New Fork Technology From BOS

Aug 30, 2014
by Pinkbike Staff  
FCV, which stands for Frequency Control Valve, is the latest patented innovation from the engineers at BOS. FCV is a technology that BOS has been using in various motor sport categories for the past few years. Most notably in the offroad category (Rally Raid, Rally Cross, Sprint Car and Motocross) such as the Dakar on Carlos Sainz’ SMG-Redbull car.

BOS has been using the FCV system quite successfully in motor sports for a few years now, however adapting it to be a DH world cup contender proved to be an exciting challenge” said Olivier Bossard Founder of BOS MTB.

This adaptation of the FCV is to meet the needs of mountain bike pilots, represents countless hours of development for BOS. The system was developed over 2 world cup seasons with the experience of world cup pilots and extended use of our data acquisition system in the off season. Until now suspension settings were a compromise between grip, efficiency, comfort, support and shock absorption. The FCV will now revolutionize the suspension by acting as a second damper inside the fork. The FCV helps to keep that "BOS feeling" that riders are now accustomed to, while offering a level of comfort and small bumps absorption unseen before with a regular fork.

BOS Suspension images. FCV Closed

FCV Closed


BOS Suspension images. FCV Open

FCV Open


The FCV is a smart system able to recognize if the compression is coming from the rider’s effort applied to the bars or an impact to the wheel. The Frequency Control Valve makes the distinction between the two, at the same time the FCV will filter a wider range of impacts coming to the fork.

Some noticeable effects expected from the FCV:
• A buttery feeling
• Reduction of fatigue to hands and arms
• Better absorption of square hits
• Reduces the risk of pinch flatting and rims denting
• More comfort on braking bumps
• Less nose diving

Look for more BOS models to be equipped with FCV in the coming year.



Newly Redesigned Idylle RaRe

2015 BOS Idylle details
2015 BOS Idylle details

Price to be announced soon.

www.bosmtb.com

Posted In:
Press Releases



132 Comments

  • 238 7
 I'm throwing money at the screen but its still saying insufficient funds
  • 10 4
 lol^
  • 17 1
 I bet they are expensive, lets hope they are remy proof!
  • 13 2
 Yesterday I was riding in "Lac Blanc", our local bike park not so far from where Rémy lives. He was there too and I can tell you the fork is able to withstand his abuses Wink
  • 19 1
 It seems you need to construct additional pylons.
  • 7 0
 I see this translating into the first $1500+ single crown AM/Enduro fork....
  • 16 3
 Loganjensen: Your problem is that you're throwing cash at the screen! Everyone knows you need to throw a credit card for online transactions!
  • 3 0
 That ship has sailed my friend.

X-Fusion Revel HLR has an MSRP of nearly $1800.

Not sure that counts though...
  • 1 1
 Fox 34 iCTD with the electronics also runs $1600.
  • 4 5
 X-Fusion forks costing $1800??????? So much for high performance at sensible prices....Sorry x-fusion, you might be ok, but you aren't up there with the top guys yet.
  • 6 1
 @gabriel: It may be 1800, but it's all GOLD and inverted. With the awesome HLR damper on top of that, I'd buy it over an electronic Fox any day.

I got an X-Fusion Metric HLR in fantastic condition for under $700--now that's high performance at a sensible price.

Once you go X-Fusion, you never go back. I'm X-Fusion from the waste down.

