BikeYoke Revive Dropper Post - Review

Nov 3, 2017
by Richard Cunningham  
Bike Yoke Revive Dropper Post


Think of the products that stand out in the history of our sport and it shouldn't come as a surprise that the lion's share of them were created by outliers who became frustrated with the status quo and took it upon themselves to make a better widget.

The Revive seatpost was developed by a couple of German engineer/mountain bike enthusiasts who were disappointed by a number of issues that still plague droppers today - the worst of which is the penchant for hydraulically actuated designs to suck air into their oil columns and morph into squishy unwanted suspension devices. Less worse, but still annoying when one considers that a good dropper costs upwards of $300 USD, is that warranty and service most often requires the owner to ship the post somewhere to have the work done by factory techs (ride and repeat). BikeYoke's Revive dropper post handily solves those issues and more.
Revive Dropper Post Details
• Hydraulic, infinite-position mechanism
• Twin-tube design eliminates internal floating piston
• Revive Valve air bleed system
• Cable-actuated remote.
• Paddle or radial lever options
• Discreet clamp, SRAM Matchmaker, Shimano I-Spec, and Hope adapters
• 30.9 and 31.6 mm diameters
• 125, 160 and 185mm stroke options
• Weight: 455g to 590g, depending upon stroke and options (525g/160mm reviewed)
• MSRP: 125mm - $375, 160mm - $399, 185mm - $450 (Your choice of remote and clamp styles)
• Contact: BikeYoke

Revive droppers have comparatively few parts and are designed to be rebuilt by an average home mechanic using simple tools. Parts are in stock and readily available (you can even buy a different diameter lower if your new bike has a different-sized seat tube) and it's cable actuated, so you won't have to watch a YouTube video to install one. The guys at Bike Yoke know that some dayyour Revive post is going to suck air, so it features a patented release valve near the clamp head. Open the valve with a four-millimeter Allen key, depress the post, close the valve and, Boom! dropper post perfection once again. You can get a Revive dropper in 125, 160 and 185-millimeter stroke options, and in either 30.9 or 31.6-millimeter diameters at prices ranging from $375 to $450 USD, depending upon stroke-length.


Bike Yoke Revive Dropper Post
Our Revive dropper was spec'ed with BikeYoke's "Triggy" paddle style remote. It attaches directly to SRAM Matchmaker mounts.

Key Features

Beyond the Revive's bleed valve, there are few, if any, external features that distinguish it from a well executed dropper like the RockShox Reverb or Fox Transfer post. Like Fox, and now RockShox, Revive also offers a smooth-acting, ergonomically acute paddle-style remote lever. Inside, rotational play is arrested by round pins, also in the conventional manner. Its seat clamp is also similar (although BikeYoke does claim that, at only 41 millimeters, Revive has the shortest retracted stack height of any currently available dropper), but that's where the similarities end.
Watch the Revive Dropper in Action

Twin tube action: Where most dropper makers use a floating piston to separate the oil column from the pressurized air chamber, the Revive features a simpler, twin-tube solution. The outer chamber of the twin tube is partially filled with oil - the rest of the space is the pressurized air-spring. The control piston travels in the inner tube, which is completely filled with oil - so when the remote valve is closed, the fluid can't be compressed, and the post locks into position. When you lower the dropper, the remote lever opens the valve in the control piston and fluid exits from ports in the bottom of the inner tube, which raises the level in the outer chamber and further compresses the air spring. That compressed air forces the fluid back into the inner tube through the ports when you re-open the control valve to extend the post. Because the ports are at the bottom of the oil column, air does not enter the inner tube. (Watch the video to explore how that works.)

Gravity dependent: If you have managed to follow along, you have probably discerned that the Revive's simple twin-tube design works if the post remains upright. Flip it up-side down and if you manage to push the remote paddle, air can escape into the inner tube and cause your once perfect dropper to become an air spring. As long as a Reverb or Transfer is perfectly bled, their floating pistons will block air from entering the oil column at any attitude.


BikeYoke Revive Dropper Post
The Revive Valve is operated by a 4mm Allen key. Current posts come with an aluminum mini lever that snaps in place.
Bike Yoke Revive Dropper Post
The internal Revive Valve lever can be easily removed to clear a standard shock pump, should you lose your adapter.


