Cane Creek DBcoil [IL] - Crankworx Whistler 2016

Aug 19, 2016
by Mike Levy  
Cane Creek DBcoil IL

The very large majority of short and mid-travel bikes come spec'd with an air-sprung shock of some sort, usually in the name of weight savings, but also because it's generally accepted that rigs sporting less than 150 or 140mm of travel should be held up by air rather than a coil. But, thanks to evolved geometry and frame design, and changing attitudes towards what a rider can do on a short-travel bike, many of these so-called ''little bikes'' aren't exactly being ridden like little bikes anymore.
DBcoil [IL] Details

• Intended use: short/mid-travel bikes
• Twin-Tube damper
• Four-way independent adjustable LSC, LSR, HSC, HSR
• Climb Switch
• MSRP: $550 USD
www.canecreek.com / @CaneCreekCyclingComponents

Enter Cane Creek's new DBcoil [IL], a slimmer version of their piggyback shock that offers all of the same adjustments that you're used to seeing on a Cane Creek product, including their Climb Switch feature, but in a more compact package. According to Cane Creek, the DBcoil [IL] is designed to, ''bridge the performance gap between trail bikes and long-travel downhill rockets,'' while also bringing, ''all of the function of an external reservoir coil shock into a lighter and sleeker package.'' Picture a DBcoil CS with its piggyback cleaved off to create a smaller silhouette and allow it to fit on even more bikes, and you'll get the idea.

Internally, it employs the Twin-Tube damper that you'd expect to see, and riders can adjust low- and high-speed rebound, as well as low- and high-speed compression via their familiar looking gold dials. There's also the Climb Switch function that applies a boatload of low-speed rebound and compression when activated, to increase pedaling performance without sacrificing traction.


Cane Creek DBcoil IL
The DBcoil [IL] will come stock on select Ghost bikes.


There is surely less demand for a coil-sprung inline shock than there is for an air-sprung version, and Cane Creek admits in their press release that they dismissed the project at first. ''This shock almost never left the R&D lab,'' said design engineer Brandon Blakely, but he built a few prototype test samples in his spare time that ended up being ridden by other employees. Those early shocks must have impressed because the project went from 'no' to 'go' shortly after that. Now, here we are with a much sleeker production model of Blakely's early prototype.

So, what is this shock for? After all, air-sprung shocks are pretty dialed these days, not to mention the ability to easily adjust their spring rate to suit the demands of nearly any rider. Even so, I could see how someone might prefer that coil feel over shedding some weight off their Banshee Spitfire, Kona Process, or Transition Scout - all of which are relatively short-travel bikes that don't mind a bit of partying.


Cane Creek DBcoil IL
Cane Creek's optional VALT steel springs cost $130 USD and drops a considerable amount of weight, compared to a standard coil.


The DBcoil [IL] can be bought with a standard steel spring or Cane Creek's new, $130 USD VALT spring, and it's when you install the latter that the weight starts to get close to that of its air-sprung competition. Much like some other steel springs these days, Cane Creek says that the high-quality steel used to manufacture the VALT allows them to use less material in the coils, and less material equals, you guessed it, less weight.

And how does the new shock ride? A lot like Cane Creeks's piggyback-equipped DBcoil CS, so much so that I doubt anyone could ever tell the two apart. I spent an entire day riding North Carolina's Beech Mountain Ski Resort on a 2017 Ghost with a DBcoil [IL] bolted to it, and it was obvious that anyone who's a fan of the company's original coil-sprung shocks is also going to be a fan of the DBcoil [IL]. The same Twin-Tube feel is there, as is the same effective adjustment range that allows you to make the shock feel exactly how you want. There is, of course, less oil volume due to the [IL] not having a piggyback, but I highly doubt that most riders really do need that increased volume. Unless you are you doing top-to-bottom Garbonzo runs at Whistler on your 140mm-travel bike, then you should be just fine.