Keep bikes mechanical.
  • 2 0
 I only mentioned the Fox for reference, you won't catch me on electronic anything. I'm pretty sure the main reason the X-Fusion Revel is so expensive is that its made in the USA. Each one is hand assembled in the Cal factory, so there's not much economy of scale. I dig the lifetime service plan. I'm currently on a Vengeance HLR Coil, its a great fork with usable adjustments that actually make a difference when you turn the knobs. What a concept! They are super easy to rebuild also. Tempted to switch to the Revel tho, it sounds like it sound be amazing..
  • 1 1
 ^^Good point on made in the USA. Quality craftsmanship doesn't come cheap without the oppression and dehumanization that makes companies like FOX so successful. I'm poor as sh*t right now, but when I eventually make some cheddar, I'm going to spend it on the best American (or Canadian) made parts I can find.
  • 6 0
 Actually Fox does all of the precision machining for internals and all assembly inhouse in Cal. I know that they have the castings and most of the forgings done in Taiwan, but they still do a ton of work in the US. They're the only major suspension player still supporting domestic labor, which is pretty cool when you consider that their pricing isn't much higher then their competitors who have everything done overseas.
  • 2 0
 Did not know that, thanks!
  • 4 1
 Sorry Guys but I have to say it. Being made in USA does not assure quality. It only means it is produced with high manufacturing costs (labour and equipment) and low productivity (cycle times and social law for workers). I am an engineer in automotive industry and I know how does "lean manufacturing" works in Europe and in USA. I honestly think that well supervised production in China can give better quality than some small shed manufacturing in USA
  • 3 0
 very true. the made in taiwan badge used to be a sign of a dodgy product. now more often than not its an assurance of quality. however I am all for the localisation of production. I dont want a bike where the front end came from china, the rear end from usa, the bearings from japan and the small cnc parts from poland. it may produce the best bike for the least money, but its bad for the world. bad for economies, bad for the workers in some cases, bad for the environment and bad for innovation, bad for humanity in general.
  • 1 0
 I would agree with you but there is one but.... It would mean that all bikes would be made in the east. I think frame should be manufactured in one plant (bearings are components so getting them from JAP is ok.). Rest of it can be assembled wherever....just like I did in my room. Assembling bike from modules is good.
  • 1 0
 Never said something made in Taiwan is of lesser quality. I use a ton of Taiwanese parts and enjoy them immensely. But as a tax-paying bike shop owner I appreciate and attempt to support domestically produced products to a reasonable degree. I'm not going to run an inferior product because its made here, but if I have a choice of equal products I'm going with domestic. Supporting your fellow worker makes your life better, because instead of milking welfare they're out spending a paycheck and feeding the machine.
  • 2 0
 @gabriel, I like where you're going with that. The more fortunate world needs to come together to help everyone become self-sufficient. Only then should multinational corporations be allowed to assimilate into the various cultures they are currently exploiting.
  • 3 0
 Fulla agree! I like the way Orban is taking care of domestic production and people by not giving tax discounts to foreign companies. He also taxed supermarkets (turnover) so smaller/domestic business is getting better. Here in Poland, government and citi boards are releasing big corporations from taxes.... Building a shop that will hire 100 people but will kill 10 small shops will not get the job done.
  • 54 17
 Looks like a trek session
  • 17 4
 i believe your post is on the wrong tread Razz
  • 34 0
 ..."the needs of mountain bike pilots"...yeah. Pilots. That's what we are. Screw being a rider--I'm a mother f*ckin pilot from now on!
  • 3 0
 It won't it let me prop you more than once for such an awesome comment, shame.
  • 2 0
 So true. I rode the bus today and then later rode my bike., doesn't really describe much does it.
  • 6 0
 If I got on a bus and the driver referred to himself as the pilot I'd know I was in for an exciting trip.
  • 1 0
 The French call drivers and riders "pilots" hence Michelin Pilot tires. And BOS is a French company.
  • 1 0
 Geography. Tight.
  • 24 0
 Guess my 2014 Idylle RaRe has found a replacement ... Running out of kidneys soon !
  • 9 3
 There are at least six billion people living in this world, you can't run out of kidneys!
  • 8 0
 7 billion*
  • 3 2
 Selfish bastard
  • 7 2
 And most of them are poor.
  • 19 0
 where have the good old days of an good and simple open bath Monster gone... it still eats cars for breakfast, and lasts longer then my mother in law!
  • 12 2
 I'm not 100% sure how this works and I have some theories and some skeptical questions, One specifically of it having no draw back and eliminating compromise between grip, efficiency, comfort, support and shock absorption (who isn't skeptical about a claim that large?). But if they have achieved it and I would not be surprised if they have or at least have to a high level, I think they just won the battle of suspension.
  • 19 1
 I also have doubts. Seriously can they make their forks even better than what they currently are??
  • 12 0
 An explanation from looking at the pictures.

