Bike Check: Nino Schurter's Custom European Champion Scott Spark Race Bike

Feb 19, 2021
by James Smurthwaite  


2020 marked the first year that Nino Schurter didn't win the World Championships since 2014 but he bounced back just a week after the Leogang wash out to take the European Championships on home soil in Monte Tamaro. To commemorate that achievement, Scott has provided him with a custom bike for the 2021 season.

There aren't too many changes on this bike from the Scott Spark Nino was racing last year. Spec-wise, the biggest change comes in the wheels where Syncros comes in to replace DT Swiss with their new Silverton SL hoops. Other changes include Syncros Foam grips replacing their Silicon ones, and HT's M2 pedals replacing M1Ts. The most eye-catching change here will be the lack of a dropper post after Nino used the AXS Reverb in 2020 but the team tells us that this is a part he will change throughout the season depending on the track.
Nino Schurter // Scott SRAM MTB Racing Team
Age: 34
Height: 173cm (5'8")
Weight: 68kg (150 lb)
Instagram: @nschurter


Scott Spark Details
Frame: Scott Spark RC 900 Carbon HMX SL Custom, 110mm travel
Shock: RockShox Nude RLC3 45mm
Fork: RockShox Sid Ultimate, BlackBox Race Day Damper, 110mm
Wheels: Syncros Silverton SL 29"
Tires: Maxxis Aspen 29x2.4"
Drivetrain: SRAM XX1 Eagle AXS
Brakes: SRAM Level Ultimate BlackBox
Cockpit: Syncros Fraser IC SL Nino Special Edition 95mm /-30°/ 680mm
Size: Medium
More info: scott-sports.com

Schurter returned to form at the European Championships and took the win after a battle with Titouan Carod and Mathias Flueckiger.

Nino is running slightly higher pressure than last year in his fork up from 67psi to 74 psi, although still with one token. His fork also has a BlackBox Race Day Damper installed.

His rear suspension setup remains the same as 2021 with 132psi and 1.5 tokens in the RockShox Nude shock.

Nino is running a full XX1 Eagle AXS drivetrain with a 38T chainring.

He runs a standard 10-50T cassette on the rear.

Nino has his own, extreme version of the Syncros Fraser one-piece bar and stem that puts his weight well over the front wheel

The bars are 680mm wide and the stem length is 95mm with a huge -30° rise.

Nino's Garmin Edge 130 head unit is well integrated into the design.

There's no dropper on this build but instead a Syncros Duncan with a 10mm offset. We expect to see Nino back on the AXS Reverb when tackling the technical World Cup and Olympic tracks this year.

Nino is running Maxxis Aspen tyres again in 2021 and will be keeping the same set up with Oko Magic Mill High Fibre sealant, 1.15- 1.20bar (16.6 - 17.4psi) front and 1.25- 1.30bar (18.1 - 18.9psi) rear.

Nino made a slight change in his pedal spec choice, going from HT Components M1T to M2s

Nino is looking comfortable on a bike that's pretty similar to his 2020 set up. Next year that European Champion livery could well be replaced with an Olympics gold one.



