Call of the Wild - Bikepacking the Coast Mountains

Apr 24, 2015
by Skyler Des Roches  
bigquotesThese here are God's finest sculpturings. And there ain't no laws for the brave ones. And there ain't no asylums for the crazy ones. And there ain't no churches, 'cept this right here. And there ain't no priests, excepting the birds. By God, I are a mountain man! - Line from the 1972 western, Jeremiah Johnson.


On a late August afternoon, I rolled out my door into the summer heat. I loaded my bike onto a public bus, and took it to the farthest stop of Vancouver’s transit system – Mission, British Columbia. What started off feeling like a daily commute through the city was actually the beginning of a three week solo excursion following British Columbia’s biggest, highest, wildest mountain range.

When I first discovered cycle touring, some eight years ago, I recall reading a journal describing the ways to ride inland, out of Vancouver. Highway 1 – A busy, windy highway with a reasonable shoulder. “The route of pure pleasure.”; Highway 5 – A huge climb while cars go by at mach speed; Highway 99, Sea to Sky Highway- Gorgeous views, constant climbing, terrible drivers, and rumble strips on the shoulder. “The scream and die highway”.

Well, I’d driven all these highways and could imagine all too well how horrible it would be to be blown off Highway 1 by speeding, exhaust spewing trucks and canyon winds, while my tires and face melted in the heat. After a few tours around the islands south and west of Vancouver, and a longer one in Europe, I mostly stopped cycle touring. My riding became confined to suburban forests and monotonous commutes. Pedaling on busy or paved roads still fails to captivate me.

Meanwhile, a siren song floated down from unseen mountainscapes. I found my way into them on foot or touring skis. I learned to climb them. But, the draw has always been the mountains, the valleys, the folded and broken panoramas more than the summits. Bikepacking has again changed the way I look at a map. Armed with lightweight gear and a sturdy, if simplistic, mountain bike, the lines in the Backroads Mapbook created a continuous dirt route out of the urban sprawl of the Lower Mainland, along the edge of the Coast Mountains, through hundreds of kilometers of dramatic wildlands. It is never flat, and that’s the point.

Call of the Wild - Bikepacking the Coast Mountains. Images by Skyler Des Roches

Once over the mountains from Harrison Lake, I followed the quiet side of the Fraser River. Though the rough 4x4 track over the mountains between Harrison Lake and Lytton was worthy of a mountain bike, I hammered through the first three hundred or so kilometers to Lillooet in three long days of riding.

Call of the Wild - Bikepacking the Coast Mountains. Images by Skyler Des Roches
  In Lytton, I met a friendly German cycle tourist. Our contrasting packing approaches demonstrate two very different travel mentalities. Nonetheless, we rode together for a day on the backroad to Lillooet.

Call of the Wild - Bikepacking the Coast Mountains. Images by Skyler Des Roches

It took another day until I found myself on singletrack, traversing over the Shulaps Range from the Yalakom River to Tyaughton Lake, the classic staging point for rides in the South Chilcotins. Unfortunately, this being outside of a protected area, dirt-bikes had found their way into the alpine and torn up what was meant to be a smooth trail through expansive alpine meadows. My hiking to biking ratio was discouraging. The views were not.

Call of the Wild - Bikepacking the Coast Mountains. Images by Skyler Des Roches
Call of the Wild - Bikepacking the Coast Mountains. Images by Skyler Des Roches
Call of the Wild - Bikepacking the Coast Mountains. Images by Skyler Des Roches

As the rain subsided at Spruce Lake, my journey underwent a sort of transformation from a ride driven by curiosity for something days away, to a quiet reverence of the rhythms of the trail. I’m not the first person to have ridden a bicycle on any part of this route. But, the feeling of discovery was real, and I doubt anyone has pedalled from so far.

Call of the Wild - Bikepacking the Coast Mountains. Images by Skyler Des Roches
  Still carrying a four-day load of food, the push past Warner Lake to the pass was long enough to merit the removal of my pedals.

Call of the Wild - Bikepacking the Coast Mountains. Images by Skyler Des Roches
Call of the Wild - Bikepacking the Coast Mountains. Images by Skyler Des Roches

At Warner Pass I stared off the edge of my mental map, down into the sweeping Taseko River valley. As if emerging from the confined sanctum of the Coast Mountains into the nave, space felt more abundant. A faint trail wended its way down the valley between stunted pines and through humic meadows. Here, the mountainscape commanded the attention of the sky above with symphonic gestures of grandeur.

