First Ride: Bold Unplugged Volume 1

Jul 18, 2018
by Ralf Hauser  



When the small Swiss company Bold Cycles introduced their first bike model with a stand-alone design - the Linkin Trail Classic, with 130 mm of travel - people immediately got curious. And not in a bad way, as so many unique design ideas inevitably tend to look more like a contraption out of a Frankenstein movie, rather than a bike.

At first look, the submerged shock inside the sleek, full carbon frame might even be mistaken for a hardtail rolling down the trail. The Unplugged is based on the same concept as the Linkin Trail, but pushing the new model into the enduro segment, with 165 mm of travel and enough space for a shock with piggyback reservoir and adjustable geometry with a wide range of adjustment.
Bold Unplugged Volume 1 Details
• Intended use: enduro
• Wheel size: 27.5" or 29"
• Rear wheel travel: 161 to 165 mm
• 63.3º or 65.9º head angle
• Frame material: Carbon
• RockShox Super Deluxe or DT Swiss R 535 One rear shock
• Trunnion mount
• Boost hub spacing
• Weight: 14.2 kg (with RockShox spec)
• Price: $4,568 to $8,793
www.boldcycles.com

At the Eurobike Media Days, I grabbed a size small Unplugged with 27.5” wheels from Bold and RockShox suspension, and a medium-sized Unplugged with 29” wheels from the DT Swiss booth with its new Holistic suspension mounted front and rear, for some laps in the bike park
.
Bold Unplugged 2018
Bold Unplugged 2018
The protective cover can be removed by loosening a knurled-head screw by hand.

Bold Unplugged 2018
Bold Unplugged 2018
Additionally, the cover is held in place by two magnets. There's enough room to fit a Trunnion-style shock with an external reservoir.

Bold Unplugged 2018
Bold Unplugged 2018
A little window gives access to the shock's upper bolt, once the lower bolt is removed.


Bold Unplugged 2018
Bold Unplugged 2018
A sag meter on the link makes setup easy.

Bold Unplugged 2018
Bold Unplugged 2018
Keeping the chain in check.

Bold Unplugged 2018
Bold Unplugged 2018
Protecting the frame from mud and offering water bottle mounts for a full-size bottle.

Bold Unplugged 2018
Bold Unplugged 2018


Geometry

Exchangeable flip chips at the dropouts (Bold calls that system Variotech) adjust the chainstay length and bottom bracket height. Its four available positions (made possible by two sets of flip chips with different offsets) allows for running either 29" or 27.5" wheels with different tire widths. This option, Bold calls oneplus. Level 01 is for 29" x 2.6", level 02 for 29" x 2.4", level 03 for 27.5" x 2.8" and level 04 for 27.5" x 2.4" tires. The bottom bracket height varies by 20 mm in length and chainstay length by 11 mm.

It's hard to nail down the exact geometry specs for each frame size with one setting affecting the other. We were checking the CAD program to get the numbers for our test bikes. For the size S model, with a 170 mm travel fork (the bike is recommended for forks between 160 and 180 mm of travel), headset cup in the slack position and flip chip in the L02 position, the head angle reads 63,3 degrees, the seat angle 76.5-degrees, with a reach of 421 mm and a 1,200 mm wheelbase. Compare that to a 63.6-degree head angle, 76.6-degree seat angle, 466 mm reach, 1,251 mm wheelbase, 23 mm bottom bracket drop, 606 mm stack and 162.5 mm of rear wheel travel on the size M frame size of the test setup.


Bold Unplugged 2018
Bold Unplugged 2018
By utilizing rotatable offset headset bearings (Double-Spin headset from Newmen), the head angle can be adjusted by two degrees on paper. Due to pushing the dropouts of the fork into a different spot, the head angle changes by 1.5 degrees effectively with its wheels on the ground.

Bold Unplugged 2018
Bold Unplugged 2018
Variotech flip chips at the Horst link give you the option to change chainstay length, bottom bracket height and ultimately, wheel and tire size.


Options

With a custom shop on their website, you can pick and choose from various components when putting together your ride. In its cheapest spec, prices start at $4,568.24 (€4,568.24) and go all the way up to $8,793.11 (€8,793.11) without taxes. The Bold Unplugged is available in grey-white or red-black in autumn of 2018. You can already pre-order the bike directly from their website.

