BMC Launches New Fourstroke 01 XC Bike

Sep 7, 2018
by Pinkbike Staff  

PRESS RELEASE: BMC

Born to surpass the demands of the world’s top XC athletes, the new Fourstroke 01 delivers the ultimate performance on the most demanding courses. Every element of its structure is crafted to optimize speed, save seconds, and keep riders ahead of the pack — the ultimate Cross Country race machine.

The holistic approach to look at the bike as an entire system culminated in the development of BMC’s fastest and most intuitive XC race bike ever. The all-new Race Application Dropper Seatpost (RAD) ensures that its fast and smooth adjustments maximize power and control whatever the gradient for a dynamic ride. The integrated dropper seatpost puts riders in the optimum position, whether attacking on the climbs or charging the descents.


The revised Big Wheel Concept Race (BWC) geometry has evolved to embody the progressive riding style the XC athletes display on technical World Cup tracks. The wide- open head angle, long front-end, short chainstays, and innovative stem design allows riders to master all the technical challenges of today’s XC courses. When pedaling a low overall system weight plus a stiff bottom bracket and rear stay area allow for explosive accelerations.

The first integrated XC dropper seatpost

RAD (Race Application Dropper) is the world’s first integrated and most radical XC dropper post. A genius engineering solution conceptualized in the Impec Lab and driven by athletes’ need for modern XC descending performance packed into a lightweight system. RAD‘s intuitive two-position adjustment delivers the optimized riding position to handle the rigors of varying terrain.


With an overall weight of only 345g, RAD shaves off more than 100g over a conventional dropper post design. This makes RAD one of the lightest dropper seatposts on the market. Peter Stämpfli, MTB Engineer at BMC Switzerland, explains: “Integrated design provides the freedom to move away from the round seatpost shape to address the limits of conventional seatpost design. Contrary to a conventional round post, RAD is designed with an elliptic shape which makes it more stress resistant. The shape reduces weight while improving strength for reduced flex and uncompromised functionality under load. RAD features varying wall thicknesses to achieve the perfect balance of dealing with rider induced forces and keeping the weight at a minimum. RAD not only provides weight advantages, it also offers a clean visual appeal and exemplifies ultimate frame and component integration.”


Saddle height adjustments are performed similarly to conventional systems, and do not require cutting the seatpost. Ninety millimeters of seat height range offer the perfect fit for every rider. RAD operates at low air pressures thanks to its oversized air chamber. This reduces force on the air seals for less maintenance. RAD is completely mechanical and has no hydraulic parts for super easy services. With 80mm of drop on all sizes, RAD delivers the optimum saddle height for every section of the race course.



Big Wheel Concept Race Geometry—a new approach

The multifaceted approach of BMC’s engineers position the rider for traction and control, creating the perfect cockpit for a bike that’s fast, fearless and nimble.

BWC Race is designed to attack the fastest and steepest XC courses with its 67.5 ̊ head angle and a long front-end. The 100mm-travel fork and 44mm offset delivers precise steering on switchbacks and technical sections. Climbing remains the essence of XC racing; and the Fourstroke 01 is updated with 429mm short chainstays to help the rider deliver power efficiently and while maintaining traction on technical sections. The steep 75.5 ̊ seat angle puts the rider in a more central position on the bike to attack steep sections with ideal weight distribution.



Built for efficiency

The Fourstroke 01 is designed for unparalleled power transfer with a redesigned chassis that excels in torsional and bottom bracket stiffness. The refined APS (Advanced Pivot System) suspension tuned for modern XC racing delivers pedaling efficiency, traction, and control on demanding cross-country terrain. APS relies on two very short links moving in a concentric motion to create a rear wheel axle path that promotes a perfect balance, fully active braking performance, no pedal kickback, and small-bump sensitivity.


Every gram counts

The Fourstroke 01 has been revised from the ground up with incredible attention to detail. Fewer parts extend reliability and durability of the system and reduce overall weight, allowing for the addition of a dropper seatpost and still achieve an extremely competitive system weight of 2575g (including RAD seatpost and hardware). The optimized suspension hardware reduces the number of parts for improved reliability and saves 51g compared to the previous Fourstroke 01. Integrated headset cups show 20g less on the scale then external cups. The super-light thru-axle developed in the Impec Lab saves additional 9g and the all-new carbon upper link provides the stiffest connection between front triangle and swingarm for uncompromised suspension performance and weights 40g less than an alloy one.


