BikeYoke Presents Revive Dropper

Sep 25, 2016 at 2:31
Sep 25, 2016
by Stefan Sack  
 
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PRESS RELEASE
Images from BikeYoke Presents Revive Dropper PR



Images from BikeYoke Presents Revive Dropper PR
BikeYoke REVIVE Details

• Self-serviceable dropper post with reset function
• Non-IFP design.
• 125mm and 160mm options
• 30.9mm and 31.6mm diameters
• 'Triggy' One-By remote or regular push button
• Weight: 470g (125mm x 30.9mm), Triggy remote 25g
• Available January 2017
www.bikeyoke.com

Pre-order deal:
• 125mm - 293€
• 160mm - 310€
• Free shipping worldwide
• Titanium saddle clamp bolts (original: stainless steel)
• Free I-Spec B or I-Spec II adapter

What if there was a dropper post that solves and not just improves reliability issues, saves cost and time, and does not let you worry about time at service centers anymore? Or how about 'bleeding' your seat post within a few seconds while it's still installed in your bike?

BikeYoke presents its new REVIVE dropper post featuring one of the most brilliant design features in dropper design in many years. Revive will start with 125mm and 160mm options, infinitely adjustable travel and in 30.9 and 31.6mm diameters. More than ten years of experience in dropper design went into the Revive, and the development has finally paid off. Of course, just as many other companies BikeYoke would say, that Revive is reliable, strong and smooth…

And yes, Revive is all of that, but not because we tried to improve current designs, but because we were thinking outside of the box and created a new concept, that is different from everything before.

Images from BikeYoke Presents Revive Dropper PR

Status Quo

To understand the benefits over other posts, you have to know about the problems of many current designs first. Many of the traditional current designs are based on a hydraulic lockout-system that relies on a perfectly sealing IFP (Internal Floating Piston), separating oil from air to prevent the seatpost from getting that suspension feeling. There are a lot of difficulties to overcome when using an IFP because an IFP has to maintain 100% sealing function. If air can go to the oil side, your post will start becoming springy. This happens to a lot of posts on the market already and is the main issue why they need servicing. Just to mention a few of the issues an IFP design comes with:

• An IFP design requires a perfect finished surface of ID and OD, of both, inner and outer tubes in the hydraulic circuit. There is a high defective rate during production and is also difficult to keep the quality stable. This means those tubes are very expensive to produce.
• IFP designs require perfect concentricity of those tubes to ensure the IFP can move smoothly.
• An IFP is a dynamic seal with high preload/squeeze. This causes a 'stick-slick' effect on many posts, which you can feel, when your seatpost gets stuck and you need to break it loose manually because only pushing the remote won't make it start moving.
• IFP's are usually kept as short as possible to save on build height. But this means they can tilt inside the tube more easily and cause overly extensive wear and/or leakage. Long tubes and long travel will make it worse because the IFP has to follow not a straight line inside the tube, but a bent tube, since longer seatposts will obviously have more flex.
• An IFP usually requires a complex or difficult bleeding procedure, where the IFP has to be set to a certain position. Too much or too little oil also can cause malfunction of the seatpost.

Images from BikeYoke Presents Revive Dropper PR

REVIVE Design

This is why BikeYoke's Revive features a non-IFP design because we think it is too difficult – if not impossible – to make a reliable design using an IFP.
The Revive only requires two dynamic seals in the hydraulic circuit (RS Reverb, KS LEV and Fox Transfer use four dynamic seals) with those two seals being the ones that are known to cause the least problems in sealing application: The inner shaft sealing and the piston sealing for the lockout mechanism. The highly critical IFP is removed and with it the need of perfect concentricity and finish of the sealing surfaces of the tubes. The lack of an IFP also results in the smoothest action of any hydraulic drop-post on the market.

Images from BikeYoke Presents Revive Dropper PR

REVIVE VALVE – The Reset-Feature

Even Revive can get air somewhere where it does not belong. This can happen for example, when you actuate your seatpost for a few times, while its upside down. And here is where the patented Revive Reset Valve comes into play: The Revive valve is located underneath the seatpost-head (same as a Reverb and KS LEV for example) and serves as regular air-valve for pumping up the post. However, pushing the Revive valve opens ports between chambers and activates the Revive-function:

Insert a 4mm Hex Key into the Revive hex port, turn it and push down the post by hand. This will automatically reset your hydraulic circuit to “new.” Whenever. Wherever. This can be done within a few seconds and only by the turn of a 4mm Allen key, without even having to remove your dropper post from your bike.

