BikeYoke DeHy - Review

Jan 10, 2017
by Richard Cunningham  

BikeYoke DeHy cable conversion for Reverb dropper posts
BikeYoke DeHy cable remote for Reverb Dropper seatposts

BikeYoke DeHy cable remote for Reverb Dropper seatposts


DeHy is an abbreviation of sorts for "de-hydraulic" and that's exactly what BikeYoke's cable-actuated conversion for RockShox Reverb Stealth dropper seatposts does. The German-made DeHy kit arrives with the necessary hardware, a remote lever, a length of high-quality cable and housing, and a mechanical actuator that threads into the spot that is usually occupied by the Reverb's "Poppet Valve" hydraulic plunger. Remote levers are configured for SRAM and Shimano direct-mount brake lever bosses.

All of the bits are beautifully CNC-machined from aluminum or stainless steel, and DeHy kits can be purchased directly from BikeYoke's online stores in Germany or North America. Complete DeHy kits run $124 USD for the SRAM version we reviewed, and $140 for the Shimano-compatible kits. The DeHy mechanical segment alone is sold for $69.

Installation should be easy for home mechanics who have basic experience with shifter and derailleur assemblies. I had the my SRAM Matchmaker-mounted DeHy working in about 30 minutes using only the kit's printed instructions - and that included re-threading the internally routed housing through the frame of the bike.

BikeYoke put together an instructional video that illustrates how simple the DeHy is to install and, after going through the process, I can vouch for that.


Installation

My reverb Stealth dropper's hydraulic remote was returning slowly and on the verge of needing a bleed when I took it on a cold and sloppy ride, where the post became unresponsive and stopped midway into its stroke. Installing the DeHy cable conversion seemed like a perfect way to make lemonade from lemons.

The task requires no special tools - just three open-end wrenches, a cable cutter, some Allen keys and a T25 Torx driver. I used a small flat-head screwdriver to remove and replace the Reverb's internal snap ring and, because I was not planning on returning to the standard hydraulic remote, I cut the hose at both ends, about an inch away from the remote lever and the Poppet Valve, so I could use the hose to fish the new cable housing through the inside of the frame.

Tip: Leave the Reverb hose inside the frame and thread a length of wire, first through the new cable housing and then through the hose. Twist a small wrench on either end to prevent the wire from
BikeYoke DeHy cable remote for Reverb Dropper seatposts
The DeHy module replaces the Reverb's Poppet Valve. Both the DeHy and the Poppet use a plunger to push on an internal valve-shaft to unlock the post. The DeHy's cable action, however, feels smoother and more precise.
slipping and then pull the new housing through the frame using the old hose. As long as you use a squeaky clean wire, this method makes short work of a sometimes frustrating task.

BikeYoke DeHy cable remote for Reverb Dropper seatposts
Slide a length of wire through both the new cable housing and the Reverb hose, and then use it to pull the housing through the frame.

BikeYoke DeHy cable remote for Reverb Dropper seatposts
Twist a wrench on both ends to trap the housing against the hose, and to give you something to pull with.

My DeHy kit was configured for SRAM Matchmaker direct-mount levers, which caused a small dilemma because my left-side brake lever clamp was dedicated to the RockShox Reverb plunger. Luckily, I had a discarded left-side Matchmaker clamp from the front derailleur era. There are probably a million of them tucked away in parts drawers somewhere. If you need one, you could probably trade for a slice of leftover pizza.

BikeYoke DeHy cable remote for Reverb Dropper seatposts
I needed to switch out the Reverb brake lever clamp to a Matchmaker type (right).
BikeYoke DeHy cable remote for Reverb Dropper seatposts
The new lever can be mounted to the Matchmaker's inboard or outboard position.


Tip: Getting the housing clipped to the proper length is not super critical, but you don't want it to be too short, because too much tension on the housing can pull on the cable and release the post. Leave enough housing between the remote and the frame to turn the handlebar 90 degrees, then estimate how deep your post will set into the frame to figure out the proper length. An inch too long is much better than one too short. Remember, you won't have to bleed the system if you decide later that you want to trim the housing a bit more.

BikeYoke DeHy cable remote for Reverb Dropper seatposts
The barrel stop is set 17 millimeters from the ferrule and the cable is clipped short.
BikeYoke DeHy cable conversion for Reverb dropper posts
The DeHy lever has an eccentric cam that actuates its plunger mechanism.


Riding Impressions

Truth be told, I could have bled the Reverb's hydraulic remote in about the same time it took to install the DeHy kit. So, assuming that I already had a bleed kit and the proper fluid, I could have saved $125 (had I actually paid for my DeHy) and had a functioning dropper post once again. After riding with the DeHy cable conversion, however, I was convinced that I had made the correct decision.

The shift-paddle-style lever's action is lighter and it feels far more precise - which made it much easier to stop the post mid-stroke for pedally descents than I was accustomed to using the hydraulic button. The radial adjustment of SRAM's Matchmaker brake-lever clamp provides the option to angle the paddle remote like a shift lever, or to operate it vertically, like many riders prefer. I still have muscle memory from the front derailleur era, so I chose the angled position. I was surprised that I did not need any time to acclimate from the push button to the new lever.

I like my dropper posts to extend quickly, and that is exactly what the DeHy does. Depress the lever and the Reverb returns with a snap. A lighter touch on the lever will slow the post's return, but there is no fine tuning feature to control the rate of extension (like the dial adjustment that RockShox built into its push-button lever). I am sure that playing with the Reverb's air spring pressure would enable users to tune the return speed to a degree, but I set the pressure at 250psi and left it there - happy to hear the top-out sound the moment my thumb called for extension.


