Bike Check: Madnes Bicycles' Made-in-France 'Stellar 27.5' Enduro Bike

Mar 10, 2022
by Alicia Leggett  


Madnes Bicycles is the new kid on handmade steel frame market. The small bike brand - with a staff of two - launched (or relaunched) in 2021 with the 27.5-wheeled Stellar, an industrial-looking, steel, full suspension bike that offers between 160mm and 170mm of rear travel and is handmade in France.

Founder Sylvain Fusillier worked in the aerospace industry for a decade as a design engineer, and that experience is what allowed him to understand and develop his bike kinematics, he said. Partnered with co-founder Jordan Colin, who is a graphic designer, photographer, and videographer, the two essentially have all their bike design and building needs covered in-house, and for anything else, they use suppliers and subcontractors from within the Herault department of France. What's the bike industry equivalent of farm-to-table? Tubes-to-trail?


Stellar 27.5 Geometry Details:
Model: Stellar 27.5
Intended use: All-around enduro riding
Wheel size: 27.5"
Travel: 160 mm - 170 mm, depending on shock stroke length
Seat tube angle: 75.5 degrees
Head tube angle: 65 degrees
Reach: 440 mm (M) or 468 mm (L)
Wheelbase: 1195 mm (M) or 1229 mm (L)
Chainstays: 430 mm
Stack: 602 mm (M) or 616 mm (L)
Available sizes: M and L

bigquotesTo design a bike we start with the purpose, so we can find the geometry and suspension characteristics. Then we design the bike as simple as possible, this is the best way to have timeless shape, and this also reduces cost and weight.Sylvain Fusillier

Sylvain and Jordan with the Stellar 27.5. As the young brand has grown arms and legs, Sylvain and Jordan have also created the Atlas 29 and now have a shorter-travel trail bike in the works.

You might recognize the Madnes name from 2013 and 2014, when the two riders first brought one of their bike concepts to life as the Stardust. While the Stardust design looks nostalgic now with its 26-inch wheels and short footprint, the aesthetics have clearly informed these modernized Madnes designs which, unlike the Stardust, have made it to market.

The Madnes Stardust, circa 2014.

Jordan, with his background in design, can readily make both standardized and custom paint jobs happen.

Pro: clean, internal routing. Con: no space for a water bottle (but they're working on that).

The head badge is a chamois (yes, the animal is actually called that), a cold-weather goat-antelope (yeah, that's a category too) that's surefooted both uphill and down.

From tubes and plates to a bike frame.

Madnes initially began building with steel because it's the best material for building a small series of frames, with relatively little tooling investment, Sylvain said. The brand also aims to create enduring, sustainable products, and steel's high fatigue strength lends itself well to that type of longevity, especially as it consumes less energy to produce than some other materials and is recyclable.

The only problem with steel, Sylvain said, is that the weight-to-stiffness ratio isn't great. Madnes addresses this by using as many straight lines as possible to build with maximum strength for the amount of material (and therefore weight) added.

It's all about planning and precision (and purpose, Sylvain says).

Bike design begins with an idea of the bike's purpose, Sylvain said. Form follows function, and he designs the geometry and suspension around his idea of what the bike should do, keeping the design as simple as possible for aesthetic, cost, and weight purposes. It can be tough, he added, to find tubes and other standard parts that fit exactly with the vision of the bike.

The Stellar 27.5 uses a combination of hand-machined parts that are made in-house and tubes and laser-cut plates that are purchased from suppliers. Madnes bends and cuts the parts to shape, TIG welds the frames together using handmade jigs, and powder-coats everything in the Madnes workshop. While there are several standard colors that Jordan created, Madnes also offers custom powder-coating for anyone who wants something a bit different.

There are polymer bushings in there for "durability without maintenance," Madnes says.

180mm post-mount. Madnes says brake adaptors are a thing of the past.

Beyond the Stellar 27.5, Madnes has also created the Atlas 29, which will become available soon and sports 29" wheels, 170mm to 180mm rear suspension, and the same virtual pivot point layout as its smaller-wheeled sibling. Next, expanding into uncharted territory for the brand that has thus far focused on enduro bikes, Madnes plans to release a 120mm - 130mm travel trail bike that, worth noting, will have space for that arguably-essential water bottle. At the moment, Madnes only sells frames and shocks.

Sylvain said the two are already proud of what they've done and have heard good feedback from riders on the performance and design of the Madnes bikes so far, but of course, the brand is just starting. They'll keep those straight tubes coming.


