British Columbia Duo Starts Farside Components, Introduces Gorgeous Cyclic Stem

Aug 31, 2021
by Alicia Leggett  

Emory Rempel built his first stem because he wanted to try a shorter stem on his bike, and, well, he also didn't want to just buy one. Two years and "a crazy amount" of money later, he has his stem. Also, the one-off project has grown into a fledgling handmade Canadian parts company, Farside Components.

Emory works at Islander Precision Fishing Reels, a branch of the Canadian machining company JS Foster, and at the time, the shop had just started using a new design software. Emory figured he could dial in his machining and programming skills faster by learning the software at home after work, so he started drawing all manner of bike parts - frames, suspension linkage, bike racks, and more - but he needed a real-life project to see his drawings through to the end. Creating his own stem gave him the perfect project.

His first few stem prototypes starting receiving attention on Instagram, he said, which is how he met his now business partner, Grant Lestock-Kay.


Grant, for his part, had his own visions for what he wanted to see in bike products, and he also had been toying with the idea of making something himself. A bike shop owner in Duncan, BC, he believes that the reason for his shop's success is his endless fascination with bikes and the fact that biking is not just a hobby or a part of his job, but an essential part of who he is. He recognizes that Emory relates to machining in the same way. When he stumbled upon Emory's stem on Instagram, he wrote, he was immediately enamored and was delighted to learn that Emory was based just an hour away in Victoria, BC. Partnering up was like throwing fuel on a fire, Emory said. It's clear that both Emory and Grant trust and respect each other immensely, and they both seem to feed off the other's belief in what they can create together.


bigquotesThe self doubt starts to fade away and it becomes more encouraging every time we meet. Ideas start to come out of nowhere, it becomes apparent that we are the right type of people doing this for the right reasons. There are a good number of hurdles that come your way when you set out to start something like this. Having someone right there with you for the highs and lows is priceless. It's like when you're out for a long ride, and you're absolutely bagged. But you're able to push on when you look over and see everyone there with you.Emory Rempel

Grant first reached out because he had a stem idea of his own and wanted to connect with someone like-minded, but the pair talked for hours about "bikes, manufacturing, companies, goals, everything." It was obvious, Emory said, that they should be working together, not developing competing products, especially since their skillsets - Emory as a machinist and Grant as a bike shop owner - were so complementary. The first order of business was to finish Emory's stem and bring it to market.


The Cyclic stem is named for the steering control in a helicopter, a nod to Emory's past stint as a helicopter pilot. It's bold and rugged, available in just the 45mm length and 35mm clamp. With titanium bolts, it weighs in at 167g without cutting any corners. The goal in creating the Cyclic stem was to create the best stem they could without trying to fit into a budget, look a preconceived way, or otherwise make compromises. The result, Grant wrote, was something that makes the duo proud.


One of the pair's biggest gripes about some products on the market is inconsistency. Measurements on products from even quite reputable brands can be imprecise, Grant wrote, and since Emory works with tolerances "within a fraction of a human hair" in his day job, the first way Farside Components plans to improve on the current market is in attention to detail and extreme precision. "Unfortunately, I have seen properly torqued stems from reputable brands slip far too easy," Grant wrote. "In our opinion, one slipped stem is one too many. Tight consistent tolerances are critical."


Now that Farside has achieved the product they wanted to first introduce, they're moving forward to other dreams. Up next, Emory and Grant plan to put Grant's stem concept into action. We don't know many details, but Emory said the new stem will be designed to be made in larger quantities, even though he said it will actually be quite a niche product. There's also a Farside chainring design in the prototyping stage. Although again, we don't have details, Emory said the chainring is designed to solve a problem that has emerged in recent years.

Lastly, Emory has been working on a crankset design that he's excited to bring into the physical world, and he said it's probably what he's most excited about right now. Since the machining shop where he works is set up with a lot of CNC lathe capacity, it's an ideal setup to eventually make hubs, Emory said, but he doesn't want to get too far ahead of himself. "Right now it's really easy to get distracted and chase the next shiny object," he said. "So we are being disciplined and trying to focus on one of two things and just move them forwards incrementally. We work at this after hours so focus is critical." That said, Farside does have a collaboration planned with a local bike company for a project in the near(ish) future, so it's worth keeping tabs.


Emory wants to be sure to acknowledge the help he has received from JS Foster and Islander Precision Fishing Reels. The fishing reel company began at JS Foster much like Farside is now, and much like so many other bike parts companies that have grown into something great simply thanks to a bit of help from the right people at the right time. We can't wait to see what Farside becomes in the coming years.