We made a video to show how simple this is:

Views: 14,432    Faves: 12    Comments: 0


Here is the REVIVE-feature in real-life action:

Views: 11,304    Faves: 12    Comments: 3


One Piece Lower

Next to creating a completely resettable hydraulic system, Revive also features a one piece lower tube, whereas many posts have the upper bushing (which experiences the biggest load) installed on a separate top cap, which is threaded on top of the lower tube. Installing the upper bushing directly into the lower tube does not only increase the structural strength of the lower assembly but also provides better load displacement. Perfect concentricity with the lower tube and it's keyways that house 6x pins to eliminate rotational play, is also an attribute that comes in hand with a one piece lower tube. Due to the extra wall thickness at the collar area, Revive is also less prone to be affected by high seat-clamp squeeze.

Serviceability

So, now one might already understand that:

1. No air will want to go inside the post's hydraulic circuit since it's charged with higher pressure than its surroundings.
2. No oil will go out (or at least very very little oil over the course of a long time) because of very stable sealing - external sealing has never been a real problem of current post design
3. The hydraulic system can be reset to “new” via the unique “Revive-valving.”

This makes the hydraulic circuit into a stable closed system and basically maintenance free. Still, there are parts that need to servicing sooner or later and when designing Revive we put a lot of attention to maximum user-friendly serviceability: Bushings and keyway pins will wear over time. Usually, the pins wear first, and you would want to replace them to reset your rotational play. Exchanging the pins and the lower bushing is simple and does not require any opening of the hydraulic system and can be done within less than 5 minutes. You can watch how to do a full service here.


MENTIONS: @Sacki

Must Read This Week






165 Comments

  • + 85
 I'm not sure I can live without service interval. Service interval is the thing you know.
  • + 20
 Yeah totally confused. This is aprils fool stuff
  • + 36
 Service interval is love, service interval is life.
  • + 31
 "More than ten years of experience in dropper design went into the Revive"
This is just like ten guys who worked at Crank Brothers for a year each, right?
  • + 11
 @sngltrkmnd: Not quite, but thank you! Why are you bringing comments like this one, if you don´t know, what our team has designed in the past? You just don´t know...
  • - 28
flag sngltrkmnd (Sep 26, 2016 at 18:08) (Below Threshold)
 @Sacki: No, I do not. Tell me more.
Secondly, I readily admit your English is much better than my German language skills. However it will benefit you *greatly* to have an American or Canadian English speaker proofread your press releases before publication.
  • + 9
 @sngltrkmnd: No it won't.
  • + 33
 Will I be downvoted for saying that mechanical dropper posts are better, lighter, and more reliable?
  • + 6
 Which are the top three mechanical droppers?
  • + 29
 @weebleswobbles: Gravity Dropper, gravity dropper, and ummm, gravity dropper.
  • + 11
 @skelldify: Soon to be e13 TRS.
  • + 14
 @weebleswobbles: Command Post
  • + 14
 @weebleswobbles: 9.8 fall line trumps!
  • + 5
 Haha looks like I will look at gravity dropper, command post, 9.8 fall line, and e13 trs. Thanks
  • + 2
 Possibly Vecnum Moveloc if anyone could get hold of them
  • + 4
 @sideshowb: The Vecnum Moveloc is in fact a charged gas spring, ie a cartridge. It's listed as so on their "Function" page under "Quick and Damped - The Gas Spring"
  • + 1
 the DOSS. The new transfer is alright but that DOSS knew how to work.
  • + 1
 @PHeller: Good point, but the locking mechanism is pin-in-hole style mechanical
  • + 28
 Giant dropper posts may lack the bling factor but ive had three of them and all issue free. At a cost under $200.
  • + 87
 So why have you had 3?
  • + 39
 @kleinblake: too stoked to have only one.
  • + 13
 I have had multiple Giant posts too... because of multiple Giant bikes. I have also used most of the other brands over the years with Thomson being the only other one I didn't have problems with and perhaps less laterall play. I'm a fan of the Giant posts, especially now with the 2 bolt seat clamp removing the weakest part of the old design.
  • + 3
 actually quite cheap in the UK but not in 31.6 size
  • + 5
 I have to service mine after pretty much every rainy ride and most of the coating is rubbed of by now (February 16 till now). But i have to say it's not very likely to fail because of the sealed cartridge and even if, the cartridge is very cheap.