Bold Unplugged 2018
Bold Unplugged 2018
By fall, a fully integrated dropper solution from KS will be offered. All Unplugged frames can be equipped with it at a later point as well.


Bold Unplugged 2018
The Unplugged will be available with a DT Swiss R 535 One shock as an option. Our second test rig also came equipped with a DT Swiss F 535 One fork.


Bold Unplugged 2018
Bold Unplugged 2018

Bold Unplugged 2018
Bold Unplugged 2018

Bold Unplugged 2018
Bold Unplugged 2018





Jumping between the two frame (and wheel) sizes, a pretty big gap in reach is immediately noticeable. With their three frame sizes offered, Bold wanted to cover a wide range for differently sized riders and with the size large going all the way up to a reach of 513 mm, I guess they succeeded.

However, both the small- and medium-sized Unplugged behave in a highly stable and controlled manner - no wonder, with a head angle below 64 degrees and the weight of the shock sitting low in the frame. Naturally, the size small Bold is much more nimble and easy to flick around the corners - enhanced by the smaller wheel size - with the front end moving off the ground willingly when pulling at the bars.

With a steep seat angle, the seating position and pedaling efficiency felt very promising, although I spent very little time trying to climb a hill during the time window I had for testing, so I'm not going to pretend that I have a lot to say in that matter.

Being able to run different tire and wheel sizes is a real treat. While most riders will probably decide on one setup and stick with it, it's nice to know that there's the option to change the riding characteristics of the bike down the road if you feel like it. Of course, that would also require buying a different fork and wheels, but that's another story.


Bold Unplugged 2018
Bold Unplugged 2018

Starting with the recommended setup of 35 percent sag on the rear end, both the RockShox and DT Swiss equipped models bottomed out as soon as I hit medium-sized obstacles or jumps at higher speeds. Digging deeper, it turned out that all volume spacers in the RockShox Super Deluxe shock were removed on the test bikes. Dropping to 30-percent sag helped, but I still ended up bottoming out on jumps and drops regularly. I would assume that many riders that don't try to push the bike to the limits would be very happy with the more plush setup between 30 and 35 % sag in most situations.

Adding pressure to the shocks requires removing a protective cover by loosening a knurled-head screw by hand and lifting the piece that's also held in place by two magnets off the frame. It only takes a few seconds. Additional pressure got the rear end to where it supported an aggressive riding style nicely. And while the small bump compliance wasn’t affected too badly, if I spent more time on the bike I’d definitely add some volume spacers to the rear shock and lower the air pressure again, to achieve a comfortable small and mid bump compliance without bottoming out on the bigger stuff. I am confident, that with the extra shock tune, the Unplugged would make for a great platform in racing conditions as well.

Bold Unplugged 2018


Overall, the rear end tracked the ground with aplomb and recovered quickly from successive quick hits that I encountered in plenty of root-carpeted sections. The Horst link at the rear dropouts keeps the suspension active under braking. RockShox’ Super Deluxe shock is a nice match for the Unplugged’s enduro ambitions, and the new DT Swiss R 535 One shock offered a similar feel but how it is going to fare on long downhill runs in heat without a remote reservoir remains to be seen. Also, I couldn't figure out at this point if the the R 535 shock offers volume spacers to adjust progression, which might be a problem for more aggressive riders.

The initial setup of DT Swiss' brand new F 535 One fork with its Plushport damping and Coilpair suspension (mix of a rather long coil spring for the first third of the travel and air spring with adaptable progression throughout the rest of the travel) looks to be a winner out of the gate. Without having looked into its technology beforehand, it pretty much acted on the trail as advertised, with a pretty sensitive beginning stroke, great mid-stroke support and it didn't get fazed by big hits and landings. I can't wait to see how much performance can be squeezed out of the new DT Swiss fork after spending more time with the different settings.

Bold Unplugged 2018
Bold Unplugged 2018

I was warned beforehand that chain slap was pretty loud on these early production models, as the chainstay protector wasn't up to final spec yet and would be replaced with a much softer material to absorb the noise. Also, the chainstays on the production versions will be filled with foam to cancel out noise further, which should take care of that problem.

If using the shock's platform lever is on your agenda (which I assume for most people it is), you won’t get around using a remote lockout lever. The Grip Shift version on the Unplugged’s RockShox equipped model didn’t get me excited initially, but at least during the rather short test session I didn’t have any issues with it. I still prefer DT's lever-style version, though.