The normal action of the fork is pushing oil through the damper (black ring with green sides). What BOS has added is a secondary set of oil ports, shown just below the hex cap in the "open" picture. They are normally closed, covered by a sliding tube (cylinder shape below hex nut). That tube is held up, in the "closed" position, by a very light spring. When the wheel hits the ground, the tube is able to push down on it's support spring very easily, opening the small valves allows the fork to sink a little bit more. After the initial impact, the tube will get sprung back into the closed position, so that the regular damper is controlling things for the rest of the stroke and rebound.

It's a "Smart" Valve because it seperates rider input from the ground input. The bottom of the fork has to be impacted to pull the sliding tube down against the spring. Pushing on your handlebars just pushes the tube against the hex nut, which is the closed position. If you wanted it to operate for both types of input, you would put a lighter secondary spring on the top side of the tube, between the tube and the hex nut.
  • 3 0
 Can you design me a fork?
  • 3 0
 If the fork can really tell the difference between being pushed up and being pushed down... I want one.
  • 1 0
 So is this an inertia based system then? If so, wouldn't there be a delay, however small, from when the bump is hit until the system cycles?

I gotta say though, attributing a mechanically controlled/actuated part with "intelligence" so that it "knows" when to do what kind of rubs me the wrong way. I get kind of tired of the over pushed marketing BS in the mountain bike world. But hey, if it sells stuff to people who don't know any better then whatever.
  • 3 0
 What happens when you try to preload the front end for popping off a lip?
  • 1 0
 that was my thought exactly. But I think it would be fine. I don't think that it totally locks out the rider input, it just makes the fork a little less sensitive to it.
  • 1 0
 saying it can tell the difference is easier than saying, we have valved and machined the parts to react to certain parameters that will lets the fork work differently depending where the force comes from.
  • 1 0
 It sounds fkin great, I just have a little trouble believing it could work
  • 1 0
 @jaame I'm right there with you on that. It almost sounds as bad as the auto-locking forks...
  • 7 0
 the fork is available for "26/27.5".... does this mean that there are 2 options, one for each wheel size OR that there is one fork with one geometry that can fit both wheels? The first option allows the best set-up for the end user but the company has to manufacture & stock different fork options. The second option is the best option for the company since it is easier to produce, but it leaves the end user with a fork that doesn't handle as well as the competition's. My fear is that they've done the latter of the 2 options...
  • 2 10
flag Kylehutch (Aug 31, 2014 at 8:43) (Below Threshold)
 To my knowledge the bos axle system works with both 20mm and 15mm
  • 2 0
 They have the two different lengths listed (573mm/586mm), so one can assume you should not worry.
  • 1 0
 @kylehutch--I see what you did there. You little devil.
  • 8 1
 Forgive me if I'm wrong about this, but don't the big S own the patents to inertial mass valves like these, à la brain (www.specialized.com/us/en/technology/brain)? Is this not how Stratos came to a sticky end?
  • 5 0
 Exactly what I was thinking, looks like the have reinvented the Specialized Brain inertia valve.
  • 23 0
 Don't the big S own the patents to everything?
  • 2 0
 was about to say the same thing. looks like a slightly modified version of specializeds brain system which requires the damper to start moving before the valve can be activated, by which time its already too late. Not saying it won`t work, but i doubt it'll be perfect. Spesh stopped using the system pretty soon after they started...





