BikeYoke Updates & Extends the Revive Dropper Post

Aug 18, 2020
by Dan Roberts  
BikeYoke Revive 2.0


BikeYoke. Despite the name, which comes from their beginnings manufacturing aftermarket links for suspension bikes, they've grown into a brand synonymous with dropper posts. Their Revive dropper post has gained a strong following from its smooth action and long working life without needing any maintenance. When launch it launched in 2017, the 185mm drop Revive was the longest on the market.

With time there comes advancement, and many brands now have longer options that also pose a threat to BikeYoke's dominance in the smoothness and reliability market. And with more and more bikes now coming with shorter seat tube lengths, the ability to fit longer drop posts becomes more possible. Taller riders often need to run such posts to achieve their desired seat height, and the same is true of the steep seat tube angle trend, with longer drop posts moving the seat more out of the way when fully dropped.





The Revive on the posts function in action.

REVIVE 2.0

The Revive 2.0 is BikeYoke's updated post, which carries over a lot of the features that made the original such a hit while tweaking some other little aspects to bring more smoothness, increased reliability and ease of use.

The biggest news is the 213mm drop option, which, in a similar battle to the big drivetrain manufacturers, looks to be one millimeter ahead of the competition and takes the crown as the longest drop post on the market.

The Revive 2.0 posts maintain the patented Revive technology inside that works to keep the hydraulics of the post uncontaminated with air. A release valve at the top of the post allows the purging of air to keep the post feeling solid and squish free. It also retains the ease of user serviceability that the previous post had.

A new stanchion and head are made from one piece, rather than the previous 2-piece and boned construction. This helps up stiffness and control of tolerances, with the stanchion tube now having a varying wall thickness for more meat where it's needed and less where the stresses and strains aren't as high.

The 213mm drop post benefits from an increased bushing overlap to up support and reduce wear.

BikeYoke Revive 2.0
A one-piece stanchion and head construction, on the left, is used on the new 2.0 posts. The previous two-piece construction on the right.
BikeYoke Revive 2.0
The new CNC actuator on the right has a much smoother surface finish compared to the older generation on the left.
BikeYoke Revive 2.0
The new stanchion on the left is also hard anodized and uses a varying wall thickness compared to the old one on the right.

All posts gain from the new updates, with the 125, 160 and 185mm drop versions also having the hard anodized one piece stanchion and head. There are also longer saddle clamp bolts with conical washers and a symmetric upper saddle clamp make fitting the saddle an easier affair.

A new CNC actuator lever tops off the updates and looks to make the post's action even smoother.

The Revive 2.0 is available in 30.9 and 31.6mm diameter options, with it being easy to swap the lower tube to adapt between the two diameters. A dedicated 34.9mm diameter Revive Max is available and remains unchanged.

Posts are available right now with prices from $320 to $380 USD or €335 to €405 depending on the drop size. Weights are between 465g and 640g depending on drop and post diameter. A 31.6mm diameter 213mm drop post weighs a claimed 640g.

BikeYoke Revive 2.0 Drawing 213mm
A 2D drawing for the 213mm drop Revive 2.0 showing the overall post length, stack height, minimum insert and lower tube lengths. Actuator length is 32mm.





Triggy Alpha
Alongside the Revive 2.0, BikeYoke also updated their Triggy dropper post lever.

The Triggy Alpha paddle runs on a cartridge bearing for smoothness and longevity, with the paddle available in two different lengths. The whole paddle has angle adjustment and there are two mounting positions for the whole lever making it easier to find the best fit for your hands and cockpit setup.

BikeYoke Triggy Alpha

There's a maximum cable pull of 11mm and a new cable clamp to make the lever compatible with nearly all cable actuated dropper posts on the market.

Mount options are also plentiful with availability to direct mount to SRAM, Shimano, Hope, Formula, Magura, Trickstuff and Hayes brakes for a tidy cockpit. Or a simple BikeYoke band clamp fitment if you need that.

