Cane Creek DBcoil [IL] Shock - Review

Feb 10, 2017
by Mike Levy  
Cane Creek DBcoil IL


The DBcoil [IL] is an inline version of Cane Creek's piggyback shock that offers all of the same adjustments that you're used to seeing from the North Carolina company, including their Climb Switch feature, but in a lighter weight and more compact package. According to Cane Creek, the DBcoil [IL] is designed to ''bridge the performance gap between trail bikes and long-travel downhill rockets,'' while also bringing ''all of the function of an external reservoir coil shock into a lighter and sleeker package.'' In a nutshell, the [IL] shock is a DBcoil CS with its piggyback removed to save weight and allow it to fit on even more bikes.

DBcoil [IL] Details

• Intended use: short/mid-travel bikes
• Twin-Tube damper
• Four-way independent adjustable LSC, LSR, HSC, HSR
• Climb Switch
• Compatible w/ OPT remote
• Weight: 633 grams (w/ spring)
• MSRP: $460 USD
www.canecreek.com / @CaneCreekCyclingComponents
Improvements like RockShox's DebonAir and Fox's EVOL air springs have, in most cases, vastly improved the performance of air suspension, which brings about an obvious question: with air shocks offering some pretty impressive performance these days, why bother with a heavier coil-sprung shock?

It doesn't apply to everyone riding a short-travel bike, but there's no doubting that some of these so-called ''little bikes'' aren't exactly being ridden like little bikes anymore. Thanks to evolved geometry, stronger frames, and components that are up to the task, as well as changing mindsets, many people are getting wild on bikes with less travel than ever. And some of those people might like the sensitivity and different feel that a coil spring provides compared to air, which is where Cane Creek is hoping that their DBcoil [IL] shock comes in.


Ghost AMR


Cane Creek knows that there's far less demand for a coil-sprung inline shock than there is for an air-sprung version, and they even admitted exactly that in their press release from last August when the DBcoil [IL] was first announced: ''This shock almost never left the R&D lab,'' said design engineer Brandon Blakely. He built a few prototype test samples in his spare time regardless, and they ended up being ridden by other employees.

The project went from 'no' to 'go' shortly after that, and I flew down to Cane Creek's headquarters that spring to see the inner workings of the new shock.


Cane Creek DBcoil IL
Cane Creek DBcoil IL


Internally, it employs the same Twin-Tube damper layout that you'd expect to see, and you can adjust low- and high-speed rebound, as well as low- and high-speed compression via Cane Creek's familiar looking gold dials. There's also the Climb Switch function that applies a boatload of low-speed rebound and compression when activated to increase pedaling performance without sacrificing traction.


Cane Creek Factory Tour DB assembly work station
Cane Creek Factory Tour DBInline Damper valve body being prepared for assembly


We can't talk about, or especially test, a Cane Creek shock without at least touching on the topic of reliability, can we? Most people are aware that there were issues with the original DBinline that saw it fail far too often, and while it performed extremely well when it was working, it was working far too infrequently for a lot of consumers. That run of unreliable shocks was, according to Cane Creek President Brent Graves, a combination of the inherent complexity of the design and not fully realizing the quality assurance and level or robustness that it required. ''We've definitely made a big investment in quality, and what we've got to do, what we've been doing, is focusing on quality assurance,'' Graves said to me when I asked him point-blank last year about what's changed. ''Quality assurance is doing it at the front end, putting in controls to ensure that you're making it right to begin with. Quality control is checking it after the fact. Quality assurance is going back up the supply chain to the supplier and saying 'Okay, let's walk through the process.''

That process has, according to Cane Creek, been examined, simplified, and purged of any troubling steps when it comes to all of Cane Creek's shocks, and the supplier manufacturing process has been scrutinized with the aim of eliminating anything that could cause an issue down the road.


Ghost AMR


Performance

During my visit to Cane Creek's HQ last year, I rode Ghost's 160mm-travel FR AMR 10 all-mountain machine, a very red bike that would usually come equipped with an air-sprung shock but that had the new DBcoil [IL] bolted in place instead. That very same bike, with the same shock, then made the journey to Whistler during Crankworx this past summer where it was treated to some serious vertical on some equally serious terrain, and it has been in my stable ever since.