fabdemere your comment genuinely made me laugh Smile
  • 2 0
 I may violate the brain patent but maybe the brain patent is US only? Europe May not be enforceable, similar to 4-bar.
  • 3 1
 Is this the same idea as fox's terralogic or the opposite?
  • 3 2
 The problem, in my experience, with Specialized's Brain or other inertia style valves is that it takes an impact to move the weight to open the oil ports. So if you're flying into a rock garden that first impact is going to feel like you're coming in with your fork locked out, because essentially you are. Maybe BOS have reworked the idea a bit to be a little more seamless, but I'm skeptical.
  • 5 0
 spot on Scandium Rider. The next logical question being: if you take an impact large enough to open the port, will the port have closed again by the next impact? who knows? so the rider (or pilot) i left trying to guess what their fork wil be doing. I'm sure BOS have worked the system into a useable state, but I propose that it will be incredibly difficult to make an inertia valve system that is compliant to the first hit and predictable during repeated high speed impacts. Shim stacks on the other hand are very simple and at the same time extremely predictable. I think predictability is one of the most important things in a suspension system, which is why it usually takes a few runs to get your head around wildly different settings and see any improvment in times, even if the new settings are technically better than the previous settings.
  • 1 0
 ScandiumRider, Because the Brain System is fully bled, the slightest bump will cause the inertia valve to open, therefore opening the suspension and absorbing bumps. The Brain Shock uses the same technology commonly employed in the suspension in Trophy Trucks. If you watch any of the Baja races you will see they are very demanding on their suspension systems, they would not want to settle for anything that is a compromise in any way.
  • 2 0
 @Callum-H: I've owned and ridden Brain shocks and forks from Specialized, I know how it works. The valve doesn't open instantly, and so the first impact when coming off a smooth section of trail always feels harsh. Not to mention I could always hear and feel the brass weight moving around in the damper, or the remote reservoir on the shocks. I just never really liked how it felt at all, and I'm skeptical that BOS has really improved it that much.

That being said, if BOS want to give me an FCV equipped Deville to test out, I'd be more than happy to give it a try! Wink
  • 2 0
 You guys should probably bare in mind that BOS have been using the FCV thingy on moto bikes and other suspension for a few years. Would they really have to have it patented for the MTB Industry?
  • 1 0
 @ the-mountainbart-experience

You mean like computer vs mobile computer patent farce that is stagnating computer innovation these days?
  • 6 1
 I know very little about MTB suspensions, but have a decent idea coming from an MX background. This is a serious inquiry as I am working to build a downhill bike for next season.

How does something like this compare to the Fox 40 Float FIT RC2?

I have the Fox 36 Float FIT RC2 (can they come up with anymore acronyms ya think) on my enduro and like the tunability.

Is there a decent thread that would give me an understanding of how to decide what fork/shock combo to buy? I can tune it from there, but there are so many bloody options in MTB that wading through all the BS becomes tiresome (so I end up purchasing Fox and call it a day).
  • 6 0
 A lot will disagree with me but especially with the 36 and 40, you really can't go wrong!
  • 1 1
 LOL @ "love" for Pinkbike. Apparently a serious question that requires brain cells triggers the incessant negative props clicking.
  • 6 2
 It depends what you want. Boxer - budget Bos - performance, long service intervals Marz - reliability Fox - stiffness and good performance just service intervals are very short
  • 6 0
 fox are easier to get spares for if you service them yourself, and easier to get serviced by a pro if you don't. But they do need frequent love. Bos probably edge it in terms of initial build quality and therefor run smoother for longer, but spares are rare and expensive. Marzocchi are pretty much fit and forget, apart from the nickle stanchions are easy to damage. Boxxers are ten a penny but pretty much need a rebuild straight out of the factory due to huge quantities made and poor quality control. if you get a good set they are awesome forks, but getting a good set comes down to luck. just my opinions, hope they help.
  • 1 0
 Thanks for input guys. I am building something worth building (aka not budget minded), so I will research the replacement parts for BOS vs Fox and make the decision between the two from there. Appreciated.
  • 3 0
 haha, slavevalley got in there before me. serves me right for typing my reply with an xbox controller.