139 Comments

  • 104 0
 They should be called Syncros Hammerhead Bars. Reminds me of shark week.
  • 2 0
 Probably a copyright issue somewhere cause that had to be the first thing they thought of looking at the finished product.
  • 1 3
 @badbadleroybrown: A copyright issue for a product made by the same company? Syncros is Syncros...
  • 5 0
 @LeDuke: they don't own rights to the name "hammerhead", but Karoo do and they make a bike computer.
  • 1 0
 @atestisthis: yeah, that's who I was talking about... but Hammerhead is actually the company, the Karoo is the bike computer.
  • 1 0
 @LeDuke: Syncros used to make cattlehead or cattleprod stems. The only use of hammerhead I recall was Giro helmets.
  • 1 0
 Syncros names its products with Canadian places
  • 58 5
 This bike is incredible, but what's even more incredible is how pedestrian it appears next to @dangerholm's spark setup. These pros need trickle-up technology!
  • 32 2
 The proof that you don't need the fanciest tech to be fast. You just need lots and lots of power.
  • 7 1
 @BenTheSwabian: still very fancy tech on nino's bike and we all know dangerholm can throw down some wattz.
  • 16 0
 He's using extra light, extra fast tires with 170 TPI casings that aren't available to the public. Custom where it counts.
  • 1 0
 @R-M-R: but electric suspension and hidden brake hoses though
  • 7 0
 @thegoodflow: I'd rather have Nino's electric legs and hidden third lung!
  • 1 0
 @BenTheSwabian: And a light bike when racing XC
  • 32 1
 I am just continuously amazed that these guys are running 16-18psi in their tires! Especially considering there are still plenty of folks who think that 30+psi is faster.

I would love to know the secret. I've heard that they run tire inserts but consider it a bit of a secret weapon and don't share that info freely. Maybe it has more to do with the fact that tires and wheels only need to last one race?
  • 1 0
 the shot with nino holding the bike has different tyre valves to the studio photos. some sort of procore-like thing? pressure monitors?
  • 2 0
 @AyJayDoubleyou: Those do look like the zipp pressure monitors but I don't think that those are fully integrated with those syncros wheels like they are on the zipps. Maybe something else special?
  • 13 1
 Not much secret—they run tire inserts in the rear tire in rough races, but other than that, 16-18 psi in a wide tire (2.4" Maxxis Aspen/Rekon Race WT on ~30 mm rims for Scott SRAM) is plenty for XC.

XC is pretty chunky these days, but they're not taking the big hits like the gravity disciplines. I've run my 2.4" XC tires as low as 12 psi with no issues.
  • 13 0
 @nattyd: I suppose the fact that they are better riders than me would certainly make a difference. Line choice is not my forte.
  • 4 1
 I run about 20psi in my hardtail f/r. Noticeably faster than 25ish psi.
  • 26 0
 @lefthandohvhater: There are races where this comes into play. If you watch World Champs at MSA in 2019 (Nino win), a couple of the other racers flatted out of the lead. There was some talk afterwards about Nino "getting lucky" with no flats, but the champ wasn't having it:

"I invested more time than ever on searching smooth lines and I can tell you almost every sharp rock on that 4.5km lap. I chose slower lines, rode higher tire pressure and I attacked (luckily I also had the legs to do that) before the dangerous descent to force my rivals to mistakes. It payed off - preparation and the right focus is ????"
  • 3 0
 @nattyd: I generally run 18-20 psi with high rollers in the summer and 16-18 psi in the winter with Magic Marys on my Giant anthem with no issues. Full on downcountry use.

My wife is running the same aspens as above on her bike and I regularly find her pressures down in the 10-12 psi range but she is just over 100 pounds so ...

Unless of course I forget to check the pressure and peal my tire off argh.
  • 1 0
 @nattyd: 'getting lucky'/avoiding sharp rocks on a memorizable-memorized track. If luck enters it, one gets pinned between competitors into sharp rocks. Less likely for NS
  • 6 0
 What do you weigh?

An olympic rider that weighs 135 and has finesse can ride at lower pressures than the rest of us mere mortals.
  • 3 0
 More risk tolerance, more skill, more experience, better at "riding light".