Working on the shock will require some extra effort to pull it out of the frame housing. On the other hand, it's perfectly protected there from the elements and impacts, which should reduce maintenance cycles.

With the rocker links and all moving parts forming a compact unit, side-to-side stiffness is rather high, although being a lightweight rider, I’m probably the wrong person to justify that statement.


Pinkbike's Take
bigquotesLoving slack head and steep seat angles (with the option to change them up by 1.5 degrees), it was impossible not to feel right at home on the Unplugged. Its unique, clean look almost hides the fact that Bold’s latest ride is a full-blown enduro slayer with greatly active suspension.

Options for custom tuning the geometry are plenty and gladly accepted - all the way to being able to ride either 27.5" or 29" wheels with the same frame. Just find your favorite setting and then forget about it. With tons of smart details and customizable spec, the Unplugged ticks all the boxes of what a modern enduro bike should bring to the table and takes some technological solutions to the next level.
Ralf Hauser








157 Comments

  • + 109
 Thats a Brave Anti eBike Name!
  • + 31
 The next bike from them would be Plugged and you won't notice it until you try to change the cranks.
  • + 30
 Ironically as it does actually look like an E-bike...
  • + 10
 @high-end-bikes: it's feels like an anti ebike name, but at the same time giving an ebike way too much legitamecy in calling a non ebike an unplugged bike.... !
  • + 9
 It's actually a Bold Anti eBike Name
  • + 2
 Hadn't thought of that... I keep thinking of a particular MTV show from the 90s. The "Volume 1" part isn't helping things, either.
  • + 3
 @sngltrkmnd: Maybe 1 Volume Spacer..LOL
  • - 2
 @tigerteeuwen: They could have named it the butt plug. . .
  • - 2
 Just a guess but the Swiss made frame is probably not designed for desert racing. Snow riding is where this bike would shine.
  • + 1
 They had to name it the "unplugged" because it looks just like an e-bike. Smile
  • + 2
 The only thing that looks a bit sketchy is the hollow chamber the shock sits in. I know there is a bash guard but we have some pretty angry rocks on the east coast. Most riders I know have mega divots in the BB area.
  • - 4
flag blackthorne (Jul 19, 2018 at 18:20) (Below Threshold)
 this e bike idiot almost ran me over and was blasting through red lights this morning, and I couldn’t catch up with him despite max effort. I really wanted to look him in the eye and curse the living daylights out of him. Not bikers. Just pathetic tools on wheels.

Glad Bold is taking a swipe with the unplugged. It’s how bikes are supposed to be.
  • + 73
 Lots of well thought out adjustment and details that puts mainstream brands to shame.
  • + 25
 It’s easy to put them into shame lately when wo many frames look like Trek which main selling point for the year model is making down tube straight which is supposed to make the frame stiffer and lighter but all it does is makes it prone to be hit by the fork crown, which has already resulted in cracked frames and destroyed compression units of the forks mounted to them, despite the marvelous cock block technology.
  • + 15
 @WAKIdesigns: knock block is odd but it does work, can be set up wrong crazy but true.
  • + 15
 @WAKIdesigns: pictures or it didn't happen
  • + 8
 @jclnv well, I like the adjustability, but sometimes things get too elaborated.... I love my banshees...
  • + 3
 Anyone know what the leverage ratio looks like? @brianpark @nr22
  • - 5
flag zyoungson (Jul 18, 2018 at 8:10) (Below Threshold)
 @WAKIdesigns: agreed cock knock is the biggest load of shit along with the 500 other acronyms trek has for thier pointless shit. having said that every other bike i have ridden felt like a bendy banana with a clearanced down tube so they must be on to something.
  • + 0
 @zyoungson: I haven’t experienced Treks to feel like bendy bananas but even if so it is not the fault of the bent downtube since pretty much every single bike out there has one. I know of 3 fkd up latest Treks in my area, one with a dramatic cock block failure. Maybe the reason is ho light they frames tend to be while manufacturing technology doesn’t seem to be any different from most other brands.
  • + 8
 @WAKIdesigns: That's Bull. I own a Slash and on all the Trek Slash forums for 2+ years and NEVER heard of cracked frames due to knock block
  • - 1
 @mikeyin19: i know of one due to fork hitting the straight tube and three other ones due to other reasons. Good night. Funny you mention Slash
  • + 1
 Agreed. My biggest concern though would be the suspension kinematic compromises necessary to fit the shock inside the seat tube.
  • + 3
 @mikeyin19: Same here, most of the guys I ride with are on treks (ride a lot with a trek dealer group). Remedys, Slashes and fuels. Never heard of and failure like this and have only seen frames fail from crash related incidents and shuttle damage.
  • + 1
 @cdmbmw: erm, so do I...
  • + 0
 @mikeyin19: 95% of the shit that comes out of his mouth is just to try and make himself feel relevant... He's the guy who always wanted to be in the industry but no one gave him the chance....
  • + 1
 @jclnv the range of adjustment on this looks really good. Why on earth go to the bother of adding adjustment to a frame to only get 0.3 degrees of range. Ohhh wow your bb height adjusts 3mm....like anyone is going to be able to notice that crap.
  • + 3
 @tgent: The kinematics on the Linkin Trail are good, one can assume they will be using similar numbers on this bike.