have fun meesterlover. if money is not an issue, don`t overlok aftermarket cartridges like avalanche. they really are good.
  • 7 0
 Just don't get your knowledge from these forums. We're a bunch of bitter ass-hats. You can't go very wrong with fox and rockshox though, and you can always get small parts.
  • 2 0
 My Boxer 2013-Boxer R2-C2 has been a great fork, absolutely no complainants. I get a lot of shit from my crew for not being in the Kashima club but there idiots. As @Grahambike stated both are amazing forks and will do anything you ask of it.
  • 2 0
 I agree, one thing the boxer has is great tune ability. And the World Cup version is one of the lightest on the market.
  • 2 0
 @Grahambike, input from ass-hats is always on a weighted scale. Some input it good, some not so much. Fairly simple to figure out which is which. I do not need the bike until next season, so I have time.
  • 1 0
 Maybe take a look at dvo too. They are inverted so more friendly to a Moto background and are an awesome green!
  • 4 0
 I personally think you should buy the marzocchi 380 c2r2 and the new marzocchi Moto shock If coming from a MX background. Look them up they are truly outstanding
  • 5 1
 Bear in mind inverted designs are not generally as stiff as conventional forks when at an mtb friendly weight. Not a big issue in moto where the weights are higher and the main input of force into the fork comes from the motor and huge weight of the chassis. Moto fork designers use much larger diameter tubes and thicker walls to counter the lack of an arch connecting the lowers, easily withstanding the twisting loads an average human torso can exert. In mtb however, all usd designs are at the same time heavier and more flexy than their right way up counterparts. Whatever fancy colour they may or may not come in...

I agree that given an unlimited budget for exotic materials and proprietary components, on paper the usd design should be better. However given current material technology, in the mtb world (at least in dh) on a performance vs weight scale, the right way up fork still rules the roost. I don't really see that changing anytime soon. Maybe in 5 years, but nothing currently available is even close. (In my perhaps not so humble opinion of course)

And yes before you ask I do have first hand experience with the DVO fork. I managed to twist it in its crowns within 5 minutes of laying eyes on it. Not impressed. Plus the whole stiffener arch thing is plain stupid. They may as well have closed off the back of the arch, chucked a few seals in it and called it a slightly heavy right way up fork...

Also I second Kylehutches point that you should have a good look at Marzocchis Cr380 fork. No first hand experience of it myself but based on Marzocchis recent achievments I expect very very good things from it.

p.s. the boxxer wc air spring is shit. dont bother with it, the r2c2 is a better fork. Fox's 2014 air spring and Bos air spring are quite good.
for reference I personally run a 2014 boxxer r2c2 and hope to upgrade to an avalanche cart when some kind soul decides to hand me 500 dollars or whatever it is they cost.
  • 2 0
 Thanks for the input gabriel. I was not aware of the issues with inverted dh forks. Also glad to hear you have had first hand experience and arent just a couch qb Razz .
  • 3 0
 nope not a couch commenter. having literally just returned from two weeks dh riding in the alps and absolutely bloody knackered, i am currently commenting from my bed. Razz