144 Comments

  • 115 3
 *waits patiently for the pun-makers to spring into action*..
  • 53 1
 Just going to coil up and wait myself
  • 54 5
 the DB air inline really dampened my mood. I hope this new iteration can spring it back to life.

edit: sorry
  • 36 1
 Pretty soon this thread will spiral out of proportion...
  • 25 20
 @makripper: dampening makes you wet, damping makes you fast
  • 37 4
 @phalley: wet and fast is better than dry and slow
  • 36 1
 @phalley: And ruining a pun train does not make me wet
  • 62 2
 i've been havin' trouble with my pun game lately. i guess you could say eyelet myself go...
  • 20 29
flag aoneal (Aug 19, 2016 at 7:42) (Below Threshold)
 A straight-forward, functional, un-inflated product. And if this proves to be reliable (and I suspect it will be), it should allow customer confidence in CC to rebound much faster.
  • 19 0
 No Piggyback?! Shocking
  • 5 17
flag drpepperrider2 (Aug 19, 2016 at 9:04) (Below Threshold)
 Hope these comments dont spring out of proportion
  • 24 0
 @phalley: Moist people don't know the difference between damping and dampening.
  • 6 10
flag rivercitycycles Plus (Aug 19, 2016 at 9:08) (Below Threshold)
 I certainly hope Cane Creeks sales rebound back after the deflating DB Inline.............I hope this isn't an inline dressed up as a coil shock
  • 12 0
 @makripper: @graeme187: after being shafted up the eyelet by the inline air,I said no more...but I am on the rebound.
  • 11 0
 I guess I'll jump in line here
  • 5 4
 All these puns, I'm shocked! I will metric out of here, or I will be out of air.
  • 17 0
 The little piggy didn't go to the market.
  • 2 2
 I was preloading for tonight, but ill shim-my on on here.
  • 12 0
 kind of seems like this thread might bottom out.
  • 46 3
 Don't understand -> DH goes air , Enduro/trail goes coil
As new gen air shocks are presented as "coil like" feel, why should I put air shock to my DH bike to get coil like feel instead just keeping my real coil shock..
  • 59 0
 Options. Be happy we can use coil or air for whatever is needed.
  • 18 1
 some DH frames feel better with air as air is naturally more progressive, some Dh frames are designed to be pretty linear and while a coil can be awesome for that, its easier to tune with air. When you have less travel, you tend to try get the most out of it so coil makes sense for some frames, as well, the shorter travel frames tend to be more progressive. that mated with a progressive airshock can make if feel like its pedalling better, but not unlocking the real potential of the frame. it is what it is and it's nice to have options to make the ride feel like you want it to.
  • 18 0
 There's also the weight factor- As shocks get larger the weight difference between air and coil grows exponentially. So in a short travel format you won't see as much of a weight penalty with a coil as you would on a DH bike.
  • 22 7
 They need new stuff to sell people. Just that
  • 11 8
 @makripper: "When you have less travel, you tend to try get the most out of it"..... "shorter travel frames tend to be more progressive...."

Huh? Who told you this? They lied. Ask for your money back.
  • 23 8
 Longer stroked shocks are typically more sensitive than shorter counter parts due to the different leverage ratio, which almost eliminates any friction in an air shock on a DH bike. Trail bikes have shorter strokes and benefit from coil sensitivity
  • 3 2
 @alonalgr: this^^^^
  • 1 0
 weight?
  • 5 1
 Also, the people who are going air on DH bikes are often the fastest of the fast; they need more progressivity than us mere mortals, & any decrease in weight can mean more money for them.

You can argue all you want about how "if it's good enough for the pros, it's good enough for me" but most of us wouldn't ride DH on the tires they do, because we need something that can stand up to our less than smooth riding, & lasts longer than a weekend.
  • 2 0
 I guess it will be a batlle that will last,like 2 stroke vs 4 stroke in MX.
  • 2 0
 @kleinblake: I would think it's the other way round. Shorter stroke equals more force on the same displacement so the friction forces which are independent of the stroke have a smaller effect?
  • 6 0
 @SleepingAwake: Yes that's correct (@kleinbake's post is not), however there are other factors at play too - like seal friction increase as a function of the higher pressure required in shorter stroke shocks, due to the fact that they are often in higher leverage frames. The net result can vary so it's hard to draw simplified conclusions like these when you consider dynamic friction.

In any case coil is superior in virtually every case, and DH bikes can easily be designed to perform well with them in terms of leverage curve progression (most already do, since most DH frames have reasonably progressive LR curves). Hopefully we will see a return to coil forks too soon.
  • 2 0
 @fpmd: @uuuu: Yes, but clearly a lot of those guys like Loic and Troy run both. There is no benefit to Rock Shox telling Troy to run an air shock over the coil shock one weekend and not another if it is detrimental to his performance. Likewise the YT Mob runs whatever they want, Gwin loves the progressive feel of the Float, Angel likes the DHX2 more. I have run most types of suspension, and I prefer air over coil. The only exception was the 2013 40 coil felt better than the first gen 40 Float.
  • 1 0
 @chrisingrassia: Claimed weight: 285 grams (216 x 63 damper only)
  • 4 2
 @kleinblake: leverage ratio has nothing to do with the shock. It's the frame that determines leverage. A shock has no more of a leverage ratio than a fork! Who are the 9 idiots who propped this? I think mak and klein are the same account lol
  • 5 4
 Instead of down voting my post, tell me why I'm wrong.