The 160mm-travel Ghost first saw a 500 in/lb spring fitted to its DBcoil [IL] shock that provided about 27-percent sag, which was maybe a touch too little. Dropping down to a 450 in/lb spring brought that number up to around 32-percent, which was more in the ballpark for a bike of the FR AMR 10's intentions.


Ghost AMR


As you'd expect from a coil-sprung shock, initial bump sensitivity was very, very impressive, and the early part of the shock's stroke only felt better after dropping down to the softer spring. Today's air shocks, with their clever air cans, are remarkably active, but our time on the DBcoil [IL] served as a reminder that there is certainly still a difference between them and a coil, and that a coil-sprung shock can be more forgiving and seemingly provide more traction. This was most noticeable when braking and, somewhat predictably, when the trail was greasier than a fifteen-year-old boy's face.

As with all of Cane Creek's shocks, the DBcoil [IL]'s adjustment range is wide enough to accommodate everyone from a flyweight rookie to an overweight hard-charger, just so long as the spring rate is correct, of course. Bikes, however, might be a different story depending on what you're looking to bolt the [IL] onto. The FR AMR has enough progression designed into it that, even at over 30-percent sag, there was more than enough ramp-up near the end of the stroke.

We expected to be dialing the high-speed compression dial in to combat clanging into the end of the travel, but just 1.5 turns in from fully out did the trick. This is bike-specific, of course, but the DBcoil [IL] certainly played nice with the FR AMR's rear-end. And when we did hit bottom, it was more of a soft, rubbery thud than a smash that would be cause for concern.
Cane Creek DBcoil IL

Ghost AMR
Ghost AMR


The shock's Climb Switch functions in the same manner as on Cane Creek's other shocks, firming up both compression and rebound rather than just the former as on other shocks. It can't really be used as a firmer "trail mode" due to how it affects the rebound, however, which is something to keep in mind.

The rest of the adjustments were turned more open than closed for our weight, spring rate, and very wet fall and winter riding conditions, which means that there is plenty of room to firm things up all around should the need arise when the trails are dry and rolling much quicker. Coil and air aside, the vast damper adjustment range afforded by the Twin-Tube design is a serious advantage for someone who takes the time to learn how to use it, and Cane Creek's website and Dialed Tuning App provides all the resources you'll need to do exactly that. Or you can just leave it at the stock setting all around and be fine.


Reliability

It doesn't matter how well something works if it only works well for a short period of time, which some of us are unfortunately all too aware of. The bottom line is that our test shock simply had to last, and it's done exactly that. The action is still consistent throughout the stroke, and there are absolutely no gurgles or other funny sounds that would hint at a loss of pressure and air entering the system. The dials and Climb Switch lever all still have the same effect and, if someone wiped the mud off the shock and put it on a different bike, I'd assume it was still brand new. Can't say much more than that, can you?



Pinkbike’s Take:
bigquotesSo, the question that needs answering is this: air or coil? Assuming that you have a bike that can work well with either, the answer is still going to depend on your needs. The DBcoil [IL] with the lightweight VALT spring weighs 633 grams, which isn't that much more than an air-sprung shock, and let's not forget that anyone looking at a coil option is probably not going to be bolting it to a mega-light bike to begin with.

It's hard to ignore the gains in sensitivity, and therefore traction, that a coil spring provides. And why would you? Well, at the risk of offending someone, those who possess fewer skills and not a ton of courage probably won't benefit from a coil spring, but they very well could from a properly adjusted spring rate, which is a hell of a lot easier to attain with a shock pump. Pick your weapon that suits your bike and needs.
- Mike Levy