linkagedesign.blogspot.com/search/label/Bold%20Cycles
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Exactly, would assume a lot of other people ride treks or know someone on one and have both situations you guys are talking about. Imagine that, there more people in this sport than just pink bike users. There's zero reason for bikes to still have this issue on SC forks. Kinda suprising Trek couldn't/didn't design around it.
  • + 1
 @shirk-007: Awesome link! I figured since it was such a small company that Antonia hadn't analyzed it. It honestly looks pretty killer, and I'm really impressed they were able to pull of some of those curves with the mountain constraints.
  • - 3
 @2bigwheels: oh go fk yourself, most dudes and gals I ride with are on Treks, so I know what I am talking about. I don’t try to sound relevant. I am relevant and don’t need your assurance or denial. I have never tried to be in the “industry”, why would I quit my great job? Try to bit me from another angle, this isn’t working. Few Treks failed, oooh impossibro. If it was a Canyon nobody would care, but Treks made in the same way, next door - nooo!
  • + 1
 @shirk-007: As everyone is doing geo adjust within the linkage, I think they're struggling to add large geo adjust without affecting kinematics.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: where are all these destroyed frames documentations u speak of?
  • + 2
 @ShailyCR: Exactly.. I no a lot of guys on the new fuel ex's and love em... I've heard of know issues yet!
  • - 3
 @bohns1: all belong to people either working at Trek dealership or sponsored by them in one way or another. Sorry, no details. You must stalk people I follow om instagram. For the record there are more not broken Trek bikes in the pack than broken ones, so the company has around 7 to 4 ratio. Sounds pretty good aye? I also know people working for Specialized dealerships, no broken frames. Like 5 bikes in total. Specialized is simply one of the best bike makers in the world. Latest Stumpy is just stunning when seen in person. I wish it was as fast as Session 29 though... and Session was as fast as Antidote Dark Matter XD ahhh...well, these days Polish brands seem more creative as most US brands. Spec is the last American brand worth looking at, at least until Intense raises back again.
  • + 3
 @bohns1: Seen a bunch of Fuel EX crack around the TT/ST junction (if you can call it that) with the pronounced STA theres a bunch of leverage placed on that section. Fantastic warranty service from them though, all swapped out in a jiffy
  • - 1
 @aushred: nearly all alu FS Treks have their Achilles heel at the chainstay near the tyre. Then their upper rocker links like to get fkd. Ok, I have to make a few calls to check if I have any friends left... may need to ride with Spesh/ Kona boys... @raay I love you!
  • + 1
 @Soilsledding: It's using a 185/55 shock length. So depending on the travel setting we're looking at a leverage ratio of about 2.9:1 to 3:1. Usually, I'm a big fan of lower leverage ratios, but the Unplugged seemed to work fine with this setup.
  • + 5
 @WAKIdesigns:
I don't believe I said you were or weren't relevant, what I said was is you want to feel relevant. I think you are full of shit most of the time thats my opinion, just as the 8 million posts you make a year are your opinion. Im not biting you, I actually didn't even direct my opinion of you towards you, I directed it to someone who was questioning your comments.