Revive Valve: Luckily for Revive owners, all it takes to remedy the situation is to open the Revive Valve, fully compress the post, then close the valve and go ride. If you own a current Revive dropper, you'll most likely never experience that issue, because they now have an elastic membrane that traps air on the spring-side of the oil column when the post is being stored inverted or laying prone. Either way, it only requires 30 seconds to bleed the post using the Revive Valve (three seconds or less if your mini-lever is in place), and that's just a tiny bit faster than boxing up a dropper and shipping it to a service center to have the air bled from the wrong side of a floating piston.


Bike Yoke Revive Dropper Post
Bike Yoke Revive Dropper Post
Pressurizing the air spring controls the post's return speed. An included shock pump adapter is used to clear the Revive Valve mechanism.


Trail Report

The Revive has been a pleasure to ride and I have only had two instances to use its oft-heralded bleed lever: the first time I installed it; and after I left it on a bench for a few months, it needed a second bleed when I put it on the bike I am using at present. One compression was all it took for the bleeds, and it may not have needed the second treatment if it were a current model.

Installation is made easy because the only critical measurement is the 17-millimeters of free cable length between the housing and barrel where the cable attaches to the bottom of the post - and there is a diagram laser-etched on the post to help line them up perfectly. As with all cable-actuated internally-routed posts, the Revive's mechanism needs to be clear of internal obstructions to operate well. To this end, the actuator can be rotated by hand to obtain the best angle.

I have not tried the radial remote lever, and I probably would not choose to, as I prefer paddle types. I have already weighed in on how nice the BikeYoke paddle operates when I reviewed their Dehy conversion for the RockShox Reverb. The short version is that the action is light, the paddle
Bike Yoke Revive Dropper Post
Laser etched instructions ensure that your cable installation goes right the first time.
feels positive with or without gloves, and once adjusted, the system never needed to be touched again.

The dropper action of the post is smoother than a Fox Transfer, which is now the class leader among the big brand droppers. The Revive is wonderfully smooth to retract and it extends with a subdued, but reassuring "clunk." The transfer ports inside the post offer enough damping to tune the extension speed to suit. I like mine fast, but not to the point where I can't stop the post mid-stroke for pedally descents - and that's how it is.

I've had the Revive on a couple of bikes and it has not shown any wear and tear beyond crash-related dings. Rotational play is almost nonexistent, so it appears that it may be a long time before I'll be writing a "How to Rebuild Your Revive Dropper" story.


Pinkbike's Take:

bigquotesFour hundred dollars is a sizable chunk to spend on a dropper post, especially considering that the last one I reviewed cost less than 150. They both go up and down and stop in the middle, but on the dirt, the Revive is in a league of its own. It's a pleasure to use, and if BikeYoke maintains its parts inventory, which is quite probable, owners should be able to keep them running near perfection for years to come. It's not often that you'll read those words in the context of a dropper seatpost review.RC









147 Comments

  • + 55
 Best dropper i've ever used bar none. I hope Bikeyoke can get into the OEM game since this thing should really come standard on most bikes and i'd gladly pay a bit more up front than exchange the stock dropper.
  • + 7
 They're OEM on the Alutech ICB2.0 (complete bike). Does that count?
  • - 8
flag sweet-bike (Nov 3, 2017 at 8:23) (Below Threshold)
 @vinay: ummm, what?
  • + 9
 North Korea?
  • + 26
 @Pmac1893: There are more countries outside the USA than just North Korea, like Germany for instance where alutech is from..........
  • + 6
 Getting the Revive made my old KS LEV feel like junk. The only other I would consider is the 9.8 and the Revive is cheaper.
  • + 3
 It is my first dropper and it works perfectly ... love the subdue "clunk" to tell me the post is up, smooth up and down, stops in any position you desire, light action of the lever that has a mount compatible with Shimano I-spec ... and I have not needed to "revive it" yet, after four months of serious use!
  • + 9
 Pole offers completes with the Revive
  • + 11
 Propain bikes come with them
  • + 12
 @bonkywonky: Yeah, right! Where is this "Germany" you speak of?
  • + 3
 Production Privee got them OEM.
  • + 33
 @TheR: Its located around Ramstein Air Base I think.
  • + 2
 I agree that it is the best dropper I have used as well. I have a brand new 2018 RS Reverb just sitting around because I love the Revive so much more. Smoother actuation and way less resistance to drop
  • + 2
 @Legbacon: I have the 9.8 and tbh I think this Revive is better for the at home maintenance and service. The cost of the 9.8 lube for the dropper is crazy with shipping.
  • + 5
 @bonkywonky: I think @Pmac1893 refers to the flag of @SiSandro. He wasn't expecting input from there I guess.