I am sure Nino has spent plenty of time on a CX bike with 33mm tubulars inflated to barely anything. And Nino used to ride tubulars on his MTBs, too, so he's used to super low pressures. You just get an innate feel for what will pinch the tire and what you can get away with.
  • 2 1
 Many people (other XC racers even) seriously underappreciate the advantages of grip and a well descending XC bike. Time you don't lose on the descents is time you don't have to make up on the climbs. So even if it were a major factor for rolling resistance, lower tire pressure for better grip could be a viable trade-off (to a point).
My team doesn't use tire inserts, we haven't really seen any major benefits from them. Not enough to outweigh the drawbacks anyways. But there are definitley people who like like to run them, even if it might just be for peace of mind in the event of a flat tire.
  • 2 0
 Alot depends on rider weight and trail conditions. He is 150lbs running 2.4's on a 30mm rim. I run the same width rim and tire on my XCish bike and weigh 170. I run a bit more PSI 18/20 and I very rarely flat. But all it takes is the wrong rock or foreign object at the wrong time and you are down for the count. I'm sure he's tested the hellllllll out of his setup to know what to avoid, how hard he can ride certain sections and what is comfortable for a 90 min push.
  • 2 0
 In this video, Nino recommends running tire pressure so low that you can press the tire to the rim with your thumb: www.youtube.com/watch?v=43ruZxBIi2w&feature=emb_logo
  • 2 1
 @schofell84: Yeah, definitely. I'm 140 lbs and suck, but I'm also going a lot slower than them on the descents, so I can get away with really low pressures.
  • 1 0
 I’m at about 155 with my gear on. I run a lot lower volume tires. Vittoria Mezcal 2.25 f/r. @schofell84:
  • 1 0
 @AyJayDoubleyou: those are tyrewiz pressure monitor valves.
  • 1 0
 Nino is a small guy, just under 150lbs in prime shape, and they're 2.4" tires on 30mm inner width rims.

That's really not all that low in the grand scheme if you scale it down from a heavier rider on narrower tires.
  • 2 0
 @schofell84: Yep rider weight is a big factor. I weigh about 30% heavier than Nino so my tyres need about that much more air.
  • 2 0
 Think i read somewhere that they've found running super fast rolling bigger volume tires with low psi and is faster plus more grip than a smaller tire with more aggressive knobs
  • 3 0
 @schofell84: Seriously. At 195 lbs on aggressive downhill trails, my rims would be toast at anything less than 25 psi.
  • 2 0
 @gnarlysipes: Yep. Try and aggressively ride trails in UT/AZ at 200lbs/90kg with 20psi. Most big fast riders I know try the low 20s rear as its trendy, then always seem to end up back around 30 for numerous reasons.
  • 1 0
 I'm about 160 lbs xc racer on 2.4 Ardent Race or Pirelli Scorpions xc tires. I run, depending on rocks and roots, 18/16 to 22/19 f/r.
  • 1 0
 Theory is lower psi has less vibration which offsets the higher rolling resistance of low psi
  • 2 0
 @SvenNorske: you mean those riding blind open trail without specialty wheels and tires or access to rolling resistance testing equipment don't have the same setup as pro xc racers? Tell us more
  • 1 0
 @ceecee: Obviously, but the point is the one-size-fits-all tire pressure approach is misguided. Specialized has a suspension calculator tool on their website that, while not perfect, offers a good starting point for suspension setup and part of that includes a recommended tire pressure range. The _low end_ for me is 25/28 front/rear.
  • 1 0
 @gnarlysipes: There are also calculators on the SRAM and Silca websites. They give pretty different results. The Silca one often gives me 15 psi for my mountain bike.
  • 1 0
 @nattyd: Thanks for the tip!
  • 1 0
 @nattyd: just tried both. Silca must be out of whack. 15.5lbs with my weight? My rims would be toast after one ride.