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178 Comments

  • + 171
 @mikelevy Did I miss something - I can't find the review in this article. There was this one sentence: As you'd expect from a coil-sprung shock, initial bump sensitivity was very, very impressive, and the early part of the shock's stroke only felt better after dropping down to the softer spring. There was one other sentence about bottoming out. The rest of the information in the "review" is on Cane Creek's website. Can you tell us how the shock performed? Did it climb well? How did it handle big hits? Did it create a less playful feel?
  • + 20
 Agreed, I would like to hear more about the ride characteristics of the shock. what kinds of trails were ridden? how did it perform?
  • + 26
 And where are the fricken lasers god damn it?
  • + 72
 Let me help, I put one on my Devinci Troy. It's unbelievable. Climbing is actually easier because the little bumps that normally bounce you a little bit and rob some energy are basically gone. For descending, my Troy is now a mini downhill bike. It feels like my Wilson with less travel. I've really never felt anything like this setup.

I will say the right spring rate and having it tuned well are important and you will lose some of the progressiveness of an air shock, but if any your frame has a progressive rate already (almost every trail/enduro bike anyways) it will be a negligible difference. I've hit (and cased) some large jumps on it, never felt a hard bottom out. Check the "Flow Pigs" video in my profile if you want to see a few shots of it in action.
  • - 20
flag powaymatt (Feb 10, 2017 at 9:23) (Below Threshold)
 It is pretty shocking that they didn't air out any info on the review. Hopefully they'll rebound back and give more volume to this one. Hopefully they'll compress some good knowledge into their next review.
  • - 21
flag poozank (Feb 10, 2017 at 9:55) (Below Threshold)
 @special-jLeslie: So its like a float x2 only less tunable
  • + 13
 @special-jLeslie: Thanks for the input man. Flow Pigs was pretty good. I was surprised - thought it was going to look like my shitty homemade videos.
  • + 13
 @mikelevy I'd like to know how it did on a very long descent. Like 2000+ feet. You mentioned that you have it in Whistler but did you use it for park days? My understanding is that shocks have piggybacks because having extra oil in a reservoir helps regulate heat and therefore ensure consistent performance when things get hairy. Any heat-related issues?
  • + 1
 squid vicious eats pudding with a fork!
  • + 10
 @RichPune: Yes, everybody watch Flow Pigs right now, it's excellent!
  • + 2
 @ryan83: I'd like to know to, but theory is because there is no air can generating heat and insulating the damper, it runs cool enough and may not fade.
  • + 2
 @RichPune how did you read my mind almost word for word?!
  • + 4
 @special-jLeslie: Amazing vid! Smile
  • + 0
 As always because of advertising issues pinkbike won't say what's better or worse . These days websites are so afraid of loosing business
  • + 1
 @ryan83:
Not only more, but taking it AWAY from the shock body-where all the heat builds up- is key.
Obviously this shock doesn't do that, so the oil is exposed to all the heat generated from the shaft.
  • + 0
 @special-jLeslie: what shock(s) did you have on your Troy before the dbcoil il?
  • + 2
 Levy's review is written for a very specific bike owner only (and begins by saying CC acknowledge this in their press release) because, as he concludes, "those who possess fewer skills and not a ton of courage probably won't benefit from a coil spring, but they very well could from a properly adjusted spring rate, which is a hell of a lot easier to attain with a shock pump." His review does what he intended it to do - answer the question if this small, lightweight shock has the same characteristics as a DH coil shock, which he makes crystal clear that it does. As for putting it on a trail/AM bike, he says of climbing - " The shock's Climb Switch functions in the same manner as on Cane Creek's other shocks, firming up both compression and rebound rather than just the former as on other shocks. It can't really be used as a firmer "trail mode" due to how it affects the rebound". Thus, if your bike climbs well in the ultra firm mode, this shock will work fine for that. But if you keep your bike in the mid trail mode, it will not. He also makes it clear that this shock is not progressive, so playfulness is entirely dependent upon your bikes built in progression in its suspension system. Summary of the review - if you want your trail/AM bike to feel more like a DH bike, then this small, lightweight coil shock works just like CC's DH coils and is reliable, but don't expect it to ever operate like the air can currently on your bike.
  • + 15
 It's a marketing hit piece disguised as a review. Wink
  • + 2
 Thanks guys! @ryan83 @YoKev I'm not sure if I've descended that long exactly, but have done a downhill race and a few enduros on it with a few relatively gnarly 4+ minute stages. I never noticed any difference in feeling at the bottom but I was also more focused on racing than suspension performance. If there was any difference though I didn't notice it.