and on that note i think its time to stick a film on and go to sleep. g'night all.
  • 2 0
 Öhlins makes aftermarket damper cartridges for FOX 40 and boxxer, probably available next season. So maybe choose a the chassis you prefer and go stock for a while and have multiple upgrade choices If stock just doesnt cut it?
  • 1 0
 @gabriel: In the real world a Dvo does not twist unless you apply brute force. Incidentally a regular fork wil twist as well, a single crown more so. What sets the dvo apart is supersmooth ride and huge amount of front wheel traction. Fox, bos, rs suffer fro stiction and canting, manitou and dvo less so. Two reasons: Properly lubricated and half the leverage of a regular fork on runsurfaces of stanchions. I ride longer harder with a soft dvo and run lower tire pressure. Incidentally the forks are always tested fully extended instead of at the recommended sag level. That stiffens things considerably.
  • 1 0
 Yes usd have some advantages, mainly the improved unsprung weight they usually allow, which as you say, can offer increased traction on the front tire. However I think this is more than offset by the weight increase on the whole fork required to get them even close to stiff enough, while conventional forks can be made too stiff even and still weigh less. I would like to know the total difference in unsprung weight of a set of dvo lowers full of oil compared to a 40 with the inverted cartridge. I'd hazard a guess that when you factor in the weight of the front wheel, dh tyre, brake etc. then the %difference is pretty small. They do also have lower leverage on the bushings but this is again offset by the increased deflection. This leads to more misalignment at the bushings and damper seals, which not only increases stiction dramatically but also increases wear on all parts. its all a fine balancing act, which i personally think has been pulled off better in the mtb market with the conventional design.
  • 4 0
 The reason why I don't have Bos:
Here in US I'm not sure who can service or repair in case something goes wrong .
I know I can buy the forks and shoks here in USA.
but they haven't done good job on who can repair or service or get parts like FOX 40,Boxxer etc (get any MTB magazine or hit fox 40 service in google )
I think Bos needs to work on that asap if they want to sell any product anywhere .
  • 3 0
 Prestige MTB on the east coast is the authorized distributor and service center. They can handle any service or repair you may need. The forks only need service once a year under hard riding, you can get 1.5-2 years for average use.
  • 1 0
 Thanks, do you have web link or phone.
  • 1 0
 www.prestigemtb.com, site is basic and it doesn't mention Bos but I own a shop in Issaquah, WA and I've ordered from him. His name is Marc and he's been great to work with. He's received the factory service training in France and is certified to perform all maintenance and repairs. If you have a MTB focused shop in your area they can setup an account and get you the product as well. Forks feel firm in the parking lot test but thats because they're properly damped, on the trail it all comes together.
  • 4 0
 I can put my pal on my bike and he goes much faster than me. No amount of money changes this. With hard work at the gym I can stop him pulling further away. Bottom line is that he would be faster on his xc bike than I am on my dh bike. Reality sucks boys and girls. It takes hard work to be fast and get faster, not a valve.
  • 2 0
 This is surprising coming from someone who does timed runs for every click of compression they adjust Razz I reckon you should give BOS a go, John.
  • 1 0
 I would love too. But the cost is unbelievable. Would like to try a boss air out back but £400 2nd hand. No way.
  • 1 0
 Even thow expensive, they are the best and transform the bike. You can run faster in control. I was also skeptical in the past, but tried and shock(ed). 15 months later, my deville is better than new, no fade like my 36 or pike. The shock, maybe, is even more dramatic.
  • 7 3
 Doesn't matter how good the fork is if you can't get it serviced in a reasonable time frame then, BOS are crap at after service!
  • 5 4
 Buy a new BOS and sell your old one as "needing a service". Boom.
  • 3 1
 as I often hear: "if you see someone in the park, riding the BOS fork, he rides to the service centre for sure"
  • 3 2
 Getting BOS serviced in the UK is no longer a problem, I use J-Tech, fast, reliable and awesome, also BOS forks and shocks can go much longer between services than many other brands.
  • 6 0
 I think they should put more money into customer service
  • 3 0
 Combine this with something like the noelithane shock mount shown at eurobike (or whatever it was) and you could have a completely vibration free bike. 30 laps a day anybody?
  • 3 1
 bos have a really good forks, the damper works good, and the regulations are true, not like fox or Marzocchi. But they are expensive
  • 6 2
 Too many acronyms. Fork this, I'm out...
  • 4 0
 yo dawg, we put a damper in the damper so your ride is more well damped.
  • 3 0
 And how much is this super fork going to cost???
  • 7 1
 super fork will be super expensive. super.
  • 23 2
 Probably not more than the DVO
  • 16 0
 A kidney and a half.
  • 4 2
 well DVO its a bit heavy i would not even consider it, but Mz 380, Boss, new BXR charger, Fox they are all about a kidney price Razz that's y i got Avalanche cartridge and there are many more www.fast-suspension.com www.cr1engineering.com/index.php
  • 2 0
 can you survive with a half of a kidney? Seems like not, though I heard you can grow back half og your liver. Maybe there is an untapped revenue channel there?
  • 1 0
 A friend of mine donated part of his liver for his mom, I don't know if he had complications or not, but he felt super sick for 2 months, could barely do anything
  • 1 0
 Brave man. Huge respect to that guy. Whoever he is.
  • 5 4
 Thats a joke. It is based on the old turner progressive suspension patents...... spv evolve, spezi brain etc working on the same princip.
  • 3 0
 This thing weights just 100g more than my Fox 36 Van RC2. 0_o
  • 1 0
 Looks like some kinda speed-sensitive automatic flow adjustment for the low speed bypass allowing more low speed flow under quicker spikes?
  • 1 0
 I guess it beats stack various colored elastomer to dial it in. Those were still ground breaking and game changing when we got added a small coil to help!
  • 1 0
 I see something that looks like a curled up worm or curly fries, Everything else is irrelevant.
  • 1 0
 You're made me crave curly fries now.
  • 3 1
 It's all too serious. The FCV, the price, calling riders pilots.
  • 3 0
 would you prefer they caled it the dufus, and used bits of old cork as a damper?
  • 4 0
 cool. I always wanted to be a pilot.
  • 2 0
 Has anyone had experience with the Bos customer service in US?
  • 3 1
 WHAT NO 29ER OPTION THIS IS BOGUS.
  • 2 0
 SSVF anybody?
  • 3 1
 Looks like a Boxxer
  • 1 0
 reduce the risk of pinchflat and dented rim is a joke.
  • 1 0
 BOS is like the POC of suspension, Cha-Ching!
  • 1 0
 Yeah, but it is progressive in it's progressivity!
  • 1 0
 Specialized might have something to say about this.
  • 3 5
 hah its also know as a High Speed Blow off valve nothing new Razz its just another interpretation of it Smile check Avalanche downhill racing !
  • 2 0
 that was my first thought but its not the same. This looks like it will be active along side the compression damper, I dont think its a blow off valve style system its more a secondary damper. I am assuming it is like a super low threshold damper that will activate for very small input during the entire stroke, leaving the main damper to deal with more support. I don't think its a dampen that is used than blows off to the next one, it sounds like it transfers force to the other damper but then this remains active still through the stroke. But this is just theory Id like to hear from someone who actually knows.
  • 2 1
 The FCV is a smart system able to recognize if the compression is coming from the rider’s effort applied to the bars or an impact to the wheel. The Frequency Control Valve makes the distinction between the two, at the same time the FCV will filter a wider range of impacts coming to the fork.