Weight is 32g for the short paddle version and 34g for the long and it comes in at $60 USD or €65. It's available around the end of August/beginning of September.

BikeYoke Triggy Alpha
The paddle is rotatable and has two mount positions to adjust the position of the whole lever.
BikeYoke Triggy Alpha
Two lengths of paddle are available.





BikeYoke USP
The Update Service Program means that everyone sending their original Revive post into an official service centre will have their post updated to the new Revive 2.0 parts for no extra cost whilst the post is being serviced.

There is a time limit for this update program with details to follow on bikeyoke.com








165 Comments

  • 148 0
 When the best gets better before anyone else can even catch up.
  • 10 78
flag stavros81 (Aug 19, 2020 at 0:09) (Below Threshold)
 Not sure what you mean mate..Been running my Fox transfer without any problems for 2 years.
  • 6 0
 Actually I don't understand why they updated Revive. Shouldn't Divine be better and updated model?
  • 31 0
 @stavros81: own both and fox f.cktory feels and looks like alibaba product compared to revive
  • 10 4
 @vitality: Kind of agree. Sold my Revive with my previous bike. New bike came with Fox Transfer Factory. A bit too early to judge its reliability, but it is no where near as smooth as the Revive. The seat clamp bolts on the 2020 Transfer are just retard engineering (there was a good reason why they changed it for 2021). Not to mention that is looks like opening up and servicing the Transfer will be a lot more problematic compared to to the simple, fast and cheap service of Revive.
  • 10 4
 @Ferisko: If it works it works. Just go ride man and if it breaks then get a bike yoke.
  • 2 13
flag stavros81 (Aug 19, 2020 at 4:14) (Below Threshold)
 @vitality: Just ride man.Worry about someything only if it's broken
  • 12 1
 @stavros81: when I am paying for "premium" product I’m expecting to receive quality product not overpriced made in china crap.
  • 4 0
 I'm inclined to buy anything this company produces. I converted my Reverb to cable actuation with their DeHy and haven't had an issue with cold weather operation since. The unit was available by itself or with a thumb lever which I find to be a rare and appreciated option in the retail arena. Well done, Bike Yoke.
  • 5 9
flag stavros81 (Aug 19, 2020 at 9:53) (Below Threshold)
 @vitality: I see your point...but why so much fuss about a dropper post when the most overpriced piece of your rig with average quality is actually your carbon frame made in Chinatown?

So we end up to same conclusion..just ride bro.. till it breaks..
  • 2 3
 @stavros81: It's made where it can be made for reasonable price and where's enough know how. Why so much hate towards China?
  • 1 0
 @pakleni:
Nothing against China whatsoever
  • 2 8
flag nickfranko (Aug 19, 2020 at 14:30) (Below Threshold)
 @stavros81:

Then don’t use racist terms. Chinatown is a location in certain cities in the US.
  • 5 6
 @nickfranko: relax bro..racist terms....your country knows better about racist terms..ask all the african americans about it
  • 1 0
 @pakleni: except is mostly Vietnam, nowadays. Even China has become too expensive...
  • 54 0
 The Revive 1.0 is the best post I have used. Smooth and no issues after almost 3 years.
  • 3 18
flag DroppingThreeTwoOne (Aug 18, 2020 at 21:03) (Below Threshold)
 it sticks when the seat is pressed from the back
  • 18 0
 @DroppingThreeTwoOne: then just sit on it
  • 13 5
 Was the best post id ever used but I got tired of paying 450 when pnw and one up make great posts for half that
  • 27 0
 @ranke: then stop buying more? Buy one and use it? How many droppers do you really need?
  • 15 0
 @DroppingThreeTwoOne:
Patient: "Doctor, it really hurts when I do this"
Doctor: "Don't do that then"
  • 1 0
 @ranke: Makes you wonder though if without cheap oil, and consequently cheap labour, all we could afford would be a locally made hardtail or even fully rigid that would cost 5 grands, cuz' I guess PNW & One Up products are made overseas.
  • 7 0
 @ranke: Depends on your usecase. If you ride a lot and/or in bad weather and keep your gear for more than a season, the Bikeyoke posts are worth it. PNW and Oneup make good droppers for most of us, but they are not in the same category when it comes to no-fuss, no-maintenance, no-issues reliability and long term performance.
  • 3 7
flag carraig042 (Aug 19, 2020 at 3:41) (Below Threshold)
 @Ttimer: you could not be more wrong. PNW has a longer warranty period, the inherent design is no-maintenance cartridge, and they have shown to have great reliability. Also PNW has fantastic customer service if you contact them. I have had the original Bachelor for almost 3 years now. I plan on buying another PNW on my next bike.
  • 3 1
 @carraig042: You should look at a TranzX post in that case. It is the same post at PNW but cheaper and the guys at PNW now run TranzX distribution so you get the same customer service.
  • 1 0
 @CaseVentura: Even better then. I do remember seeing somewhere that companies like PNW do have additional control/engineering over the Tranzx designs. How much, I do not know.
  • 1 0
 @bigtim:
...Patient: How am I going to put on my pants?
  • 2 0
 @jonus216: Doctor: "I see you didn't this morning, so I can clearly see you're nuts."
  • 1 0
 @drfunsocks: you want to buy a rig with no post on it? I'll keep my dropper next time if you buy the bike from me like that. thanks a bunch.
  • 1 0
 @Ttimer: I ride 4-7 times a week, and buy a new rig every year or two with the funds from selling the last. With a couple bikes in the stable at most times, I'd rather buy a new post than swap them out to keep a used one and hope it lasts. But i hear u. I'm sure the bike yokes would've lasted. I'm in CA so it's not a whole lot of rain and mud. Droppers last for me until I sell the bikes... outside of reverbs. Those things are terrible, and a pain to rebuild. Never again.
  • 53 2
 Unless it’s got a battery I have to charge I’m not interested.
  • 52 1
 I've just been throwing the dead batteries in the garbage and buying new ones for maximum freshness.
  • 54 1
 @f*ckingsteve: IN THE GARBAGE?!? ARE YOU SERIOUS?!? I throw mine in the river.
  • 46 1
 @Olimac: i grind mine up into a fine dust and sprinkle it into the food i donate to orphanages
  • 5 8
 @Olimac: Great, follow the presidential line of thinking!!
  • 2 1
 @Olimac: if you cut them into pieces they make good fire starters as well. Great for bike-packing.
  • 26 1
 3mm more drop than OneUp but 42mm longer total length.
  • 25 2
 Yeah, OneUp isn’t the smoothest, but you get more drop for a given rails-to-collar dimension than anyone else and the post is only $200.
  • 8 2
 @melanthius: it’s a shame that the action on the oneup doesn’t feel great. I tried to switch to a oneup, and went back to bikeyoke
  • 3 1
 @onlyDH: Oneup uses a pretty cheap seal, just sliding the seal head up the stanchion for a service shows you just how much friction there is. The bushing isn’t the best either, it’s on there very tightly.
  • 7 0
 Yup, OneUp makes it possible to have 8” dropper on bikes that couldn’t handle it. Not the case w/ other ~8” droppers (too long).
I would not say that OneUp isn’t the smoothest - there is a little play, but movement is smooth. And no squish or other vertical play.
  • 1 0
 OneUp has a bit of lateral play but the remote feel smoother than the one on the Revive! I had my OneUp for 3-4 weeks this spring and then I've put my freshly serviced Revive and didn't believe it!
  • 2 0
 @MaplePanda: I don’t think it’s so much the seal, but the surface on the shaft. The machining step over is noticeable. That said, for $200 it’s pretty hard to argue with
  • 1 1
 @Alvey72: I have an SDG on my hardtail, and I couldn't believe how much better than my Fox Transfer it was, smoother and more reliable in every way.
Now I just got a BikeYoke Divine for my full sus, and really look forward to getting rid of the Transfer, though I don't expect it to be as smooth as the SDG, as that set a really high bar.
  • 23 4
 Sram are gutted, they were getting set to release a market leading 212.899mm reverb.
  • 2 1
 dead joke is dead
  • 12 0
 213 mm.. someone's trying to one up OneUp
  • 5 0
 Or vecnum nivo which has 212
  • 6 0
 In what situation or why would I pick a Revive over a Divine? (assuming same length and insertion)