@Rubberelli This review is very descriptive of the general differences between air and coil shocks on trail bikes, but says almost nothing about the performance of this specific shock. That's what most people here are left wondering.
  • + 1
 @special-jLeslie:

No way that you will experience heat related fade on this coil shock... any coil shock for that matter. You would have to have really long, burly descent to generate enough heat in the damper to where you will experience fade. 4min is not nearly enough time. Plus all CC shocks are twin tube and already have a higher oil volume than other non-res shocks.

At 4min you are fine. A decent that lasts 40min? maybe you will get some heat fade... On super long descents your arms and hands will give out before the shock does though.
  • + 1
 @special-jLeslie: Since he does state that it performs the same as their dh coil, you can read all about that elsewhere until your heart is content. However, no trail bike has the geometry of a dh bike, so it is rather irrelevant. What you do need to know is how this coil will differ from whatever air can you are replacing, and as you said yourself, he was very specifc about that. Also, take into account there are no similar products to compare them to or even for him to judge against other than stating the characteristics of a coil shock in relation to a trail bike.
  • + 1
 @special-jLeslie: I'll 2nd this. I've had one on my 2017 Troy for 3 months now and it's awesome.
  • + 1
 @mattcarswell: Is the lockout as firm as a float x2? I'm not looking for a climb tech trail switch, just a solid hardtail crap feel fireroading platform.
  • + 2
 @rnm410: climb switch isn't a lockout. it just increases both the compression and rebound damping (most lockout switches just increase the compression). the idea is to reduce bobbing but keep the shock active enough to aid in traction while climbing. imo it works great. here's some more info: www.canecreek.com/products/suspension/dbcoil-il/climb-switch-technology
  • + 111
 All this 'inline' configuration is bollocks. I want a shock with 4 piggy backs. And fricken lasers.
  • + 43
 And if it doesnt have a god damn water bottle mount they shall expect no business.
  • + 16
 Can't have enough piggy backs. Can they add piggy backs on forks' dials?
  • + 6
 Gotta start putting money in the piggy bank for one of these...
  • + 2
 @chyu: That fork exist. bos idylle pro
  • + 54
 Having trouble deciding on coil vs air. Which would work better on the back of my hardtail? Please help.
  • + 55
 well with the coil being ribbed its going to give you more pleasure when its shoved up your ass
  • + 3
 @poah: it will just cause hemroids! And will need anal reconstruction surgery
  • + 2
 @poah: oh I remember you! You're the grumpy guy who messaged me about how my mom's a hoe. I'd recommend that you'd read this article from a couple days back m.pinkbike.com/news/lets-not-be-a-holes-opinion-2017.html
  • + 0
 @moose-tastes-good: that must've been another grumpy guy? I'm more of a psycho lunatic guy
  • + 0
 @moose-tastes-good: actually you messaged me first,

"Dec 5, 2016 at 11:37
moose-tastes-good says:
It's pretty pathetic that the only way you can feel good about yourself is sit behind a keyboard a say disrespectful things on a mountain biking website. "

I merely responded with

ep1.pinkbike.org/p4pb14214781/p4pb14214781.jpg

clearly you've not been taking them
  • + 2
 @markar: And you're not Poah, either.
  • + 1
 @poah: what the hell are you babbling about, you on drugs or what, I never said anything disrespectful you pussy, I never messaged you, and I've never met your mom either.
  • + 2
 @KeithReeder: I know, I got confused
  • + 1
 @poah: ignore my comment that wasn't for you I goofed, because I'm a goof
  • + 8
 This is why we can't have nice threads!
  • + 44
 Omg! It's happening...

Game changer! Enduro approved! WC tested! Race winning! The most advanced tech, years of refinement, factory tested, wc riders feedback...
Now, the mortals are able to ride F1 technology!
Never seen before!!

COIL SHOCKS!!