As long as the service intervals don't increase any more and the basic functions are working I'll ride the hell out of that thing though.
  • + 2
 I don't like the Giant's actuation lever but I'd take it over the reverb's piston.
  • + 1
 My friend has had the same problem in wet weather. He returned his and got a different post. Working at a shop I have seen this many times as well.
  • + 2
 I am on my seventh Giant post and they too have all been reliable. Obviously I haven't owned any of them for over a year, but they do get hammered in that year. I have noticed the coating rub off on the really wet Winter we just had but I'm going to put that down to laziness on my part. If I purchased a bike other than a Giant I'd shove a Giant dropper on it, in a flash.
  • + 1
 @Gweggy:

I haven't looked deep into the issue, but I washed my bike yesterday followed by lubing the dropper stanchion. I found some water into the post. Probably entering from the top of the post if you run it in a stealth set-up.

So, word of caution is to keep an eye on it so water don't enter through the head.

Other than that, both my Giant Switch posts have been reliable. I'm getting the new Wolftooth lever though.
  • + 5
 I've got the latest Giant Contact SL (with the 2 bolt seat clamp, hacked XTR shifter for a lever) and mine's been smooth and trouble free too. Never had a Giant bike but I love the simple, no-maintenance design of this dropper. And If by "bling" you mean a color other than black, I'd say I'm happy to have no bling. Even the Giant branded logo is subtle and in black lettering, It's like how much more black could it be? And the answer is, none. None more black.
  • + 7
 @kleinblake: C'mon man... Do you even know anyone with just one bike? Wink
  • + 1
 @poah: Using an £8 shim with mine, no issues, though it slipped a little at first.
  • + 1
 Just about to buy one but can't seem to find the base of collar - rail measurement for the 150mm to see if it will fit me. Can anyone help me out on this? I need it to be 185mm or less to fit my inside leg on my bike. I'd be well grateful!
  • + 1
 @alexhyland: I have one at home. I'll measure it tonight and pm you.
  • + 20
 Hoping the best for this product, sounds great. Small german company, great engineering design. Funny that at the same day there is the SRAM Tech Talk about the new sealing in the Reverb, just read the comments there. :-D (My new reverb failed already again as well).
  • + 15
 This sounds great. I've had Crank Brothers and two Reverbs - all with problems and none of them cheap or quick to fix. I now have a Thomson Covert - and it was replaced when it developed some vertical play.
Getting two of functional (160mm!!), reliable and reasonably priced would be a significant step in the right direction!
  • + 2
 You have a knack for choosing the shitty dropper posts.
  • + 10
 If it works successfully, this will everything!I think that I will have to try one!
  • + 97
 This will definitely everything.
  • + 18
 @Pedro404: sorry that should have been "change everything!" lol
  • + 3
 @Pedro404: Vote Pedro for President!!!!
  • + 6
 How about if someone invented the expandable handlebar, it will grow from 760mm to 820mm with just a click, riding thru tight corners and narrow trees, ride it in the 760mm length like Ritchie Rude likes it, going a bit downhill, ride it at 800mm or 820mm... patent pending!
  • + 3
 there was some kickstarter for the expandable stem.
  • + 8
 nice low weight vs price - now lets work on getting the weight below 400g and the price below $300, need it by 2018, hurry up
  • + 9
 They're totally right about all the IFP issues though. Glad someone finally pointed this out.
  • + 10
 Finally a Dropper-Post that excites me!
  • + 1
 Since you clearly read the article can i get a TLDR?
  • + 3
 @fercho25: Tldr:
Dropper post bouncing? With the twist of this magic dial and a push on the saddle, you can fix that! Just fork over this amount of dough and suddenly your service intervals are more than halved!
  • + 2
 @Lookinforit: thank you. You da real MVP!
  • + 1
 You do understand that this post is not meant to be used internally, correct?
  • + 6
 I've got a Reverb Stealth, and I like the way it performs... WHEN IT WORKS ! It's been rebuilt 3 times, upgraded with new internals. Still, it's been really unreliable.
  • + 3
 There is a reason why there are so many reverbs on the buy and sell. People are tired of rebuilding them over and over.
  • + 1
 @pav4: Yep. If someone made a "spring conversion kit" or the Reverb somehow, or even if the price of BikeYoke DeHy kits came down, I think it might make more the Reverb more attractive, but even the recent updates on the post aren't enough to interest me going back to one (I rebuilt mine 3 times.)
  • + 1
 I never liked my reverb. Didn't work well in the cold.
  • + 3
 Get a 9.8 fall line and be done with it....
  • + 1
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: I thought that too, then I adjusted it and boom back to normal.
  • + 2
 @pav4: bleeding the reverb remote is super easy. And you will experience less problems with the idea on the reverb as long as you avoid pulling up on the saddle when the post is lowered. I agree, it is not an ideal design, but still the best performing post on the market in my opinion. TheBbikeyoke one Is promising I think
  • + 1
 @thestraightline: You're right in some way. BUT, I've been riding for 25 years and I'm so impressed about the way bikes and components have evolved over the years. Bikes are light, stiff and extremely reliable. I cannot say that about any dropper post I had experienced so far. Still lots of room for improvement,imo.
I saw Giant switch SL's at a good price on some web sites, I'm gonna try one as a back up and see if they are as reliable as some say.
  • + 6
 This looks like a fairly well thought out design, but if there's one thing the computer games industry has thought me it's "never pre-order anything".
  • + 3
 Introducing your post by saying what's wrong with other and how to fix yours. Not saying anything about how it actually works?