@sweet-bike : Yeah I think that is one of the coolest full suspension bikes currently available for general riding. A bit like a (previous generation) Process 134 but then with a threaded bottom bracket. But I mentioned it because their complete build currently comes with the BikeYoke seatpost. BikeYoke also makes a different yoke to modify the ICB2.0 to run a 26" wheel in the rear (instead of the 27.5" wheel it is designed for).
  • + 4
 @eldiddo: So hat man mir erzählt. Smile
  • + 1
 Agreed
  • - 83
flag NYShred (Nov 3, 2017 at 12:44) (Below Threshold)
 The most ridiculous product in mountain biking is the dropper post. Stand up and ride you Nancy's and save yourself $400+ bucks. This product will not make you a better rider or make your ride more fun.

From a dropper post rider - "love the subdue "clunk" to tell me the post is up, smooth up and down, stops in any position you desire, light action..." do I need to make the point clearer? These things are absolutely ri-dick-ulous.
  • + 3
 @NYShred: lol you doos!
  • + 2
 @bonkywonky: I think he was referencing what he thinks is the flag....
  • + 10
 @NYShred: congratulations, you’ve become the most consistently hated person in the comments this year- god some of your comments make me cringe
  • - 1
 @NYShred: I wipe my ass with $100 bills (Canadian ones, butt still...)

400 is a deal. If only it was available in carbon.
  • + 3
 @Legbacon: I have both (and have owned or used many of the other popular droppers out there). The Bike Yoke is waaaaay better. My Revive has hundreds of miles on it and has always worked flawlessly. It is easier to set up and my 9.8 only works for a handful of rides before it has to be serviced again. The amount of money just in cables i've gone through on my 9.8 I could have bought another Revive. I am very disappointed in the 9.8. Just a warning if you were thinking of getting one.
  • + 2
 @jpv6578: Maybe the newer Fall Line have something different?! My friend told me this as he have problems too with his new 175mm! He never had with his previous. I had my first one for a year and I'm on my second year with my second one (150 instead of 125mm) and still perfect. Just putting some grease from time to time. My only complain is about the installation... seems a lot simpler with the Transfer. Otherwise, I've got the new Wolf Tooth remote and it is so much smoother, plus no more broken cables! Wink
  • + 6
 @NYShred: bike snob, is that you?

Guess what... you're wrong. Dropper posts (and especially this one) do indeed make riding your mountain bike way more fun. This is coming from someone who talked shit on droppers for a long time and now considers them as important as hydro brakes.
  • + 2
 I completely agree, this is a totally amazing post. The action is so smooth and it's been flawless for me so far. One point that was missed was that this is also the shortest overall 160mm dropper on the market which is great for those with clearance issues.
  • + 1
 @NYShred: hahaha clearly you are not a true mountain bike enthusiast! Show yourself out!
  • + 1
 I've always use a KS Lev and I am tired of them always having issues. Switch to the Bike Yoke and so far very impressed. It comes up when I push the trigger!!! crazy! lev no more....
  • + 1
 I put the 160mm on my ride yesterday and gave it a maiden voyage. Awesome post (and I was pretty happy with my previous reverb, but needed a different size). Super smooth operation, good dimensions, and great lever. I'm sure I'll appreciate the Revive function when I finally need it.
  • + 1
 @jpv6578: Same experience with 9.8. I may have to consider the yoke
  • + 1
 @jpv6578: My 160mm Revive with the 2x remote starts fraying the cable after a month, and the cable snaps after about 2 months. When I press the 2x remote, I can hear a click as the nub at the end of the cable reseats itself, which results in a sawing motion that ultimately causes the cable to fail.