The Cyclic sells for $229 CAD and is available in-store at Cowichan Cycles, Beaufort Cycles, Marty's Mountain Cycle, and Fuca Cycles and at farsidecomponents.com.






206 Comments

  • 282 5
 Beautiful stem...faceplate logo leaves something to be desired?
  • 32 1
 My thoughts exactly.
  • 90 0
 Each stem also comes with a decal sized to cover the entire back window of a Tacoma.
  • 35 1
 This! The back is beautiful and then the plain front plate and ugly brand name ruin it. Put a nice subdued logo on the front or no logo at all.
  • 15 4
 Chromag BZA back without the nice BZA front...so I'll stick with Chromag.
  • 24 3
 Yeah. Amazon special aesthetic.
  • 8 3
 @monsieurgage: it is so not like the BZA at all
  • 2 0
 @DirkMcClerkin: Lock me in man! My taco rear window is scarce .....
  • 6 0
 @berryjm9: Beer
The $229 CAD price includes the decal and for a limited time a free Tacoma back window for those that don't actually drive a Tacoma.
  • 3 0
 they should have machined that too!
  • 23 0
 Butterface
  • 2 1
 "Oil slick" color offering or it's not a real product. Smile
  • 6 1
 Agreed, it's way too big... especially for a brand no one's heard of.
  • 2 0
 @justinfoil: He's right. The embarrassing part is that I have a BZA stem. Actually, I will claim half points. Both have the mount bolts on the same side.
  • 2 1
 @justinfoil: lol yes it does
  • 39 0
 @brianpark - With so many aftermarket stems, when will we see a comparison article? I'm dying to know how they all differ in ride quality.

I'm the kind of guy that just knows that stem characteristics between companies will drastically change how my bike rides, and I want to know which stem is best for me.....
Is it the 40mm CNC'd stem, or the 40mm CNC'd stem...... or the OTHER 40mm CNC'd stem???????
  • 10 13
 This thread is all negative shitting for the sake of shitting. I think that the Farside stem a beautifully designed mountain bike component! I'll be putting one on my new bike this fall for sure!
  • 3 0
 just get a chrome one
  • 7 1
 Just what we all needed.. one more expensive stem to choose from
  • 1 0
 Exactly,needs to be more subtile in my eyes,but really nice looking apart from that
  • 5 0
 @gordonshred:

Get the Dub stem. 39.99mm.
  • 1 0
 Maybe just a capital F with a circle around it? Be less in your face.
  • 2 8
flag justanotherusername (Sep 1, 2021 at 4:31) (Below Threshold)
 @Waldon83: Do you really think stem characteristics will drastically change how your bike rides?

I don’t think that’s the case at all, unless you go from one extreme to the other, say super heavy to super light.
  • 3 0
 @justanotherusername: I'm typing this very slowly because I know that you can't read very fast.. that was a joke.
  • 4 0
 @justanotherusername: Surely you jest. I’m quite obviously taking the piss.
  • 4 0
 @Waldon83: Genuinely, I didnt think you were taking the piss, nope.