You are always trying to "get the most out of your travel" regardless of 100mm or 220mm. Whatever that even means btw.

And leverage ratio has to do with suspension type and how it's tuned. More specifically, leverage ratio has to do with leverage ratio! Independent of travel.
  • 4 3
 @dtm1: because how the travel of the shock is used depends on the leverage ratio. A progressive downhill bike will use more of the shaft for the first 20mm of travel vs the last 20mm. Downhill bikes typically have lower leverage ratios (at least at the start of the travel) than trail bikes, which makes them more sensitive. That way the negative effect of an air shock isn't noticed as much
  • 1 2
 If you don't like it, don't buy it. Simple.
  • 2 2
 @kleinblake: I think you should look again at the definition of leverage ratio. What you wrote above is completely wrong except for the first sentence...
  • 1 0
 @chrisingrassia: yes, I'm also curious how much lightweight is lightweight
  • 18 1
 I was never a proponent of coil vs air until I stuck a coil on my Nomad in place of the air just for the hell of it. I forgot just how great coils feel after riding air shocks for so long. That said, I'm totally sticking one of these on my trail bike.
  • 5 0
 Ditto on putting a coil shock on my Nomad, totally transformed the bike.
  • 4 0
 Ibis Mojo with a coil shock checking in.
  • 5 0
 I loved the way my SB66 handled a CCDB coil over the Fox Float. Made that bike way more fun on the DH.
  • 2 8
flag pinnityafairy (Aug 19, 2016 at 14:10) (Below Threshold)
 @Camolloyd: FUX SUX!
  • 4 5
 After having the first gen Nomad with coil, I them chaning to air, I am now back with a coil shock on my 160 bike.
  • 11 0
 Push Elevensix vs. Extreme Racing Shox Storia vs. Cane Creek DBCoil (IL) -- this is a head-to-head comparison article that needs to happen!
  • 5 1
 A custom reservoir shock that's only available for certain frames, vs a reservoir shock that's only available in one size, vs an inline mass produced shock... How is this an even comparison? Avalanche make an inline coil shock, would love to see a comparison with this perhaps
  • 1 0
 The regular Dbcoil cs would make more sense with those competitors.
  • 1 0
 @ctd07: what's the name of avalanche's inline coil shock? i can't find it on their site (which is pretty terrible)
  • 1 0
 @ctd07: thanks!
  • 9 0
 I own a DB Inline and it has been absolutely trouble free and great. I've seen people complain on here about them recently, what have been the issues?
  • 4 0
 Early on in production there were a lot of issues with the inline. Since then i think the have tightened up on production. I believe it was even talked about in an article not to long ago. I think people might still be nervous on a 1st generation product where issues, if any, start showing pretty quick. Seems like cane creek is a company that would get all their ducks in a row, and not go through the same thing.
  • 4 0
 The inline seems to be an overly complex dosing sacrificing reliability. First failure it locked up. Second failure it puked its fluid everywhere and and lost all pressure. After talking with cane creek apparently they've upped their quality control game and made minor adjustments to improve the in-line. Keeping my fingers crossed this time because the shock is great when it's working and I like being able to use my bottle cage on my Enduro.
  • 2 0
 I bought an Inline within a week of it coming on the market and it's been absolutely 100% reliable.
It'll be replaced with one of these coils though.
  • 3 0
 I own a few CCDB's they all are 5 star. I had a few friends with the inline issue and CC took care of them and then some. My inline is flawless.
  • 9 0
 I'll take one. Now how do I get a ti coil 29er VAN36 with separate high and low speed R/C for my SB5.5 to go along with it? Not kidding here.
  • 7 0
 I can't imagine it's the case, but would it fit on an Evil Following? That lower mount is quite tucked away, but...(fingers crossed)