170 Comments

  • 176 3
 YESSSSSSS!!!! MORE 27.5 BIKES!!!! Good looking bike too
  • 12 21
flag dwbaillar (Mar 10, 2022 at 21:04) (Below Threshold)
 I know, I was also surprised it was really a 27.5 after reading "Enduro" in the title. They must have meant to write "fun."
  • 38 5
 Biggest regret I made was believing all the bike mags including Levy that 29ers can be fun too. Then I hopped on a friends’s mojo 27.5 enduro bike and was like WTF this is so much nimbler than my epic evo 29. Physics is physics. Too bad I was a sucker for the marketing.
  • 14 0
 Thank you! Yes it's a fun bike, you can find geometry and kinematics curves on our website : madnesbicycles.com
  • 5 2
 @blackthorne: I think it depends a lot on the rider and the trails. I went from a 27.5" SC Bronson to a 29" Hightower. When I first jumped on the 29er I was aware it wasn't as nimble - my usual style of rattling down the inside then smashing the corner just didn't work on the Hightower - it was a bit too cumbersome to turn that quickly. At first I thought I had made a mistake in buying it. Where it shone however was on the rougher sections. I found I was able to hold lines and stay in control enabling me to set up for the corner better.

I went back to the same trail I had trouble on before and hit it again and had a blast! The bike was so much faster through a section of trail compared to the 27.5" Bronson. That being said, most of my trails locally are quite rough and pretty fast which is part of the reason I have this opinion. I'm also on an XL frame - if I were on a small or medium I might feel differently.
  • 1 0
 'Oh là là
  • 6 1
 The wheel size debate is really a sizing debate I think. The same way people are now talking about size specific chainstays. If you are over a certain height, 29ers will feel plenty playful to you and you can get around the rear wheel fine. If you are shorter, 29ers may be too big to handle if you are trying to be playful. I am waiting for bike sizing to match to wheel sizes next.
  • 1 0
 @blackthorne: Indeed, now we have the ultimate fad Mullet bikes!
  • 2 0
 @adrennan: Some brands are already doing this, Polygon for example, who offer Small and Medium bikes with 27.5 inch wheels and Medium, Large and XL bikes with 29 inch wheels.
  • 2 0
 @WishIWazFaster: Canyon did that years ago already.
And, if you think about it, kid's bike sizes are defined by the wheelsize It makes total sense to have everything in proportion.
Then again, if you come from a BMX background, your idea of proportion may be very different.
  • 1 0
 @blackthorne:

Dude you went from a “big” XC bike to an enduro, not a fair comparison…but I agree 27.5” are way more fun.
  • 88 3
 Man if I was loaded I would have a serious bike ownership problem
  • 8 1
 The problem being you can only ride one of them at at time?
  • 8 0
 I became a bit of a "collector" for a bit. I liked having multiple bikes that are pretty, cool, rad, fun..all that, and I always tweaked them with matchy parts and such. My mistake in thinking was I'd recoop money if and when I'd want to sell any...this was horribly wrong! One super duper carbon bike I had for 6 months...got less than half for it, and it was hassle to sell. Then I thought I'd part the bikes and sell the bits and frame...this becomes a new level of hassle. Some bits sell quickly while others aren't as desired and sit past any value. It was like having a bad drug habit without any of the highs...just tossing out money. Plus, besides being "cool-guy-with-lots-of-bikes"...why ride different bikes..each time having to adjust a bit to the geo...maybe for different types of trail that's fine. I finally settled on one bike I really like, and now have two of them(and I plan to ride them to the point of can't be sold). But yeah, I have been looking at other bikes thinking.."that would be cool to have". especially now that 27.5 is cool again(apparently). I sure do like this red frame! ha ha
  • 9 0
 @GlassGuy: Well there's your problem, you were trying to invest using bikes as a commodity instead of collecting for the passion of bikes. With a few very rare exceptions that is never going to work. This sport/hobby is a money pit
  • 4 0
 @ROOTminus1: Nah, it was all passion/fun...but, when you realize you don't like the bike as much as you thought, and you figure you can still get a pretty reasonable amount for a good bike, and that doesn't happen due to ever changing "modern standards" and a very deep pool of used bikes and gear, then you start to reel back on the habit, and adjust your way of thinking about it. I didn't even sell them as a need for cash...I just didn't see the point of letting a perfectly good bike just sit around, and space eventually gets crowded.
I did however buy a classic muscle car with the idea of investment, but it's also something I really enjoy..but, that's a more clear market of monetary appreciation
  • 3 1
 @ROOTminus1: Totally - I have 7 bikes currently and am always looking for my next target. They are like golf clubs - each one has a different purpose. Having built each up from a frame - they represent a completed project, and make me happy even looking at them. I think of them more as an investment in fun. I can always go for a spin to even our my mind and get some good exercise in. No matter what "standards" change or trends emerge, my bikes will always be fun for me to ride. Therefore they are and were worth all the time and money I spent building them up. Plus I think if your bike looks good - you want to ride it more.
  • 51 2
 The world needs more steel enduro bikes!
  • 41 1
 Climbs like a...cold-weather goat-antelope, descends like a...cold-weather goat-antelope?
  • 9 0
 Rides as smooth a polishing leather?
  • 4 0
 down-duro-country cold-weather goat-antelope
  • 2 0
 @tsewhsoj: Thats what you call downhill skills!
  • 31 0
 Best looking steel FS that I’ve ever seen.
  • 6 0
 Thanks for your support
  • 25 1
 Take my money,… the green one please, Large
  • 6 0
 This green color (+/- a bit in the darkness) is simply the best bike color.
With mango Chris King ... sign me up.
  • 18 0
 Daaaang...27.5"s keep droppin'! Love the steel!
  • 14 1
 Multiple references in the article to design decisions made to reduce weight… and then no where in the article actually mentions the weight of the frame
  • 5 2
 Weight of frame: Steel kg
  • 11 0
 3.5 kg
  • 13 2
 Love the idea but Rickos has a point with the Bushings use. There's a reason companies went to sealed cartridge bearings and they did that before dual link designs, which tend to burn through bearings. Speaking of those links too, they look a little flimsy and long, like the back end might not be too stiff. Great looking bike but this engineer thinks they're gonna have a lot of pivot issues, especially when used in mud.
  • 6 1
 Don't mention the engineer thing round here! I suspect they may have an unhappy shock too. Compare those links to the beefy triangulated (and smaller) links on an SC or similar and I think they may be asking for trouble. If they send me one to ride for a year, I'll happily report back if I'm wrong though!
  • 7 0
 See my answer to Rickos for the bushings.
I can add that front triangle is machined after welding to have the 2 pivots perfectly parallel.
About the rods, they are stiff as they are made of steel which is 3 times stiffer than aluminium (210 vs 70 GPa).
According to everyone who has tested the bike, and our personal analisis, this is the stiffest steel bike on the market.
  • 1 0
 @MadnesBicycles: thanks for the answer. I hadn't twigged that the links were steel - some "competitors" use aluminium links on steel bikes. Hopefully I'm wrong and you're right!
  • 2 0
 @MadnesBicycles: The material might be stiff, but the design is not that stiff and puts extra pressure on the pivot points. If there was a crossbrace joining the two rods, even with a less stiff material, the result would be both stiffer and lighter. But... if it works, it works!
  • 1 0
 @DavidGuerra: yep. I had in my mind a nice machined aluminium X with perhaps an M6 in each corner. There are some tricky cantilever loads with this design asking quite a lot of the bolts/spindles
  • 5 0
 According to FE analisis, the rods represent only a few part of the global lateral rigidity of the bike. The shafts connecting the rods plays a very important role and the contact rod/shaft (steel/steel) has been studied for a maximal stiffness contact.
Adding a X between rods was an option, but the stiffness increase is only few % for an increase in cost and weight. So we didn't take this solution.
  • 1 0
 @MadnesBicycles: Can't wait to see a review of this bike. I hope they love it and wish ya'll success, the bike is beautiful. I'm glad to hear you did some engineering and FE review, as there have been plenty of bikes that look great without actually being great because of the design. Marketing vs engineering prowess I guess. Best of luck. Building a bike from the ground up is mighty impressive.
  • 17 2
 “One step beyond!!”
  • 3 1
 they call it gladnes?
  • 2 0
 The rockiest rocksteady bikes of Madnes
  • 15 6
 Cool bike. 180mm rear brake mounts are definitely going to need an adaptor for a bunch of us now using 200mm
  • 15 11
 Another benefit of smaller wheels, no need for 200mm rear rotor
  • 1 0
 @emptybe-er: maybe we're missing out by not having 200mm rear rotors on our 27.5? maybe that's our ticket to mtb apotheosis???
  • 5 1
 @emptybe-er: Recently went mullet on my Enduro and kept the 220 front/200 rear rotor set up. Loving how fast I can dump speed
  • 5 2
 @emptybe-er: Depends on the rider, the terrain and the brakes. I'm a light rider. But with my lame Guide brakes I need a 200mm disc very much
  • 1 0
 @bashhard: true and swap the centerline disc for the new hs2 (or other better disc) is the best thing I done to my bike recently!
  • 12 3
 @emptybe-er: I used 200mm back when wheels were 26"