I quoted to myself a favourite line from the 1972 western Jeremiah Johnson. “These here are God’s finest sculpturings. And there ain’t no laws for the brave ones. And there ain’t no asylums for the crazy ones. And there ain’t no churches, ‘cept this right here. And there ain’t no priests, excepting the birds. By God, I are a mountain man!

Or, at least the views were pretty enough to stir up that sort of yarn.

Call of the Wild - Bikepacking the Coast Mountains. Images by Skyler Des Roches
Call of the Wild - Bikepacking the Coast Mountains. Images by Skyler Des Roches

One hundred kilometers from the next human I’d see, I could appreciate the divergent meanings of ‘Wilderness’. An atavistic fear of bears nagged, while I escaped into a similarly bestial satisfaction. It dawned on me that this is what draws me back on long cycling trips. There is nothing so good as to eat when you’re hungry, drink when you’re thirsty, sleep when you’re tired, and put on clean, dry socks in the evening. There is nothing so satisfying as to swim in a cold lake when you’re hot, wash when you’re grimy, and chase away the cold with a campfire.

People often ask me if I’m not afraid to travel in the mountains or in bear country by myself. I am afraid of bears. But there is also something reassuring that these dangers can be resisted. Grizzlies can be fought with wit or weapons and cold fought with fire. (Besides, these dangers are often exaggerated.) This anarchic existence is a privilege, and is perhaps the reason cowboys have migrated to the Chilcotins for generations. For me or Jack London’s Buck or the cowboys that moved north with the tide of the law, this is the call of the wild. And what a boon it is to be able to escape into that kind of romance.

Call of the Wild - Bikepacking the Coast Mountains. Images by Skyler Des Roches
Call of the Wild - Bikepacking the Coast Mountains. Images by Skyler Des Roches
Call of the Wild - Bikepacking the Coast Mountains. Images by Skyler Des Roches

Riding north along the Taseko River the next day, a small hand-carved sign pointed the way up a track to Fish Lake, somewhere above the gorge. There are undoubtedly as many Fish Lakes as Beaver Lakes, or Trout Lakes, or Green Lakes or Moose Lakes, in Canada, so I didn’t think much of it until I spotted another sign at the junction with the forest service road. “Save Fish Lake.”

In one of the more shocking recent industrial proposals, Taseko Mines Ltd. proposed to drain this lake and fill it with tailings from the proposed Prosperity Gold-Copper Mine. The proposal to drain the lake was rejected by the government last year, but the mine was not. Now, they want to surround the lake with artificial ponds full of mine tailings.

The people who call the back side of the Coast Mountains home lead threatened ways of life. The cowboys, who based their living on the assumption that the Chilcotins were empty when they arrived – that what they needed to survive could be taken from the land given sufficient strength and cunning – are finally facing the lie this always was. They are learning to become ranchers, to ask for permission. The Tsilquot’in people, who have lived here forever, have been fighting a cultural war with the Canadian government, who assumed the cowboys were right, since Europeans arrived in the area. The tide seems to be slowly turning in their favour. A recent court decision recognized Tsilquot’in property title in part of their territory. It acknowledges that this land never actually belonged to the provincial government.

For tourists like me, it is exciting that the Xeni Gwet’in (the Tsilquot’in people of Nemiah) are gaining more power in land-use decisions in the Chilcotins. While the concept that aboriginals are inherent stewards of the land has an ugly, racist history (“the noble savage”), the Xeni Gwet’in seem to see themselves as genuine protectors of their territory. The Nemiah Declaration makes it clear that they have every intention of blocking all industrial resource extraction in the areas surrounding Taseko, Chilko, and Tatlayoko Lakes. The power imbalance between industry and natives is still very real, and I worry that the magic I experienced from travelling through a region where the landscape is still shaped more by natural disturbance than by large industrial projects will not be there forever. That the folks I met around Nemiah are so welcoming to privileged travelers like myself, who in many ways represent yet another presumptuous encroachment on their home, is inspiring. The people as much as the landscapes will draw me back to the area around Chilko Lake.