  • 1 0
 Had the same thought.
  • 1 0
 Inline Coils not offered in the Followings Size Frown
  • 1 0
 Seeing as how the normal DB Inline air doesn't fit I highly doubt the coil will. That being said I had the same thought/hope when I read the article. Following with a coil would be my perfect trail bike.
  • 3 0
 Called Cane Creek to ask, they stated that it may fit dimensions-wise, but they aren't making one in a short enough stroke as of now. Though, he stated, that could change if there's enough interest, and he also noted I wasn't the first person to call that day with the exact same question hah
  • 1 0
 Hopefully on the new following gen 2
  • 1 0
 @rpearce1475: they can note me down as a customer! I was having the exact same thought...although the Evil folks seem not to be fans of CC on their bikes.
  • 1 0
 @jrocksdh: When is there going to be a gen 2 Following?
  • 1 0
 @briceps: 2017 my, not sure of release date. For sure they'll be a size up and threaded bb, sharing same hardware as all other evil mtbs.
  • 1 0
 @jrocksdh: I might have to hold out for one then. The press fit BB and the short(ish) reach compared to say a Smuggler has been holding me back a bit. I can't wait for them to release a new full blown DH rig.
  • 8 1
 Was just coiling one down on the toilet when I came across this
  • 2 1
 Don't get shite on yer phoneWink
  • 1 1
 @Earthmotherfu: pahhahahhaaa ????
  • 3 0
 That's an ideal low friction, low rebound scenario.
  • 3 0
 Coils are great and all, but unless you get the right spring rate the first time around, it is a huge pain in the ass to get right. If the rate isn't right, you have to buy another spring. And if your body weight changes a lot seasonally then it really sucks. I had three springs for my old DHX4 and still didn't think it was totally right. Also, coils are linear rate vs air which is rising rate. Most newer bikes are designed for the rising rate of air shocks. Putting a linear coil on there is probably going feel a lot less rampy/poppy in the end stroke. Even though coils feel better I think air is a lot easier to deal with for the adjustability aspects alone. That said, I would love to have one of these if I could have an assortment of springs on hand.
  • 3 1
 I would throw one of these on my Sight in a heart beat. I have an Inline, shock is great when it is working. In one year I'm going on my third shock. First the damping went south, then the seals holding the air chamber went. The plus is Cane Creek customer service has been phenomenal, the crap part if the shock needs service you need to send it to Cane Creek. Hopefully third time is a charm and Cane Creek is sending a brand new shock no questions asked. I'm going to send back my shock.
  • 3 0
 I've had the exact same experience with my DB Inline. And yes, Cane Creek customer service is absolutely top notch! Unfortunately, since they appear to use the exact same damping unit (at least the shape of the upper damping circuit and adjusters) as the DB Inline, I'm not too keen to try this out as it will probably run into the same issues with leaky seals and damping becoming useless. If I remember correctly, the oil flow path they machine into this upper damping circuit is incredibly intricate since it has to fit into such a small volume. This may be contributing to the reliability issues.
  • 2 0
 I just purchased a Monarch Plus to put on my 2014 Bronson upgrading the CTD with vorsprung corset. The push 11-6 is sweet, but weight and costs made me say no way. This is intriguing though for less cost and weight (supposedly). I'm wondering if anyone can explain the feeling of coil over air? From what I've read, air is more "poppy" where coil sits in the suspension better and eats up a bit more through the rough as it has a bit better damping properties. Can anyone comment?
  • 2 0
 Interesting article from 2 years ago from RC www.pinkbike.com/news/ask-pinkbike-oct-7-2014-cranks-shocks-nukeproof.html