I have never needed to revive my post; it worked perfectly straight out of the box.
  • + 32
 I don't want to read any bad yoke about the price.
  • + 9
 It's definitely revived my interest in a new dropper.
  • - 16
flag vinay (Nov 3, 2017 at 9:14) (Below Threshold)
 "Bad yoke".

Drops mic...



Sorry, had to post that one Wink .
  • + 1
 Good to get these out of the way as this thread is going downhill quickly.
  • + 2
 Me and my wallet are yoked together until they drop the price......or my reverb dies......whichever rises first.
  • - 1
 @Boardlife69: Dude, I just did three puns in a single post and got downvoted to the depths of the PB troll party. You just did four. I guess I'll meet you there Wink .
  • + 14
 @vinay: it’s not that you squeezed in ‘3’ puns, it’s just that it wasn’t funny
  • + 3
 This thread has its ups and downs.
  • + 2
 @blackthorne: Thanks for the feedback! Clearly my pun-skills are not up to there yet. Please keep the downvotes coming. @Thustlewhumber : Thanks for reviving this thread.

I'll show myself out.
  • + 1
 @Boardlife69: you'll be waiting a long time... This is a boutique post.. Price drops aren't going to happen.
  • + 1
 He won't have to wait too long he did say he would get one when his reverb dies @bohns1:
  • + 2
 punists who scored 9.8 or more, please stand in line
  • + 22
 I will reserve "best dropper on the market" statement until I've used it for a solid year without failure, but so far, after 4 months, it is by far the best dropper I've ever used. Extremely smooth action, great 1X lever remote, great 2X remote for those that need it, and an excellent seat clamp mechanism. The low stack height and long drop options (160 and 185) also beat many of the alternatives.
For those complaining about pricing, note the $400 includes a remote, so the msrp is $10 less than a Factory Transfer and remote. I paid $320 for mine using a ubiquitous 20% coupon (which, fwiw, excluded Fox products!). So although not cheap, it is fair/competitive with other droppers, some of which don't function nearly as well.
If I had one complaint: no external version. So as much as I love my Revive, unfortunately I can't install it on my other bike.
  • + 4
 +1 request for a external routed version
  • + 3
 also calculate in the cost of shipping out for service and downtime from riding and its much cheaper than the others.
  • + 4
 @asboites: why send it out when you can just spend 4 hours rebuilding your reverb...every 3 months...
  • + 6
 I've been testing a Revive for a company who wants to spec it OEM. I've had it now for 8 months and intentionally subjected it to the most horrific abuse I could - i.e. racing on it, not cleaning or lubing the seals, riding in well below freezing temps, and hanging my bike by the saddle.

Conclusion? It's bomber - I haven't even had to "revive" it once, haven't had to re-tension the cable and there is still zero play in the shaft. I went through 3 reverbs and 2 KS droppers in the two years prior. So yeah, this product is the real deal.
  • + 1
 Drill baby Drill !
;-)
  • + 1
 Upvoted for correct usage of the word 'ubiquitous.' And also the other stuff you said was agreeable Smile

I also want an external version for the bike I have that is currently sans dropper. Too satisfied with the Revive to look elsewhere.
  • + 14
 Got a 160mm and a 185mm - one on each bike - best dropper ever. So smooth - way smoother than reverb, transfer, control post. Rarely have to bleed it, but I can now do this in 5 seconds. Say goodby to the pogo reverbs! Best in class....
  • + 4
 Sums my own experience up pretty well. I've been on the 185mm version since the day it's out and it moves like butter, absolutely flawless and precise function. Much better than my Reverb (which also developed that typical 5-10mm movement from the top position).
  • + 2
 i've got the 160mm on my Patrol and yes, best I've ever used!
  • + 7
 I bought the 125mm as my first dropper. My LBS (shout out to Bicyclette de Hull) went out of their way to help me make it happen; they discounted the price of the fox transfer on the bike I was purchasing so that I could install my own revive.

I am very pleased with its performance over the last 3 months. I have ridden other droppers (limited to demo rides only). The revive is very smooth, has an audible pop when it reaches the top, and has a very dampened bottom out. The lever remote is very comfortable and has a lot of adjustability for positioning it properly.

The only time I have ever needed to 'revive' the post is to prove to fellow riders that the function actually worked.