There has never once been a moment where I've thought "I wish my brakes sucked more and weren't as strong, but also overheated more easily."

bUt mOduLaTiOn!!!1!!

f*ck that shit. Learn to use your brakes. Having to drag your brake 40 feet before you actually make it to the corner isn't a good thing.
  • 6 0
 Might want to check those 200mm+ aspirations against that unbraced forward mount/seatstay. Certainly an interesting way to add a modulation to Shimanos.
  • 2 1
 @emptybe-er: Been riding 200mm front and rear on 150/160mm 27.5 for 3 years, zero chance I'm downsizing. This bike is 170-180mm...
  • 4 0
 @William42: I miss the era of shitty bikes. Nowadays people complain when something has 2% less modulation and no bite point adjustment. I don’t remember people being miserable back in the day with none of those things.
  • 2 1
 It is possibl to run 200, but don't forget it is a 27.5", smaller wheels means more powerful brakes for the same rotor size
  • 1 0
 Yes, they definitely are lol. No doubt about that. I don't expect a non-DH bike to have 200mm mounts though. What bike does that??
  • 4 1
 Even for DH bikes, having a 200mm mount is a hassle. Those with 203mm rotors will have to add a few carefully measured washers between the mount and the caliper. A 180mm mount is the rightful standard for any non-XC bike.
  • 1 0
 @William42: If you’re slamming on your brakes before a corner it sounds like you need to learn how to corner.
  • 1 0
 @peterman1234: And old breaking bump once told me: Smoother is faster
  • 1 0
 @bashhard: I agree, heavier riders need more braking power. Especially if you’re doing most of your braking on flatish grade where you actually have weight on the rear wheel, otherwise it’s just more skidding
  • 1 0
 @William42: And I suppose braking 40’ before a corner is quite a distance at 10mph but at 30 that sounds about right
  • 6 0
 More bikes with crazy paint jobs please! I'd happily lay a bit more to have a bunch of color options. Stanton does it right, you can get like 20 colors. So many bikes lose my interest by having "meh" paint.
  • 8 0
 man, that is a great looking bike!
  • 6 1
 Last time I fell in love (and bought) a bike without bottle space that caused me endless anger when the bottle once again was covered in cowshit. But life isn’t about being reasonable is it?
  • 1 0
 With a lower back mount (waist bottle holder) it's not as bad.
  • 7 1
 FFS, stop listing the lack of water bottle space as a con! It's a bike, it's supposed to ride the best it can/was designed for, not a f*cking rolling minibar!!!
  • 5 0
 Need to know more about the low maintenance bushings. Stiction? Lifespan? Replacement? etc. I know Turner used to use bushings, but they also had a little grease port.
  • 3 0
 Many brands have used bushings, but everyone moved to bearings quickly. No first hand experience but i think it didn't work out so well.
  • 7 0
 My experience is they feel great when the bike is new but they develop slop. Feels better again when you replace them (but never quite the same) and each replacement cycle lasts less and less time. Regular bearings wear out too, but in my experience, when you replace those, it gets back to 100% and lasts about as long every time.
  • 1 0
 @gtill9000: Yes, my guess is that between not so great surfaces (when you change the bush you should also, at least, check the spindle for sizing and replace/or polish) and that on most designs the outer surface of the bush is not totally constrained some slippage and wear occurs. This could be solved with shrink fits, or grub screws etc, and I would like to se brass bushes with graflube treatment or something similar, but then it would probably weigh more than roller bearings...
  • 2 0
 I guess they are using this kind of bushes, high tech plastic or something. www.igus.com
  • 2 0
 @GBlanco: IGUS is the common material for bikes (common in shocks) but all plastic bushes exhibit flex compared to the metallic brethren - have had bitter experience on commissioning larger machinery! Need to ensure that the load is completely radial, which is virtually impossible to guarantee on a bike...
  • 10 0
 After 18 months of intensive testing we don't have any issue or wear on the bushings, their are oversised for this application. The shafts are stainless steel, machined with high precision and low roughness to avoid friction and wear. The material is the same than fox style shock busings. They can easily be replaced cheaply as it is standard Igus bushings.
  • 6 0
 Jeez that's beautiful. Chapeau Frogs. Something about that rear triangle is just perfect.
  • 7 0
 Thank you Brits for Reynolds tubing!
  • 5 0
 The stars were aligned when form and function had a baby. Zeus smiled and said, "This one will live long and prosper." I said, "I love this bike!"
  • 3 0
 How can you call something so beautiful "industrial-looking"?