Call of the Wild - Bikepacking the Coast Mountains. Images by Skyler Des Roches
Call of the Wild - Bikepacking the Coast Mountains. Images by Skyler Des Roches
Call of the Wild - Bikepacking the Coast Mountains. Images by Skyler Des Roches
Call of the Wild - Bikepacking the Coast Mountains. Images by Skyler Des Roches
Call of the Wild - Bikepacking the Coast Mountains. Images by Skyler Des Roches
Call of the Wild - Bikepacking the Coast Mountains. Images by Skyler Des Roches

The ride across the Potato Range, between Chilko and Tatlayoko Lakes further fuelled in me a frenzied, exploratory drive. Such delusions of adventure are born of a city-boy's romantic, Hollywood self-image. Even if I found myself occasionally pushwhacking, fooled off the horse-packer's trail by cow tracks, the views of the Coast Mountains' most impressive peaks - Queen Bess and Waddington to name only two - had me longing to force my way deeper into the range. A day and a half later, however, my continuous line of dirt riding ended abruptly when I reached the Chilcotin-Bella Coola Highway. Here, with what motivation remained from the Potato Range, and lured by a map-line, which showed a trail leading down into the Bella Coola valley, I resupplied with Dorothy's fresh bread and hitched a ride 100 km west - avoiding a day of slogging on pavement to rejoin the dirt. Soon enough, pain and terror would supplant all notions of the proverbial 'mountain man'.

Call of the Wild - Bikepacking the Coast Mountains. Images by Skyler Des Roches
Call of the Wild - Bikepacking the Coast Mountains. Images by Skyler Des Roches
Call of the Wild - Bikepacking the Coast Mountains. Images by Skyler Des Roches

There are occasionally trails that do not deserve a write-up for their quality or scenery, but as a warning to others. It is generally easier to find information about top-quality rides on the web, than to find evidence that a particular trail is actually no place for a bicycle at all. The ride down the Sugar Camp Trail, off the Chilcotin Plateau into coastal valleys, falls into the latter category.

Some folks in the nearest town, Anahim Lake, assured me that ATVers had ridden up the Hotnarko River to the plateau's edge. When I arrived at at the so-called Precipice, one of the two families living out there assured me that no one had been through in nine years (and never on anything but horseback), and they hadn’t done any trail clearing in five. I reasoned that twelve more kilometres of brushed-in trail would be better than an 80 km ride back up to the highway and down 'The Hill'.

Mountain Pine Beetle has killed much of the lodgepole pine trees of central British Columbia. The Sugar Camp Trail passes through an area that was killed early in the province-wide infestation, and the beetle-kill has reached an age where they are finally falling over. Every tree in the area seems to have defiantly landed directly across the trail. Piles of twenty or more logs, still clad in all their twigs and branches and stacked up to eight feet high, block the trail in many places. So, with the top tube of my bike slowly embedding itself into my highest thoracic vertebra, I climbed over one teetering mess after another.

At some point, while holding my loaded bicycle across my shoulders with one hand, and breaking a path through the sea of uplifted branches with the other, on top of yet another jack-pot of fallen pines, it occurred to me that I should turn around. Rather, it occurred to me that I really should have turned around some hours ago, and now I was in that awkward position ahead of several kilometres of torture, and behind an unknown distance of unknown terribleness. Unfortunately, when one has dug oneself so deeply into a pit of despair, the only rational decision becomes to fumble quixotically forward.

Call of the Wild - Bikepacking the Coast Mountains. Images by Skyler Des Roches
Call of the Wild - Bikepacking the Coast Mountains. Images by Skyler Des Roches
  The Atnarko River belongs to grizzly bears. It even says so on the sign by the highway. Of course, I didn't know this when I finally came down the switchbacks on the Sugar Camp Trail and entered the Atnarko valley from the back door.

As soon as the trail reached Tote Road at the valley bottom, I could sense I was deep in bear country. The log piles on the trail had stolen my day and now it was dusk – grizzly hour. After a few minutes, I rolled past a small puddle in the middle of the road, with a few wet spots leading from it – an odd sight in such a dry place. Around the next corner I found a mother bear and her cub staring at me from 15 meters away. She’d heard me coming and was off the road. I spoke to her softly and rolled past. Though only 8 kilometres of 4×4 track from the highway, I realized I shouldn’t be caught riding that road in the dark.

I pitched my tent in the middle of the biggest clearing I could find, leaving lots of room for bears to see me and go around. As soon as it was dark, I could hear the splashing of bears in the river nearby. Then more splashing. Then two voices roaring. A grizzly battle over a prime fishing hole was going on meters away from my tent. Bears were crashing through the forest all around. This went on all night with more bears joining the fray. And I just lay there in my tent, terrified, with my knife ready to slice an escape route and join the battle.