The post has a high upfront cost, but in the long run I think it is completely worth its price.
  • + 1
 Actually I love the post too, although I gotta bleed it after every couple rides. It's worth noting that when turned upside down in the lower position it will draw air into the system.
  • + 1
 @Mooka: weird, it shouldnt as long as you dont activate it while upside down.
  • + 1
 @Mooka: @Mooka: same "issues" with mine. do we have a bad batch? but still best dropper i had...bunch of reverbs and command posts. sadly a fwe weeks after my purchase the 185 version came out. highly recommended!
  • + 1
 @funkzander: it's a known issue, that is also acknowledged by the engineer of the post (you can read all about it in the mtb-news forums: www.mtb-news.de/forum/t/bikeyoke-revive-neue-teleskop-sattelstuetze.814796/page-54 , where the engineers engage too)
Also it's pointed out in a couple of reviews like this one: www.mtb-news.de/news/2017/02/09/bikeyoke-revive-test-variostuetze
Honestly I can love with it, but it's still a small hassle.
Furthermore the problem is supposed to be fixed with the newer version, that was released when the 185mm came out. I was a little bummed, since I bought mine 2 weeks before that.
  • + 1
 @Mooka: we should get the bleeding lever for free which can be bought aftermarket in their webshop. when i build up an enduro hardtial in spring i grab the 185 version.
  • + 1
 @Mooka: @funkzander:

I had the same problems when carrying my bike a lot on my back. I read somewhere that this is the downside of the Revive-valve.

Just remember to put the saddle in the highest position when you turn your bike.
  • + 4
 dropper post to be well priced in XXI (2017) cant be more expensive than £100-£125 or equal in any currency. whatever comes above that price is mambo-jambo. no money required for R&D in big companies. there has been no change really other than cosmetic for last couple of iterations of dropper from renown companies. each of them are happy, because they grown client base accepting sky high price. just thought.
  • + 3
 Heres a spanner in the works.....By far the best post i've used and currently own.....Magura Vyron bluetooth dropper....and no-one had hacked it as per all the comments on here when it came out.... Never has it let me down, in 17 months it's still as good as it was out of the box....Just have to remember to charge it once every 2 months. Hassle free, cable free, worry free dropper. Oh and the dog chewed the USB cable for charging it.....Magura sent me out a new one free of charge......awesome!
  • + 3
 So it's not really cable free and worry free Wink