SRAM had similar results to the Specialized calculator.
  • 22 0
 I would like to challenge this statement: "He runs a standard 10-50T cassette on the rear."
  • 21 0
 Definitely a 52T but lets not give him too much beef monster pushes a 38 up front
  • 11 0
 @Aburjakowsky: I feel so inadequate with my little 32T up front...
  • 17 0
 @goldencycle: You could be me with a 28...consider yourself good.
  • 11 1
 @Aburjakowsky: I doubt its his choice. Sram is pushing the 52t too hard.
  • 2 0
 I saw the first pic at the top and thought...he went to 52T in the back, wonder what the front ring is? Obviously whoever wrote the blurb for the close-up cassette pic didn't even look at it.
  • 1 0
 @Aburjakowsky: Agreed.. If I was on a 29er with a 38T in front, my cassette might need to be about the same diameter as the tire.
  • 9 0
 As a gear head I love that cycling is the one sport where amateurs can have better equipment than pros. Compare this sponsor restricted rig to Dangerholm's or my sub-20lb Spark. In any other type of racing you can't access anywhere near the level of what is used by factory teams.
  • 2 0
 You cant get those prototype tires, that handlebar, or the black box dampers in the suspension. Its not uncommon for pro frames to be one-offs with minor tweaks to geo and or linkage setup. Pros were also using axs a year or two before it was released to public. There’s plenty of tech not available to us that the pros have.
  • 7 0
 "The most eye-catching change here will be the lack of a dropper post after Nino used the AXS Reverb in 2020"

He used one at Worlds and Euros, but that's it. Not for the World Cups at Nove Mesto. Previous to that, the last time he used a dropper in an international race was 2018 Albstadt, when he ran one with a travel reducer on his hardtail in the mud:

www.pinkbike.com/photo/15921375

I asked him his take on droppers at Sea Otter a few years ago, and he said "too heavy for XC". At 700 g with remote, I wouldn't expect the AXS to change his take.
  • 3 0
 I read an interview with Nino where he said that with the dropper, he descends more aggressively and is more likely to flat. That interview at least a couple years old, and we know he has moved to bigger rims and tires, as well as inserts when warranted, since then.
  • 3 1
 I wonder if 2021 is the year that Nino will start running a dropper for races. He's starting to get challenged by younger riders, so my armchair quarterback take would be that he should race with a dropper to exploit his superior descending skills to save time, make up time, or just recover better on descents.
  • 1 0
 @Hobbanero: Yep, I remember this too. Pretty fascinating.
  • 1 0
 @PAmtbiker: Could be, but I'm not sure it makes him faster. He's already the fastest descender in the field, but the margins are so small—probably a handful of seconds for the whole race. That vs dragging around a extra pound and a half for the whole race...
  • 1 0
 Nino is using dropper on marathon races, and on some xco courses
  • 2 0
 Just use a much lighter dropper (One Up 125mm) or a carbon dropper (60mm DT Swiss, weighs only 369g). Even a solid seatpost has some weight, so adding a lightweight dropper post would add much less than 1lb, and would be great for any XC race race bike, + you have the best of both worlds (you can still descend safely and fast). My Scott Spark SL (120mm travel front & rear) weighs only 23.1lbs with a 150mm dropper, 760mm 35 bars, Fox 34 SC fork, and bulkier 2.35" tires, & Time Atac pedals. It may not be as fast as my Enduro bike downhill, but it's very quick and fast everywhere (both up and down).
  • 2 0
 @RowdyAirTime: He is required to use the Reverb AXS
  • 9 0
 They could have put a Scott sticker on a pogo stick and this guy would win on it
  • 6 1
 I wonder if you got all of the champion riders from multiple riding disciplines and calculated the average age, height, inseam, and reach, what the ideal body geometry for champ bike riders would be. Only bring it up because I had no idea Nino was 5'8, thought he was way taller.
  • 14 0
 Here's a great read about that topic:
www.thestar.com/news/insight/2016/01/16/when-us-air-force-discovered-the-flaw-of-averages.html

Cliff's note version: They tried to make the ideal cockpit size for airplanes by averaging all pilot's physical dimensions. Conclusion: Out of 4,063 pilots, not a single airman fit within the average range on all 10 dimensions
  • 4 0
 @hardtailparty: That is an interesting article, but I think Total Amateur was referring to BODY geometry. As in, are you more likely to be fast / pro biker if you are short or tall or whatever.
  • 5 0
 @smokingtires: Ah, gotcha. Yup, I totally misunderstood and saw what I wanted to see. Thanks for the clarification.
  • 2 0
 I don't think there is a right answer and it's ever changing. Most pro cyclists tend to be in that 5-8 to 5-10 range based on what I've seen, 140-150 lbs....I bet the average would be close to that.