My opinion of you really doest stretch beyond that to be honest, theres a good chance you are a super nice guy who likes to ride bikes and maybe we would be nice to each other if we crossed paths, doesn't mean I'd stop thinking that most of the time you are full of shit...
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: @WAKIdesigns: Dude- is just possible that more Treks are sold in your area than other brands so you just see more broken Treks? I'm tight with a guy in Trek's warranty group and their warranty numbers are crazy low and very few people have issues with the frames. The only gripe I've seen is that the frames are pretty light compared to say a Santa Cruz and you sure as hell don't want to tailgate shuttle them. Other than that, damn good machines and frames.
  • + 0
 The more I look at the specs on the Bold the more impressed I am. It's basically a shock shuttle with from experience with YZ 450's and BMW's gives the typical single pivot a very plush and dynamic feel. Would love to give one of these a rip.
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: I know of no one u follow on Insta!...
  • + 1
 @aushred: are u talking newer Treks as in last couple years?
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: not heard or seen warranty failure on Slash or Remedy or fuelEx in UK, been crash damage or people hucking the fuelEX and trashing the evo link landing side on happened twice. But not heard of down tube fail.
  • + 2
 @enduroFactory: The fuel ex is surprisingly huckable tho... I'm on the 16 with only 120mm rear pike 140 front... Its been hucked for damn near 3 years now
  • + 1
 @bohns1: more in regards to poor landing and lateral force on evo link.
  • + 42
 If Storm Troopers were issued mountainbikes...
  • + 83
 Safest bike you can ride; you'll never hit anything!
  • + 6
 @haroman666: Under-rated post of the year.
  • + 1
 @cdmbmw: You just drop a pun in there?
  • + 3
 @Clarkeh: These aren't the puns you're looking for
  • + 1
 @haroman666: except doorways
  • + 32
 I wonder if the lack of airflow over the shock body ever negatively effects damping on extended runs. I like that companies are moving towards integrated seatposts after what Liteville have done though, that is a really slick solution.
  • + 26
 More on that seatpost shortly...
  • + 5
 Very impressive design, can I get one?
  • + 3
 Air flow is really the only thing that would cool a shock. ...that, convection and a very small amount of heat radiated through the frame.
  • + 3
 I think if shocks got hot enough, the insulating stickers would be the first to go. In desert racing, the stickers turned black if the steel shock bodies got hot enough.
  • - 4
flag nouseforaname (Jul 18, 2018 at 7:18) (Below Threshold)
 @brianpark: That's the most interesting thing about this review.
  • + 1
 @Ron-C: good point, but the stickers on mtb shocks cover the air can, not the damper. (Genrally)
  • + 1
 Wondering what a 170mm lyrik would look like on there as far a Geo, it's extremely adjustable so shouldn't be a problem.
  • + 34
 It’s hard not to like some variety in bike design in those session days.
  • - 9
flag Sontator (Jul 18, 2018 at 0:35) (Below Threshold)
 Looks like an E-bike.
  • + 6
 @Sontator: an unplugged ebike
  • + 2
 @Sontator: True, the BB area looks as big as a specialized levo.
  • - 2
 We definitely need more bikes that look like an e-bike.
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns yep these days anything that does look like another bloody Session is winning.
  • + 1
 Now Kona dayz Wink
  • + 28
 It's been a long time since I've looked at a bike and thought it looked this cool.
  • + 5
 It's been a long time since i've looked at a bike and thought it's a pain in the ass to set up properly the shock :-)
  • + 3
 @payze: At least they arent Specialized and Trek and use some crappy proprietary shock that breaks easily.
  • + 21
 Where's the obligatory suspension action/squish video?
  • + 16
 It took too much time to take half the bike apparat to let the air out
  • + 13
 If the short travel version was the Linkin trail then the long travel version should have been called the Linkin park. Oh well missed opportunity.
  • + 3
 Would anybody ride a bike called the Linkin Park?
  • + 5
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: 15 year old me would have.
  • + 1
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: wouldnt end well.
  • + 19
 @jrocksdh: but in the end it doesnt even matter
  • + 3
 They must make an all black stealth version with black logos.
  • + 7
 Fantastic overall design! Geometry that can be set at size L. Hard to find anything to bitch about here.

"It's hard to nail down the exact geometry specs for each frame size with one setting affecting the other."