I have a 4 year old reverb that works perfect and has never been serviced. Wife has a 3 year old KS Lev that's the same. Did we find unicorns?
  • + 3
 I'm into my third year with my original Reverb - haven't had it serviced once. Sometimes it drops like 2 mm when I sit on it. Otherwise, it works great (albeit a little slowly in the cold). Crazy how many people have had problems with it. I'm also kinda lighter (160 lbs wet)
  • + 6
 I love how Reverb works and I would call it reliable. But I wouldn't call it issue free. With reliability I mean not failing on the trail in a way it would ruin my ride and then it would take lots of time and money to fix it. If I wanted a faultless seat post I'd run a regular post operated via seattube clamp... People complaining on dropper posts remind me of those complaining on flights being delayed by 30 minutes. Yes it took you 4,5 hours to fly from LA to NY instead of 4 weeks if you were walking.
  • + 7
 No, you just need to ride more. Wink
Seriously though, it probably has a lot to do with the conditions you ride in, and how rough you are on the post.
I rebuild my post every few months, and can nearly do it with my eyes closed now. The same seal (bottom seal on the internal shaft) fails pretty regularly.

Once you learn how to rebuild it though, it's cheap to get a "new" post from the buy+sell. Big Grin
  • + 3
 I like this approach. Reverb it's the most popular dropper post and they taking advantage of the problems that it has, doesn't seem like a honest move but it's very damn smart. They could go more straight in detail about how their dropper works, but you can get enough information in this article. I like a lot that they put a video right away of how to do maintance yourself (something very important to me) and that they ancitipe a problem and gave the solution.
  • + 14
 It is explained in detail, how it works in the videos. And yes, we do want to address the difficulties, that many other post designs have to overcome. We have been design droppers over 10 years now, and we wanted to make something different, not trying to improve current designs. We were trying to think out of the box, not staying inside the box and rearranging the mess.
  • + 3
 @Sacki: when is the post hitting the shop shelves? Genuinely interested
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: ahh yes, wakiflakes' logic and reasoning at its best.... Next time your in a car accident, just tell yourself, "At least I wasn't attacked by a horde of Vikings"... Then again you may be the type who enjoys getting manhandled by a barbarian, messing your hair and corduroys eh?
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: what height,ave speed and feathers per arm please?
  • + 3
 @WAKIdesigns: Or just get a fall line! Problems solved..
  • + 8
 @dtm1: hi mate, I stole this logic from Louis CK when he was talking about the civilization of pussies. Reverb works great for me just like for all of my friends. Luv'ya all! Remember, we are all going to die.
  • + 4
 @WAKIdesigns: The posts will be ready to shipt to customers in January, at the same time when we ship to our OEM customers. However, we are offering our pre-order deal (free titanium bolts, free I-Spec adapter or BikeYoke Shiftl) only until end of October.
  • + 4
 @Sacki: Do you plan a non-stealth version of this ?
  • + 7
 This might be my next dropper post, well done
  • + 3
 Funny enough I had a problem with my Reverb, went to Suspeensionlab.be, the guy explained my Sram was not purging those Reverbs, they were just taking yours and giving you a new one in exchange! It took him an hour to purge both the remote oil and the internal mechanism, and he had to try it twice, so not an easy job for a newbie. There are also other designs with simple springs.
  • + 5
 Sounds great, but we will never know until its tested by the average man or women.
  • + 7
 I want that!
  • + 2
 Lost me at " ... let the guide pins fall out!" never to be found again on my workshop floor.