More sensibility! More mid stroke support! More traction going uphill to improve your strava times! Climb like a goat, descend like a rocket! Save money on service intervals!
Because air shocks are so 2016! WELCOME TO THE FUTURE!!!

Don't be a looser. Choose coil

Next episode: "Welcome 20mm axle"
  • + 15
 Make coil shocks great again!
  • + 2
 Funny been doing all that for years. I'm so friken trendy
  • + 2
 And don't for get "150mm rear hubs: Just enough boost"
  • + 29
 Having never ridden a coil shock, this interests me.
  • + 147
 Coil story, bro.
  • + 0
 drop the money. get push. air is not good enough for me any more.
  • + 8
 @adrennan: love my push-
  • + 2
 @logic007: i don't know if i have ever heard someone say "meh, dont care for push" haha i am just waiting for a coil fork from them.
  • + 1
 If push makes one for the stumpy I'm in.
  • + 0
 @AllMountin: subtle. +1
  • - 6
flag adrennan (Feb 10, 2017 at 14:37) (Below Threshold)
 apparently someone doesnt like push in this thread downvoting comments that are praising push (cane creek is that you?)
  • + 4
 @adrennan:

It's because people have to justify the $1200 to themselves.

I thought hard about getting one, or a DHX. Ended up buying a used DBairCS for $300 and called it good.
  • + 25
 "...why bother with a heavier coil-sprung shock?"
Reliability and service intervals.
  • + 15
 I test rode this shock on my Knolly Endorphin 27.5 in place of a DB IL. It unlocked the door to even more traction and performance on a bike that is already phenomenal on technical climbs and all-mountain trails. It felt like by rear wheel tracked the terrain: large step-ups, slick rock and roots perfectly with unbelievable grip. When I came to point the bike down some of Cumberland's best DH trails again the shock's performance was outstanding. The purchase of one is on my radar.
  • + 2
 Sickkkkkk! I've got an Endorphin 27.5 as well and this shock is calling my name. How'd it compare to the air shock on yours? I've got a fox evol that's been rebuilt by Avalanche and it does just fine, but like you said I think there is lots of potential left to be had!
  • + 6
 @kleinbc11: The coil felt like it provided better supper at sag, even though the sag was identical on both the coil IL and air IL. Small bump sensitivity was much improved and therefore traction. It made the bike grip the trail like the rear wheel had suction cups. A 2' high step-up which during the wet season I may clear 4 out of 10 times was a breeze. As I said it unlocked the bike's performance, which I already thought was unreal. My thoughts are that the Endorphin 2 received rave reviews about its climbing capabilities. Mike Levy loved the bike, but wasn't as taken with the 27.5 version. I think the IL coil likely gives the bike that same capability again.

I tried a stock Fox evol about a year ago too. This didn't perform anywhere near as good as the air IL on technical climbs.

I didn't notice the weight difference at all between the air IL and coil IL. Nothing -ve to report there.
  • + 4
 @glennblake: Appreciate the time you took to elaborate. Puts me even closer to pulling the trigger on it. Thanks!
  • + 17
 Coil is coming back. As frames become more progressive, coil shocks are a winner.
  • + 8
 Want this for my Nomad bad. Currently running an Inline, waiting for it to implode. While way better than the stock RC3 DB, the frame really calls for a coil.