Call of the Wild - Bikepacking the Coast Mountains. Images by Skyler Des Roches
Call of the Wild - Bikepacking the Coast Mountains. Images by Skyler Des Roches

After 1000 km and three weeks on the trail, I arrived back at the Pacific Ocean at Bella Coola's harbour. A few short side trips past big trees and mysterious petroglyphs kept me busy for a few days in the valley while my aspirations for further adventures settled back into healthy proportions. Eventually, incoming fall weather, the lure of friends and comfort back in the city, and the need to make money forced my return home. And so I began the tedious process of hitch-hiking half-way across the province with a bicycle.

- Skyler Des Roches

About the Author-
When not exploring the mountains around his native Vancouver or away on bikepacking travels, Skyler Des Roches funds his adventures with work in northern forests. In the past year he has ridden bikes in BC, Washington, the American southwest, Chile, Argentina, and Peru. You can read about some of those trips on his blog www.offroute.ca


Call of the Wild - Bikepacking the Coast Mountains. Images by Skyler Des Roches


Must Read This Week

86 Comments

  • + 159
 Wow. What a refreshing article! No dirt-roosting, tailwhips or bros. More please.
  • + 27
 Yes. Totally agreed
  • + 20
 Absolutely, would love to see more articles like this!
  • + 6
 More is good. A nice side track from the BS new standards coming soon. Blah blah
  • + 1
 thanks for feeding the wanderlust!
  • + 44
 Well done mate epic adventure!!

Reading your grizzly fight story made me relive a monkey territorial battle next to my tent on my last year tour, not much you can do but lay there waiting... longest night of my/our lives I'm sure
  • + 14
 What an amazing trip and a great read to-boot.
  • + 2
 The grizzly fight got my heart racing. I wouldn't have been able to sleep a wink!
  • + 4
 More info about what SwaBo is talking about please?
  • + 19
 Gritty man gritty, in the upmost respectable meaning of the word. I would like to say thank you for your post and more specifically thank you for including parts about our relationship with the land and the people that "have been there forever". I find it of upmost importance (especially for white men) to be able to talk about racism. Your "noble savage" comment lets me know this isn't your first time around the race talk block. Keep at it man, and when the haters show there hatred, breath deep and remember the sounds of grizzlies splashing through the waters.
  • + 15
 Inspirational trip and write-up. Whenever a cycle-tourer comes through my shop. I can't help but put down whatever I am doing and help them out as much as I can. When they leave I am left with excitement and envy for their journey across the continent!
  • + 13
 Ill live such asperations through your trip. That looks amazing. Sometimes I make excuses for why I could not do that sort of thing now with kids etc. Really its probably because I dont have the balls.
  • + 11
 Articles like this are the biggest reason I come to Pinkbike. Thank you and good luck on future adventures!
  • + 9
 Beautiful photos and what country! Mostly I enjoyed your optimism and respect for the land. Thanks for sharing and keep writing!
  • + 7
 I love stories like this! Really want to try something similar myself, but haven't worked up the balls (or the fitness) to do it yet.
  • + 3
 Pure awesomeness! Great narrative and good to see that a 3 week outing can be supported with light minimalist packing. There is something special about a solo trip but I think that these are definitively experiences that would be nice to share with one or two good friends. Sometimes though, this is hard to coordinate and one must just get out there.
  • + 3
 I would love to do a trip like that with a small group. Don't feel confident enough to take it on alone at 58 yrs old for ther first time. Are there guides who help fossils out with this sort of thing, hurl themselves into the path of raging bears etc.
  • + 6
 happiness only when shared man
  • + 5
 ^ Chris McCandless's epiphany
  • + 0
 Check out 'Tyax Adventures', @slicks1 . They do guided trips up in the Chilcotins with float plane access.
  • + 2
 OR Big Mountain Bike Adventures. The owner, Chris Winter is an incredible guy.
  • + 1
 Yoho Adventures is another good adventure guiding company.
  • + 2
 "It is generally easier to find information about top-quality rides on the web, than to find evidence that a particular trail is actually no place for a bicycle at all." ---- this is SO true. A few years ago I scoured the internet for a good several thousand food descent in the Presidentials in New Hampshire, USA. Long story short, the lack of information on long sustained mtb descents in the area led me to use a topo trail map for hiking to plan my route. I decided on hiking up and riding down the airline trail of mount madison on a 5 inch travel bike..... I likely rode about 1.2 miles of that 3+ mile descent, and the parts that were "rideable" left me needing clean shorts..... scariest descent of my life, any who have been there know that this was a foolishly optimistic endeavor at best.--- Nothing like fighting a grizzly, though, Awesome story!
  • + 2
 Breathtaking! The author's picture with him relaxing by the lakeshore (with forested island) and watching distant mountains is astonishing. Here in Poland is hard to take a landscape picture without power lines or buildings:-)
  • + 3
 Great article, beautiful pictures. I'm interested to know a bit more about your bike. Surly, obviously, and fat tires. How did you decide on your setup? Anything you would change? Get many flats?
  • + 2
 x2 on that. Very inspiring!!!