Exactly. Bold needs to have a geometry configurator on their web site. If they could also spew linkage charts for a given geometry configuration even better.
  • + 2
 Ya the medium can easily fall into modern large sizing...and the large is def far off into xl territory.
  • + 10
 Bike looks really sleek, but also looks like potential maintenance hell.
  • + 6
 If your shock wouldnt work properly you'd feel it like on any other bike. It takes a bit more effort to remove it but considering I barely change settings on my bike I'm sure I'd take this small setback for the super slim look!
  • + 7
 @winko: Not to mention not having your expensive, delicate shock out of the elements and protected from rock strikes. Even as a frequent knob-fiddler I still love the idea, my guess is this setup would extend air seal intervals substantially.
  • + 4
 Taking clean lines to the next level - adjustment knobs on the fork not visible, rear shock not visible, integrated dropper post. Just add a Pinnion gearbox to that and you have one seriously stealth bike. Not my cup of tea - but I can admire good design when I see it. We are probably going to see the big players in the industry head down this road in the near future.
  • + 5
 That thing is rad, love seeing what smaller builders come up with, steel, carbon, alloy, don't care just love the creativity.
  • + 2
 So when a lightweight rider repeatedly bottoms-out the rear suspension over 'medium-sized' obstacles, PB(or rather 'Ralf') thinks it 'ticks all the boxes of what a modern enduro bike should bring to the table'?
Would good-ole 'Ralf' happen to be an employee of said bike company by chance?
  • + 5
 Finally a bike with some proper geo adjustments ! Now hopefully the big manufactures will begin to catch on
  • + 2
 I dunno seems like a potential creek fest to me
  • + 3
 What about heat during long runs with the shock hidden like that?

Also, didn't get how you access the lever of the shock for pedalling?
  • + 2
 I think he said that if you want to use a shock with a pedaling platform, you have to use a handlebar remote. One of the bikes had a gripshift, one had a lever.
  • + 2
 Yeah, cooling
  • + 1
 He went on to put some volume reducers, looks down... nahhh bottoming now and then never hurt anybody.... Overall looks great with some great details but hiding a part that has to be accesible isn't wise, promote integration but it makes it more complicate that what's needed
  • + 5
 Such a clean, sleek looking bike.. I love it
  • + 1
 You mentioned the Linkin Trail Classic in the first sentence but failed to mention the Linkin Trail LT (Long Travel). Let's talk about those. The Linkin Trail was designed to be four bikes from one frame - medium travel 27.5 or 29 and long travel 27.5 or 29. Now it seems to me it's impossible to get geos to work properly across four designs from one frame without making compromises to performance in each configuration. Your statement ' It's hard to nail down the exact geometry specs for each frame size' kinda says as much. The very fact that they've brought in an 'enduro' model with the same amount of travel as the LTLT kinda proves that the concept didn't really work. Oh well at least it shows they're willling to learn by bringing in this enduro specific model. All they need to do now is re-design the LTC as a short travel xc specific frame. Oh and they need to modify each of the frames to accept shocks other than DT Swiss. At the moment both designs are like Apple products locking you in.
  • + 5
 So many great ideas implemented on that bike
  • + 0
 I appreciate the idea of having full freedom to tailor in the Geometry as you please, however, most riders would do this likely only once and that would be that. The problem afterwards is that you have all these flip chips and angle sets that inferior and more costly to a standard headset or pivot bearing configuration. Looks like a lot of areas that will creak, collect dirt, etc.
  • + 2
 Wow what a great looking bike. Seat tube angle and chainstay length vary by size thankyouverymuch. Bigger companies take note.
  • + 1
 Biggest question in my mind is what the hell is a Rockshox Poetry fork? Anyone else notice that on their website? New fork to compete with the 36 that allows H/L Compression and Rebound? We want to KNOW!!!
  • + 5
 I think that it is a bad translation of Lyric Frown
  • + 1
 That is one good looking bike! I'm not sure I would worry about the shock heating up, I've never felt my shock after a DH run and noticed it being hot, but it's possible I guess.
  • + 3
 Ah that is so clandestine! Something like the government would do
  • + 7
 Your government must have more money than ours does. Ours would look like this: cdn.wideopenmountainbike.com/images/Trek-9500.jpg and it wouldn't work when it was too hot, too cold, too wet, too dry, too sandy or too muddy.
  • + 2
 @MonkeyPuzzle: do one for usa now, lol.
  • + 3
 put a gear box on it and there's the future look of a bike
  • + 3
 Sexiest bike on the market. Now one of the most versatile.
  • + 2
 Will this thing fit a Coil Shock? Is the linkage progressive enough for a coil?
  • + 1
 I would love to see this bike with a pinion and a long travel integrated seat post. I imagine it would look something like this: www.pinkbike.com/photo/16134068
  • + 1
 I like this bike alot its very clean and very customizable! I bet its quiet aswell with that chainstay rubber fin! bike is SICK!
  • + 2
 Beatiful well thought out design and engineering. Thinking out of the box. Well done!
  • + 1
 I like the idea of protecting the shock, however simple things like seeing how much travel you've used after a run would require taking the bike to pieces.
  • + 5
 It's quite easy with the small window on the NDS. You can see the red o-ring in the picture.
  • + 1
 @Demoguy: That 10x10mm window looks like it would only show the o-ring when it's at about 35% sag, not blown off the end of the stanchion. I could be wrong, as I can't tell what the value of the markings is - looks like 55mm.
  • + 2
 slick looking rig! somehow feels like hiding all you shit and mess under your bed!
  • + 1
 So if they continue with this naming convention we could get a bike called Vol 4. I'd probably buy it just for the name then
  • + 3
 looks nice wish i had the money for one.
  • + 3
 Bold move they did there with rear shock, smexy bike thought. GJ.
  • + 3
 Oh my god. Want. Now does it come in black...
  • + 2
 ...... and here I thought maintaining my suspension was a pain in the ass.
  • + 0
 By naming it 'Unplugged' all I can think about is an ebike. Bummer. It's such a nice looking bike but the first thing I would do is cover the Unplugged stickers.
  • + 1
 The only thing that excited me more than the bike was seeing Ralf Hauser on the article... Will we be seeing more from him?
  • + 2
 Interesting, but looks like that shock would overheat!
  • + 2
 Nice tidy clean looking bike.
  • + 1
 If Aperture labs built a bike. Lots of well thought out details and design making it earn the price point... not bad
  • + 1
 "Greatly active suspension.." what's that all about! My suspension is greatly active, that active its probably *%$#ed!
  • + 1
 I wonder how long till we see some major producers with some Shimano/DT swiss parts packages.
  • + 1
 Not so sure about the integrated dropper, especially given KS's track record with their posts.
  • + 1
 A 4 bar/Horst with a concealed shock, how revolutionary!