Details make the difference

The integrated and lightweight fork stopper utilizes a straight downtube for front-end stiffness, while optimized cable routing and frame protection enhance the Fourstroke’s clean lines. The lower link mud protector delivers durability of the bearings. Protectors on the chainstay and a nice little chainguard make the bike race proof. The internal cable routing is completely guided inside the front triangle, lower link, and swingarm for quick and convenient cable maintenance.


Sizing and Models

The new Fourstroke is available in the following models: Fourstroke 01 ONE, Fourstroke 01 TWO, Fourstroke 01 THREE and Fourstroke 01 Module and available in sizes S, M, L and XL across the entire range.



Find out more about the new Fourstroke 01 on BMC's website.


86 Comments

  • + 60
 That bike looks clean AF. Seriously nice looking bike, regardless of however it actually rides.
  • + 3
 The area where the upper pivot bolts on the rocker is really clean how the rocker covers the pivots. I love the look, but I'm curious how you service that area if needed? (It's obviously possible, as someone put the bike together, but just curious.)
  • + 3
 @davemays: Probably have to disassemble things in a specific order (e.g., remove the shock first and move the rear end through it's travel to access inboard seatstay pivot bolts). Just a guess though.
  • + 2
 Named it 4stroke and not an ebike.
  • + 2
 @chyu: think it’s a 4” stoke.
  • + 1
 @seans: yeah, just from looking at it I'd say let the air out of the shock, compress the suspension and you can access what you need without even taking the shock off.
  • + 40
 They should make an enduro bike and name it the two-stroke. I bet that thing would really BRAAAPPPPP!
  • + 8
 I work at a BMC dealer. While I am happy to see some new bikes coming out can someone please retire that confusing naming scheme.

it's the BMC FourStroke 01 one, 01 two, 01 Three
02 one, 02 two, 03 three

etc., etc., etc.. It looks easy on paper but trying to talk with a customer and it's like all mixed up.
"I want an 03 two, but what's the difference between the 02 three? wait...you want one 01 two to? no that's too many two's...Just get me an 01 three in a 21 size. Wait is the 02 one cheaper than an 01 two, three 2 oh won to, too with you
  • + 4
 If they named it 1.1, 1.2, 2.1, 2.2, that could make it easier
  • + 5
 Great to see more XC bikes moving to modern geometry. Although, I’m thinking the reach numbers could be longer, but that’s probably from xc riders having a hard time mentally with short stems. With reduced offset forks and steep SAs, you don’t need a long stem to keep the front under control on climbs.
  • + 3
 Then why aren't xc pros riding bikes lime that?????
  • + 22
 The obvious answer being that pros and XC racers know that trail geometry doesn't work for XC racing, despite what pinkbikers think.
  • + 3
 for these guys proper hip angle for power delivery, and enough room to breath effectively keeps these guys stretched out with long stems. That being said a longer front end is starting to address that.
  • + 1
 I think is because shorter bike puts more the wheight on the back wheel and this trully helps when pedaling uphill with the dinamic efects on the pedal... Longer the wheigh gets more distributed to the front and then you loose power
  • + 3
 @clink83: yeah, but this BMC geometry is even more progressive than many current mid-travel trailbikes. Take the Ibis Ripley LS for example: the BMC has the same HA, steeper SA, and longer reach. Are you saying that this won’t work on the WC XC? If the pros do well on this bike, does that mean trail bike geometry does work?