I just seems to me that the auto bleed and drop adjustability of the Divine puts it ahead of the Revive. The Divine is cheaper too
  • 2 0
 Waiting for that answer, too. Completely satisfied with my divine 185. Running for 14 month now, smooth Acton, reliable.
  • 1 0
 Revive is smoother with a lighter lever feel and actuation. That said, the Divine is on par with the other high end competition like Fox; the Revive just positions itself in another level. I’m currently on a Divine and love it- Auto bleed with no need to “revive” it was the selling point for me. I’ll give up some smoothness for that. It’s also a hair lighter :-)
  • 2 0
 I went through this discussion with myself the last few days before buying a divine. The revive has better quality internals so runs at a lower pressure. I understand that makes the action lighter/smoother?
However, the cheaper internals of the divine are also lighter. Not sure how it impacts servicing, etc.
Had I known about the update 2 days ago I'd have waited (but only to get the longer post - 213mm rather than my 185mm), assuming it was available imminently. As it stands I'm just reminding myself I saved some money and it's only 3cm! Ha ha!
  • 1 0
 Also lets not forget the Devine travel can be reduced in 5mm increments whereas the Revive cannot, That swung me to the Devine, It worked out fine, but was concerned it may have been a little too long and the ability to make it a bit shorter may make the difference to some.
  • 1 0
 @nealy578: Not me - I've the legs of a grasshopper!
  • 6 0
 "A new stanchion and head are made from one piece, rather than the previous 2-piece and boned construction. This helps up stiffness..."


Google translator or mind in the gutter?
  • 3 0
 Pinkbike error. Other websites used the word "bonded." So that's what PB must have meant instead of "boned"
  • 4 0
 They appear to have lowered the price too, no? The V1 revive in 185mm went for $450usd, with a triggy. You could order without a remote direct from BikeYoke, but I don’t think they’re even shipping to the US due to COVID stuff. I’ve never seen them sold without remote at any third party retailers.

Anyway, even without a remote, I think the 185 V1 went for more than the $350 they’re asking for for the V2 185.

Rad.
  • 3 0
 I noticed the price drop, too. I definitely recall paying the $450 for my revive 3 years ago.
  • 1 0
 The new lower prices reflect that they no longer include the remote.
  • 1 0
 @Inertiaman: As I already said, even without a remote, the 185 V1 went for more than the 350 that they’re asking for the V2. They sell they triggy for 60 bucks or something. Removing the remote from the package cost still doesn’t account for the total price drop.