But you are seeing a lot of guys WAY out of that range too, more relatively recently. Guys like Chris Froome, Brad Wiggins from just a few years back to guys like Toon Aerts, Tom Dumoulin, Wout and of course MvDP. All these guys are in that 6-0 to 6-4 range and seem to have no problems climbing / hanging with the best....but they are the exceptions body wise relative to the average but also happen to be some of the best - so statistically, who knows.
  • 3 0
 @hardtailparty: hey that was still super interesting! That brings about a totally different question too is how much consumer feedback goes into cockpit designing on these bikes? I'd love to see some companies like Chromag or Raceface come out with some surveys about reach, shoulder with, and grip diameter/hand sizing to better tailor their options.
  • 3 0
 @RadBartTaylor: ya I know there are some big boys out there crushing it, but I can't help think about how much easier the sport would be if my center of gravity was lower.....

I'd also be super interested in seeing what disciplines of riding and racing most champs came from previously. UFC did a breakdown of their champs and their respective specialties and it was super interesting, albeit predictable.
  • 1 0
 @TotalAmateur: totally predictable until somebody totally changes the game like Khabib! Prior to that you had glimpses of brilliance from guys that were totally different, Maia and Lyota come to mind. What was the background of the champs?

The best local around here for years at XC and CX, who had 2-3 national championships was 6-6....pro's and con's just like martial arts to body types. Look at Minaar, he's 6-4 190ish and the GOAT but the modern group of guys are shorter and likely more naturally gifted athletes and seem to be dominating.
  • 3 1
 @RadBartTaylor: dude it was like overwhelming wrestlers and jiu jitsu fighters. I think it went wrestling, jiu jitsu, boxing, muay thai, etc. in terms of what discipline yielded the most champs. I wish I could find the article (probably can but being lazy) as they made some claim where if you were a UFC fighter who also was at least a D1 wrestling champ or All American, can't remember exactly, you had like an 80% better chance of attaining a belt than someone without. Basically, the study confirmed what Khabib basically proves every time: strong wrestling pedigree is the best base to start from and the best discipline to be strong in as a UFC fighter.
  • 6 0
 I’d love to be riding my very best on some descent on my 170mm bike only to have Nino blow by me on his ultralight XC rig that the PB comment section dubbed totally inadequate for such riding.
  • 1 1
 I guess thats an equal comparison.
  • 3 1
 @RonSauce: just underscores that these guys and gals are in a completely different universe from us mere mortals.
  • 3 0
 Still cool that we can easily find bike checks for the setup that one of the best pros is running. Not many sports where you can find the same components and setup as the best of the best. Kinda looked like the bike in the riding photos was a little different to the bike check photos. Different tire valves and almost looked like a 10-50 cassette while riding and 10-52 in bike photos maybe.
  • 3 1
 Yeah, if it was the NFL bike checks would be "this is, or isnt a bike that may, or may not be ridden during the race. Thank you."
  • 6 1
 Can't get over the tire pressure.. that's wild low! And he doesn't exactly shy away from technical or hard riding either
  • 15 5
 For a light guy on 2.4" 29 tires that's not that low.
  • 11 10
 @smgishot13: 16.5 psi on 2.4" tires is low for anyone! I historically considered the floor for that volume of tire to be around 20-22. Didn't know you could dip that far into the teens, especially with the kind of riding he does.
  • 2 0
 His fork pressure is relatively low too. Maybe because of the bigger 2.4" tires and his relatively low body mass.
  • 2 0
 @goldencycle: yeah below 20 psi seems too sluggish during the sprints to the finishing line
  • 5 1
 @goldencycle: 17 front, 18.5 rear. I'm happy with 20-25. Given that Nino and his bike is about 20kg lighter than me and my bike that is pretty much equivilent.
  • 2 0
 @goldencycle: I run F18/22R on 2.5s on my enduro bike on most trails and I weigh 210. Certainly with the massive weight difference and the fact that Nino is undoubtedly smoother than me, it doesn't seem that hard to believe.
  • 2 0
 Wonder if he has inserts? No mention of it but wouldn't surprise me.