Ive had a Giant dropper since 2012, only replaced it last year due to the seat rail clamp failing. Went straight to the new 2015 Giant contact dropper and its flawless!
  • + 2
 With droppers it seems to be the luck of the draw if you get a good or bad one A friend and me have got a Reverb stealth's, both been faultless in all weathers for over a year now Before that we both had KS Lev's which straight out the box had a habit of getting stuck if left in the dropped position for 10 minutes or more and you had to give the seat's nose a tug to get the post to lift back up
  • + 2
 I agree, the Lev needs a quick pull bc it gets stuck in the dropped position, pulling it while riding is fun :/
  • + 3
 My KS Lev still works perfectly after months of abuse. I don't know the lifespan of KS dropper posts but mine is still rock solid. No springy issue, works like a charm. But REVIVE, you got my attention.
  • + 2
 My ks is going on three years... Now it's on the wife's stumpy.. Not as much as a single issue... Maybe I'm lucky.
  • + 1
 @bohns1: yeah, aside from the little initial stiction when the bike's not used for a while (which goes away once you pump the post with the switch open), no other serious issues. Kind shock really is kind to me.
  • + 2
 This is a cool thing. Simple, serviceable, and designed with the long haul in mind. I'd be happy to be a guinea pig towards that last point if @Sacki wants to sling one my way for a test.
  • + 6
 Ze Germans!!
  • + 5
 Ze Taiwanese!
  • + 5
 just when I'm after a new post as well
  • + 1
 So you lower your seat to ride downhill. Over all the bumps surely the oil and pressurised-air in the outer tube get shaken together quite badly, hit the uphill and raise your seat and this slightly bubbly oil goes into the inner chamber and makes it squishy? This builds up over multiple descents and so you have to use the reset feature to fix it? So is the reset really a bonus feature to fix it IF air gets in there, or a necessary, repeated annoyance that you have to do regularly as a matter or course to fix this as a problem? Or is there some reason that the mixing of the air and oil is prevented?
  • + 6
 The oil is pressurized with 250psi in fully extended position. In dropped position, the pressure will go even higher. This prevents oil from foaming or getting bubbly, as you try to explain it. You can shake an oil/air chamber, but under high pressure, it will not mix, the high pressure will not allow both fluids to mix.
We have been riding and testing the post for a long time now, and you may believe me, that what you are explaining is not the case.
You need to reset your post for example, when you have the post upside down and push the remote.
Just this past week, we have been riding our posts in Italy with a continuous 1500m descent from about 2100 to 600m above sea level. Several times a day for 4 days straigh. Never had to reset it even once. And believe me: Those trails are fast and rough. ;-)
  • + 2
 @Sacki: Thanks for replying, but surely this goes contrary to basic physics? The higher the pressure on the spring side, the more air the oil can hold, when this oil then moves into the inner chamber it is cut off from the pressure and so returns to close to atmospheric pressure which would cause much of the dissolved air to come out of the oil. This is how many hydraulic air separators work after all?
  • + 2
 @G-Sport: The pressure inside the post is the same same everyhwere. It is an open bath design. Pressure in both chambers is the same all the time. Pressure does not stop at valves. ;-)
When you open the valve, the pressure equalizes on both sides, naturally. When you close the valve, the pressures stay at where they are.
How would the air pressure ever different on the other side of the valve? Oil can not be cut off from pressure by an open valve.
Believe me or not. It works perfectly! ;-)
  • + 1
 @Sacki: Surely the oil in the central chamber above the main valve is not pressurised (by the air spring) as soon as that valve closes? Yes, while the valve was open the air spring could act on it but after that closes there is only any slight residual sticktion in the action keeping it under pressure... and I'm assuming you would want to keep that to a minimum...
  • + 1
 @G-Sport: Why don´t you just buy one, and find out by yourself, how well it works. I am almost sure, you will be surprised by how things go contrary to basic physics. ;-)
  • + 1
 @Sacki: sorry if my questioning seems hostile. I'm super impressed that you are trying something new and have such a nice clear video to explain the operation. I'm also very impressed that you are following up comments on here to help clarify. But most of us can't afford to take risks on unproven new designs. A company spokesman recounting a week of alpine descents on a brand new setup with new oil without issues is great, but if the basic physics rings alarm bells then you'll forgive me if I hang on top my hard earned for a while longer yet to see how it copes in the real world.
  • + 1
 @G-Sport: Nono, it´s fine. I´m there to answer questions. I don´t feel offended. However, I cannot really follow your thoughts and explanations regarding basic physics and the pressure issue.
The pressure is still in the center chamber, even after the valve is closed.
It does not matter, if it is disconnected from the air side, or not.
If that what you are saying was fact, then you´d be able to let pressure simply disappear.
Imagine, both chambers have air and oil inside. Then when the valve opens, the pressure will be same in both chambers, right? And when you close the valve, the air pressure in the center chamber will still remain. That is clear, right?
And now go away from the idea, that a pressurized air volume has to be involved, to set oil under pressure.
Another example: Go diving in 100 meters depth. Take a cup with a lid with you. Fill the cup with water and close the lid! Does the pressure inside the cup suddenly disappear, just because you disconnect the water inside the cup from its surroundings? No, right?
It does not matter where the pressure comes from and it can not simply disappear, because a valve closes.
  • + 1
 @Sacki: The post can just move up by the fractional amount that the oil has compressed, pressure gone... similarly, if the rider tries to lift the bike by the seat, the pressure will actually drop below atmospheric.
  • + 1
 My 5 year old Rase 9 has never failed , most likely never will - nothing to fail in the design .