They lowered the price.
  • 3 0
 Glad to see they increased the bushing overlap for the longer post (looks like ~9mm). OneUp, please take notice. Many of us would rather have a more reliable post at the expense of a few added grams and millimeters of length. It's not just reliability, either. That should reduce binding, so the actuation should be smoother.
  • 3 0
 2 years and running perfectly smooth. My 180 is hands-down the best dropper I've ever owned! No weird notches or unpredictable stopping points. And won't fire up at mach 10 and smash your nuts Smile
  • 3 0
 Never a dull moment riding with good ole spesh command post
  • 2 0
 The free upgrade is cool and all, but a rebuild from Dirtlabs costs $150. The rebuild kit is $20, and takes about 10 minutes max. I’d much rather get the 2.0 internals and install them myself, rather than wasting $130
  • 1 0
 Is that what it would take to get a new upper/stanchion? Mine has wear marks on it and needs some... "touch up".
  • 1 0
 @kinematix: I’m going to email bikeyoke and ask.
  • 1 0
 @kinematix: nail polish or sharpie
  • 1 0
 @onlyDH: I emailed them and they said I have to go through one of their service centers to get the updated parts. They said they wanted to make sure the rebuilds were completed properly so there wouldn't be problems down the road. That's understandable, but I can't justify spending the money to have both of my posts upgraded. I'll probably hold off and have it warrantied if the head/stanchion fails. Just hoping I don't end up impaling myself...
  • 9 8
 My revive has never been all that great. Started sagging after maybe 6 months. Got it rebuilt with the new internals and it still says. Will definitely be going to the new cartridge style post in the future instead of rebuilding it again. Lot of people seem to like the post though. Mine was a pretty early first gen post so I must have just got a lemon.
  • 8 0
 That sounds like a prime candidate for the upgrade program. It's an excellent post, your experience is not typical.
  • 3 0
 Bike Yoke has a 2 year warranty
  • 6 0
 When it started to sag, you couldn't just fix it with the reset valve like in the above video? I thought that was one of the biggest selling points of the Bike Yoke dropper.
  • 6 1
 @tacklingdummy: the revive valve sometimes works sometimes doesn’t. The upgrade program has been unofficially going on for a while. My post has been rebuilt with the updated internals. Maybe it is user error but I checked the torque on the collar. The sag is probably about 1/8”. So i mostly just deal with it because it is summer I got kids and all so any free time I’d rather spend riding. Just offering up my less than stellar but still not reverb level experience cause all I ever see is glowing reviews. Also seen one that sheared off at the top of the post. When it is working well it is a slick post, I’ll give it that.
  • 3 0
 Mine had been great for a year, something like that. Instead of rebuilding it myself, I gave it to an official service center but they f*cked it up! He said it's probably the oem seal that was a bit tight so put another one and now it is working but is loosing air a bit or something because it aint going up perfectly! I just serviced it this spring so I won't have the new internals... I think I'll have to try to sell it and just buy a second OneUp even if it has a bit of lateral play. Frown
  • 4 0
 @Timo82: at least you have a service center.