Sorry couldn't help myself. Good to hear the Vyron has been solid.
  • + 2
 @dwojo: Ah ha......I get your point.....I didn't think of that when I was spouting out about being "cable free"
Keep the humour alive!
  • + 3
 I've had my reverb B1 fail so many times on the trail I've lost count, and that's just the 8 months I've owned it. It's literally garbage. It's not even cheap either, it's one of the most expensive posts available. Sent it in for repairs but that took a month in April. You're looking at 2+ months if you're sending stuff to sram in peak riding season (they have had my Guide RSCs since August). I can fix whatever is wrong with it by fully bleeding it every 3-4 rides, but that's a pain in the ass. I'm eeking out whatever is left of riding season and will send it in for a final warranty then sell it to either buy this or a 9 point 8.
  • + 1
 This is my worry with the Transfer as well. Even the 9point8 is complicated enough internally that I wouldn't want to have to service it myself. The Revive is about the only hydraulic locking post that I'm confident has been thought out enough to prevent it from needing 20 seals, special tools, and a host of other problematic servicing factors. That being said, I still prefer the replacement cartridge equipped options.
  • + 3
 @PHeller: the reverb isn't that complicated to service. Just a hand full of speciality tools need, easily ordered from jensons, and seal kits are prety cheap. If you can service a suspension fork, you can service a reverb.
  • + 2
 @cmcrawfo: Thanks, I know. I've done it three times. Fact is, it's a PITA and shouldn't be necessary.
  • + 2
 @PHeller: huge f*cking PITA and always takes longer than it should...I need a paper copy of the directions so I don't get hydraulic fluid all over my phone or computer.
  • + 1
 @cmcrawfo: Ditto. All five Reverbs I've owned have been flawless aside from my current Stealth B1, which needed some attention after the first year (replaced quad seal with an o-ring). Still running one of the original A1 on a hardtail which is 6 years old...
  • + 2
 I use just the lever at the moment and it is brilliant...soooo much better than the Fox lever!? Soon buying a Revive post...Well done to such a small brand of people who clearly know their stuff about bikes, engineering and design.
  • + 2
 I'm using the lever as well and on my Reverb. Got the kit to convert from hydraulic to the cable actuated lever and it's fantastic.
  • + 2
 Cool to have another option. My 2 Transfers have been bombproof though, but I wish I could get them in a 160mm. Might have to consider the Yoke. Back the the Transfer - the non-Factory version is priced way better, and I prefer to get an aftermarket Wolftooth lever anyway.
  • + 1
 Wolftooth non-Factory Transfer is the best combo.
  • + 2
 $400 is pricey but not out of line for a high end dropper post. I'm planning on paying up for one because I've had other posts blow up at the worst time possible. Trust me, nothing is worse than having your Reverb die on day 2 of a 4 day Moab trip. You might be able to buy 2 or 3 cheap posts for the same price, but reliability is worth the premium.
  • + 1
 When I bought mine, it came out to be less than $400 by a good bit.
  • + 3
 Looks like RC is riding himself a Diamondback Release Carbon 5c that he reviewed a while back. Good enough to keep riding, @RichardCunningham?
  • + 1
 My 2017 Reverb 150 post is bunk. When it's cold outside this post is slow as molasses. Takes extra energy to drop and takes forever to top out. Super annoying when I'm trying to focus on my ride. The Revive 160 is my next post for sure.
  • + 1
 Between my bike and son's we've had a Reverb, two 9point8's and a Transfer. The Reverb has been terrible, constant bleeds needed, and cold temps cause issues. We both love the 9point8's but mine lasted 5 months and needed to be sent back as the collar came loose,which I was told had never happened. My son's was great for a yr but then kept losing air, sent back for warranty and now 3 months later issue is back. My Transfer was new in June and thus far no problems. The feel and function of the 9point8 is fantastic but sending the post back to Canada is a pain, if this is truly serviceable at home it's worth it.
  • + 1
 I'm a 9.8 guy as well and have had 2 failures now in a year. It's still a damn good post and I'm stuck with them as they're the only 200 game in town. If the Revive had a 200 option I'd jump on the bandwagon. Are you listening BikeYoke?
  • + 1
 I feel you, as we have to send back everything to the USA also... Wink That's what I like about my 9point8 if I ever have to send it back....

Do we have to send our Revive back to Europe if we have trouble with it?! :S
  • + 1
 @Timo82: these are really easily self serviceable.
  • + 2
 @Timo82: sorry I should add that if you are not confident doing it any local bike mechanic could easily do it. Parts/kits easily available via their website
  • + 1
 @tcmtnbikr: @ 200mm option are your running your DJ as your trail bike just curious...
  • + 1
 @Whats-Next: Do you ever do 40% + drops? Just curious...
  • + 1
 @tcmtnbikr: What does that even mean? 40% + drops, is this a trail name, the steepness of the trail while hitting a trail feature... confused by your question
  • + 1
 @Whats-Next: Steep trails
  • + 1
 @tcmtnbikr: Yes I would guess Lake Tahoe, Whistler, Santa Cruz and other riding areas that I have ridden have steep trails so yes, I have ridden steep trails.
  • + 1
 One question, does anyone have experience with the e13 TRS post? Reliability is something I'm really interested in. Just bought a new bike, the TRS was stock. It worked fine before the bike was fully built, but afterwards it won't reach full extension. Talked to support and we reached the conclusion that it might be that the spring is too weak. The service guy told me that I'll get a new one as soon as the german distributor gets some. It might be a 2018 model I think, which I heard will come with a 2 cm longer spring to fix issues like that. Is that Dropper worth keeping or going for a different one?
  • + 1
 Do you guys think it will be good in really cold temperatures for my fatbike? I thought about buying a Transfer to replace my 9point8 but this one might be better... but got to be good for -30°C up to 35°C (sorry, don't know how much that it in F.)
  • + 1
 -30 c or f doesn't matter - it's too damn cold.