Have you seen what the CX guys run on those little 33c tires? They are in the high teens too.....
  • 2 0
 @RadBartTaylor: it would surprise me. Carbon rims are more difficult to pinch flat, esp those with a wide lip atop beadwall. Also pressure goes up during race if temp goes up, XCers don't steamroll rock gardens, 2.4WT on 26mm iw, and Magic Milk. I used 18.5/15psi last night in similar setup, cuz I was too lazy to top off tires, and I'm 175 lbs. Front is EXO+ tho. Low pressures are fun if one avoids the sharper rocks in landings
  • 1 0
 @ceecee: I find it can be a big limiter in corners, but as you point out, it's possible if care is taken.
  • 4 1
 I weigh 185lbs. ride medium aggressive. Minion DHF/DHR on my 2015 pivot mach 4, 27.5" tires. I routinely run 17.8/19.8psi. ZERO issues. Great grip and no deflection issues nor tire roll/fold during G outs. .5psi less in rear and I will start to feel lack of sidewall support.
  • 6 0
 I always though I ran 22+ psi until I got a digital tire pressure gauge and learned that I was 19-20. The analog gauge on my floor pump reads higher than the Topeak digital....I think I trust the new digital gauge more and was also surprised how low my tire pressures were! On my hardtail I can run 12-14 psi on the front with 29x2.8" no problems no squirms and lots of grip!
  • 1 0
 I run 17F/18R on my enduro bike with cushcore and I am 205lbs loaded. Have yet to flat from hitting a rock. This is with a 30mm rim and 2.35 mary and hans combo.

On my XC bike I run 18F/20R no cushcore with 30mm rim and 2.35 ralph and ray combo. Still no flats.
  • 1 1
 @goldencycle: Unless you're over 190 pounds, over 20 psi is probably too high, or your gauge is off. I'm 215 and running 20 psi in my 2.4 Aspen in the front on my XC hardtail, tubeless, no cushcore.
  • 1 0
 @smgishot13: what make you think YOUR gauge is right? Partially joking, but I've seen these things all over the place to your point. I bought a Accu-gauge analog one thinking it's the most consistent, but at the end of the day, it's all about what works and being consistent day to day.
  • 1 0
 @RadBartTaylor: lol, I spent enough money on it, it better be totally accurate. ????
  • 1 0
 @smgishot13: What did you get?
  • 2 0
 I'd love to know the real reason he was on the non-SL version of the frame for at least it's first couple years. This is the first time I've noticed he's on the SL but that could have started a year ago or more. He was definitely on the non-SL for '17 & '18.
  • 2 0
 From his bike check in 2019 for the XCO World Championship in Canada it stated;

"As always, Nino Schurter has chosen the version made of HMX carbon, which is not the lightest of the available models, but he prefers the rigidity that this brings."