Comparing Features

RockShox's choice to use a hydraulic actuation system provides a couple of advantages over a cable system. The most salient is that, properly installed, the hose can be kinked, pulled and shoved, and the post will still function properly. The second is that it is a sealed system, so it should be impervious to cold, wet and dirty conditions. In the real-world, however, the Reverb's remote often becomes sluggish when temperatures drop near freezing, which is annoying.

The DeHy's cable-operated alternative is sealed from the elements at the seatpost, but is exposed at the remote lever. If you have issues with your cable operated shift levers in freezing or mucky situations, you can anticipate the same from your DeHy. That's a rare occurrence these days, but it happens. On the plus side, the lever action of the DeHy system is more intuitive (both right and left hands mirror the same movement), and the option to set the lever where it works best is a feature that the Reverb's push-button cannot duplicate.
BikeYoke DeHy cable remote for Reverb Dropper seatposts

BikeYoke DeHy cable remote for Reverb Dropper seatposts


Pinkbike's Take:

bigquotesI'm a fan. RockShox Reverb seatposts have earned my respect as one of the more reliable members of the dropper generation, and I was happy to live with its push-button remote until I spent time with the DeHy conversion. BikeYoke's cable-driven remote and its paddle-type lever are an expensive purchase, but for Reverb owners who want a more user-friendly remote, the DeHy is a delightful improvement. It's a more ergonomic alternative, easier to service, and one less reason to smell like hydraulic fluid while I'm wrenching on my bikes. - RC



172 Comments

  • + 153
 I don't think that I've ever heard of the reverb being described as "reliable"
  • + 29
 No kidding - I want some of the happy meds rc is on that allows him to feel the reverb is one of the more reliable members of the dropper generation......
  • + 48
 Let me help you then. Both my well used Reverbs are reliable. And they certainly dont need this device.
  • + 35
 Thats why they are called "Referb" not Reverb
  • + 11
 My first -early version- Reverb failed. Got a replacement within a week. Newer ones (2015+) have been faultless since.
Now running a Race Face Turbine, having many more issues and missing my Reverb.
Touched a Fox Transfer once and that one seems the most solid of them.
  • + 24
 I have a 2012 reverb since new, got it serviced once a year, and had no problems with it. If that's not reliable I don't know what is
  • + 8
 My b1 version completely stopped working in cold weather. Bleeds helped very temporarily, then it was back to not working in the cold. Luckily was able to return it 6 months in and am ordering a 9point8. Reached out to SRAM via an LBS and they said they didn't even have certain replacement parts for the B1 as it was too "new" (I bought it a half year ago). I guess if you need parts within 6 months+ of buying it you're possibly SOL.
  • + 5
 Reliable,easy to install, robust,easy to Service,great customer Support and travel options up to 170 and 200mm already for years long before others tried to go beyond 150 or even 125mm: moveloc
  • + 0
 @toronte: I've been using a fox transfer on a demo bike for the last week in cold weather. I have had to intermittently pull it up manually several times when it wouldn't fully rebound. Could be an isolated thing and it's not my bike so unsure about treatment, but that's been my first limited experience with it. Also have heard generally good things but I think it's only been out 6 months.
  • + 5
 @bansaiman: Wow! Where can you buy it? Oh, wait...
  • + 10
 my 180€ reverb non-stealth, 2 years without any service, still goin perfect!!
  • + 1
 @bansaiman: Saw that when I was looking for a reverb replacement. As far as I could tell it wasn't avail. in the US unfortunately.
  • + 4
 @bansaiman: That's basically the unicorn of dropper posts - never seen one in the wild.
  • + 1
 After 5 month of using Reverb Stealth (150mm) is going to warranty, cause not working at all below 5°C. Changing whole internals.
  • + 1
 @bansaiman: IF you ever get one... I tried last year, writing emails, calling them repeatedly... Noone ever bothered to reply or to pick up the phone....
  • + 0
 @m88888m: are you guys talking about 9point8's?
  • + 1
 @bansaiman: tryed to get my Hands on one - two years passed and it's still not available
  • + 2
 @Gamsjaga:

I' ve seen one in someone elses bike, I was on the trails with and for 2 months I also own the 170mm version. Great stuff. If you want one, you have to enter on a list.
They formerly had problems with their manufacturer in Taiwan.now they are starting to produce in germany and finally they will become available. Problem is,there were so many preordered that they are srrved first.
The only "bad" about the moveloc is,no internal routing and it is longer than some others.
If i hadnt suddenly had the luck, to get one M earlier I' d have gone with the 160mm revive from bikeyoke.
  • + 2
 @mattvanders: the fox doss that never needs servicing. and it works in the cold.
  • + 3
 I have about a year and a half of riding on mine with no maintenance and it works perfectly. I'm not sure if I'm just lucky or if the problems with it are just exaggerated.
  • + 1
 @ilovedust: Got one , you are right. I think for DH make sense... maybe.
  • + 1
 I don't know anyone who's got a reverb that hasn't had problems with it. Usually works for a small period of time then looses the bleed and drops and inch whenever you put weight on it.
  • + 3
 @lukehmail: I've had the fox transfer (kashima coated) for 6 months. After about 4 months of hosing it off after every ride it started to rebound slower and sometimes stick. A drop of oil at the seal and it was like new again. Great post.
  • + 2
 @Garpur44:
owned them since 2012, 2 stealth’s just sold non steath with a bike. all working perfectly. used in uk all year. try different bleed techniques until you find one that works for you (cold weather problems ,sounds like moisture in oil,completely change oil next bleed maybe )
the sit on dropping is purely pressure related' 250psi should sort that out
DeHy is clever but are we not trying to get away from bow-den cables
just a better shape/style hydro lever would be good
  • + 2
 The folks at BikeYoke should've made a "Reverb Spring Conversion" that somehow gets a metal spring and locking device inside the Reverb. The Reverb's reliance on hydraulic seals are it's weak link.
  • + 1
 Last ride I went on, 3 friends were on Reverbs, 2 of them were not working.
  • + 2
 PHeller: We are working on somethig even better for the Reverb! REVIVE your Reverb! ;-)
  • + 5
 Mines lasted 2 years, with 0 maintenance...
  • + 5
 Reverbs on two bikes. Both external. No issues so far. What I don't like about the Reverb is the lever. It's hard to push. I also have a Spesh Command post and I like the lever so much better. Both in ergonomics and feel. Unfortunately, the DeHy does not work with the external posts.
  • + 2
 I'm not gonna read all that. I had a Reverb. I had all the problems. Seems like this device will resolve 2 of the 3 biggest probs. Good on em.

Reverb: Oil -AND- Air pressure to make the thing go? Way over-thought by RS. The final insult is having to pull the saddle to check air pressure. I could warranty my Reverb but I doubt I'lll ever get around to it. After months of riding a triple-suspension bike with a terrible plunger, I pulled it out, cutting the hose and threw it in the Transfer box. Installed the Fox myself with minimal effort, slapped on a Wolf Tooth ReMote paddle and never looked back.
  • + 3
 Yup. No problems with my Reverbs after years of year round riding.
  • + 2
 @mattvanders: same here but since 2012 only 1 bleed and no service !
  • + 4
 Another happy customer chiming in. 2 full years on my reverb no issues no complaints.
  • + 45
 SRAM/Rock Shox should be embarrassed by their dropper remote. First gen? Ok, I'll let it slide, but they release a "new and improved" Reverb with the same horrible design??? 0/10 is too generous. You can't create a video celebrating the death of the front derailleur and then stick with the least ergonomic lever design possible instead of taking advantage of that free space. Whatever position you end up putting the Reverb lever in, it forces you to compromise your grip on the bars every time you operate it. Not to mention that the stroke takes more force and distance than a cable operated design.

I'll definitely be picking up a DeHy, but it's sad that I need to spend $70-140 to upgrade the lever on a recently redesigned $500 post.
  • + 16
 You don't. Just start over with something better. Life's too short to be sad about a seatpost, but I get what you mean. You could buy 3 Giant Contacts for $500.
  • + 12
 @kingsx: Agreed. Giant's post is underrated and under-publicized - it should have been PB's product of the year because it is the same as the Fox Transfer yet cheaper.
  • + 3
 @iamamodel: Really - just the same? I have a Giant and it certainly was good value and has worked pretty well. In fact in over a year it hasn't failed once. It has a bit of play - perhaps too much and the black on the upper post is wearing off, but has not affected performance. Best of all for me was that its convertible to either external or internal routing.
  • - 4
flag Rasterman (Jan 11, 2017 at 4:46) (Below Threshold)
 Or just get a whole brand new seatpost with an awesome lever for $200, Crankbrothers Highline.
  • + 6
 The funny part is people figured out using the right side on on the left to deal with the akward button... you would think after seeing that they would have gone ah-ha! I know what our customers want
  • + 3
 @headshot: mine started to develop a little bit of play after 2.5 years of use, i took everything apart, regreased everything, tightened everything to spec and the play is gone. must have been a loose screw somewhere, which after 2.5 years is pretty good
  • + 2
 @Jokesterwild: from my 25 years of mtn biking I've come to believe that sram could give a flying f-ck what their customers think. Imagine if shimano made a dropper seat post, it would last 10 years and would be perfect before it hit the market, the only downside would be the weird tools needed to service it.
  • + 2
 @unrooted: shimano does have a dropper now, under their Pro brand. I agree that it is probably one of the best posts out there (though I've never tried it), but it only comes in 125 drop
  • + 3
 @headshot: Yep, I've had several Giant posts and I just got a new bike with a Fox Transfer and there's little difference. The Fox tops outs with a clunk and sometimes the lever gets stuck down and therefore when I go to sit back on the seat after raising the seat compresses. I had to fix that. Agreed that the black on the Giant is prone to wear, but I found if you keep dust wiper clean and grease underneath it, it is less likely to do that. If I had to buy a post aftermarket I'd choose the Giant, regardless of cost. I hear the piston is replaceable real cheap and all other bits are serviceable.
  • + 1
 Don't forget the Novyparts Reverb Trigger Remote as another option for folks who really like the Reverb but want another remote.
  • + 2
 @rmalexan: that's really cool, but it appears to not yet be on the market, I can't even find a msrp.
  • + 3
 I agree with the Giant post being reliable inexpensive and light. No issues in 2 years.
  • + 1
 @PHeller: you mean the one that falls apart after 2-3 rides? as per the pinkbike review.
  • + 1
 Also the WolfTooth trigger lever is a perfect upgrade to the Giant Switch. Still cost less than the Reverb.
  • + 1
 @Jokesterwild:

Yup running my right top remote, under the left side.
  • + 37
 I can see it now...a mech conversion kit for my hydraulic disc brakes. For only $129!
  • - 42
flag Kramz (Jan 10, 2017 at 21:45) (Below Threshold)
 To be fair hydraulic brakes for bikes are pretty bad, especially compared to cars, or motorcycles.
  • + 26
 @Kramz: I wonder if it has anything to do with the mass of the object it's slowing down?
  • + 22
 @mike-gamble: I think Kramz only has been given the option of using Juicy 3s.
  • - 5
flag Kramz (Jan 10, 2017 at 23:58) (Below Threshold)
 @codypup: I'm not saying they don't stop well, but their serviceability is definitely not as reliable from my experience.
  • + 3
 @Kramz: What does that even mean? If you can't reliably service brakes that's not the brakes problem..
  • + 4
 @Kramz: lol what? Changing pads and rotors are easier on a car? Uh no. Brake bleeds easier on a car? (without a vacuum bleeder) once again no. Servicing stuck pistons in a caliper easier on a car? Maybe, but cleaning a bike's stuck piston's isn't difficult either.
  • + 4
 I Think he means you need to service a bikes brakes more often than a cars or motorbikes. But when you do it is more work on a car.
  • - 9
flag Kramz (Jan 11, 2017 at 5:26) (Below Threshold)
 @gkeele: As far as hydraulic brakes go, it should really only come down to urinating on them while you're drunk riding home, they're not complicated at all.
  • + 2
 Ha, they have that already for road/CX and trials!
  • + 10
 I don't what the fuss is all about with the Reverb, I've had one Reverb 2 with external routing and one 2017 and they absolutely rock ! The action is always smooth, no need to move around on the saddle to drop it (unlike KS), and bleeding can be done in 5 minutes.
I quite like the lever, but if your only problem is having a paddle lever, you can consider novyparts lever that was reviewed a couple of months ago.
  • + 0
 Well there are exceptions to every rule. By and large, the Reverb is a nightmare.
  • + 4
 I've had 2 reverbs, the only issues I've had is the need to service them every 6 months, which is a pain, but not super hard.

It seems like someone could easily make a lever conversion kit that attaches a paddle to the current lever... too bad I don't have acces to a Cnc. Anyone want my idea drawn out?
  • + 3
 My Reverb has been reliable also and I like movement. The problem for me is having to unwrap my thumb from the bar to actuate the button, hence the dehy kit for me. As far as the Novyparts remote is concerned, it's a neat piece but I prefer cable actuation to hydraulic for droppers and it's cheaper here in N. America.
  • + 10
 Think its a nice idea, but I think you're better off selling the Reverb and putting it towards a dropper such as the Transfer from Fox.
  • - 1
 Gotta agree, there's a better way. Even if you happened to get the Reverb for free, after factoring in the time spent fitting this, you're still out less $ with something like the Giant branded dropper (Contact SL Switch) if you're time's worth anything. And it's stone reliable. But this does seem like a vast improvement, if a Reverb was literally the only option.
  • + 2
 Problem is, if you got a reverb in a build kit a few weeks before the B-1 came out, you aren't going to get much for selling your "old" reverb, after all, since the typical advice is to sell them, they don't go for too much on the used market anyway. I had just bought a brand new carbon bike, I didn't have the extra money to make up the difference. A few months later, bikeyoke offered this kit for about $80 shipped for preorder, I didn't look twice.

It really does work, & feel, extremely good.
  • - 1
 I sold my Reverb for $60 and bought two Specialized Command Posts with the SRL lever for a total of $275. Neither has failed me in the year of use. Infinite adjust is only so great as the post's reliability, and I'll gladly take 3-Positions if it means a more reliable post.
  • + 0
 I'm with everyone else on the Reverb not really working in cold weather. It's just terrible. I'm a big fan of the Contact Switch, it just works like the DOSS and you can use the same one internally or externally. Oh, the price and it's stupid easy to rebuild.
  • + 6
 I have 2 converted Reverb Stealths. Both A2 and B1. I will not convert back to the awful original remote. I hardly used the dropper before due to the terrible ergonomics with the lever above the bar (left side above bar, the worst of them all). Now I use it all the time. I really don't understand why you would like to adjust the return speed, the fast the better as long as it does not crush your balls Wink
  • + 5
 He comments on changing the air pressure in the reverb from the recommended 250 psi to possibly change the return speed. This won't work and should not be done. If you increase or decrease the pressure it could cause the post to perform poorly or fail. The return speed in a reverb in changed at the lever's dial adjuster by increasing the pressure in the line.
  • + 9
 Sorry, but of course higher pressure will increase the maximum return speed of the post. The dial adjust of the Reverb sets the range, how much oil is being displaced, when pushing the button, by lengthening or shortening the effective hose length.
  • + 1
 Yea, if he had talked to an actual mechanic, or someone from sram about this, they would have told him that changing the air pressure will either cause it to fail prematurely from over pressurization, or sag from being under pressurized. The air spring is not the speed adjustment, that's the whole point of the hydraulic actuation, the whole point of owning a Reverb. Most Reverb posts I've encountered usually only need a quick lever bleed, not a big deal. Taking away the return speed adjustability from a Reverb is just silly and shows a lack of understanding of the product.
  • + 4
 @mecabeat: Yes, changing the air pressure is not originally meant for speed adjustment, but air pressure still does influence the speed. And no, it does not show a lack of understanding, when you remove the speed adjuster dail, since this speed adjuster requires more (MOVING) seal, and plays a role in Reverb´s problems with the hydraulic hose of the Reverb´s. Also the DeHy controls the speed by how much you press the button. The leverage of the DeHy is designed to maximize the poppet valve travel for maximim oil flow. The Reverb´s original lever also has limits in adjusting to maximum speed.
  • + 3
 Very much this. Literally the only problem I had with installing my DeHy was a little bit of sag after I was done, & it was down to me not getting the post all the way up to pressure. Reverbs use an IFP setup that other hydraulic posts do not, & you can't modify the air pressure like you can with other posts.
  • + 4
 @mecabeat: If SRAM gave customers a better product, perhaps with a more ergonomic remote, then the customer wouldn't need to adjust the return speed by changing air pressure. BikeYoke wouldn't have made this product if they didn't think there was a demand. Now it's up to SRAM to get its ass in gear and make changes to its product.
  • + 1
 @groghunter: Exactly, to function properly the reverb must be pressurized to 250 psi. The return speed was controlled by how much fluid went through the actuating mechanism so the only way to increase the return speed with this is to press the lever farther and quicker. And to keep the cable as tight as possible.
  • + 2
 @blkmrktrider156: And the more pressure is inside the post, the faster the oil (thus the oil volume) is pressed through the valve, by the spring. Which means it moves faster. Lower pressures could cause the lips of the IFP to not seal as tight, as with higher pressures, since they might be one-way-sealing (depending on which version you have). But in any case, it would be very unstable design, if a change in pressure would result in a leaking IFP, since pressure on both sides of the IFP are changing dynamically during adjusting the post. Older Reverbs use O-Ring (maybe Quad-ring, correct me, if I am wrong) IFPs and they are sealing both ways. The new B1 IFP has 2 Lips on the IFP, each of them sealing one way (as far as I can see from the drawings).
  • + 3
 @Sacki: Even with the new B1 improvements I still don't think the stock remote "button" is ideal anymore. It'd be soooo easy for SRAM to do a Novyparts-esque remote.