I remember going from a 140 stem to a 120 stem in my XC bike in the 90’s. My XC buddies told me I won’t be able to climb with that short of a stem. It climbed just fine and descended better. Same thing happened 5 years ago when I put a 90mm stem on my XC bike before a Hundo race.
I just cleaned the steepest, most rutted climb I know with a 35mm stem on my Ripmo. The new geometry is legit. A 50-60 mm stem would put me in an XC fit position on that bike due to the long reach. We’ve been moving to longer reach and shorter stems ever since Gary Fisher came out with Genesis geometry in the 90’s, it’s just been a slow process.
  • + 0
 Take a look at the scott scale and the spark, 68 and 69 degree HTA angles, short chainstays, and Nino still rides >700mm bars and a 90mm stem. You're not going to run wide bars and a short stem on an XC bike because it will handle like shit climbing and wheelie up climbs. Right now I have a 740mm bar and 80mm stem on my Scale 900 and I can barely keep my front wheel down on steep climbs.
You wouldn't want to ride DH geometry on a trail bike, why would you want trail bike geometry on an XC bike? The whole long low and slack trend is to make bikes more fun and stable on the downhills, but it makes them climb like crap. Yes, XC bikes are slacker and longer than they used to be, but no serious XC racer is going to want a trail bike on an XC course.
You can find youtube videos of Nino or Julian on trail bikes, and they can pretty much dictate what bike geometry they want, so why do they keep going back to the same general XC geometry? Do you really think they are that dumb? Nino has no problem piloting an enduro rig:
www.youtube.com/watch?v=UgQbIB_98NM
  • + 1
 @clink83: have you tried riding a bike with a steep SA or a reduced offset fork? Until you really spend time on one, and one that has an adjusted longer reach, you can’t really understand how the new geometry rides. You just can’t say how long of a stem you need to climb by what works on your bike, because your bike doesn’t have a steep SA, a longer reach, and a reduced offset fork. It may not be for everyone and this BMC is the most progressive XC that ive seen to date, but the new geometry really is a game changer. And, it’s really only been the last year that has seen that geometry change to trail bikes, and the ones that have come out generally have wait lists to get them. I think the Ripmo and the Rallon are both around 4 months of a wait. I’m sure the new Yeti 150 will sell it’s stock out quickly; they were always selling out of the 5.5.

As far as what Nino rides, the Scott Spark had one of the slackest HAs when it came out last year. 5 years ago anything less than 70 degrees was said it couldn’t climb well.
Also, yes he rides Scott trail bikes, and since they just released their first bike this past month with this more progressive geometry, I doubt he has spent any time on it as he would be training on his equipment he wins on a regular basis. I’m sure he will get some time on it in the off season. But if I were him, I’d be reluctant to change anything bike fit that has worked for so long. It just takes a long while to adapt to a new fit: which is why things are slow to change in XC, few racers want to try something new and jack their current setup.
  • + 1
 @whambat: I have a hard tail with a 68* hat, I have no clue how a slack bike rides...nope.

If you took an XC bike with an 100mm stem and made the top tube long enough that it required a 50mm stem you would have a huge wheelbase that wouldn't be able to navigate tight turns worth a shit, and you wouldn't be able to weight the front wheels. Long steep and slack is for stability at high speeds and letting you keep your weight over the rear, which hurts climbing. Comparing trail bike geometry is about the same as saying world cup skiers should be using DH skis in the slalom because they are more stable. If you want a bike that pedals like shit uphill but descends fast, they have a race format for you already, its called enduro.
  • + 1
 Focusing on a single aspect like hta or stem length just shows ignorance about overall bike design...my scott scale has an 68degree hta and a 80mm stem and is twitchy as hell, and my 71 degree FS is stable and not twitchy at all.
  • + 1
 @clink83: I’m just saying, try a bike with the new geometry before you judge. My Ripmo has a 1250 wheelbase and corners awesome and is surprisingly good at slow speeds as well. What’s amazing is how planted the front end is on steep climbs with a 160 fork and a 35mm stem (I rarely have to slide forward in my saddle), and I have 25mm of spacers under the stem and a 40mm rise bar. It’s not because of one part of the geometry, it’s the whole package. Long reach, steep SA, slack HA, and reduced offset fork. It’s about keeping your weight balanced, not over the rear. Hell, I weight the heck out of my front end on descents with my chin near the bar now because the geo makes it so you don’t endo, no more hanging off the rear wheel on sketchy bikes of yore.

