Calibre Bikes Bring Spare Parts Manufacturing to the UK

Jan 22, 2021
by Calibre Bikes  
Views: 1,703    Faves: 2    Comments: 0


Press Release: Calibre Bikes

As with many other bike retailers at the moment, we are having some problems with supply due to issues in the far east following the global pandemic, leading to stock outages. We recognise that our biggest problem, along with many other bike brands currently, is that we have been letting the riders down on spare parts availability. Therefore, we are proud to announce the launch of our UK-made spare parts programme.

We have worked really hard to ensure these are of an improved quality on anything we have made before and we're stoked that we're producing them in our local machine shops in Sheffield, England, from stainless steel and 7075 aluminium in a variety of colours to match to your Calibre bike.

The parts that will initially be available, for the Bossnut and Triple B will be mech hangers, main pivot bolt kit, chainstay & seatstay pivot bolt kits, thru-axles, shock bolt kits, rocker link hardware kits and replacement bearing kits. We are also producing thru-axles and mech hangers for the Sentry, Line 10, Line 20 and Line 29.


Click here for more information on how to get your hands on a spare.


81 Comments

  • 205 2
 Practising my british. Well chuffed, mint bringing ye olde nuts and bolts to good old Blighty, innit. Fair play!
  • 31 0
 Needs at least 50% more Hugh Grant.
  • 36 2
 Yeah we all speak like Dick Van Dyke in Mary Poppins....
  • 16 0
 on yer bike
  • 27 1
 Perfect, if you’re a pirate from the 1500s.
  • 15 6
 Supercalifraga i'm not racist but, coming over here, ye olde go back to where you came from, Britain to be about British listicexpialidocious.
  • 5 0
 @Samuel-L-Jackson: priceless... I must admit my novelty British accent ends up sounding very Jack Sparrow-esque as well.
  • 20 1
 Funny thing is, accents in Britain change basically every 5 miles. How there's a single default British accent most think of, I do not know.
  • 2 0
 @FredrikWestman, try saying that with a strong drunk Glaswegian or East Midlands accent, if nobody understands you, it's perfect.

With ships like the Vasa to defend the Swedish capital, did the pirates just have a party there?
  • 4 0
 @iian: the same you can't tell apart a new yorker from a texan, but both sound clearly american
  • 5 1
 Throw another shrimp on the barbie, mate.
  • 2 1
 Points awarded for the generalisation we are all British too, its like says Americans comprise people from Canada, USA, Mexico etc.
  • 8 1
 How about a hand with speaking God's own language, Yorkshire, with
A Yorkshire man's advice to his son:
"See all, hear all, say nowt ... Eat all, sup all, pay nowt ... And if ever tha does owt for nowt, allus do it for thisen."

Never was a truer word said.
  • 1 0
 @GoWithTheFlo: thought it was "strong in the arm,thick in the head,Yorkshire born and bred.(I am a Yorkshireman by the way)
  • 1 0
 @Samuel-L-Jackson: Ahoy matey, thar she blows.
  • 6 0
 @jase111171: I am too :-)

You can always tell a Yorkshireman. But not a lot.
  • 1 0
 @pbuser2299: ''I said play a game with me, Raymond..''
  • 2 1
 It should be “practicing your English”
  • 2 0
 No no its, '' good show old boy, time for elevenses and a game of tiddlywinks after all this fettling''.
  • 6 0
 *Small boring fact of the day, for those who may (or indeed may not) care.. Did you know that if you'd gone around at the time pronouncing "Ye Olde" (as in Ye Olde Shoppe) as literally "Yee" and "Oldie" respectfully, you'd probably have received some strange looks; both words were spelt differently, but were pronounced exactly as we would today. Centuries ago, "Th" was often written as "Y" and the "e" at the end of "Olde" or "Shoppe" would have written but been silent when spoken.
Original Shakespeare text provides some good examples of this, as well as other small period oddities such as a distinct reluctance to spell certain words the same way each time - indeed, he sometimes spelt the same word three or four different ways throughout a single text, also quite a common characteristic of the time.
  • 49 1
 I heard the bigger problem is bringing the parts out of the UK...
  • 23 0
 I am a little concerned about tariffs on my titanium clavicle the next time I export myself, I have no idea of the country of origin. Although the rest of me was definitely made in the UK, from parts sourced in Yorkshire and Devon.
  • 40 0
 The German made a joke! And it was good!
  • 4 0
 @sargey2003: does that mean you are part pudding and part cream scone?
  • 26 3
 But now we have TAKEN BACK CONTROL we can REEP all these benefits, am just waiting for one to become apparent Sure it will arrive any time soon, my mate Boris and Nige said so, and they dont lie
  • 3 0
 @sargey2003: You must be fun at metal detectors.
  • 5 0
 @TheBearDen: Thanks. We're very effective at joking.
  • 3 0
 @TheBearDen: Ze German, surely ?
  • 1 0
 @pigman65: vas gud also
  • 2 0
 @usmbc-co-uk: waffle waffle FISH waffle waffle...oh wait.

I think the only thing left is waving our French-designed Polish-made blue passports and shouting SOVEREIGNTY.
  • 1 0
 @Riggbeck: Depends if you put jam or cream on first, or if you pronounce "scone" wrong. Either can start fights in some parts
  • 1 0
 @ROOTminus1: jam first every time, it's the only way that makes sense from an engineering point of view.

Scone would be scon.

I love the jurassic coast, got a draw full of insignificant fossils from there.
  • 1 0
 @Riggbeck: No, I think the engineer's point of view would be that it depends on the temperature of the jam and cream.

You can't spread cold thick clotted cream onto runny warm jam and vice versa.