I'm also not keen on the fact that if you do have a seal failure in the Reverb, your post is stuck down. Not a big deal if you run enough post to simply bring it out of the seat tube, but for folks who have bike with short seat tubes a blown Reverb means that you're standing for the rest of the ride.
  • + 1
 @Sacki: Sure, but you've got a minimum & maximum operating pressure, & the Reverb doesn't tolerate pressures below it's recommended pressure well. I can't explain why reverbs exhibit spongyness when under-inflated, but it's a fairly well documented issue.
  • + 6
 The reverb stops performing well 'near freezing temperatures'? That piece of shit stops working well at anything less than 50*F. Basically useless by 40. Takes off another 2 months off riding.
  • + 0
 @stonant That was my feeling exactly.
When I had my reverb it slowed down a LOT even when temps hit the 10C-15C range (about what you found in F). So here in Canada that's a good part of the year where the Reverb is less than ideal. And useless when it gets colder than that.

My Fox Transfer on the other hand (much like the Fox DOSS I had on a previous frame) has been impervious to cold. Even at the freezing mark it functions without any change.
  • + 1
 FWIW, had my bike out in sub-freezing temps with the reverb+dehy, & the slowness was completely gone. Seems the slowness is down to the remote.
  • + 1
 @groghunter: I would think it is because the oil viscosity changes with the temperature
  • + 1
 @daweil: If that was true though, it would be more of a problem for all droppers, but the reverb is more prone to problems, or at least exhibits problems at warmer temps than other droppers(anecdotally, at 0F, it seems most droppers have issues.)

Also, a lot of the complaints about the reverb in cold weather is that the button itself gets stiff.
  • + 4
 Got this lever with a Fox Transfer and i wished i bought it sooner. The Fox broke (twice) and this one is very robust, feels solid and no doubt a quality product. Adding the fact that you can match with Shimano i-spec for a cleaner cockpit and the awesome customer service, its a winner everyday.
  • + 6
 another happy user here. hated the reverb remote, took a punt on this and couldn't be happier with it. SRAM should take note.
  • + 3
 I recently picked up a cable actuated stealth routed dropper post for less than this conversion that works perfectly and will probably be more reliable than a reverb. Its pathetic how much dropper post prices are pumped up because they are the most recent must have accessory.

Save yourself some money and they also have ex display models for £99

www.chainreactioncycles.com/s?q=brand-x+ascend+dropper+seatpost&cat=product

Even if it doesn't hold up the two year warranty means it should be straight forward to get sorted and if it only lasts for two years its a damn sight cheaper per year than other posts.
  • + 4
 Giant Contact Switch SL is a fiver more.
  • + 2
 @gkeele: and only available in 30.9mm
  • + 1
 @Paul7189: Yeah, forgot about that. I liked mine so much, I just used a Wheels Mfg shim on a different frame and I was good to go. Can't even see it and works perfectly.
  • + 3
 I bought it, It work perfect. My reverb failed on the first day, losing hidraulic from the connection in seatpost, then It got caught in a branch an broke the connection on the lever...never liked the fragile remote lever, I don't fell often but in a race or middle of nowhere is the worst thing that can happen to get the saddle fixed down. To get rid of that mental worry I bought the dehy and the remote lever is far better that the sram, also being mechanic you can fix it on the trail. I was about to buy the 9point8 but for a quarter of price I did a fine upgrade to the Reverb. Highly recommend.
  • + 3
 Not exactly related but I've just bought a new bike with the race Face dropper and it didn't make it through the first ride without having to be Pulled up. The doss on my last bike did 2 years on two cables with no issues at all. Tempted to go back
  • + 6
 Rock Shox is the ONLY company that makes a dropper post with a hydraulic lever... weird
  • + 6
 Does it make it better than another cable actuated dropper post? No sarcasm, I don't think I get the point
  • + 3
 FWIW, the lever "feel" is among the best of any I've used. But the point is that you get a more ergonomic remote, & a cable actuation that doesn't get affected by cold.