www.brujulabike.com/scott-spark-nino-schurter-world-championship-2019

I guess the SL version has made improvements in rigidity?
  • 1 0
 @pcassingham: Nothing has changed with either model and back then I heard them say it was for durability. I don't think we've been told the real reason.
  • 4 0
 It's weird not seeing Nino in the rainbow stripes but tbh I think the EU Champs jersey looks better.
  • 2 0
 Been wondering if he just isn't a huge fan of the all-black Scott kits and likes having a white top hahaha
  • 4 0
 Absolutely love scott bikes, why dont you guys include them on reviews more often? I feel like I dont see them on here much
  • 3 0
 I'd guess this is because the only significant change to any of Scott's full sus range since they were all reviewed here has been paint.
  • 1 0
 Honestly, I’m a “mtb” biker(shifty eyed), and I’m wondering out loud here, are there any aero considerations being made with that bar/stem rider interface? You know, cough, watts, cough marginal gains, cough, watts. But seriously, are there any aero considerations?
  • 1 0
 The bike is awesome but this 42-52 gear step is so awful. Other manufacturers (Garbaruk, E13, Shimano) provide cassettes with more balanced gear steps in 10-51/52 versions. I'm sure Nino would throw away this cassette if he could.
  • 8 5
 I'd rather ride downhill with Nino's cockpit setup than ride even the most drowsy XC trail without a dropper
  • 3 0
 I bet that thing is just crazy fast uphill and makes you feel like superman. I bet it sounds interesting too.
  • 8 1
 do you want to push a 38T uphill?!?!? Nino feels like Superman because he is.
  • 5 1
 Looks like a 10-52 cassette ? But who’s counting ...
  • 1 0
 Yeah, 10-52 for sure. I've got one and it looks exactly like this
  • 3 0
 38t so no need for chain stay protection.
Gotta work on my legs for cleaner bike looks ,????
  • 1 0
 Are there any further read-ups on those wheels.. that looks amazing... one-piece carbon rims.. how do they true that??? comes true out of the box.. find that hard to believe..... did I miss a review on those???
  • 2 0
 How is stem length for something like this measured? Because the lump that's there can't be 95 anything surely?
  • 6 0
 I think it's more of an estimate based where your hands end up relative to a more normal bar and stem setup
  • 1 0
 That's what I'd guess too. It's interesting because that isn't how it works normally, but realistically there's no other way of doing. It's effectively the same as buying a 40mm stem and 50mm riser bars and rolling them all the way forwards instead of up.
  • 3 1
 Quote
"The bars are 680mm wide and the stem length is 95mm with a huge -30° rise." ?????

Drop surely?
  • 4 0
 a -30 degree drop would be a 30 degree rise.
  • 15 0
 Choose either one of -30° rise or 30° drop then be a dick about it.
  • 2 0
 @Ginsu2000: 'i f*cking hate that'
  • 3 0
 I thought it was DH bike week.
  • 1 0
 My takeaway from this is that you're saying you'd prefer to see Nino going down.
  • 2 0
 No relevant changes from the last year, but that wheels, and the best color.... Love It Wink
  • 2 0
 I wouldn't ride with those bars if they were given to me for free. My back would be killing me.
  • 1 0
 wait. whoa. where is the OSP setup!? how can this bike be complete without it!?
  • 1 0
 He's running the 35mm SID lowered to 110mm correct? Not the 32mm bumped up to 110...
  • 1 0
 Looks like the 35 to me.... judging more by the crown width. But I'm not 100% certain.
  • 2 0
 Yes, its the sid ultimate 35 120 mm lowered to 110, sid sl cant go above 100 mm
  • 2 1
 Wheels do really make a bike stand out ,very nice bike ,only flaw is no dropper
  • 2 1
 He needs to join orbea, BEFORE YOU DOWNVOTE I HAVE A REASON THE PAINT ON HIS SPARK IS TO HEAVY There now you can downvote
  • 3 0
 Bike weight?
  • 1 0
 Am I the only one who thinks Nino’s Garmin setup is NOT well integrated here, facing away from him?
  • 2 0
 That’s one slick bike.
  • 1 0
 Nino Shurter defitintelly needs that bail out gear!
  • 1 0
 Does he know his handle bars are on upside down????
  • 1 0
 How does this man not have a power meter on there?
  • 1 0
 680 mm hehe
  • 1 1
 needs about 100% less cables
  • 1 1
 Those bar stem combos are ugly
  • 3 4
 Pretty sure he lost because of the silicone grips.... Foam FTW!!!
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