Also, single speed or internally-geared hub?
  • + 4
 This trip was on a Surly ECR 29+. I test rode the big wheels for novelty factor while shopping for a more conventional bike, and realized there were several levels of fun I hadn't yet tapped into on a bike.

I got one flat. My tires are set-up tubeless, and I slashed too big a hole in my balding front tire. I also run a Rohloff internal gear hub - the finest option for reliability, but a drivetrain that lasts 150,000km doesn't play well with constantly changing axle standards.

I've switched frames to a Surly Krampus (and a size XL) since then for better trail geo (notably the higher BB is key for trail riding on a loaded bike).
  • + 4
 @ ryan83 There are two cables coming from his right bar/ grip area (see photo of him looking out of mini tent) which leads me to believe Rohloff hub.

But an extra mini-article on your bike, bike set up, adventure gear and packing philosophy would be interesting in itself. Well done on a real adventure.
  • + 1
 @skylerd thanks for the response. Great call on the internally-geared hub.

I recently moved to Colorado and am considering doing some bike packing as there are a lot of good options for such an adventure. This article is very energizing for me. Now...if my broken-ass foot would heal so I can get back out there.
  • + 1
 i don't think the author is 'cavalier' in his attitude about grizzly bears or the risks they pose. i think he has the mind and stomach for the risk/reward trade off that is involved for solo travel in grizzly country. he admitted his fear and understood that the ultimate risk of attack is very small, even when in close quarters and in high density habitat. i've traveled through a very small portion of this route and had 2 griz encounters close up. mental control and understanding is key. profound excitement at getting to spend time in these places (that the author also shares with us) and being grateful for the opportunity to experience this risk, (which he seems to value and maybe even need) is the deep and long lasting reward. it goes so far beyond the usual mtn biking skills and thrills (which are awesome of course) and i'm glad this was shared with the broad PB audience. i had read his blog previously but this format and photo essay are awesome. thanks for baring and sharing Skyler. and yes, bad ass as f*cking hell, let there be no doubt. serious man shit right there.
  • + 4
 Heck yeah Skyler. Glad you shared this with PB. Lots of interest in this topoc
  • + 2
 Skyler thank you for sharing the photos and stories! Could you provide an equipment list? Just curious what you would bring on such a trip. Did you do resupplies along the way or did just pack a lot of dehydrated meals?
  • + 1
 Great write-up and great pictures! I'm going to risk some nays by making one complaint though: Author seems pretty cavalier about the whole grizzly country thing. Maybe just trying not to make too big a deal out of it, but that sounds seriously life-threatening--like decent odds of death.
Seems like an unnecessary risk if he knew he'd be in that area with them, but in any case lucky to get out unscathed.
  • + 4
 What a beautiful document of your trip! Beyond epic! It would be great to see a companion piece on your set up and gear.
  • + 3
 Wow what a great ride and adventure, I've got to do a bike packing ride like this at least once in my life. Really well written mate and great photos, thanks for sharing
  • + 1
 I hiked that Sugar Camp Trail many years ago - no real probs with fallen trees then and it was beautiful. Also, having hiked from Anahim Lake and down the Precipice, my mate and I stayed a while with the 2 families that homestead there, helped with the hay harvest. Jim & Sue Glenn were recovering from being smashed up in a horse/wagon accident. Helicopter to hospital only had room for 1, so Jim with broken arm got to ride in a cargo net slung under the chopper... I'm wondering if they're still farming at the Precipice? Thanks for the article.
  • + 1
 @TheDarkHorse Jim and Sue have moved on I guess. The couple that moved into the lower homestead (about 8 years ago) are determined to clear the Sugar Camp trail and restore it to its former glory. That trail is an historic treasure, and deserves more attention from BC Parks too. I'll probably go back up there and do some clearing myself, at some point.