Cane Creek is supposedly offering an upgrade to the new DB Air IL for $60 to Inline users. I wonder if they'd consider allowing me to pay a little extra and get that instead.
  • + 1
 @SoDiezl350: I can't see them offering an upgrade that cheap. But if they do I would bite their hands off at the chance...
  • + 7
 DHX2 goes with the Nomad like cocaine goes with hookers. Except cheaper. And it lasts longer.
  • + 1
 @slimboyjim: I was told by came creek that they offered an upgrade to the db air cs for $100 if you have a failed inline on a specialized enduro, don't know about other offers but could be possible
  • + 3
 @SoDiezl350: For what it's worth Cane Creek seem like a bunch of very nice people so you should just send them an email. I took their upgrade to the DB Air CS from the DB Inline and the differences were very noticeable. Besides it not shi$%ing itself 3 months on, it has a more linear feeling and does better on DH tracks. They also just came out with a fancy new valve for it that allows you to tune the "climb" switch. This allows you to have 2 tunable modes. I ran the shock for over 200 hours and finally had it rebuilt just because I felt it was time...My recommendation with suspension stuff is to go with what has been proven and let others be the guinea pig.
  • + 14
 Will it fit on my hardtail?
  • + 1
 Of course.
  • + 1
 ....
  • + 12
 Would be interested to see how this compares with a PUSH Elevensix, which is over 2 and half times more expensive.
  • + 4
 The Storia as well
  • - 7
flag jrocksdh (Feb 10, 2017 at 9:24) (Below Threshold)
 Diff category as 11.6 is long travel. Explaining design differences may be insightful tho.
  • + 4
 @jrocksdh: its also an "enduro" shock
  • + 4
 @Lagr1980: well it says "intended use: short/mid travel" top of description.
  • + 10
 I swear I've seen this article or parts of it as part of another article on PB.
  • + 3
 I had the same thought.
  • + 2
 @RichPune: me three
  • + 1
 @Supergo: you da man. I knew it.
  • + 9
 Surprise Surprise coils are more sensitive than air.... Now everyone is going to be sticking coil springs back on their bikes.
  • + 8
 Every review of this shock I've seen is on the same bike. I'd really like to hear some feedback about this shock on other linkage types (e.g. VPP, dw-Link).
  • + 1
 It's great on my SB6c. Coming from a Nomad, the bike hooks up better at Enduro speeds with the DH IL coil. DH speeds may find the use of air shocks better. Poppy and bottomless on the landings. Rocks and ruts just get eaten up. You'll find your new fast on his shock. The control and hook up is craycray. Climb switch is amazing but you must to turn it off to descend or you will be riding an oc hardtail all of a sudden.
  • + 7
 @Orangesicle: Is Enduro speed somewhere between Trail speed and DH speed? or is it like doing 80 in a 50 zone? like a BAAAAAD TO THE BOOONE type of thing?
  • + 3
 I know that the Mojo Hd3 caused Push some real issues when they tried to get the 11-6 to work for it. They ended up giving up! Saying that I know the older HD was fine with coil. I don't think you can simply say it suits a specific suspension design like you ask, as each implimentation is slightly different and gives a different degree of progression/linearity... It would have been nice though...
  • + 2
 Coil is great for vpp bikes. Generally they have a regressive-progressive curve, which means the initial travel is firm, middle soft, and end firm, which is pretty much opposite of a linear coil curve, so they balance each other out well. Adds initial suppleness, midstroke support, and feeling of consistency.
  • + 2
 I have a Nomad and ran it with both coil (fox dhx2) and air (monarch debonair rt3). It feels like 2 completely different bikes. Fox DHX2 on a Nomad is just perfect match, very predictable, easily the best shock for climbing, jumps and small bumps, basically any type of terrain. Rockshox Monarch feels more soft, specially on climbing, and does not provide the same amount of grip as the coil shox. Hard landings on coil is also way better than air. Completely worthy upgrade!! No regrets.
  • + 10
 I could see this going on my Hightower.
  • + 6
 got an inline on my suppressor, its so much better than the monarch it came with. The app doesn't have the IL coil on it yet, and the app every so often deletes all your data.
  • + 3
 I would love to see a coil inline shock that you can service yourself. Even if the service intervals have improved I would much rather save the money and time and do it myself.
  • + 2
 I just pu a Rocksox Kage on my Covert 29, and once I got the spring rate, rebound, and compression fialled in it was obviously well worth the extra weight. Some regressive frames are really built for air shocks, but anything with a linear to a progressive leverage curve works waaaaay beeter with a coil. I haven't tried a new high end air shock (like the evol or debonair mentioned) but no matter what the friction of those seals will make small bump sensitivity less than with coil.
  • + 2
 Has anyone else dealt with the coil rubbing the shock body on certain frames? One of my riding buddies and a few customers at our shop all have coil rubbing from their DB coils.