Yes, you could just buy a different dropper, but for some, that's not as easy an option, & this kit does work quite well.
  • + 4
 Mine works great for about four months now as does my reverb for over two years. (I know that's rare) having a paddle style remote symmetrical to my shifter on the right....worth every penny. Love this thing.
  • + 5
 3x the price of a Reverb hose replacement / bleed. You gotta really hate hydraullic hoses?
  • + 3
 It will pay for itself if you insist on sticking with a reverb...
  • + 2
 The lever is heaven compared with the Reverb button. I got it because I had used shifter style levers on my older posts, Got a Reverb stock on a new bike, & found myself not using my dropper the same ways, simply because of the button ergonomics.

You could probably find an old above the brake thumb shifter for far cheaper than a modern XT shifter, but the much better ergonomics of the XT are worth the extra cash, no?
  • + 2
 I had problems with my reverb on a regular basis. I ordered a new lever and cable from them (as retailer and Rockshox wouldn't take the blame), fitted it and it's worked perfectly for over a year. I think the problem Rockshox has is with assembly more than engineering.

The new lever and cable is still cheaper than this.
  • + 5
 I think people miss the point of the DeHy. We did not make it to get rid if the hydraulic actuation in particular. We designed it, so that people can use a regular Trigger-style remote, to egt rid of the pretty suboptimal ergonomics of the original lever. Of course it woud have been possible to make a hydraulic trigger-style, but that would have increased price and engineering work drastically for us. And in our opinio hydraulic engagement does not come with benefits only.
So again: The point of the DeHy is the trigger-style lever, not the "dehydraulification".
  • + 2
 @Sacki: "DeHy is an abbreviation of sorts for "de-hydraulic""

But I understand, I'm assuming creating a hydraulic trigger-style remote would have made quite a bulky remote due to the travel needed?
  • + 3
 @mpenver: Yeah, the name is DeHy. I mena, it does "dehy" the Reverb, but that was not the main idea behind the DeHy. to be honest, I didn´t really spend a lot of time thinking about a hydrualic version, because I knew it would have been too complex and and also more prone to failure, since a lot of sealing is involved. Not sure about the bulkiness, maybe you could design one quite sleekly. We didn´t want to bother with this, since the DeHy already costs enough, and at some point there is no really use in tuning your dropper post, when it gets too expensive. Then you should rather buy our REVIVE dropper. ;-)
  • + 1
 @Sacki: Not with the current value of the £ I won't be!

I'm assuming you're using the same lever from your dropper post for this solution?
  • + 1
 Definitely. Every RS product I've gotten back from a warranty rebuild, or rebuilt myself & properly lubed, has worked flawlessly. every RS product I've gotten new from the factory(except, ironically, my reverb) has had some problem that came down to problems with assembly. (Lyrik & Pike had no lube oil, Pike was leaking air out of the negative spring into the lowers, Monarch HV leaked air & lost rebound damping, Monarch Plus leaked oil from the piggyback.)

The only real engineering/design problems I've had have been more design choices on fork dampers that I didn't agree with(I don't want to trade good damping for a lockout function on my fork, TYVM RS) & the terrible ergonomics of the stock Reverb lever.
  • + 2
 @mpenver: Yes, the Triggy remote is same for DeHy and REVIVE dropper post.
  • + 6
 My DOSS just keeps on working!
  • + 1
 So now you have to pay $150 to get this part, added onto the $450 already spent on a post, and an extra $300 a year to get it constantly rebuilt because it shits itself when used?


I love Rockshox and use their forks and shocks, but the reverb is something I would expect from Crank Brothers, not them. Please fix it.
  • + 1
 I love when people say 'well mine still works fine' etc as if that is proof of utter reliability. Some people probably never had an x-box 360 break on them.... That doesn't mean it was a reliable item overall. Se applies to the reverb.
  • + 3
 Many, many people in the pinkbike comments say things like

" Mtbkid21 (10 hours ago):

I don't think that I've ever heard of the reverb being described as "reliable" "

Which is the top comment right now. A lot of other people have had good experiences with them (including me) and are trying to offer a counterpoint.
  • + 2
 "I love when people say 'well mine still works fine' etc as if that is proof of utter reliability."

Nobody does that, any more (or less) than the bloke whose kit breaks tries to present THAT as the Status Quo.