What you wrote is so close to the wierd shit people write in all seriousness on here my sarcasm meter seems to be completely broken.
  • 2 0
 yup, total butter face
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: I find that heavier stems help the smoothness of the front end, so I've gone to machining them myself from depleted uranium.
  • 2 0
 Agreed .IMO the best looking stem is the raw/polished version. The rest have a offshore catalogue look.
  • 2 0
 @bikerider0985: I'll take high-end engineering and shitty branding every time. The reverse is what we so much these days that I pretty much look for the companies that do it 'wrong'.
  • 100 1
 I hope they start laser engraving classic farside comics on their stems.
  • 22 1
 LOOK WHAT THAG DO!
  • 35 0
 All-time favorite:Midvale School for the Gifted.
  • 8 0
 @steveczech: Mine is: Objects in mirror are closer than they appear
  • 5 0
 @steveczech: That is a great one!! I always like "where beef jerky comes from"
  • 1 0
 I’d buy one of those
  • 6 0
 Boneless chicken farm
  • 47 0
 Emory from Farside here. We actually had to pay quite a lot to make sure that Gary Larson wouldn't sue us over the name. The lawyers were able to determine that comics and mountain bike parts were Infact not similar. But if we start putting comics on them...
And the best far side comic:
Cavemen looking at a mammoth with a single arrow in its side
"Maybe we should write that spot down"
  • 15 0
 Bummer of a birthmark, Hal.
  • 6 0
 I liked the ones that made zero sense. "Hey man, wanna buy a hoofed mammal?"
  • 7 0
 Cow Tools
  • 4 0
 Classic comics. Not a good advocate of weigh savings. All the characters are super fat.
  • 10 0
 Stems for the mechanically declined.
  • 3 0
 "And next, for show and tell, Bobby Hendersen says he has something he found on the beach last summer."
  • 4 0
 How nature says "Do not touch".
  • 2 0
 ‘The real reason dinosaurs became extinct.’
  • 3 0
 Rocket scientists.
  • 3 0
 Alarm “DID NOT WASH HANDS!”
  • 3 0
 @emmerz: The first that came to mind besides Mr Larson's efforts were these guys... en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bizarre_Ride_II_the_Pharcyde
  • 4 0
 "Thag, take napkin. Got some mammoth on face."
  • 1 0
 @emmerz:
That thing looks sweet. And as a person who seems to crank the bars out of whack just by dismounting I like the stress put on getting the size correct so it all stays tight. Plus made in NA by people who arent being exploited by their government.
  • 62 2
 always exciting to see a new stem company
  • 14 0
 LOL
  • 12 0
 Especially if they launch a model called the Cell.
  • 1 0
 It was needed as a piece of bread
  • 1 0
 fucking lol
  • 1 0
 Why the sarcasm? They're also making chainrings, you know
  • 37 1
 I mean, sure, there truly is a shortage of anodised stems and/or pedals out there. Can someone start an afterwork project on gears already?
  • 9 1
 It's not so much a need, but it appears Stems are the fine-art-self-expression components of bikes? Kinda like chairs are to industrial design and tea pots to ceramics???
  • 12 1
 Too bad ChrisKing doesn’t make a stem. That would be the sexxxxx
  • 1 0
 @itslightoutandawaywego: Crazy they have not got into that after all these years... missed opportunity!
  • 6 0
 @stiingya: too busy with espresso tamps and salt and pepper shakers
  • 1 0
 @diggerandrider: Stems are also one of the components you’re most likely to swap out from whatever can stick on your bike. Makes sense to start with a part people are not only likely to buy, but one that has relatively live risk in the design when trying to get your feet wet in the industry. Stems, pedals, chainrings, that’s the easy stuff, after that complexity skyrockets
  • 1 1
 There is truly a shortage of tshirt companies for example, designs of trainer, types of sweets?

Why do they all bother?

I genuinely don’t understand this way of thinking - so if you think you can make something unique, desirable or better than existing products you shouldn’t because others exist?
  • 1 0
 @itslightoutandawaywego: I can’t see them doing it. They see themselves as first and foremost a bearing company. Stems would be out of place.
  • 1 0
 @itslightoutandawaywego: Chris King is on a mission to shrink the number of products they sell. Less SKU's is the way. I think every small company seems to want it the way Porcelain Rocket did inventory management - if buyer orders on the day of release, you might get one. Gets them the margin they deserve and the punters can all gtfo.
  • 38 4
 CNC stems will never have as good strength to weight ratio as forged ones. Best stem is made by forging and not milling. They'd be better off making some other interesting parts such as axles, hubs, pedals, dropper levers and even overpriced suspension links instead of just another stem that doesn't stand out by anything other than an exuberant price.
  • 11 2
 forget stems are actually cheaper as well
  • 6 1
 @nickmalysh: cheaper by what metric? Per piece once the dies are created, maybe, but creating, and replacing dies is not inexpensive, and with access to a CNC mill and some billets, machining can produce pretty good stuff quickly and without a huge layout of upfront costs. Of course, owning that mill for maximum output does cost some, but to start, writing a program and borrowing mill timeis going to be cheaper than mastering a die and borrowing forge time
  • 10 1
 @justinfoil: for end, my oem stem cost like 25$ and does decent job over last 6 years within 122g weight;

Stem is probably the last thing to upgrade or that can be broken on the bike
  • 3 4
 @nickmalysh: there are different qualities of forging. Some of the crappiest and least expensive stems are forged. I personally question the post about forging being better. I don't see why a piece of good hardened bullet is inferior to the general quality of forging stems in the bike world. I would love to see an example of high end forging in a stem. But all my experience is that cnc stems are stronger and have better tolerances than forged.
  • 2 0
 @takeiteasyridehard: forging is cheap at massive scale, and fast, that’s why cheapie stems are generally forged. The raw forging also doesn’t lend itself to making small intricate details, which is why cheap stems are often “pillowy” looking. So you’re correct in that most billet stems are superior to most forged ones, however a forged blank that was then finish machined would be unequivocally better than a pure billet one. Problem is it would be crazy expensive which would mean the cost to forge it would be amortized over very few parts, making it even more horrifyingly expensive.
  • 1 0
 ...exorbitant... Smile
  • 7 0
 Agreed a forged stem has a better grain structure than a machined one. I've got the Spank Spike Race stem and the shape and production method just make so much more sense to me than every single CNC stem I've ever seen. Investment is high because of the dies and the equipment, hence only the big brands are able to do that. A small company can make small series using CNC machines. They don't have to produce more than they need and can quickly spin up production when demand increases. And adapt the production immediately if they come up with an improved design (rather than sell off and/or scrap old stock). This is how brands like Superstarcomponents and Hope can be efficient. But yeah, as for a stem I don't see what would be the appeal of having one of those over what I have. If it holds the bars and the fork, it does what it should but it can't really do better.

