100 looks so much better and is so much more compact down near the bottom bracket.
  • + 3
 I only have one bike. Figure out your goals and your preferences. And because I ride one bike everywhere, I picked the one I would and have more fun everywhere, anytime.

Rocky Mountain Altitude... Sooooo fun!

Some of us are not fortunate enough to have N + 1 bike...
  • + 3
 Ever since the days of the purple anodized, CNC-ed RS Quadra Fork brace, that did nothing for the fork, we the mountain biker bunch have been an easy prey for the marketing departments of the bike industry. Back in those days, we could count on bike magazines to call the BS and uncover the truth... but unfortunately, that is no longer the case. When I read any magazine it's a virtual love fest - everything is great - the bigger the industry player, the better their stuff is. Then you have the army of influencers out there who will rave about anything really. And we are the ones paying the price - literally. The biggest effect of the big wheel "revolution" is that the prices of bikes have gone through the roof, yet the basic bottom line is the same - the bikes ride the same, at least since the full suspension became the norm. The changes are incremental, but we're being duped into thinking that the 26ers are un-rideable and the bike's weight doesn't matter. But then they charge $5-8K for a bike that's 27lbs, where in the past you could get something comparable for $3K. Also the industry has been a lot better at manufacturing the right amount of OEM equipment since the days of great prices on OEM stuff are long gone... it's all about separating us from our money now.
  • - 2
 Be glad the industry ate the cost of the recession for so many years so asshats like you could complain about bike prices years later. Get informed and maybe your argument would be worth a damn to those that realize where the prices should be for the effort given. Bikes don't grow on tree's. Talk with a proper purchaser at a big shop and you will get it.
  • + 3
 @MikeGruhler: Just relax pal... bikes never grew on trees, some were made by great welders in the US, and other in Taiwan. Now they all get made by carbon fiber gurus in China... wonder if these people got paid the same. The closer you are to the industry the more cool-aide flows through your veins, and many forget how many small manufacturers there were even 15 years ago, did they get paid for their effort back then? Today bike companies are owned by investment companies with the means and expertise to market the heck out of their products, and manufacture them more efficiently. You clearly have no clue how normal economy works... effort given has nothing to do with what the prices are... the price is what the buyer is willing to pay - and that's that. If you trick people into thinking that they are getting an incredible value - they will pay crazy prices - and that's that. Marketing at it's best... open your mind and really... be happy.
  • + 1
 @Sobieski: Like I said, talk with someone who actually knows what I'm talking about and you will understand. Efforts given do have an impact on price. Someone designed it, someone made it, painted and packaged it correct? You mean to tell me that there wages have nothing to do the final cost.
Cause that would be absolutely ignorant to ignore the cost of production when selling a product.
  • + 1
 There is no 3k 26 bike from andeacse ago that compares to one of today's hyperbikes. I get things are changing, but come off it dude.
  • + 3
 I can't speak to the Yeti, but can for Devinci. Spending lots of miles on both a Spartan and a Troy, the switch to shorter travel makes sense. Just for reference, I built the Troy to have similar geo and build to the Spartan. The Troy is way snappier, better accelerating, and livelier. It's not so much about travel, its the frame kinematics that make a big difference.
  • + 4
 No try the Django. It's a fast as fuck man I tell ya
  • + 2
 And another nod goes to the Transition Scout vs the Patrol. The Patrol definitely has a bit more going down the rough stuff, but 98% of the time the Scout (same travel as stock SB130) is faster/quicker, turns better, and is more playful based on my experience riding both AND given the trails I ride in SoCal. The new Transitions also have a similar long reach (well, 2018+ models) as the new Yeti, and that geometry change definitely helps in terms of stability at speed. I think the Yetis are running the shorter offset forks now, like Transition? Like a 44mm on the 29er?
  • + 1
 @mollow: Just built a Marshall actually. My wife liked it so much, she "decided" it was now hers. Oh well, the new Django is due, and now I have an excuse to build another bike.
  • + 7
 Why do some of you seem so angry about the weight thing
  • + 4
 Used to live a couple doors down from him in Courtenay. Good guy, wish him all the best with racing. Sweet looking bike too.
  • + 17
 Three Doors Down???
  • + 4
 @Boardlife69: . . . . good math, but I think a 'couple' is actually four.
  • + 5
 @Boardlife69: Let's hope not. That's the American equivalent to Canada's Nickelback.
  • + 8
 @Waldon83: Excellent swingers party ethos.
  • + 2
 @Waldon83: A couple is actually two.
  • - 1
 @dualsuspensiondave: And a dozen is a fruit.......getthef*ckouttahere
  • + 1
 @Waldon83: Couple: synonyms - pair, duo, twosome, two
  • + 0
 @dualsuspensiondave: eye roll, thanks dad
  • + 2
 @Waldon83: You're welcome son.
  • + 1
 Obviously I don't know the course but I'm very familiar with the area and I do know specifically some of the trails that have been cleared for the event (Thank you Trans-Cascadia !!).