Head " Wiggles" I don't give a crap

No effect on riding but killed the company .
  • + 2
 I have had two reverbs that were both faultless and my current bike has a stealth LEV, also faultless....have I just been lucky? Have I just hexed my luck?...
  • + 1
 I've had a reverb for nearly 3 years, one service and bleed in that time and faultless, go figure????
  • + 3
 The twin tube layout with the air release valve seems like a really slick idea
  • + 1
 Was nice to have the status quo section. Wouldn't it have been nice if they outlined all these issues before they sold millions of faulty units and had the consumer foot the bill for R & D.
  • + 1
 @G-Sport: George are you thinking of branching out into Mtb's and could we soon see Gsport mtb parts?

Would love to rock some Gsport hubs on my mtb

Been running Gsport products on the bmx since 94
  • + 4
 Time will tell...
  • + 0
 Is it just me that doesn't want a remote operated cable and would rather have a lever under the saddle.i hate having crap cluttering up my bars!!2 brake levers and 1 shifter nothing else
  • + 20
 Yup it is just you.
  • + 0
 Wow so you like taking your hand off the bars then at speed to actuate a seat lever? Weird
  • + 1
 @bohns1:
Erm no!!I set and forget.seat down at the start of the downs and seat up at the beginning of the climb!why would I need to put my seat up half down a downhill track.now if you do that bohns1 your the weirdo
  • + 0
 @Allaboutthehardtails ... HAHAHA to funny guess your trails must be sorta lame... Love to see you make use of that on the shore.. I'm always fine tuning my heights and it's never just long climb up then one big bomb down... Guess me and thousands of others are real weird there terd nug!
  • + 1
 @bohns1: So remind me what people did before dropper posts!!
  • + 0
 @Allaboutthehardtails: well, simple... THEY Either didn't ride as aggressively.. Stopped everytime they got to a down and lowered their post disrupting flow... Left the post at a more neutral height which would impede pedal efficiency.. Rode more cross country orientated trails... All of this hindering sport progression...