Thinking of it, one thing they could do is make it modular. For instance different faceplates. With a light, with a mount for different cycling computers (or e-bike monitors), with a quickmount for certain bikepacking bags... lots of different stuff people have up there. So yeah, that's where CNC could come interesting. Having these options without creating a huge amount of stock.
  • 1 1
 True, but does it matter?

Do we see many stems fail anymore, I don’t, and I don’t care to buy forged stems, I buy what I like the look of that is in a decent weight range.
  • 3 1
 Typical stem then.. Sketch circle - extrude cut, offset from surface, taper out 15deg. Add shitty logo. Done. With all due respect, the attempt to remove weight got lazy when the CAD feature wasn't as ideal for the bar clamp area. When a design teeters between warranted engineering and stylized accent the result is certainly - novelty. Moreover, it's risky for that result to assume such a high price tag. If the stem sells, fantastic, but I think there's more potential with a bit of refinement.
  • 1 0
 @nickmalysh: what does that have to do with forging vs CNC for a similar quantity and build & finish quality?
  • 1 1
 @msusic exorbitant means extravagant and beyond the normal range (orbit)
exuberant means excited and enthusiastic
  • 1 0
 "dropper levers" I am seriously considering importing a stock of those cheap ZTTO levers, 15EUR for aluminium with bearings, they are better than any lever I have used, be the Fox, the Reverb, Brand-X or any other one I used.
  • 2 0
 @maxyedor: You basically said what I said...you just tried to prove that you know more. I was speaking in terms of practicality and real world availability or supply. I didn't care to make a discussion about engineering, because that quickly turns into a passing competition on this site. Do you know an example of a high quality forged stem with finish machining?
  • 1 1
 @sonuvagun: this is Pinkbike, Pedanticbike is a different site.
  • 1 0
 @Lemmyschild:
Why did you feel the need to involve your opinion? Your opinion has no bearing on what words mean. Stop thinking like a child.
  • 2 0
 @takeiteasyridehard: The thing with cold forging is that it will never be possible to realize a product with super accurate dimensions. You'll always have spring back and as the hammer/upper die works in one direction, spring back will be different in different directions. Of course to us these products look perfectly fine (think Shimano cranks) but at the mating surfaces (threads, splines or in case of a stem the face where it meets the faceplate) it needs some machining at room temperature to get a perfect fit. So even if your spanners says "drop forged", the beak where it grips the nut is still machined to size. Similarly if you have a sand casted wok for induction cooking. As sand casting is a low pressure proces at elevated temperature, the product will deform slightly as it cools down. Which is fine, but for induction cooking the base should be perfectly flat. So that face is being machined. Yes machining would elevate the temperature (because of friction) hence this is why they constantly cool it down. As a lubricant, to remove swarf and to cool it down so that the temperature of the product stays low.