Another thing it sounds like is air shocks are much more tune able for the type of trails. I wonder how much the climb levers though have changed that.
  • 17 2
 In a nutshell, coil is better than air. It's more sensitive, more consistent and goes longer between services in the real world.

The problem is, you need to change the spring to change the stiffness. In an ideal world, you'd try three or four different ones per rider per bike per riding style. That's bad for dealers and customers alike. The air shock can be infinitely adjusted with a simple shock pump. Shuttles today, XC loop tomorrow? No worries, just inflate.

This is the reason air shocks have taken over. The marketers have cleverly realised they can keep selling the weight savings and while conveniently ignoring the inferior performance.

Coil like feel? It says it all. If you want coil like, get a coil and forget about 400g weight penalty. You'll never notice that weight with all the extra fun you're having. More grip both up and down. It's a win-win!
  • 19 0
 @jaame: amen. coil...butter. air...margarine
  • 2 5
 Hope these comments dont spring out of proportion
  • 3 1
 @jasbushey: thx for the link. I lulzd @ "If one considers that most of the top enduro racers have histories as pro DH racers, the fact that almost all of them choose air-sprung shocks should be evidence enough. - RC"

RC... Constantly proving himself wrong and never tiring of it. Whatever happened to the "Tantrum" he recently endorsed btw? Smh..
  • 1 0
 @dtm1: I like coil better too, I use one on my Patrol. But hey Gwin, Troy, Brook, Brendan and other top DH guys choose to run air shocks sometimes, even on the roughest tracks, so gotta keep an open mind.
  • 1 0
 @fpmd: I don't think "choose" is the correct word, often pro riders are given a little push to help market different parts of the product lineup (even though in the public eye it's made out like they have 100% freedom) - and they are already restricted in terms of the brands they have to run, so it's not always the gauge of ultimate performance. Coil is superior hands down from a performance perspective, and as the mass gets closer I think we'll see a return to it in both forks and shocks.
  • 2 0
 @uuuu: I'd probably disagree with the marketing. The #1 thing is they want to win, and I would highly suspect Gwin isn't choosing air because he's told by Fox to. Most are sponsored by Fox and Rockshock and they have both options, and I would bet they choose the one they feel better on.

I would guess it more comes down to personal preference.
  • 3 0
 I reckon the main issue with air shocks reputation is that they were lighter so helped give a good weight figure on paper on a bikes spec sheet which helps sell a bike, as such air shocks have become the mainstream spring platform. And the mainstream bike choice being xc/all mountain bikes.
Which bought about the introduction of pro-pedal, platform dampers and cheap base models with nothing but a spring backed check valve to control damping, the market has become saturated with xc/pedalling orientated suspension that has piss poor bump performance, non existent mid-stroke and using 'tokens' as a substitute for bottom out damping.
People are now mistaking the air spring as being the reason for terrible performance when really its the sh!t dampers behind them.
My 2002 fox vanilla r coil both pedalled and ploughed bumps better than any of the pro-pedal platform shocks that fox has since produced for the last decade and a half as it had proper shim based damping.... Makes me laugh when I read people reciting 'how far advanced suspension has become' when really we're only just catching back up with 2005 thanks to companies with their heads screwed on right like Cane creek, producing budget options with decent damping again - Thanks Cane creek!
  • 1 0
 @ctd07: Agreed, I have Avalanche re-valve all my shock dampers. It's hard to ride stock after feeling the difference.
  • 3 1
 The "it feels like a coil" has been used for over a decade now for air shocks ... maybe its time to put that phrase to rest (along with "game changer"). Air will always have its place and so will coil. The CCDB CS is a great shock by its own merit. If this one is better (going down) that is quite an endorsement.
  • 2 1
 Can we also put "confidence-inspiring" to rest? If I never see that phrase in a bike/component review again it'll be too soon.
  • 2 0
 Climbs like a goat on uppers
  • 3 0
 Interesting, hopefully it doesn't have the reliability/big man issues the DB Air Inlind had/has. In fact, this might be the perfect shock for the big man's trail bike Smile
  • 3 1
 I would love to know what sizes they plan on making. This sounds very attractive assuming it doesnt have issues like the inline did.
  • 4 0
 Lengths: 190 x 40, 45, 50mm // 200 x 50, 57mm // 210 x 50, 55mm // 216 x 63mm
coil info
Strokes/Rates: 2.0 x 400, 450, 500 // 2.25 x 350, 400, 450, 500, 550 // 2.5 x 400, 450, 500, 550 // 2.75 x 400, 450, 500 // 3.0 x 300, 350, 400, 450, 500 // 3.5 x 300, 350, 400
  • 1 0
 I was idly searching around a while back to see what coil options were available for shorter travel bikes, just to experiment. I'd be really interested in seeing how this rides.
  • 1 0
 Would be nice to get a shootout between this and the Storia. Both lightweight coils aimed at trail bikes, but one using old tech in an innovative way, and the other using twin tube.
  • 1 0
 I just got one, it is so much smoother riding and plush than an air shock, my question:

At the same relative weight as an air shock, why wouldn't you want to ride a coil?