Frankly you have to be a bit of a pillock to think that's what it means. It's just another data point.
  • + 1
 At the same time, RS has put a lot of changes into the Reverb to get rid of those reliability problems, even before the B1. So you can make the same argument for people who bought a Reverb when they first came out, had problems, sold it, never tried one again, & are in this comment section telling people how unreliable Reverbs are.
  • + 1
 Had dropper posts since they came out first had a ks dropper which was cable operated and that died whenever I had a wet ride, reverbs haven't been the most reliable (I'm on my third in 4 years) but some of my warrentee s have been down to my poor mechanics. The newer model is now a year old and working amazing still just a bleed every now and then and fill the seal head cap with grease and it keeps on going even in the wettest of winter Wales rides
  • + 1
 Here is a shot I found of it mounted I spec. mtb-uk.boards.net/thread/4225/bike-yoke-lever?page=1 I always wanted to have this under the bar and I think I would like the lever over the button. Probably gonna buy one.
  • + 0
 This whole article mystifies and confuses me. First, "Reverb seatposts have earned my respect as one of the more reliable members of the dropper generation" is about the most polar opposite statement compared to my experiences possible. Literally the last ride I went on, 3 friends were riding reverbs, 2 of the 3 were not working, and yes it was a bit cold. So I pay $124 for a conversion to a mechanical dropper, which if you just bought a mechanical dropper in the first place would save you a significant amount of money over a reverb with many options available. The only group I can see this useful for is people who's bikes came with Reverbs, and they don't want to shell out the money for a whole new dropper...

Makes me happy I just bought 2 Fox Transfers for my bikes.
  • + 1
 Ive had decent luck/performance with both stealth and non Reverbs since they have become the
"norm" in biking. Leaning towards trying the 9point8 when time comes for a new dropper
  • + 1
 Jesus, all these hacks to fix a broken design. Just get a Giant Contact Switch Dropper and be done with it. or, heck, any of the other dozen droppers that have copied giant's design in the last year
  • + 1
 Kinda OT..Speaking of giants contact switch. Mine needs a new gas cartage. It seems like the older posts don't have spare parts availability like the newer units. Any ideas where I can get a cartage for an older post?
  • + 1
 @trailrider1127: I'm assuming you already contacted a giant dealer? I would open it up and get the part number. for instance, the strut on my 2014 version says winso suspension 40608700-400
  • + 1
 @trailrider1127: further research says that giant stopped carrying the 1st gen ,(pre 2014) cartridges. I didn't even know they had a dropper before 2014, must not have made many of them. 2014 was the 2nd generation and giant should have replacements for that one
  • + 1
 @xeren: I did contact a dealer, they told me the older cartridges are no longer available. My post is a 2012.
  • + 2
 Just wait till Pinkbike reviews the new Bike Yoke dropper. It has potential to blow all competition out of water, but we'll see.
  • + 2
 Why everyone blame reverb remote? absolutely fine using under bar, Only one disadvantage I've notice, slow actuation speed below 0 temperatures
  • + 3
 I really really dislike the ergonomics of the lever. It is hard to push, and angled weirdly, not matter, where you install it.
I am very sure, once you have used a dropper with a remote like KS Southpaw, or Specialized SLR, or our Triggy, then you will understand. If one thinks, that standard Reverb remote feels better, than a good trigger remote, then I am rellay not sure, what to think about that ;-)
  • + 2
 @Sacki: waiting for delivery to bike components Smile
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: One shipment has already landed in Germany, the other one is on the way and will arrive next week. BC will get one share of their ordered posts from me from one of those two. Need to check, which one contains, the pre-order special edition with Titanium bolts, and which one contains the regular aftermarket version (BC gets the regular version). But no worries, it´s just a matter of few days...
The other share of their ordered posts will go there with the upcoming shipment that is coming by beginning of February.
I am not sure, how many posts BC is stocking, or when you ordered, though.
Long story short: As of now, I will send some posts to BC from one of the first two shipments, and the other ones later, but at least by beginning of February.
And with this February shipment I will have enough stock of all posts (well, I should have, if not the orders go through the roof).
  • + 1
 @Sacki: Now I have RF turbine and I swear Revered was more trouble free with more comfortable lever, however I mostly ride park, so my dropper usage in quite limmited
  • + 2
 @clownpnd: Yeah Turbine is another story...I´d have chosen 9Point8. But the price...
  • + 2
 @Sacki: I haven't ordered it yet Wink I never order things that are not in stock with waiting time 20 days or more. Smile But I'm tempted.
  • + 4
 Looks to add a fair bit of length. Difficult in some frames.
  • + 0
 See here in the pacific north wet all things cable freeze up in wet then freezing conditions. So the cable version won't do a guy any good this time of year. Nice try i'll stick to hydro.
  • + 4
 My 9point8 Fall Line has been just fine this winter.
  • + 7
 @DrPete: My 9point8 fall line dumped all its air yesterday. Blown o ring at the top of the main nut. Must be a known problem to them as they re-designed the top nut. Its only available as part of a full service kit, FOR FIFTY QUID!.... Fook that, went to hard ware store and bought a bag of o rings for pennies, working fine again now. P.S. The droploc thingy worked as intended after air loss, was able to lock post in any position i wanted and keep riding.
  • + 1
 Eh? We ride in freezing conditions all year and cable actuated derailers freezing isn't a problem. In the past decade I've seen more hub palls freeze in the unengaged position than I've seen cables freeze. If anything, cable actuated seat posts should be even less problematic than shifters/derailers; one end is completely enclosed.
  • + 1
 @dfiler: A shift lever encloses the cable mechanism, though, where it's generally exposed on the lightweight dropper levers. If I lived somewhere wet & cold, I'd probably opt for a converted shifter over these levers for just that reason.
  • + 1
 @stumpymidget: The reason the top nut was changed was to make user service easier. No seals were changed in the design.
  • + 1
 @jackp: Well then, that makes my little bag of o rings even better value for money. Redesign makes sense though, the v1 nut was a pig to undo.
  • + 1
 @groghunter: Not enclosed? This setup is less exposed than a derailer cable. If you don't have trouble with your rear derailer freezing, there wont' be any problems with this either. You probably couldn't make it freeze even if you tried.
  • + 1
 @dfiler: If you actually read my comment, you'll see i'm talking about the end at the handlebar. shifters enclose the cam+ratchet that pulls cable, most of the dropper levers leave it exposed.
  • + 1
 @groghunter: What you said was clear. You just didn't understand the counter-point.