Maybe the claim why forging (usually) gives a superior product needs some clarification. And this is a tough lecture if I can't use any visual material but I'll give it a shot. (Solid) metals have a grain structure. If you cast a product, these grains are more or less even in all directions. So if they cast a solid block, you have that too. But no one needs a billet like that so it is being rolled into a flatter billet. And by doing that, these grains are being compressed. The become flatter. And the closer to the surface, the more these grains are being compressed. The grains deeper in the billet become flatter too but nowhere near as flat as those close to the surface. Of course if the metal is being rolled down to sheet material or thin wire this difference can be neglected. So much about the grain structure for now. If we look at metal fatigue (which you always have in case of aluminium) there are three phases. First phase is initiation. The crack starts at a weak point in a grain. For instance because of a scratch. Once the crack has reached the edge of that grain, it is easier to grow between the grains than to enter another grain. This is called the crack propagation phase. This can continue until the crack is so deep that there just is too little material left to transfer the applied load (so basically the cross section got so small that the stress reaches the ultimate stress of the material) and the product breaks. This last phase is being called the termination phase. Now, if you have a forged (rolled, extruded etc) product hence the grains at the surface are flat, the cracks in the propagation phase still grow between these grains but this implies that the crack grows mostly parallel to the surface. So the crack may never grow so deep that you even reach the termination phase (hence product failure). A typical example is a wheel hub. If you have a Shimano hub (so rolled/forged) the grains are parallel to the surface so a scratch at the surface of the hub shell won't affect the hub too much. If the hub shell has been machined from a thick round billet (so with an axial grain direction), these grains will be perpendicular to the flanges. A scratch in such a flange could lead to a crack that goes straight through that flange. Now don't worry too much about Hope hubs. They don't machine their hubs from round billets, but from forged (I think) billets that already have these flanges in place. And yes, there will still be a lot of machining going on as Hope is Hope. But even Shimano will have to do some machining for the bearings, brake rotor mount and, in case of the fancier models, some material removal to make the higher end models a bit lighter.

So yeah, forged bike parts still see a bit of machining. I actually don't think there is a single forged bike part that hasn't seen a little bit of material removal as everything has at least some interface with something else.

TL;DR: No one told you you have to.
  • 1 0
 @sonuvagun: that's pretty funny coming from a guy(?) correcting people on a public internet forum.
Why did you feel the need to be pedantic, especially with what is probably an auto correct error?
Stop thinking like a pedantic.
LOL
  • 1 0
 @Lemmyschild: Are you developmentally challenged???
The Croatian flag next to the guy's name suggests his first language isn't English. I helped him differentiate two words so that he avoids that mistake when it matters. Again, that's called HELPING, not correcting.
Your assumptions are projections of your own biases.
Go get help.
  • 2 0
 @sonuvagun: I wasn't familiar with the word exuberant either (coming from The Netherlands) so thanks for the clarification.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: how much do you think machining aluminum actually raises the temperature of the part?
  • 1 0
 @5poundplumbbob: You want me to give you an absolute number, regardless of the product, machine settings etc? Sorry, I'll leave that up to someone else to bother with. The comment was made in the context of accuracy of different production processes. If you really need an accurate fit (a sliding fit, interference fit etc) the expansion you get when the material heats up (because of friction, as mentioned) matters. The temperature rise isn't insignificant mind you. If you would produce a part on a mill or lathe without cooling, it soon enough gets so hot you wouldn't want to touch it. No not red hot but enough to affect the accuracy.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: most heat machining aluminium leaves with the chip, coolant is more about chip control and tool longevity than anything else.

Aluminium gives up heat very well and you often find a part that has been just heavily machined is completely cold to touch.

Your explanation was good though and I didn’t think you made too much of a big deal about the coolant aspect.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: Yeah, as aluminium conducts heat well, it usually isn't too much. Though when for instance when making small parts on a lathe, after you cut it from the bar you can't immediately pick it up. It is definitely hot. Now I indeed never experimented and tried how much my accuracy would be affected if I didn't cool/lube properly (also out of respect for my cutting tools) and obviously I didn't want to mess an otherwise good part. For sliding parts in hydraulic or pneumatic cylinders, when you need a groove for an O-ring or a recess for a cartridge bearing, the tolerances are in the order of hundredths of a mm. Now again I haven't done the math (in terms of using the expansion coefficient and figure out how much temperature increase it would take for a few hundredths of a mm diameter increase). I just thought that if I'm going to make something precise, I'd better measure at proper low temperature.

But yeah indeed, this is a huge focus on a small part of the discussion. My point just was that (near room temperature) material removal like machining is the way to make accurate dimensions hence it is a common process to finish forged or cast products.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: Hmm I don’t want to go on but aluminium parts shouldn’t be hot coming off a lathe, we pick them right out of the parts catcher and they are as cool as they went in…

Accuracy is unaffected if the part gets hot while being cut as you presumably measure it when it’s at room temperature - so long as you don’t alter your cutting strategy part size should be constant.

0.01mm isn’t really a tight tolerance, modern machinery will hit that in terms of concentricity for hours on end after the machine is thermally stable (not the raw material, the machine) - ours certainly do.