It's the identikit carbon and aluminium bikes you usually feature that actually are industrial, as they're made in factories in China and Taiwan.

Anyway, I've admired these on Instragram before but didn't realise until now it was a VPP, hope there's a review coming soon. Preferably of the 29er.
  • 7 0
 Rear triangle porn
  • 6 0
 This is a god damned œuvre d'art les mecs !
  • 3 0
 Merci !
  • 1 0
 @MadnesBicycles: But cable management bordel !
  • 2 0
 I'm in my 50s and grew up riding steel frames, then moved to aluminum, then carbon, then back to aluminum. I'm so over the carbon hype. I wish more bike manufacturers made steel frames. Looking at a steel frame and seeing welds is like looking at art. Skilled hands went into build that frame. When I see a carbon frame I think of "paint by numbers." Nothing special. I would love to own this steel masterpiece. It so beautiful.
  • 5 0
 made in France? must be fast.
  • 2 0
 1 to 3 months delivery time. But unfortunately we can ship only in Europe for the moment. Too expensive outside.
  • 8 0
 @MadnesBicycles: you can't say Outside is expensive here
  • 3 0
 For some reason I usually don't love the look of a lot of these newer boutique steel full suspensions, but this one looks dang good. So so so pretty.
  • 4 0
 i want one just for the headtube badge
  • 4 0
 Elegant , simple. Lots of gussets . I like it !
  • 2 0
 These guys have been doing some great stuff! So glad they’ve got to the point of being able to sell them now. Want one badly
  • 1 0
 So awesome. Love this bike and I think all the structural naysayers are just wrong. I know Madnes explained carefully that they can’t ship to the USA right now, but I feel myself about to go all Veruca Salt on this
  • 3 0
 That is beautiful bike, clean lines!
  • 1 0
 "Madnes has also created the Atlas 29, which will become available soon and sports 29" wheels, 170mm to 180mm rear suspension" - THIS!!!
  • 1 0
 Atlas has from 150 to 160mm rear travel, it is already available on our website
  • 1 0
 @MadnesBicycles: are you planning ro offer XL frames anytime soon?
  • 2 0
 Forget EVERY SINGLE other steel full sus this is the only nicely designed one out there. Nice work.
  • 1 0
 Does it really look that different to a Cotic?
  • 1 0
 @SimonBarton64: Cotic use an Aluminium swingarm which is cheating really as that is the hard part to make lightweight in steel, the frame is easy and you cant't do much with it, the swingarm is a different matter.
  • 2 0
 But if pushed to find fault the geom does look a bit old skool. Would be nice to see a 500 reach with 64° and 50mm stem.
  • 1 0
 Beautiful frame! Really looking forward already to the release of the trail bike. However, a version witha little mor reach for us taller guys would be nice.
  • 3 1
 “Brake adapters are a thing of the past”

180mm post mount
  • 2 0
 Well, that's just lovely. Beautiful work, fellas.
  • 2 0
 This is superb. Nice work!
  • 2 0
 Now that is a damn clean design. Wow!
  • 2 0
 Is it pronounced “mad-ness” or “mad-ney “ or “mad-nah” ?
  • 3 0
 Madnesssss
  • 2 0
 This ticks almost all the boxes for me
  • 1 0
 waterbottle?
  • 2 0
 the aesthetics of that frame is "steeling" my breath away
  • 1 0
 Nice! Especially the swing link, I wouldn't trust the longevity of the shock on any steel bike without one
  • 2 0
 That coolant needs changing
  • 2 0
 Yes that pic was taken when we just buy this machine, lot of dust in coolant tank
  • 1 0
 Ha ha ha looks like sewage!!
  • 2 0
 @Sylvain-F:

Was only joking. My first job as an Engineering apprentice was changing coolant in the machines, hence first thing I noticed. Frames look great btw
  • 1 0
 Stellar bike indeed. Love the green too. If you need a test rider let me know! Allez allez!
  • 2 0
 Gorgeous colours and lines on the bike.
  • 1 0
 Nooo, I'm in France right now, can I come and collect one in green pleeease...
  • 2 0
 That is a beautiful bicycle!
  • 1 0
 Beautiful bikes. Would think that bridging the links may slightly improve rear end stiffness.
  • 2 1
 Fantastic to see 27.5 isn't dead and nore should it ever be. Get rid of Mullet Bikes now and accept it was a fad.
  • 1 0
 @MattP76 : I'm enjoying my mullet bike and can't see any downside. It seems silly to hate on something so innocuous. Can't you just get over it?
  • 1 1
 @WishIWazFaster: Get back on a 27.5 then tell me how much you are enjoying your fad Mullet.
  • 1 0
 @MattP76: How long does it have to last to not be a fad? I think history will prove you wrong on mullet bikes, there's enough logic in the idea for it to last I think. My regular bike is 27.5 with 140mm/160mm but the mullet is a 160/160 ebike so very different beasts. I like them both but the ebike is definitely faster and more stable on chunky terrain. I rode a friend's spare bike a few weeks ago, a 26 inch hardtail and it was a hoot. So nimble and easy to accelerate. Different bikes do different things well.
  • 1 0
 @WishIWazFaster: History will prove me right. It's an utter fad. It's lasting longer than fads like 'plus size tyres' but it will go.
  • 3 1
 Looking stellar
  • 3 0
 Pure Madnes
  • 2 1
 How do you do it Its better than I ever knew You are Stellar
  • 2 0
 Mad for this
  • 2 0
 Pretty
  • 1 0
 this bike is sick!!! holy crap! giving the people what they want
  • 2 0
 Class.
  • 2 0
 Not even ugly
  • 1 1
 How do you do it?
Make me feel like I do
How do you do it?
It's better than I ever knew
  • 1 0
 Nickel le velo! Felicitations!
  • 1 0
 All around enduro riding is a great wording of how I ride.
  • 1 0
 I think I will start now to save up for that 130mm trail bike.
  • 1 0
 Man I love that blue paint scheme, brings me back to the 90's
  • 1 0
 Beautiful frames! Love the fact of another steel full sus manufacture.
  • 1 0
 that's doppppe
  • 1 0
 OUI, OUI!
  • 1 2
 Would be a prime candidate to mullet and slacken out the head angle a touch!!
  • 1 0
 Looks fun AF!
  • 2 2
 How many spare bushing sets comes with the bike? Smile
  • 2 2
 Wonder how wide of tars you can run on that beast? 2.8?
  • 2 0
 2.5" max
  • 1 0
 27.5aintdead
  • 1 0
 Beautiful work!
  • 1 0
 Sweet looking rig
  • 1 0
 Gorgeous
  • 4 5
 Great looking bike, Looks like a Starling murmur
  • 7 0
 But Madnes is vpp Wink
  • 8 3
 No it doesn't. Starling make awful looking bikes - this is lovely.
  • 4 4
 looks like a noodle
  • 3 4
 Leave it to an aerospace engineer to not leave room for a bottle
  • 3 0
 In space we drink from a pipe Our next trail bike will have bottle cage
  • 7 1
 @MadnesBicycles: All bikes don’t have to have a bottle holder, it’s ridiculous compromising suspension for a poxy bottle
  • 1 1
 Full suspension bike

. Straight uninterrupted seattube (for room to lower the saddle)
. Straight downtube (for structural reasons and low weight)
. low top tube (to be able to move around over the bike)
. bottle mount inside the front triangle (because that's what you prefer)

Pick three. For every combination of three, there are more than a few choices. Stop bitching about the availability of a bike that's been designed around a different combination than what you're shopping for. Are you the one who's complaining about the availability of blue shirts just because you are looking for white ones (which are available too)?
  • 1 0
 @vinay: I love how easy it is to troll people on this site. Good good fun
  • 1 0
 @CFR94: Shouldn't you just do that in classroom instead so that people can see and touch your face?
  • 1 0
 @vinay: plenty of people on here need to be educated as well.
  • 6 9
 No water bottle mounts. Huge oversight.. only thing missing from this being my dream bike
  • 13 3
 naw that's why I'd buy this bike. they are sending a message
  • 2 5
 @luckynugget: the message is they don't want it to be my dream bike? That's the ultimate troll move. 9d chess right here
  • 1 4
 nice bike, vpp and details, but that rear end thanks to not crossconected links will be stiff as a spagetti! Frown
  • 3 0
 Both rear triangles are connected at the 3 ends by 2 14mm stainless steel axles and the hub. This design is stiffer than welding a little plate bridge and no connection at the pivots.
  • 1 0
 @MadnesBicycles: siiiick! this is the kinda bike we need more of!! good job
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