When the right XC bike takes on the newer geometry, which this BMC has started to, I’ll trade in my Scalpel. But for now, I mostly ride my enduro bike because it climbs so well, although the heavy tires are slower.
  • + 1
 @whambat:
m.youtube.com/watch?v=Udf-5Xh3UsY

I'm rolling my eyes as we speak.
  • + 2
 @clink83: Titouan Carod placed 7th at the World Champs aboard a Fourstoke 01XC.
  • + 1
 @Jodaro: on trail bike geometry? Whaaat?

The Intense Sniper XC has the reach I’m looking for. The BMC has the seat angle I’m looking for. The question becomes what company will be the first to combine the geometry that I’m looking for in my next XC rig. Fortunately, I’m in no rush. And, yes a slammed forward sadddle in the Intense would get me close to what I’m looking for.
  • + 1
 Oh wait nm integrated dropper. Chemistry has fried by brain.
  • + 4
 If you look at the frameset it appears that the stem is slightly inverted, or so it looks to me


2575g doesn’t seem that light to me for an XC frame, even with a (semi) dropper post ...
  • + 1
 Its probably a -6 stem.
  • + 2
 Geometry and frame look really good. Kind of disappointed they didn't go for more drop on the seatpost. Over time I've gone from 125, to 150, to 175 now and each time I've been very happy. Seeing as how my 150mm drop KS Lev ci weighs only 414g and my 175 post is only a little more than that, I don't think the weight savings is enough to be worth the reduced drop. I do think the integrated post looks great and is a good idea.
  • + 1
 This "lightweight" reasoning is BS! The FRM XC dropper weighs 290 grams, so how is this even an advantage, or considered light?
  • + 4
 Isn't it about time someone exclaims something like "hey great, room for a bottle!"

Or are these people still scratching their heads what the third bolt is for?
  • + 4
 Don't get your hopes up. probably well over $5000CAD for an aluminum frame with NX build
  • + 2
 Only carbon, from €6'000 to €10'000. Frame €4'000.
  • + 3
 Pricing? This release and BMC's website doesn't list it. "Big Wheel Concept Race Geometry—a new approach" , geo looks good but "Downcountry" is not a new approach.
  • + 3
 Perfect. Apart from the intergrated 80mm drop post. No where near enough for BC XC racing and just limits a very capable bike geo wise.
  • + 3
 I wonder if the 80mm is limited in the design or just the number some euro enginerd picked knowing that anymore would scare the hardcore xc types? But yes a great move to more modern geo on an xc bike.
  • + 3
 Agreed, although for most Euro / North American XC racing on buffed tracks, 80mm is enough. When you go to 125+mm every time you drop it you have to stand back up to descend, lifting your body weight 100 times in a race sucks energy. Different drop options would be nice here.
  • + 3
 @xvxbg: Two stage dropper with 70mm on the first part of the lever push and 140mm on the second?

Specialized had a old Command post that was three stage. I got fairly good at only going down 50% on rough, rolling, trails.

As others have said, it's hard to run short droppers on the XC race bike if you've got used to more drop on a trail/AM bike. How anyone does any kind of off-road riding without a dropper these days blows my mind. I'd rather race a hardtail with a dropper than an FS without and I f**king hate hardtails. I watch Nino in amazement!
  • + 1
 @jclnv: Coming from only riding hardtail and tall posts, even 60mm would be enough to keep you from snagging on your saddle where you once did before. I have been riding tall post so long, that it isn't even a second thought. It is all about keeping it loose, and letting the bike do it's thing underneath you, while never touching the brakes unless you h a v e t o. Not so easy, but fast as hell when you get it.
  • + 1
 Nice looking bike. So the seatpost uses elliptical seals and bushings, both presumably proprietary. If a component company did that I’d be skeptical. When a bike company designs a proprietary, highly stressed component with wearing parts, I’m full-on doubtful. Good luck in the future, BMC bleeding-edge dropper buyers.
  • + 3
 I'm sure that in a few weeks someone will come out with an aftermarket oval shaped dropper post with increased range, in fact it will probably become the new "standard" and make round ones redundant and all new bikes will be oval.
  • + 3
 "APS relies on two very short links moving in a CONCENTRIC motion..."
That seems strange.
  • + 4
 Damn! N+1 right? Never really wanted a BMC until now...
  • + 4
 Full black tires and I'm totally in love
  • + 0
 Full black everything. Yes please.
  • + 1
 What's with all the upside down shocks lately? Doesn't the normal position make crap go down and oil reside against the seals, naturally lubricating them and also provide ready access to controls?
  • + 1
 Seriously, look at where the dials are located... (BTW: how can one edit a message instead of posting a new one?)
  • + 2
 It's so the cables for the remote can come out of the frame and attach to where the controls are more easily.
  • + 4
 I wonder if the twostroke will be lighter
  • + 1
 bro, that's priceless!
  • + 3
 OMG, BMC's XC MTB FTW w/ their RAD! XC WC really calls for BWC and APS, FS. One BMC ONE, pls!
  • + 2
 BWC Big Wheel Concept Race, ( my eyeballs immediately roll to the back of my head )...