Anyway, we all use coolant to cut aluminium, it’s just not really to keep stuff cold, it’s to keep stuff from breaking….
  • 1 0
 @sonuvagun: correcting people on the internet is basically going full on pedantic. Boringly belaboring your point is also pedantic. Telling people to seek help and calling them retarded w/o using that word is super classy. Keep it up, but I'm done with you for now.
  • 1 0
 @Lemmyschild:
You seem to be conflating a correction of definition with some kind of personal expression of superiority. That's your bias, in your head, and not healthy.
Vinay says he found it useful; go ask msusic if he was offended, or if he found that useful.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: Yeah, maybe indeed it were only the steel parts that got hot. I just taught myself to just not pick them up right away after I had one that was hot. But yeah, maybe it was steel indeed. As for the required accuracy, agreed a hundredth of a millimeter may not even be super accurate in some industries but for the kind of interfaces and fits this is what I needed. I usually don't measure before cutting. I spin the machine and approach with the tool until I can cut a full circumference and once I've got that I measure and calibrate the lathe. Then I cut the product until I'm almost there, measure again and might recalibrate the machine before I finish it. I think you probably do it like this too. But yeah as you mention the temperature doesn't rise even if I wouldn't lube/cool it then indeed I am measuring at room temperature.
  • 38 1
 Looks like a truvativ hussefelt stem from the front
  • 2 0
 I had the exact same thought!
  • 27 1
 I believe currently we have huge demand in overpriced polished stem's more then ever
  • 9 0
 You had me at over priced and polished. Now back to reading the article on Kuats kashima coated bike rack.
  • 1 1
 Don’t buy anything but one type of anything, ever.
  • 20 2
 I'd always love to see passionate people follow their dreams and invest time and money in their projects... Just would be so much better if there would also be some innovation involved that would result in unique products rather than cutting into some other passionate people's pie...
  • 17 0
 Looks lovely....but i'm not spending $229 on a stem, when I need to buy tires and pads and tubeless fluid and drivetrain parts and all the other shiz just to keep the bike running. That doesn't even include the parts that I break.

I've actually never broke a stem, or had a stem where I thought "wow I need a better stem" and felt the need to upgrade it, but fair play and good luck to them.
  • 19 2
 Neat, another expensive machined aluminum stem.
  • 10 1
 Good luck with the "tight tolerance" ethos. Dimensional precision must be implemented at the system level, not the component level. Steerers and handlebars are all over the spectrum. If you iterate a stem to perfectly fit a particular handlebar or steerer, it won't fit the same on the next one.
  • 10 0
 I simply could not imagine ever spending $229 on a stem. As an art project, OK this is nice, if not unique. As a business project... well it's an art project.
  • 9 0
 Another totally useless jewel... Every time another stem, pedal, grip, seatpost clamp that supplies zero differentiation shows up, we're just proving again how deep the MTB pockets are to mine.
  • 10 0
 Jeepers! Nice bling for the dentists and rich rappers - WTF @ $229 for a stem?!?
  • 9 0
 ...with $22.9 looks.
  • 9 0
 VERY similar to the old Straitline SSC stem....
  • 9 0
 Agreed. I wish these guys all the best, but this sure is a lot of storytelling for ....... a stem I’ve seen already.
  • 1 0
 was thinking the same thing
  • 9 0
 Don’t worry about the stem. Just look at that vice!!!!!!
  • 3 0
 I may have retouched the photo so the orange popped a little more -Emory
  • 3 0
 Just looked up an orange bench vice, $999 usd. Somehow I think that is a reasonable price.
  • 1 0
 @pcloadletter:

Totally. It even uses the same carve smart soft jaws as the OVDS20 we use haha
  • 3 0
 You can tell they are proud of it...the photos are almost angled more at the vise than stem
  • 7 0
 Does this connect your handlebar to the bike? If so i already have one. This must be a copycat.
  • 8 0
 Really nice stem… until it showed the faceplate
  • 7 0
 Producing stem without bar roll mark in 2021 kinda lame is not that hard, however adds to the end user satisfaction
  • 5 0
 Fancy stems are so hot right now - seems like every machine shop has some low-volume backdoor business dealing in stems these days.
  • 18 3
 Unlike my tramp ex girlfriend. She had a high -volume back door business.
  • 5 1
 @itslightoutandawaywego: was it called Backside?
  • 2 0
 @DizzyNinja: downcountry backcountry
  • 1 1
 @itslightoutandawaywego: comment gold of the year
  • 3 0
 @itslightoutandawaywego: username checks out
  • 1 0
 Name another machine shop making stems?
  • 2 0
 @itslightoutandawaywego: I hate to encourage but pics or it never happened.
  • 2 0
 @itslightoutandawaywego: but was it a large-volume backdoor business?