Wheelthang is the service center in Vancouver but they are not accepting new clients. Pretty disappointed and may jump ship to one up.
  • 1 0
 Waiting for that answer, too. Completely satisfied with my divine 185. Running for 14 month now, smooth Acton, reliable.
  • 4 0
 Broke the head off of mine. Replaced under warranty. Great post tho. I also use thier lever conversion with my reverb which replaces the hydraulic lever.
  • 3 0
 @psldix: You aren't the only one. Some guy on MTBR almost lost his manhood when the head broke off.
  • 2 0
 @onemind123: Well I don't have one anymore...when I called them back to say they screwed it once again they said to me that they'll try to do something but they're not doing it anymore... They say it took like 3 months to receive the parts etc....and that maybe the new service center would be somewhere on the west coast... don't know if they were talking about Wheelthang. Frown
  • 12 9
 Love my 210mm Oneup post, good to see more companies offering long travel droppers. Still hoping to see a 250mm or 300mm dropper one day
  • 7 6
 I feel like 200mm is a good number for mtb. 200mm drop, 200m travel, 200mm disc rotors. anything more than that is getting a bit excessive
  • 2 1
 300 would be cray af. Seems like the market for folks who show at least ~350mm of post can’t be too big.
  • 8 2
 @zyoungson: Excessive yes but that doesn't mean I don't want it. Just like I always wanted a set of marz super monsters
  • 3 0
 We’d probably need a new seat tube diameter for that.
  • 27 0
 @zyoungson: I’m trimming my bars down to 200mm then
  • 3 22
flag erikkellison (Aug 18, 2020 at 21:19) (Below Threshold)
 @zyoungson: that’s some weak logic, matching numbers as if some cosmic force in nature dictates harmony among those particular measurements for bikes.
There is no mathematical relationship between suspension travel, rotor size, and dropper stroke.
And numbers beyond that being excessive? Also wrong.
  • 4 0
 Absolutely this. I run my 210mm One-up slightly less than the minimum insertion as it is. Bike frames keep lowering standover, so it makes sense for tall riders.
  • 4 0
 250+ would be most useful in a hardcore HT, so you can slam the seat right out of the way so your legs can do the rear suspension thing!
  • 3 0
 @zyoungson: 200mm schlong
  • 1 0
 @kyytaM: not nearly enough....depending on what your needs are.
  • 3 0
 @Linc: But with increased dropper length the insert length also increases. It needs to go somewhere and as seat tube lengths shorten it's gets harder to get longer posts installed. Or am I missing something?
  • 1 0
 @zyoungson: SUPER MONSTER!!
  • 2 1
 @freeriderayward: Yep, that might make me consider a dropper at some stage. My seattube is 400mm and my seatpost (rigid) is 400mm. I usually leave it slammed but I do have the option to raise it 300mm (leaving the required 100mm insertion length in the frame). That would get the saddle right up to XC height, should I ever wish to. I eventually never did that, but it is good to have the option. But it also implied that I never felt the point getting a dropper if it doesn't cover the full range of heights I would potentially use it. I may not need the full 300mm of travel as there is always the collar and the head extending above the seattube. But over 250mm would definitely make sense. Back when I had my frame built, the Eightpins dropper was exclusive to Liteville bikes so there wasn't really a point getting a compatible (large diameter) seattube. But at this stage, if someone has a bike built it may be an option to consider. Not sure what it would do to the bike handling though. I recall Ed Haythorntwaite (Dirt mag tech editor in a Pinkbike article, currently working at Robotbike/Atherton) felt that when Stanton increased their seat tube diameter, it kind of deadened the feel of their bikes. So that might be the limiting factor eventually. Longer travel dropper posts will eventually require larger diameter seattubes. On a hardtail, these might negatively affect the bike handling. On a full suspension bike, it may interfere with the linkage design.
  • 1 0
 @Citrons: 80mm of extra drop, plus 80mm of extra dropper-body = 160mm increased length. Given how must exposed post myself and many others are running to get correct pedalling position, this wouldn't be a problem.
  • 1 0
 Funny, I just received a lightly used 185 Revive post and noticed it looked different than the 160 Revive I was running so I called BTI yesterday to chat about the differences. Then this article gets posted last night. Turns out I have a 2.0, which is definitely nicer on the head/clamping design and also a bit smoother/faster on extension. I actually bumped the pressure down even lower (to 180psi) to get the extension speed to match my old 160 Revive (at 200psi). I love these posts, they are one of the best on the market IMO. And while 185mm is perfect for me (35" book in crotch inseam) I'm glad that the tallest riders have a longer option too. Thumbs up all around for the new post.
  • 2 2
 Love my Bikeyoke but the triggy eats cables. Not sure if it is just me, but switched to a Wolf Tooth Remote with Spurbell on top which cleaned up my bars even more. Will update to the new parts on the next service which is just so easy to do. The video made it simple.
  • 1 1
 I hate the bikeyoke lever. The post is pretty good...its nice it has the reset feature, because it seems you have to use it often...but their lever geometry is crap, it always feels like the angle is wrong, no matter where you set it. I haven't seen them eat cables, I just cant stand the ergonomics of it.
  • 1 0
 You're not the only one, have seen this happen to several other people running this remote. My two Triggys however have not shown any signs of cable breakage.
  • 3 0
 @txclg This is interesting to hear. I have two Revives with Triggy levers, and haven't had any issues (though both only have ~700-800 miles on them). I'll be sure to keep an eye on them. Where did the cable fray/break? Did you file down the end of the cable housing during install?

