Bike Check: Keegan Wright's Not-So-Secret Devinci Spartan 29 - EWS Whistler 2018

Aug 10, 2018
by Mike Kazimer  



At the moment, only Devinci's athletes have access to the new Spartan 29, but that's likely to change in the near future. We first saw Keegan Wright on the bike at the NZ Enduro earlier this year, but he's made a few modifications, and switched to a frame with a flashier paint job, in preparation for the Whistler round of the Enduro World Series. The Whistler trails are rough and rowdy enough that many riders will be making the switch to coil shocks and longer travel forks in order to handle the wild terrain.

Tire choice is also going to be critical on race day, especially on Stage 5, which descends all the way from the Top of the World trail down to the base area some 5,000 vertical feet below. Keegan's running DH-casing tires front and rear, plus a Huck Norris insert in the back tire for even more flat protection. Going without a flat or a mechanical will be high on every racer's priority list, and being prepared with the right tools could be essential to successfully finishing the big day, which is why you'll see tubes, tire plugs, and multi-tools stashed all over riders' bikes.


Keegan Wright and his Devinci 29 Spartan
Keegan Wright
Unior / Devinci Factory Racing
Height: 6'2" / 188 cm
Weight: 187 lb / 85 kg
Instagram: @keeganwrightmtb


bigquotesIt's black and red, which means it's faster.Keegan Wright


Keegan Wright and his Devinci 29 Spartan
Keegan's Spartan 29 Details

Frame: carbon
Wheel size: 29"
Shock: RockShox Super Deluxe Coil, 375 lb spring
Fork: 170mm RockShox Lyrik RC2, 99 psi with 3 tokens
Wheels: RaceFace Turbine R, 30mm internal width
Tires: 2.5" Maxxis Assegai: 23 psi (front), 2.4" Maxxis DHR II (DH casing, with Huck Norris insert): 28 psi
Drivetrain: SRAM X01 Eagle
Dropper post: 170mm RockShox Reverb
Brakes: SRAM Code RSC
Cockpit: RaceFace Next R handlebar, 780mm

Keegan Wright and his Devinci 29 Spartan
What makes a Blackbox shifter different than what you can buy at a bike shop? In this case, the thumb paddle is a little shorter than the norm - Keegan's been testing a few different styles, and so far this is the one he prefers.

Keegan Wright and his Devinci 29 Spartan
A pre-loaded tire plug tool is tucked into the crank arm spindle, where it's held in place by a bit of moto foam.

Keegan Wright and his Devinci 29 Spartan
Keegan Wright and his Devinci 29 Spartan
Keegan's not French, but his teammate Damien Oton is - that might explain how he arrived at this brake lever position.


Keegan Wright and his Devinci 29 Spartan
Keegan's running HT's DH-oriented X2 pedals for this race - he says he usually runs pedals with an even smaller platform, so he doesn't feel the need for any traction pins.


Keegan Wright and his Devinci 29 Spartan
A coil shock has been installed to help handle the long, rough tracks that are on tap for this weekend's race.
Keegan Wright and his Devinci 29 Spartan
There's a 170mm RockShox Lyrik up front aired to 99 psi with three tokens.