Maybe this has been addressed on the newer models but on the ones I have seen its pretty bad.
  • + 2
 Got a Lifeline, didnt ride it hard. And the coil rubbed the body twice (replaced the shock after failure, 3 days old ! ). And still got the rubbings.
  • + 3
 I have an older db coil, and the coil used to rub on the body of the shock, but i got a set of needle bearings from ti-springs that sit at one end of the spring and help the coil to not bind up as it's being compressed, and it seems to have done the trick. I can try and find a link for you if you're interested.
  • + 2
 @karrot989: Sounds good Smile Funny thing is my CCDBC started leaking badly after 3 days of riding it ( brand new ). They have send me a new one and its kinda always " dirty" after riding. Wonder if it should be like this...
  • + 1
 If you're talking about the coil rubbing the black plastic sleeve on a DB Coil, yeah, that's common. Cut that thing off with a knife and it won't rub (or make creak noises) again.
  • + 1
 ^I run a needle bearing from Ti springs also on my vivid coil. I didn't have rubbing issues but they do make coil shocks feel even more sensitive. I recommend them for sure.
  • + 2
 @m-t-g: The black plastic sleeve is to protect it from metal on metal rub. Dont cut it off.
  • + 2
 @richard01: You're about 5 years too late. The spring has never touched the body since, as it gives several more mm of clearance.

Edit: Cane Creek were the folks that told me to cut it off when I asked about spring rub, btw.
  • + 1
 @m-t-g: my bad, it was on my old bike that it rubbed which was about 4 or 5 years ago.
  • + 3
 I thought Cane Creek had really good customer service but I try to reach them for a while now and they don't react to my mails. Please get back to me @CaneCreekCyclingComponents !
  • + 22
 Dear Sir or Madame,
We are tired of reading your whiny 'mails.' Now please f**k off.
Sincerely,
Cane Creek Customer Service
  • + 6
 have had the same problem, had a new shock fail and they havent returned my email in over 2 weeks.
  • + 5
 Same story here @CaneCreekCyclingComponents. I've sent a handful of emails over the last couple of months asking some questions about this very shock. No whining included
  • + 6
 They'll answer their phone, ya know.
  • + 3
 yeah, they are usually really good about getting back to me, but they haven't responded to my email recently. I'm guessing the DB inline trade in program is overwhelming them
  • + 0
 @LaXcarp: no shit right!and they are cool as hell to just shoot the shit with.
  • + 3
 Go on the canecreek lounge forum tell them your gripe,and they'll get back to you.I had issues with TF Tuned UK damaging my shock and not taking responsibility for it,one post on the lounge,brand new shock,next day,and an apology from TF.I was emailing the wrong address to start with.
  • + 2
 Call them up. I sent several emails no response. Called them up and talked for about 15 minutes about the shock in for service, trails and riding. Great group of guys.
  • + 2
 @DHaddict82: tried to call them several times no one answered the phone. and kinda a bitch to call from europe...
  • + 1
 Just gonna stick the other 'alternative facts' in right here... I've been in regular contact with them recently, I've felt like I've been bugging them, but they always get back to me quickly and are very helpful. If @canecreekcyclingcomponents find this, give Bryan a high five. Or a pay rise.
  • + 2
 "those who possess fewer skills and not a ton of courage probably won't benefit from a coil spring". Pffft, ROFLMAO the most skilled & ballsy riders on earth run no squish at all. Levy talking about skills is like Trump talking about, pretty much anything. Blank Stare
  • + 1
 I've got an old coil and oil 140mm lefty max on my trail bike. Does that make me retro or cutting edge? Should I update to the modern 2016 internals?? IDK. I ride bikes with both setups. They do different things it seems. Although I'd have to say I'd love to try a shock like this out.
  • + 4
 I'm shocked at the longevity. Looks like Cane Creek have sprung back from their QC issues.
  • + 2
 i hope its true. i know the complaints had always been with the db air inline but my db air lost damping performance in less than 6 months. unfortunately, with so many great products out there, i dont see why i would go back to cane creek for suspension.
  • + 2
 Sounds like they have rebounded quite nicely.
  • + 1
 @adrennan: yup, same thing here. Had an inline fail, "upgraded" to a db air cs and it failed early too. I'm convinced that the combination of the slim damper shaft and over tight bushings are a cause of early death for these things.
  • + 1
 i have this shock on my banshee prime for 3 months: longer travel feeling, less stroke - more speed with more control, 14 cm stroke on my rs pike is limiting now to achieve more speed, perfect function of high speed compression.... I was realy very surprised that so easy looking schock can be so functional..... (instagram: gt.cerny)
  • + 1
 "The DBcoil [IL] with the lightweight VALT spring weighs 633 grams, which isn't that much more than an air-sprung shock..."