@DizzyNinja: you've got the right question, but I still can't resist: Buttcountry
  • 6 0
 Should have named it the Gary Larson stem
  • 4 0
 Wonder what local Vancouver Island bike company they're collaborating with. Or maybe they've already given it away in the photos.
  • 3 0
 Think it's expensive to buy? Wait til you install it and feel an instant compulsion to upgrade every other component of your bike. Not so many parts out there are that shiny and smoothly shaped.
  • 4 0
 For version two please go with: Subtle branding & adding grams to prioritize strength.
  • 6 1
 “No gap” or I wont buy. Its 2021 , those should be a standard.
  • 4 0
 Beautiful in the back. Ugly in the front. Exactly what all the girls say about me. At the bars. At 2am. #sadface
  • 1 0
 The Stems - yup, pretty things.

But, The Orange Vises you see in a picture.............. Look them up, Boys and Girls. Their Bench Vise is just so very desirable (and for what it is, it's a bit of a bargain) , but, by the time I'd option it up, I'd be in for a few K. All my venerable old Record Vises will have to do. Even if / when I stump up for the Orange Bench Vise, I might be too scared to mar it.
  • 1 0
 I do love these vises. It's a cool company too, completely run by 5 people (or it was ). Pretty amazing what they are able to produce . And the bench vise
  • 1 0
 The bench vise has a Kishima coating in the main shaft... LOL
  • 1 0
 @Mpblikes2ski: the bench vise literally has a crash replacement program too lol.
  • 1 0
 Sorry to say, but the stem looks like Chinese knock off on Amazon. This is due to that hideous faceplate, ugh. Just redesign that faceplate that will compliment the rest of an otherwise gorgeous stem. Consider this Pinkbike comments can be either cruel or the best focus group on the planet. Good Luck!
  • 5 0
 That's a stem alright.
  • 4 0
 Is there a market for this? Lol
  • 2 0
 "Emory Rempel built his first stem because he wanted to try a shorter stem on his bike" stem is 45mm thats far from short in my opinion
  • 5 0
 This wasn't the first one I made however. I went shorter and wasn't really feeling the steering, so went longer to 45mm which is what felt best for me and my bike . I don't think there is a "right" length but this felt the best to me and I'd say I'm pretty average on a medium bike.

Cheers
Emory
  • 1 0
 @emmerz: Understood, nice work
  • 5 0
 Butter face
  • 2 0
 @usedbikestuff The Larson Edition is being reserved for the 50th anniversary and is only available in cow print.
  • 2 0
 OH GOD THE FUEL LIGHT IS ON. Oh wait that’s just the intercom. Classics never die
  • 2 0
 Maybe make some matching stem spacers, tubeless valves and seat collars. Sooo shiny!
  • 1 0
 start with the most over priced component which people throw away the most money on. Race Face affect, good enough, reasonable weight, looks fine, rides fine.
  • 1 0
 She Said its a nice looking Stem but with that amount of cash to Drop i need Group Therapy and keep Running so it Keeps on Passing me by like the Pharcyde
  • 1 0
 Farside was a great comic / joke that is about to startup again…

The faceplate of this stem and the price is also a joke…

Colours are nice…
  • 1 0
 Finally, a good surface finish that doesn’t look like the entire thing was machined with a 10mm roughing endmill at 8 bazillion feed rate.
  • 1 0
 Finally! Dentists haven't been buying these, but metal workers have lol. Thanks for noticing. Cheers Farside
  • 5 3
 wouldn't kick that stem out of bed
  • 3 2
 Size queens would DEF ask "31.8 or 35mm" diameter though. Big Grin
  • 3 0
 cow tools
  • 2 0
 Let’s see the rest of that Forbidden!
  • 2 0
 www.cowichancycles.com/blog/blog-post-forbidden-dreadnaught

Grant did a pretty thorough write up on it here
-Emory
  • 2 0
 @emmerz: thanks! That’s a beauty of a bike. Also great work on the stem, i’ld bolt that on anyone of my rides
  • 1 0
 About time they get a shoutout I’ve been following them before they were Farside components. Absolutely love their work
  • 2 0
 Now I can get a nukeproof stem in different colours!
  • 2 0
 That orange vice looks sweet!
  • 1 0
 Yes 2much $! My Race Face Turbine R stem with 35mm clamp x 40 long is 130g and cost 90.00, that's with steel bolts.......
  • 1 0
 If you listen to it closely, it'll tell you left of center jokes about life.
  • 1 0
 HAPPY TO SEE THE BIKE INDUSTRY GROW WITH PEOPLE TRUE TO THE CULTURE... BEST OF LUCK FARSIDE!
  • 3 0
 Man, why i read Fartside
  • 1 0
 Looks like every other stem. I've got a Truvativ from like 2008 which looks the same, and it didn't cost that silly amount.
  • 2 0
 No oilslick, bamboo, new standard or battery I am out.
  • 1 0
 Looks like you used the word "beautiful" when you meant to say "generic looking".