Now I want a lightweight coild fork Smile
  • 1 0
 @mikelevy
How did the Ghost feel with that particular shock?
I have the same bike with a Monarch plus and have considered moving to a coil.
  • 3 1
 that would do me assuming the price is right for aftermarket and it comes in the right size
  • 3 0
 My thoughts too.. I dream of having an Eleven-6, but at 1/2 the price (would it be 1/2 the performance? probably not for my ability) makes me ready to ditch the Monarch!
  • 3 0
 130$ for a STEEL Spring... yeah why not!?
  • 1 0
 check out the new light weight spring
  • 1 0
 Hey Cane Creek. How about an inline with a remote resvouir for tighter fitting bikes....kinda like the old Fox on the turners and the manitou swinger.
  • 3 1
 Great....and.....WEIGHTS???????????
  • 2 0
 Cane Creek Website..285g for 216x63
  • 3 0
 @bikeblur: That's gotta be minus the spring. The Monarch Plus RC3 in the same size weighs 335g. The Debonair weighs 394g. The Marzocchi 053 S3C2R is 324g. If the Inline Coil comes in under 425g I'll be impressed. 285g for damper + another 300g for a spring.
  • 1 0
 @PHeller:
Yes that's minus spring...Vault spring weight not listed on their site..
  • 1 0
 @bikeblur: 50-211g depending on stroke and lb according to their site
  • 3 0
 @poah: 50-211g weight SAVINGS depending on size. Good luck finding a 50g steel spring. Smile
  • 1 0
 @jimw: didn't actually read it properly Frown
  • 2 0
 that would be inline with the typical pinkbike comment response
  • 1 0
 Hopefully the reliability isn't along the lines of the other inline we all know of.
  • 1 0
 Why do they call it "high and low speed rebound?" It doesn't make any sense. Surely they mean beginning and end stroke?
  • 3 0
 Nope, the high and low speed compression chambers have their own rebound circuit, so depending on which type of hit the shock compresses from, it will rebound accordingly. So you could set it up to rebound slowly on landings and hard hits, but quickly for pumping/preloading liveliness
  • 2 0
 @special-jLeslie:
Ahh okay gotcha. Didn't know that, thanks for the clarification!
  • 1 0
 Got the new DB IL coil the other day and wrote a small inital comment

wp.me/p4HYH0-28
  • 5 4
 Or get an X2 and do top to bottom Garbanzo runs!
  • 6 4
 Exactly. $550 for a watered down shock... what's the point? Might as well go all out and get an X2.
  • 16 5
 @jaame: You two are kind of slow, aren't ya? The X-2 is an external reservoir shock, just like the standard DB-Coil. It won't fit many of the bikes this will, THAT's the entire point.
  • 3 8
flag Beez177 (Aug 19, 2016 at 10:24) (Below Threshold)
 @Satanslittlehelper: then why is it on the Ghost in the picture, plenty of room for a reservoir there. Good thing we have you to point it out though..
  • 2 1
 @Beez177: Can't speak for Ghost, I imagine they probably wanted it because it's lighter than the X2 and the standard DB-Coil. Doesn't change the fact that it fits on tons of bikes an external res shock doesn't.
  • 3 1
 @Satanslittlehelper: I can't think of one bike ( that I would actually want to ride ) that you can't put a proper shock with a reservoir on it !?
  • 2 1
 @Beez177: Apparently other people can. Norco's carbon sight is one mentioned in comments above.
  • 2 3
 @Satanslittlehelper: Can you even name another ? No but you sure can be a dick about it!
  • 3 1
 @Beez177: I just do what the Dark Lord commands.
  • 2 1
 @Satanslittlehelper: Eat Pudding With A Fork
  • 1 0
 The old blue commencal metas wouldn't fit a piggyback but that's tied only one I know. They are about five years old though. Who's going to spend this amount of money to change the shock on such an old frame. I still don't see the point.
  • 1 0
 @Satanslittlehelper is right, there are many trail bikes not designed for piggyback. The Jeffsy looks like it would never fit a coil w piggy for instance. Many people use water bottles on their trail bikes and the use of a piggy would rule that out like on my Mega TR.
  • 1 0
 I wonder if it would fit on my Comencal Meta V4
  • 2 0
 Answer is probably no, unfortunately.
  • 2 0
 Would like to know this as well but guessing the answer is probably no
  • 1 0
 Cane Creek - Will it fit an Alloy 650b Trek Slash?
  • 1 0
 If their eyelets still aren't 14.7mm then I'm done here.
  • 1 0
 They are 15mm like the inline
  • 1 0
 @Turnbar: then I'm done here Smile
  • 1 0
 Better wait a year to get the bugs out.
  • 1 0
 @beez177. I can, Norco Sight. Reservoir shocks don't fit.
  • 1 0
 @CaneCreekUSA, please make the VALT steel springs in 25 pound increments
  • 1 0
 Coil or Air sprung? Hmmm
  • 1 0
 Finally, thank you! My trail bike needs this.
  • 1 0
 And it says "BUY ME!"
  • 1 1
 Why?
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