MENTIONS: @devinci, @SramMedia. @keegan511, @raceface




58 Comments

  • + 41
 DH casing,Huck Norris and 28psi. The Fort Knox of tires.
  • + 1
 gotta be rock hard, i can't imagine the weight and how firm that must be. what a beast.
  • + 20
 I get the feeling im the only person still riding a 27.5...... seriously how many 29er bikes were posted today?15-maybe 30 Wink
  • + 53
 Don't worry - Sam Hill and Danny Hart are both racing on 27.5" bikes this weekend. You'll be ok.
  • + 7
 @mikekazimer: Until you see Sam Hills instagram where he just posted a new bike photo !
  • + 2
 I'm 27.5 DH & Trail bik in Colorado. Both newer models. It's ok.
  • + 1
 @Waldon83: must not have it up, kuz me no see nothin!!
  • + 37
 @Jaybirdy, it’s right here: bit.ly/1e1EYJv.
  • + 17
 I don't wanna be dat old dude but I'm still riding my 26 stumpjumper lol
  • + 2
 @slumgullion: wow I just got owned . well played sir .
  • + 4
 Still shredding my Glory 26", you'll do fine. Wink
  • + 1
 @slumgullion: ha ha. Still funny.
  • + 1
 @slumgullion: hahahah ha ha haaaaa..... lmao
  • + 0
 Why does anyone care?
  • + 3
 Don't worry, according to the Pinkbike survey at Whistler opening day, 94% of guys were either on 26 or 27.5. Almost half still on 26ers
  • + 5
 Anyone tried this brake position? looking for an honest perspective and an explainer of how it works. Are your wrists sitting as normal and your fingers curled right over the lever, or are your wrists super flexed?
  • + 4
 That's pretty much how I run them. While descending my forearms, wrist, hands and fingers created a flat plane from my chest to the lever. Way less fatigue and control. Look at it this way, how would you feel strongest/most comfortable when doing a push up using a bar perpendicular to your body...it's that same as being on a bike but everything is rotated up from horizontal. Note, you may need to mess with your reach adjust.
  • + 3
 Helps with steep terrain when you're hips are over the back wheel. Your hands naturally rotate backwards which forces your fingers upward and this lever position compensates for that. It's weird when you're in a neutral standing position as you'll need to rotate your hands backwards to grab the brake correctly.
  • + 1
 Yes.. I'm slightly more conservative with mine, tho not by much.. ever since I've changed mine from almost straight down & started turning them up to be more level, its been harder and harder to want to go back down to my older steeper lever setup! Flat is still a bit odd.. but I like the way it eases my grip squeeze/pressure because I'm pulling and pushing more forward/backwards with the bars.. vs Pulling upwards or downwards as much for the steeper lever setting! But what do I know about geo, I'm just a Golf Pro that goes more by feel over "perfect form"!
  • + 1
 for steep shit, yes. less stress on the hands. Next time you're on the bike lean back off the saddle and look at the position of your wrists/fingers.
  • + 2
 Not that extreme, but mine are flatter than most, and I've been slowly converting my buddies. Having them flatter significantly reduces arm pump, and they're set up for when you actually need your brakes-descending. As @camcoz69 mentioned, your hands are going to rotate back when you're descending, so bringing the levers up puts far less strain on wrists. It can feel a bit different on flat ground, but in the steeps it feels very natural.
  • + 1
 I'm literally transitioning to a flatter lever this summer. It's been slightly odd, but my levers have been steep for nearly 20 years as I started riding enduro style motos back in the day. I'm making the change to try to combat arm pump issues and have been finding a huge difference. That said, I Generally ride up logging roads and the. Descend hard so it suits my riding style I am finding. Worth a shot, I have been keeping a journal of the angles and results, but without riding the same trail circuit every ride, the results are fairly anecdotal. I've been happy though, and don't see myself shifting back to such steep levers anymore, as others above have also said.
  • + 2
 @poah: get low, don't lean back, unless you're on a 2006 xc bike. Today's bikes don't necessitate getting too far back
  • + 1
 yup , switched about 18mth back , it does help . I have mine about 10degree lower angle
  • + 1
 It helps when you have a 380mm reach than way you can get waaaaay back behind the rear axle for the steep techs.
  • + 2
 i have my brakes set up that way. i put most of my weight on my pedals, and when i put my hands on the bars, most of the weigh is on the very bottom of my palms. the brake position is comfortable, but it definitely depends on what you are riding. i dont really see a point if you dont ride anything that has at least a few steep bits
  • + 1
 I feel it makes it super awkward to grab the levers no matter the gradient but then I tend to stay neutral on my bike even on the steepest of steeps. Just try it out. If it works for you great if not stick to what you know.
  • + 1
 Fooled !
  • + 1
 Yeah, it works, as long as you are always pointed down.
  • + 1
 @trialsracer: Yeah these EWS guys have no idea right
  • + 5
 What is the point of listing the riders height and putting a little tab called "frame:" if you aren't going to tell us the frame size.

..idk if it was there in the text didn't read it yet
  • + 5
 At his weight, how does he get by with a 375 spring?! Very coil friendly/progressive frame or a ton of damping?
  • + 3
 low starting leverage and progressive.
  • + 1
 Seems crazy to me to. I’m just a bit heavier and running 500lb spring on Capra 29
  • + 2
 Stiff front, soft rear. It's the new thing
  • + 3
 Wow that fork seriously packed and with loads of air... i wonder what the sag is at? Like 10% lol
  • + 4
 How much rear travel?
  • + 2
 is anyone going to comment on the actual bike? i'm really interested in the Spartan, but not this, the 27.5 Big Grin
  • + 1
 So I thought they gonna release that beast at CW Whistler. When exactly?? Cant wait!
  • + 3
 Size and weight?
  • + 1
 Interesting that he's a fully SRAM sponsored rider running a SAR Spring and Spacer. Unless SRAM is trying their hand at it.
  • + 2
 And room for a water bottle? Take my money already!
  • + 2
 Seems like stays could be lower for bigger bottle..?
  • + 3
 That steed is dope
  • + 1
 oh fawk yeah!!!! please do an aluminum version @devinci
  • + 1
 I am guessing 38lbs or so for that bad ass setup
  • + 1
 I so need that Blackbox lever.
  • + 1
 Good stuff PB! Keep em' coming
  • + 1
 Is that a threaded bottom bracket?
  • + 1
 Wow this 29er is sick with it ????????
  • + 1
 Figured he’d have the grip shift rear shock lockout
  • + 1
 So many new 29er goodies coming out lately Big Grin
  • + 1
 What grips are those?
  • + 1
 Lizard Skins Charger EVO.
  • + 1
 Thx
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