Oops.
  • 1 0
 Killing systemic boredom in the cockpit.
  • 2 0
 The pharsyde
  • 1 0
 Damnit you beat me. Have an upvote.
  • 1 0
 That’s a bizarre looking ride
  • 2 0
 I like it ,
  • 1 0
 7075 heat treatment or ,6061 .
  • 3 0
 Good question. I'm also curious if this is made from a higher strength alloy such as 7075-T6 or a lower strength and lower cost 6061-T6 aluminum. I couldn't see it on the bar-stock shown in the video. I can generally tell from looking at the bar in my hand but don't want to guess. Hopefully at this price point, it's a higher strength alloy. One of my pet peeves is seeing a "premium stem", which should be strong and light be made out of 6061...

By the way, JS Foster has done some good work for the company I work for in the past. Good folks!
  • 1 0
 might be 2014.It's the best alu to make a stem from in my opinion.
  • 1 0
 Both are heat treated.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: there are different levels of heat treatment to achieve different levels of hardness for any metal. 7075 is much stronger than 6061 . This stem is under 200 grams . I most certainly hope for the sake of reliability it's made from 7075.
  • 1 0
 @Sshredder: The numbers 6061 and 7075 do not refer to the level of heat treatment.

Aluminium doesnt need to be heat treated post-machining and pretty much everyone uses aluminium in the T6 temper, so thats 6061 T6 and 7075 T6.

You need to go back to basics.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: This bro science is so boring. Yes 6061 is the ratio of alloys added to the aluminum . The numbers refer to the ratios and amounts of alloys added .
So your so smart please tell the the different metals in 6061 , 6069 , 7075 and what t6 heat treatment is compared to t8
Oh I want the tensile strength of each alloyed aluminum in relationship to the heat treating number.
Exactly what other metals are in 6061 verses 7075?
Bottom line your rude and you think your smart . Maybe you are .shame you can't be polite.
  • 1 0
 @Sshredder: you found google then huh?

Background from me: Beng Mechanical engineering, dissertation on crack propagation in aluminium caused by hard anodising, currently part own a machine shop that recycles about a tonne of 6082 and 7075 a month…… bro.
  • 1 1
 @justanotherusername: no I'm a machinist , stone Mason , ran CNC Mills for Race Face ect.
Made my own fly reels on my own lathe . Obviously I used 6061 t6 as its less not completely but less corrosive in a salt water environment. My stem is near net forged 7075 Al which is about as strong as you can get for Aluminum . I'm guessing as I'm not an engineer.
Yes all these facts can be obtained on Google.
Was not aware that hard anodizing could cause dissertation on crack propagation. Wouldnt you x Ray first to look for flaws in material before hard anodizing? I'm guessing the answer is about 200 words long .
Thus my short wording that people can hopefully comprehend.
  • 1 0
 @Sshredder: Either way 6061 is too soft and more material is needed so heavier and 7075 is too brittle.7075 stems have been known to crack at the steerer clamp as it doesn't like to be cycled.

2014 is where it's at for stems.

it's what Hope uses for their stems.
  • 1 1
 Looks like the transition to Outside advertising PR machine model has been put into hyperdrive already.
  • 2 0
 Looks like a Stem
  • 1 0
 I wonder if Fila want their 'F' back?
  • 1 0
 So many good Farside songs playing in my head now.
  • 2 0
 Price is on the FARSIDE
  • 1 0
 looks good but i'd pay extra for more ball milling on the face plate.
  • 1 0
 trying to make aluminium cool again.
  • 1 0
 Looks great and 45mm length to match the current fork offsets is nice.
  • 1 0
 Ooo ahhh
I’ll be ordering one for my s works
  • 1 0
 No thanks, I'm still waiting for a bamboo stem.
  • 1 0
 "Gorgeous" if we say so ourselves in our own press release. lol
  • 1 0
 Why would you buy one of these vs two Thomson 35mm X4's?
  • 2 2
 So like an i9 but with a beefier face plate so it won’t creak as much?
  • 1 0
 So original !
  • 1 0
 It's a stem.
  • 1 0
 Far-out...
  • 1 0
 Direct mount please!
  • 1 0
 Me Too!
  • 1 0
 a stem? how original
  • 1 0
 Vice. VICE.
  • 1 0
 the garry larson stem
  • 1 1
 FINALLY

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