Stay warm

Why you replacing the 9.8?
  • + 1
 @onemind123: lol I want it to be good at -30c just in case but on a average fat bike day,it is more like -5/-10°! Wink

I have a 150mm 30.9 Fall Line. I bought a Norco fat bike last winter and it is 31.6 so I use a shim. My next bike will also be 31.6 and I would like to have a little more than 150. The Fox transfer seems as good as mine, if not better, but simpler to install so I thought about trying something different...and then this one seems better than everything else so might try this one instead! I really liked the fact that mine was canadian though... Frown

I paid both my 9point8 350$cad and now it would be full price so if I'm paying 500$+ I would like to try something else.
  • + 2
 Mine has been well functioning to -20, never got it to -30 yet. Slows a bit, but thats to be expected just based on friction changing.
  • + 1
 @ratedgg13: Good to know, thanks! Smile
  • + 1
 I have one of these and I like the post a lot, but I wish the trigger was a bit more substantial. It's kinda small and flimsy, and the Shimano I-Spec mount doesn't allow the lever to be moved as far outward as I would like. I've been thinking of replacing it with the WolfTooth remote. The hydraulics of the post itself have been flawless, and I like that it moves very quickly in both directions. I have a first batch model that I got in Feb, and only problem I've had so far is lever not returning due to cable being gummed up, which was fixed by a new cable and lube. Cable end is very easy to engage and disengage when removing the post, which is nice if you fly with your bike. Other posts can be a PITA if you need to remove the post.
  • + 2
 I've rebuilt my KS Lev twice in the last season and a half for the squishiness. $160 a pop, I should have had one of these and it would pay for itself in 2 years. Once mine dies again I'm going for this
  • + 3
 If I didn't have to pull the seat up with my ass treaks several times a ride, $400 is worth it to me
  • + 1
 Ass treaks Yes!!! Stern Show reference on Pinkbike on a Friday. Today is good.
  • + 3
 After being in the war zone that is the ebike article, this was refreshingly polite.
  • + 4
 We need an e-bike version of this post
  • + 1
 had a bit of teething with mine, but afterwards. its been sick!! for like, a year, no bother!!! and I break stuff most rides!
  • + 0
 This post will be the best ever made. The bleed system is great. Mine has been faultless. I guess if it was a reverb it would have been sent away. I have bled the yoke 3 times.
  • + 1
 The collar locks relatively small. Issue with my reverbs is that all the collar stuff adds an inch or more to my already long seat tube. This may be a solution!
  • + 1
 Anyone have issues with this post getting stuck? It gets released when you roll your weight forward on the seat.
  • + 1
 They have a good costumer service. they are friendly. and may be my next seatpost is also a Bikeyoke.
  • + 2
 I want an E post. Are we going to argue about that?
  • + 1
 Magura
  • + 1
 Well done on the maintenance free hydraulic dropper. Now sell it at 300$ and you have a deal.
  • + 15
 Jenson is selling it for $374.99. Use coupon code "SAVE20" and the price comes to $299.99. Use Active Junky and you can get another $18 off of that.

Deal?
  • + 1
 @igxqrrl: I bought mine from the LBS. Since it is listed in the BTI catalog, any bike shop can order it. I wanted the local support in case something went wrong with the post.

Post is awesome! I do have to reset it any time I turn my bike upside down, or if I lift my bike by the seat and the post is not fully extended. I avoid doing those 2 things, but honestly it's no big deal at all to reset it, especially now with the integrated reset lever.

Well done Bikeyoke.
  • + 1
 @igxqrrl: SAVE20 didn't work for me for this post. Anyone else having issues with this?
  • + 1
 From years of watching reviews on Pinkbike,I understood 2 things: WTB for saddle and Maxxis for tires.
  • + 1
 Will they develop 200 mm travel seatpost, or even better 220 for me ? Smile
  • + 1
 This plus "trail sync" please.
  • + 1
 Be good to hear how it does when temps get low -10C or so
  • + 1
 $450 for a seat post?! Is gotta be a Yoke right?
  • + 1
 Be proud of your Taiwanese heritage Jackie and team ... Congrats
  • + 1
 What seat is that? Older WTB Silverado Race?
  • + 1
 Might be WTB Volt Pro or Race.
  • + 1
 does it drop it like its hot ??
  • + 2
 German Engineering!
  • + 1
 Great indepth review
  • + 1
 Laguna Meadow!!!!
  • + 0
 You lost me at $450.
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