Dude if u want a lever at your seatpost, rock an old Joplin then and be happy.. But the sport has moved on... Get over it
  • + 1
 @bohns1: Oi you dick get over yourself I made one comment that didn't concern you and was about my own preference and the dick you are butted in and called me a terd nug for my own preference.f*ck off you dick and rat on someone else
  • + 1
 @Allaboutthehardtails: WaaaaWaaaaaaa! ???? ???? ???? ???? nhfffffffff WaaaaWaaaaaaa!
  • + 1
 so... this thing works simple yet effective, it doesnt require a lot of maintenance and its made by ze germans. i need to measure up my seatpost.
  • + 0
 Sweet! Decided to snoop around their website and couldn't find post length anywhere. Finally found it under the technical tab. The 125mm drop is 362mm long and the 160mm drop is 432mm long..... Intrigued.....
  • + 7
 You can also find the full secs in the article description. There is an "extend" button. ;-)
  • + 1
 @Sacki: Thanks! Didn't know, don't have that option on my phone....
  • + 1
 @Sacki: can you remove the stealth routing attachment and attach cable external? I have a pivot bolt that will hit the stealth routing portion. 362mm is the absolute max i can run
  • + 1
 @t1chan: Hi there! Unfortunately it is not possible, to swap it to an external cable-routing.
But please consider our extremely low stack height!
This means, that for the same saddle height, our post does not go as deep into the seattube, as other posts with the same overall length. Also the bottom part, where the cable attaches is rotateable to get some extra clearence, in case the is a pivto or somethin This can also help in some cases.
You can check out detailed drawings and measurements here in our tech section or directly via this link:
www.dropbox.com/s/4uj60aawpzkr167/REVIVE%20125.JPG?dl=0
www.dropbox.com/s/doxo24cuqwt7z97/REVIVE%20160.JPG?dl=0
  • + 0
 Bah, still no 34.9 model for me. I'm surprised more companies aren't doing mechanical posts like Specialized. Hydraulic has so many issues.
  • + 3
 Command Post is not mechanically sprung. It still has seals. It just utilizes a mechanically actuated locking collet, which can eventually fail. The nice thing about the collet design is that even if the post lost all its air, it would still be dropped and locked into various position, you'd just have to raise it manually. The Command Post is a great design, just needs more positions.
  • + 2
 @PHeller: the command post ircc has like 22 positions
  • + 1
 @wiscobiker: Yes and no. The Cruiser Control only have a few positions within a narrow range (usually about 25mm in the center of the post) and the top and bottom position. The Command Post could be improved by spreading those positions out across the whole travel.
  • + 1
 @PHeller: Honestly I only ever use mine in fully up or fully down anyway. If I need the post up its obviously not steep or non technical enough for me to sit and pedal. if the trail is steep or technical enough to lower the post at all I can just stand and sprint
  • + 4
 @PHeller: I have the older 3 position model and cant say I even want more positions.
  • + 4
 @wiscobiker: Agree with only using the post mainly all way up or down but also use it just slightly lower than skyscraper mode for trail riding at times. I went from a infinite adjust post to the Spec and thought I would hate having only 3 positions but it was really all I was using anyway and I just didn't know it.
  • + 2
 If there is enough demand, we can do a 34.9mm version. Just get me enough customers and we´ll do it right away. I am not even kidding! ;-)
For us as a (still) small company, we can not offer too many variations in the beginning, because tubes have a very high MOQ from our suppliers.
This means, we have to concentrate on the major diameters first, which are 30.9 and 31.6.
Anyway, if (for example) "only" all 2017 Specialized Enduro owners would like to swap their 125mm post for a 160mm REVIVE and we get enough confirmed interests and then finally "safe" orders, then we could do a 34.9 version basically right away.
  • + 1
 @Helm72: I think a three position post where you could adjust the "cruiser" position would be pretty cool.that I could see myself using. but with the 20 "micro adjust" positions specialized puts in its more trouble than its worth.
  • + 1
 @wiscobiker: I completely agree with you on being able to adjust where the "cruiser" position is. I'm glad i have the older Spec post that only has 3 position setting. Know somebody that has the newer one and all the settings drives him crazy.
  • + 2
 Nice fun popper.. (C) @singletrackmag
  • + 0