He* will be fine on that bike. Might be a bit rough on Tongue Mt and other portions of Juniper Ridge but it will be nothing like a typical EWS chunk course. And there should be lots of opportunities to put power down.

*Obviously Geoff will be fine regardless, I'm speaking more generically on bike choice for this event.
  • + 5
 Put the kabolt on there,at least for the picture.
  • + 2
 Kabolt for Kabush? Sounds tailor made for him!
  • + 1
 Nice bike!
Iv been scratching my head on the tire choice for this event?
Trans-Cascadia told us " A front mud spike and aggressive rear tread would not be a bad choice. Beefier tire casing is a good idea."
I was thinking Shorty front and back... Assegai front, shorty back or DHF....if possible Double down or DH casing for the rear EXO in the front. The agressor is a great tire, but not shure if its a good choice for loam and mud ?
  • + 1
 I'd definitely run something in 3C compound in the rear for the greater Oakridge area. My go to would be Shorty front, High Roller II for us mortals unless the forecast is for dry weather.
  • + 1
 @Hill-Seeker: race is in Gifford-Pinchot, WA this year. Not sure if Oakridge applies.
  • + 2
 I would rather muscle up a 160mm up hill all day to use the long travel down...up hill is painfull down hill is fun. I buy for the downs.
  • + 3
 How is there not a Kabolt on the front, since they made it for him???
  • + 1
 Instead of making us choose between the 130 and the 150. It's too bad they didn't make a 140 with some flip chips/geometry adjustment.
  • + 2
 Guys, CLEARLY he doesn’t care about weight: the fork features a Q/R - it’s not his namesake/tool-free Kabolt model.
  • + 4
 That garage...
  • + 3
 Yes. More “Real Garages of the Older Established Pros” features plz.
  • + 1
 Yeti is my all time favorite bike brand but I was checking out the garage more than the bike Smile And those Ducatis... mmmm...
  • + 3
 Hey Mike, how did overforking this bike lead to a STEEPER than stock STA?
  • + 2
 at least they could give us the actual seat tube angle as well as the effective...
  • + 0
 Perhaps allows for more sag/ run deeper into fork travel?
  • + 1
 Just thought I'd throw this out there so racers don't show up in the wrong state but the Race isn't in Oregon this year. It's really close though. You're welcome.
  • + 2
 Bike needs an X2 or FLOAT X2
  • + 2
 All that work to allow for an on board beverage and it's dryer than ....
  • + 1
 Such drama on the choice of a shorter travel bike. Looks like an ideal pedally Oregon race bike to me! ????????
  • + 1
 I like these articles. There are things to learn from how these guys set up their bikes. Thanks!
  • + 2
 Did they have to format the font on the title to cover his face?
  • + 1
 Never mind. I see that it is that way on my phone but is normal on my desktop.
  • + 2
 Wonder if Lopes will show up for round 2 ????
  • + 1
 He's back riding an Ibis now. May have a better shot than riding a "100% efficient!" Ellsworth.
  • + 2
 >not a weight weenie
>wont shut up about weight.
  • + 2
 Ooooh, that live saving extra 10mm fork travel!
  • + 19
 If you had an extra 10mm, you wouldn't be complaining.
  • + 5
 I've never had a girl say "If only you had 10 more millimetres"

And I'm running less than SB130....I'm more like SB85
  • + 3
 Yeah , I had a major eye roll reading that one!
  • + 1
 It's not uncommon for racers to run 10mm more travel up front, then lower the pressure a hair. This makes it more forgiving on rough tracks while maintaining the same geometry as stock.
  • + 1
 Add another bike to my wish list, Yeti you’ve done it again.
  • + 1
 "Rarer than bar ends on an enduro bike" love it! lol
  • + 1
 As any body tried a 5010 with a 150 fork??????
  • + 1
 Forget the bike, how about a garage tour?
  • - 1
 The only upgrade he needs is a chest plate for protection on the podium from a surly douche who's name rhymes with gropes.
  • + 1
 That garage, though...
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