[edit] Well you can...you can do anything you want...but it's asking for structural scone failure.
  • 1 0
 @terribleone1982: I would only use jam that complies with the ISO scone standards. This is perfect for cream adhesion.
  • 31 1
 Maybe it’s time to switch to Sram UDH... just sayin’
  • 17 0
 A lot of Calibre fans are going to love this! They really are great bikes for the price and this only makes them better.
  • 9 0
 I havent got a Calibre but I love it too. In our company we're still outsourcing and even offshoring fabrication. Reducing supply chain problems and reducing carbon footprint go hand in hand
  • 2 0
 @vhdh666: I love that the bike industry is slowly turning to this model.
  • 9 0
 Smart move, I'm sure we will see a lot of that this year
  • 11 3
 burgtec and BETD been manufacturing in uk for bare time nothing new to see here
  • 5 0
 And superstar, works comp, unite, hope, middleburn (now betd)
  • 2 0
 Which Burgtec products are made in the UK? I thought they were all Taiwanese!
  • 2 0
 @thingswelike: pedals, rings, axles....
  • 3 0
 Bare time? But wah gwan wit da mandem wit da bally on, bludd?
  • 9 2
 Probably being done by Superstar Components, in which case does that make the Super Calibre?
  • 2 0
 Superstar was Norfolk way I thought?
  • 1 0
 Uberbike is in Sheffield
  • 1 1
 Superstar has stopped shipping to the EU due the Brexit mess. The EU has installed a new VAT regime for non-EU imports from China (collecting VAT for parts lower than 22EUR), and it's already a logistic mess.
  • 2 0
 It says in the article it’s a local machine shop, superstar isn’t local and uberbike isn’t a machine shop (unless you count one machine as a machine shop)
  • 3 0
 @zoobab2: Superstar must have internal issues - we are shipping to Europe with no problem at all (not bike parts but from the UK) - all orders £50-£100.

They may be taking a week to clear customs but are getting there just fine, no charges so far either.

The VAT thing isn’t implemented in the EU until July by the way.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: they have a supplierbin sheffield i think that machines stuff for them, bit of a pain in the arse though the grades of aluminium we use are imported sonit costs a shit load more to make anything domestically now anyway
  • 1 0
 @Compositepro: same - 7075 isn’t getting any cheaper that’s for sure.....
  • 4 0
 Parts were near to impossible to obtain shortly after Mike Sanderson left, so was going belly up before Covid. I think when the take over happened, Mike left and they had a bike company with no one who actually knew or understood how or what is involved in running a bike company. Sadly their poor control of customer service and backup parts, left a lot of owners with unusable bikes. Many owners had resorted to using inferior nuts, bolts and micro scooter parts to try and fix them. Lets hope they have now got thinks back together and heading in the right direction as all troubles aside, the Bossnut is a great bike for the money and its intended use.
  • 7 0
 Parts don't come easy but it's a game of give and take.
  • 3 0
 Ah mate, I thought I heard Phil Collins in the background. Nice play
  • 1 0
 You can't hurry parts. Parts got to wait. Parts don't come easy.
  • 2 0
 This is good news. My boy has a bossnut with a couple of rounded pivot bolts that I need to replace.
For him its a nice bike. They are made by Polygon who also market the bikes under their own name.
Of course, you get what you pay for.....like SX Wink
  • 2 0
 To be fair, Go Outdoors seem to be replacing any failed SX mechs with NX (or GX if you’re lucky and that’s all they have). Free of charge.
  • 5 0
 Great to see local manufacturing in any country by companies to support their products and customers. Great move!!
  • 1 0
 Can Calibre copy the SRAM UDH design and make them the new standard for their frames moving forward?
  • 1 0
 Looks like the hanger is patented, but free licenses are available for its use:

www.universalderailleurhanger.com

It's also a question for international patent law, but in spirit, the answer is 'universally' No.

Also appears that UDH frame design requirements are a gateway to new-ish der design:

bikerumor.com/2019/09/16/srams-universal-hanger-concept-could-make-coaxial-mounted-hangerless-derailleurs-a-thing
  • 1 0
 @ceecee: they don't mention the patent numbers, because patent law is different country by country.
  • 1 0
 @zoobab2: www.uspto.gov/patents/basics/international-patent-cooperation

It's creepy that a hanger will influence frame design, but brutally savvy on SRAM's part. Even a small builder whose customer wants UDH, will have to apply for a license. World domination, USD 15 at a time.
  • 2 0
 And once again, Phil Collins ruined it all.
  • 3 2
 Uberbike components knocking them out for Calibre?
  • 3 0
 Uberbike don’t have a fleet of Nakamura lathes, they only make rings in the UK on a single milling machine I believe.

Its just a subcontract cnc shop by the looks of it and what the article says.

Simple parts, any shop could knock them out.
  • 2 0
 ..
  • 1 0
 finally! hopefully we can get parts to upgrade v1 bossnuts as well
  • 1 0
 Everyone in the UK should return to buy ROYCE racing stuff.
  • 2 0
 Their website took me back to a dial-up Internet connection.
  • 1 0
 When you say calibre, I hear cheesy drum n' bass.
  • 2 3
 I honestly thought Calibre bikes had died a death along with the company rejig. Will they be revived?
  • 6 0
 Is this a recent thing? They've been pumping out great quality and great value bikes for the last few years - wasn't aware about the rejig/potential death aha
  • 1 0
 @Joebohobo: Well the designer of the Bossnut and Sentry (and I assume the Dark Peak) Mike Sanderson moved on to Planet X last year and then they went very quiet. Stocks seemed to be 'running down' rather than a covid rush. But a lot of that is me reading between the lines. I was kind of hoping a member of staff might chip in on this post
  • 1 0
 This is really good
  • 1 1
 A lot of companies moving out of EU indeed nowadays...

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