 Nothing beats Gravity dropper yet in performance and reliability. But GD needs to work on the look. I ditch the ugly boots right away. This Revive looks good though. .
  • + 2
 This is nearly the exact same thing as the x-fusion strate...
  • + 1
 Well I had hopes for the Highline but now I'm glad I waited. This looks most dope.
  • + 1
 I'm not a mechanic so I have no idea if that video makes sense but the pictures look good. It looks like it will work?
  • + 2
 Hry, i need it asap!! Where can i buy it And for how much?
  • + 2
 I like how simple it looks.
  • + 1
 is there a leaver option under the seat?
  • + 1
 Hi There, Sorry, but we only have Remote versions for REVIVE.
  • + 0
 @Sacki: ah dam thanks
  • + 1
 What about the oil? Doesn't need to be replaced after certain time of use?
  • + 10
 Basically: No. Dropper post oil does not "wear".
Of course oil level will decrease (although very very slowly), because seals are never 100% sealing. REVIVE can work with an oild leverl of more than +/- 5ml of factory setting, so even if 5ml of oil get lost due to regular use within years, then REVIVe will still wirk perfectly. And losing 5ml due to "seating seals" takes alo of time.
However, if anyone wants to do a oil chamber service, this is basically how you do:
1. Release the air pressure
2. Remove the stanchion unit (as you can see in the service video)
3. Unscrew the bottom endcap of the stanchion unit and remove it with the shaft and piston unit.
4. Drain the "old" oil and clean the stanchion unit
4. Fill in about 40ml of new oil
5. Insert the shaft unit and reinstall the botton endcap
6. Put everthing back together as seen in the service video and reinflate.
7. REVIVE your seatpost
Done.
Don´t forget it´s an open bath design, and super simple to deal with. No messing with super accurate IFP psoitioning or precharging or charging, or whatever. Just put in new oil in the right amount and put back together.
  • + 1
 @Sacki: Thanks for the info. I'm going to consider this dropper when I get a frame with stealth routing. Looking forward for a review.
  • + 1
 Nice! Now can I wait until January?
  • + 1
 Its really raising my expectations.
  • + 1
 I think I' ll wait for the E13's one; not oil, not air.
  • + 1
 Now I know what's for my birthday
  • + 2
 This is genious.
  • + 1
 Yep I want one. Mine (reverb post) has the springy bit too and it's really anoying. Giant dropper posts are good too
  • - 1
 Patent money waiting for someone to do a genuinely simple mechanical dropper. Pneumatic dropper is like eating burger with fork and spoon.
  • + 5
 Hmm, somebody did about 15 years ago, the Gravity dropper. No air, no oil, just steel and alloy. Affordable, and reliable.
  • + 1
 @nedersotan: Yes, but their problem is that they basically stopped developing and evolving its design.
  • - 2
 Looks like a Joplin, except serviceable without the need for a stupid long pin wrench to get at the valve seat, well that and the bleed function (which the Joplin would have benefited from).
  • + 1
 no love for the Cannondale's 34.9 and external dropper Frown
  • + 1
 Cuz I always use my dropper post on my DH bike
  • + 1
 Just go with a Gravity Dropper.
  • - 2
 FYI:
$330USD preorder. Germany.

If so much complexity is reduced, and manufacturing tolerances opened up, how come those savings don't show up in the MSRP?
  • + 13
 I am not exactly sure, what you want to say.
We are still a small company, producing not in quantities of hundreds of thousands, like the other droppers mentioned here.
Other posts, that are referenced here in some comments cost less in production than REVIVE, just because they are produced in quantities that go beyond hundreds of thousands, while we produce maybe 1% of that. Still their MSRP is way over 400USD and it goes up to 470 USD.
Yet, our MSRP is way lower than any other "high-end" post on the market.
Also our price includes free shipping world-wide.
And please do not forget, that your post has some pretty nice features that other posts do not have.
So please, may you explain to me again, what exactly you want to say?
  • + 1
 @Sacki: So the short answer is the volume. That makes perfect sense. Not dogging the product at all. It looks great and I hope it is a success! I may buy one as well, if my KS ever wears out and stops working.
  • + 1
 i have a seat post clamp
  • + 5
 well done for you! first part of a complete bike, when are you getting the rest?
  • + 2
 @lesz42: its a hard one because i don't know what i want, do i want a leaver clamp or just a bolt.
  • + 1
 Doss dropper!!!
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