@takeiteasyridehard: It's interesting that you don't like the ergonomics. I personally think it's better than any other lever I've used. On the flip side, I hate the PNW Loam lever. It feels like the axis that the lever rotates about is off.
  • 2 0
 @DaneL: interesting....you described exactly what I failed to. The axis it rotates on is what I dont like, or maybe the offset. It would be ok, but the lever is offset too far underneath the bar when I get it at the right axis for myself. The loam lever and wolf tooth remotes feel better to me.
  • 1 0
 @DaneL: The shifter cable gets worn and starts to fray near the pivot on the lever. The good is that it is easy to see when looking over stuff on the bike since when you press the lever, the exposed cable is clearly visible. The end of the cable housing has a ferrule on and a was cut with the same park cutters I always use. I cut the housing, clean it up with a awl, inspect, and install. It has happened with multiple housings too as I replace those yearly.

I could be a hack mechanic, but this is the only cable that has ever done this too me and it did it often enough that I replace the lever, which I like.
  • 2 0
 3 years on my Revive, original cable, no signs of fray. Also love the ergonomics.
Re: the ergonomics, maybe the different opinions reflect different mounts (independent clamp vs brake integration)??
  • 1 0
 @Inertiaman: That could be true. Mine are both mounted via SRAM Matchmaker X. Ergonomics are perfect IMO.
  • 1 0
 @txclg: Good to know. There must be a sharp edge that isn't consistently getting deburred. I'll keep an eye on mine.
  • 1 0
 @DaneL: I didn't see an edge, but perhaps it is on catching on the threaded section that the barrel adjust goes into.

Still the best dropper I've used yet!
  • 1 0
 @txclg: interesting, mine hasn't had that issue yet but now I'll keep a closer eye on it. The barrel adjuster threads could definitely be a likely culprit...
  • 5 1
 Now is a great time to be a tall person riding mtb
  • 2 1
 I wish my Brand X posts lasted longer than 6 months lol. Butttt.... They keep warranting them... And I still only spent $140 for a 175mm. Smooth action and good speed when they do work.
  • 1 0
 someone in fox and rockshox r&d department, what??
fk again this german dude.

3 revives in use, one of them from preorder butch. still running like new, with out any service. just instol set and forget.
  • 1 0
 Technically, "When launch it launched in 2017, the 185mm drop Revive was the longest on the market." isn't true, the Swiss from Yep Components had one in 185 a few months prior to the Revive Wink
  • 1 0
 200mm vecnum moveloc came way earlier
  • 1 0
 @m4k1: Eightpins up to 258mm. Just choose a suitable bike (or have one built).
  • 2 0
 9point8 already had a 200mm post, first on the market at the time I believe
  • 1 0
 Bought my 185 2 years ago and it's been flawless ever since day one. Worth every penny just for peace of mind knowing the thing gets me there and back. When I get another bike, Ill buy another BikeYolk without question.
  • 3 0
 Shit now I have to sell all my 210mm droppers to have 213mm of drop.
  • 2 3
 I'm buying the first dropper that comes in at 300mm. I don't care one bit about internals. I'll take a comfortable pedalling position, and ability to descend as priority any day. A few extra services or replacement seals along the way are less of a concern after riding bikes with the wrong pedalling geo my whole life. Really want a company somewhere to figure this out.
  • 1 0
 How often do people need to refill the air chamber on their Revives? I'm not a fan of the very loseable shock-pump adaptor that's needed for that with these posts.
  • 2 0
 Have two, never had to put air in either, don't even know how.
  • 1 0
 Only after a rebuild
  • 2 1
 213mm... are people just getting taller all of a sudden?

Personal choice I guess or are these really for people who are 6ft4 or taller.
  • 1 0
 Good point. Why do they even make XL bikes either?
  • 1 0
 Tall people have more options now, instead of having to make to with average components & being bent over on tiny bikes
  • 1 0
 Standover height on frames has reduced dramatically - meaning more exposed post to get the seat to the same position it used to be with a higher standover frame. That's the reason.
  • 1 0
 @Linc: The exposed post up to the height of the dropper section is the important part.
This has not had to change, therefore the argument does not stand.