  • + 3
 Outstanding article. Great writing and photography. That's the inspiration I needed to plan a fresh multi day route in the mountains.
  • + 4
 quixotically wow ... read.google ,,read, google truly brilliant and educational
  • + 1
 As everyone has said...great read. Ive been fortuneate to have explored some of this region you write about and cant agree more with your sentiments regarding the divergent meanings of wilderness!
  • + 4
 Great adventure! Thanks for sharing..
  • + 1
 Absolutely fascinating read , brilliant beautiful pictures and your account of the journey there is something to remember . Makes me want to go ... Right now.. Thanks for sharing !
  • + 1
 Amazing trip! Just watch out for the busy forestry roads too, with trucks and thick heavy dust clouds every 15 minutes on narrow winding roads it's worth taking the path less traveled sometimes.
  • + 3
 Wow, Wow, Wow and Wow. Amazing adventure and I doff my hat to you. Lovely write up and some fantastic pics.
  • + 1
 Great trip! Inspiring tale. A true homegrown epic. Doing it solo adds greater dimension to the adventure. Thanks for sharing Skyler.
  • + 3
 Way to get after it, hi from lillooet
  • + 1
 starting to notice a trend - fancier bikes are nice, but there's something about taking a basic bike and doing something epic. Great stuff.
  • + 3
 Thats biking! So sweet, so good!
  • + 2
 That is one awesome write-up. Thank you so much for sharing your adventure!!
  • + 1
 I want to do this this summer, but I'm afraid that the additional weight on the bike will take the fun out of it
  • + 3
 it won't,trust me.I haven't done what Skyler did but have tripped around the Chilcotins with a packed bike.It's a lot more fun than you might think.Pack light and have fun.
  • + 2
 Best article I've seen on here in months. Great trip.
  • + 1
 Amen brother. I was with you in my thoughts. Very inspiring article. One day maybe...
  • + 1
 Beauty trip Skyler! That's a full pull for sure! Can't believe you got that rig across Powell Creek!
  • + 2
 Negative. Went over Warner Pass and down Denain Cr. Thanks for the kid words though!
  • + 1
 beautifully written and inspirational! Thanks for the time and thought you put into this write up.
  • + 1
 Went out into the wilds one....caught some fish.... saw some sweet stars..... built a berm.....enough said
  • + 1
 Awesome. So cool to see this booming interest in multi day bike trips lately
  • + 3
 Inspirational!!
  • + 1
 Amazing, although i think if i ever went to BC, fighting bears would not be top of my agenda !!
  • + 1
 Photos AMAZING!!! I love this kinda adventure likes!!!! the 29plus setup yes nice to read a different style of riding.
  • + 1
 Wow. That's damn eloquent for a dirtbag hero. Keep writing and I'll keep reading.
  • + 1
 Now that was a really cool article. Unique and amazing! What an adventure.
  • + 2
 Fantastic! What an adventure!
  • + 1
 Simply amazing, thanks for posting this...
  • + 1
 I bet his shoes didn't smell to good after that trip
  • + 1
 one of the finest ride reports I have seen, thank you for sharing
  • + 1
 Just inspirational guys. Thank you !
  • + 1
 Thank you for the 10 minutes of office bliss! Truly inspirational!
  • + 1
 Great article and photos. I'd like to do something like this someday.
  • + 1
 Now that is just fucking badass dude!!!
  • + 2
 Well done! What a trip!
  • + 1
 By any chance do you have a .gpx file for your route?
  • + 3
 Logistic info for (the rideable part of) this route and many others available at: www.pedalingnowhere.com/bikepacking-routes
  • + 2
 Wow wow wow!!!
  • + 1
 You, my friend, re define badass! Thank you for the inspiration!
  • + 2
 Nice work Skyler. Smile
  • + 1
 Super Fa"'kin awesome,thank you.
I hope to do a trip like this soon!
  • + 1
 Epic trip! Very well written too
  • + 1
 sick pics sick trip sick story!
  • + 1
 I am jealous.Awesome article.
  • + 1
 Nice work Skyler, excellent writing and beautiful pictures.
  • + 1
 fucking sick. period.
  • + 1
 Awesome!
  • + 1
 more of these,more
  • + 1
 amazing !

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