Rear derailers don't cover the cable and are exposed to waaaaaay more water, mud, grit, etc. If rear derailers aren't a problem, then the even better covered and less exposed amount of cable of this dropper lever shouldn't be a concern at all. My entire bike is currently covered with a layer of mud so thick you can't see what color it is... except for the outer ends of the handlebar. They are out of the way of splashed and wheel flung mud.
  • + 1
 @dfiler: water ingress at the top of the system is far more of a problem than at the bottom. Gravity is working against you at the shift end, for you at the derailleur end.

They're not directly comparable, all you can really say is that covered is better than open(having lived through the days of interrupted housing, while living someplace that gets snow, this I can confirm.)

The lightweight dropper levers leave a lot of the cable exposed.
  • + 1
 Never serviced 2012 DOSS still going strong. Perfectly smooth too. No play at all (it has self adjusting keys that stop it from rotating).
  • + 1
 I'll just go ahead and say it: no one should be riding when the temperatures are near freezing. Just stay inside and wait for nicer weather.
  • - 1
 Right. I'm not bloody happy here, Pinkbike.

Off subject I know, I posted a "go fund me" page link in the thread, to try and help ex pro BMX rider Stephen Murray move back to the UK.

My post has been removed, and some cheeky c*nt @seraph has simply said "no" to getting behind the collection?

What am I missing here, after watching the Aitken vid on "movies for your Monday" (great feature by the way), it made me think of his injury and recovery. Which cast my mind back to Murray & his. I ressarched his current state hoping for a happy update. It was not so. He's a grand away from his target to move back to his family, something I thought we would all get behind.

Have I missed some commentary on this, or are @seraph and PB both. Ring arses by doing this?

Please enlighten me.

Thanks,

MJH
  • - 1
 I don't understand why other brands of dropper posts don't go hydraulic. I hate, cable pull. If cable pull was better, then we'd still have cable pull disc brakes, not hydraulic. Anyways.
  • + 4
 Why do people always bring up those comparisons?
This is (sorry, if Im being so straight forward now) BS! There are totally different requirements on brakes than on dropper actuation. Or do you care about a defined bite point and modulation for a dropper?
Hydraulic actuation can have its advantages on both, brakes and droppers, that is true.
However, on brakes, hydraulic actuation clearly outperforms the mechanical actuation, but for droppers a bite point and modulation does not matter at all, so the theoretical benefits of a hydraulic actuation is reduced to exactly one thing: Being immune to dirt and weather.
And if you have ever had to do with a service center or worked oat one, who has to take care of Reverbs, then you´d know, that a hydraulic seatpost actuation is anything but trouble free. So the benefit is not there anymore IMHO.
If I had to choose between replacing a cable and and bleeding a hose, then I know, which one to go for. I can get a cable and outer housing everywhere.
  • + 1
 exactly what @Sacki said - that's a TERRIBLE argument- hydraulic is good for modulation, and power. 2 things you absolutely don't need in a dropper post. why put up with the decreased reliability of hydraulic when you don't need any of the benefits of hydraulic brakes in a dropper?

mechanical disk brakes are still more reliable- it's the reason many bikepackers use them instead of hydraulic brakes, despite being inferior otherwise.
  • + 1
 btw, you're literally the only person i've ever seen who things hydraulic droppers are superior. there's a reason people complain about the reverb breaking so much, and there's a reason that all the new droppers coming out use gas struts like from office chairs, with wire actuation. there is just far less to go wrong. hydraulic droppers are dying. let them go.
  • + 1
 so $70 for the thingy that fits the post and a KS Southpaw , some housing and cable and your set , I like that
  • + 1
 They need to make a stand alone bar mounted paddle to bolt on and go. You can then use with any brakes or bar combo.
  • + 2
 Can we expect a BY Revive post review coming any time soon?
  • + 2
 Who knows, who knows...? ;-)
  • + 1
 it seems like every dropper is not reliable when reading pink bike comments.
  • + 1
 I wonder if this will fix the crap way this post works when it gets chilly out.
  • + 0
 I've got a Thompson cable stealth dropper, perfect for over 2 years of use without touching it. Cable is IMO far better, hydraulic isn't needed for a dropper post at all.
  • + 1
 Makes the reverb almost as good as cable droppers.
  • - 1
 if you can precisely actuate a derailleur with a cable, it's really questionable why there is hydraulic dropper systems at all.
  • + 2
 OK, I'm impressed.
  • + 0
 I might consider going back to a Reverb for this. If my Command Post ever dies.
  • + 1
 dirtnapped It will
  • + 0
 i work at a shop and have had problems with a ton of there post,and lets not talk about the cold weather issues
  • - 1
 Best fix for a reverb- sell that thing and get a dropper with no seals.
  • - 1
 Great solution for non existing problem
  • + 0
 ilogic
  • - 1
 I wondered why they made it hydraulic before I read this.
  • - 1
 turn a rs reverb into a thomson elite covert?
  • - 2
 Just get a fox post.
  • + 1
 I've had to send my transfer post in for warranty twice already...
  • - 1
 I already wondered that
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2017. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv65 0.114737
Mobile Version of Website