Let me know when they reach 11 so I can go FULL Spinal Tap LoL Big Grin
  • + 1
 S***!! For a moment, when I saw that huge area in the BB, I thought I clicked on an E-MTB article. You guys got me there!!
  • + 2
 Looks great, I love seeing new designs.
  • + 1
 Does it have a good iihs crash rating? Side deployed airbags?

How long between oil change intervals?
  • + 1
 Clever and attractive but all that thick carbon is probably responsible for pushing the weight to 14.2 kilo / 31.3 lbs.
  • + 2
 unplugged is amazing......cant imagine when it is plugged.
  • + 1
 If George Clooney were a bike. I'd ride that.
  • + 1
 I like to fiddle around my shock a lot so this won't be for me...
  • + 2
 Never mind
  • + 1
 Dig the sag meter on the linkage
  • + 2
 Nice bike.... shit name
  • + 1
 All bikes in the future will be able to fit 27.5 and 29 wheels.
  • + 0
 I want it with an adjustable top tube and an integrated waterbottle in the stem.
  • + 2
 [Swipes right...]
  • + 1
 Anyone have one? What is maintenance frequency/pain like?
  • + 1
 Sure hope it’s one of those set it and forget it suspension designsz
  • + 1
 Pretty interested.....but I'm an exact smedium.
  • + 1
 Another sick bike that we wouldn't be able to get in Canada Frown
  • + 2
 A tinkerers wet dream...
  • + 1
 Looks like a seeeebike
  • + 1
 Nice, but no battery....
  • + 0
 If YT made an e-bike, this is about what I imagine it looking like.
  • + 1
 They do....maybe not public yet.
  • + 0
 Looks great, but... fourteen kilos?
  • + 0
 What's Volume 2??
  • - 2
 Looks like a Demo
  • - 2
 Where's the water bottle holder?
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