well check here as i said nothing new Smile
www.avalanchedownhillracing.com/HSB/High%20Speed%20Blow-off%20System.htm
  • 2 0
 You don't need to convince me I saw the exact same thing.

But with the avy cartridge I thought once it blows off that mid valve is no longer active. I didn't think the mid value worked at the same time as the HSC damper. I saw it more as a 2 stage HSC almost like LSC>mid value>HSC. Or essentially the mid valve been a mid speed compression (jumps etc) Once you have moved past the mid value into HSC if you hit something that is lower frequency the mid value is not longer active because the HSC damper is already working.

This however I saw as a value that remains active at the same time as the HSC damper. So it works like the mid valve but it keep active even when in deep HSC damper.

Or does the avy work the same way?
  • 2 0
 this in an inertia valve, it opens when the fork lowers experience a suden acceleration. a high speed blow off opens when the fork lowers reach a certain velocity, regardless of acceleration. they are completely diferent things.
  • 2 0
 @gabriel misson9

Thanks for that clarification.

well explained and simple. It sounds like it work like I imagined, should be awesome.
  • 1 3
 At least in the all-mountain world, nobody gives a shit about anything but Fox/Rockshox. I don't do much DH or hang with that crowd so maybe this is good news?
  • 1 1
 gimmick. and since this is a DH fork. A stupid gimmick.

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