Nice looking bike though, no stupid long negative rise stem too!
  • + 3
 Looks like a bike from the future!
  • + 1
 Time to bring back 2 strokes, no more thumper bikes, everyone wants to hear brraaap. Pretty clean looking bike, talk about a slammed stem.
  • + 4
 More acronyms please.
  • + 0
 Integratet seatposts seem good but what if I want to put my bomb-proof Transfer in there?? It won't work! But hey if it'll get the XC guys on longer droppers so we see crazier and crazier tracks I'm all for it
  • + 11
 To be honest I always considered most current (aftermarket) dropper posts a kind of in between solution. They were dimensioned to drop into conventional frames. Which is great (because the internet burns down with every new standard introduced) but it also meant that the stanchions remain relatively small diameter. And silly enough most frames now are dimensioned to accommodate droppers dimensioned for frames not dimensioned for droppers. Reality is a silly as that sentence, indeed. Someone needs to break out of that. Liteville/Eightpins did that, now BMC does too. I do think it is the future. Now I wouldn't jump on the bandwagon just yet. Let all these companies find out for themselves what they think is supposed to work best, then get together and create one new standard.

The oval shape makes sense theoretically though I'm curious whether it won't be to hard to produce (within those tolerances) and whether it would jam when subjected to twisting forces (like when you push the saddle sideways with your thigh).

Ideally though, as long as they make the width over 32mm or so it should be possible to make some adaptor so that people can install their existing round dropper in such a frame. Next step, companies like Cane Creek and Superstarcomponents produce their "steeperizer" adaptors so that people can install their old small diameter droppers and steepen the seat angle.
  • + 2
 67.5 HA doesn´t belong to DownCountry ??...
  • + 2
 Just throw an inverted 150mm stem on there and it'll be race ready.
  • + 1
 Did you mean to say an inverted 150mm fork? :-P
  • + 1
 If you read this article in a sports announcer voice with a deep coffee fuelled over excited tone.
It's plenty of funSmile
  • + 2
 Wow. Dem some clean lines.
  • + 3
 I guess.
  • + 10
 know or know not, there is no guess. -broda
  • + 1
 Probably
  • + 2
 Bike looks clean and tight..
  • + 0
 The FRM 80mm dropper is only 290 grams, the same as a cheap carbon or aluminum rigid post. So, how is this light?
  • + 1
 Will it fit a dual crown fork?
  • + 1
 Was there a mention of an overall weight for a complete bike?
  • + 2
 Looks pretty rad
  • + 2
 in LOVE !
  • + 1
 Want to see the post in action!
  • + 1
 Did I just scroll through an infomercial for an XC race bike?
  • + 5
 "holistic...integrated...multifaceted" pretty much sounds like they've got all the hit words for a modern business proposal pitch.
  • + 2
 Yet no mention of total bike weight...
  • + 2
 @robokfc: Complete bike weight: 10kg (From BMC Website)
  • + 1
 If anything wouldn't a bike be a 2 cylinder 2 stroke?
  • + 1
 4 STROKE GANG OFFICIAL BIKE.
  • + 2
 Looks very nice.
  • + 1
 "4 Stroke"
  • + 1
 Those colors are sick
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