Stand over is an interesting one, too low and you wont feel the frame whilst cornering and its a bad thing, try cornering a MOD bike!!!
  • 4 2
 the d*ck measuring competition

and im all for it
  • 1 0
 I'll take every millimeter of kashima I can get. Broscience states it makes my bike better than yours. This comment is full of satire. Dont take offense.
  • 3 4
 Twice as much as OneUp, that’s a lot, especially for the same drop. Make it 230-250mm, then it might be worth more.

My OneUp V1 and V2 continue to work well without issues.
  • 1 0
 thank goodness! was waiting for this. Bikeyoke and done. Mine has been fine with minimal care for over 2 years.
  • 1 0
 For the record- their customer service is top notch. So is their US partner Dirt Labs.
  • 1 0
 So no 34.9 Revive 2.0?

What’s the best post diameter to shim into a 34.9 seat tube?
  • 2 0
 31.6 will have slightly more wall thickness
  • 2 0
 The most reliable incredible mountain product I've ever used in 15 years.
  • 2 3
 That little bit of squishy could be a plus on a hardtail. A little bit of hard hit cushioning. Definitely a negative on a full squisher.
  • 2 0
 Their XC post has that exact feature.
  • 1 0
 No 213 for the 34.9 post??!!
  • 2 5
 I still really like the Reverb. The smooth hydraulic action of the level and being able to control the speed of the post is really good. The price is just high and not the easiest to bleed. However, I haven't tried the Reverb.
  • 2 1
 One of these words was supposed to be "Revive", wasn't it? I'd be a bit confused otherwise.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: Brain fart. Last words was supposed to be Bike Yoke.
  • 1 0
 @tacklingdummy: Alright, makes sense now Smile .
  • 1 1
 yup, you're about as smart as a tackling dummy
  • 1 0
 Anyone know what saddle that is in the top pic?
  • 4 0
 that's a Bike Yoke Sagma saddle, it's available in some shops but no longer on their website
  • 1 0
 @danielfeary: thanks mate
  • 1 0
 Rebranded Morgaw morgaw.com
  • 2 1
 Going 213 when Vecnum did 212 is just silly
  • 3 0
 They could've done 212.99. Lol
  • 1 0
 @takeiteasyridehard:
Not sure, probably patented by SRAM
  • 1 0
 OEM Reverb C1 and frustrated with it. Maybe this is a worth upgrade.
  • 1 0
 Nevermind the dropper, what seat is that?
  • 1 0
 Anyone know the brand of that seat...looks very good to me!
  • 1 0
 I have the SQLabs and love them. Based on how well Bike Yoke does other things, will definitely given them a try when the time comes.
  • 1 0
 Rebranded Morgaw morgaw.com
  • 1 0
 @Geochemistry: The Morgaw came out first. The Bike Yoke Sagma saddle was codeveloped by Morgaw but is a different saddle using the the same rail tech
  • 1 0
 @danielfeary: Thanks for the info! This saddle does interest me for my hardtail. It's amazing how a small amount of cushioning improves the long ride comfort. 30 years ago, before full-squishy was a good option, I had a USE shockpost and loved it. I think it had 20 mm of squish motion, enough to make me a believer.
  • 2 2
 Don't forget the chronically creaky seat clamp, not sure if it's a design feature or flaw, but it's always present!
  • 1 0
 What is that saddle with the heavy rails? They look replaceable.
  • 1 0
 Found it. Morgaw. Hong Kong made, they have an elastomer system for shock absorption. Rails are either carbon or aluminum, and are replaceable.
  • 1 0
 So, uh, what make/model of saddle is that?
  • 1 0
 Bike Yoke Sagma, I think
  • 1 0
 Rebranded Morgaw. morgaw.com
  • 2 5
 Awesome. I was going to rebuild by 185 and put it on a new FS this spring, move the 160 to my hardtail from my Chamois Hagar, and put a Divine SL on the CH... Now I want a 2.0 213 for whatever new rig I get.
  • 1 0
 Waiting for 220mm...

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