That's not exactly true, it's roughly 130g heavier than the same size X2 and around 300g heavier than the same size Monarch+.
  • + 7
 300g is very little in comparison to the weight of an elephant
  • + 3
 Still don't get it why there is no 230x65mm version for transition patrol or rocky slayer...
  • + 2
 Take a x fusion vector hlr coil in 230*69 and put a 5mm larger bumper in there instead of the stock One. There you have it ;-)
Oh,and it is cheaper, almost as light and has a piggy and bottom out adjuster. Have had it in other bikes and it was great
  • + 1
 You can postulate on the decision process of other riders, but you should definitley make a clear statement on you personal choice and why. So, Mr. Levy - will you keep the coil or revert to air?
  • + 3
 test between this and Push Elevensix pse, coil is so Enduro, weight weanies need not apply!
  • + 1
 I have been on mine for a month. I typically ride very technical fast trails. And it's a phenomenal shock. I came off a CC DB CS. Both are great shocks but the traction on the coil is a dream.
  • + 4
 If your spring is in inches per pound, you're going to have a bad time.
  • + 3
 I've had one on not only that same exact Ghost but also my new NS Snabb Carbon, what a way to transform how the bike feels.
  • + 2
 Review was vague as far a performance goes. I'd like to see a six month or year follow up review.
  • + 1
 @mikelevy How does the climb switch compare to going full lsc on my elka or isx-6? Is there any advantage to a regular coil-over?
  • + 1
 Amazing how things progress, "4 way adjustable HSC, HSR, LSC, LSR, + climbing lockout". Back in the day it was like, "a spring; boing, boing".
  • + 2
 Are Cane Creek becoming the new Crank Brothers? (Headsets are good though, apart from angleset)
  • + 3
 I wish.Cane Creek 40 bearings are junk, I have them on both my Chromags and the lower bearings were rusty in less than a week of Squamish riding.
  • + 4
 I just put a 40 series on my bike, after maybe 10 rides the lower bearing feel apart, not joking. And I don't ride in harsh conditions at all. Going to get a 110 series bearing to replace it but I'm less than impressed so far
  • + 2
 @orangenut: I had your same experience and did the same fix. The 110 bottom bearing fixed the issue. The top 40 bearing is still good after 3 years and the new 110 bottom has probably 1.5 years going strong.
  • + 1
 @acali: thats good to hear, my top bearing felt brand new (as it should still after so little use)
  • + 1
 @mountain-life: I have only used a 110 headset. Cane Creek are the new Crank Brothers then so it seems
  • + 1
 @Racer951: Good to know, I'm going to try the 110 lower bearings in the 40 as it seems to be working out for people.
  • + 2
 @mountain-life: A real heavy marine grease can keep out a lot of water too.
  • + 1
 @Rucker10: I've had both headsets and the 110 bottom is definitely better. 40 top wasn't impressive either, that tapered split washer would sometimes stick on the steerer, preventing me from tighteming it properly in the house. Yhen it would loosen off after the first few minuyes of riding and have to be tightened again. Yhe 110 has been flawless, except for the blue rubber seal half ripping off the crown race... but it still doesn't seem to let water in.
  • + 3
 @Rucker10: "A real heavy marine grease"

But where can I find a real heavy marine, and the right grease, at such short notice?
  • + 2
 @KeithReeder: Hmm.... I've got a fabulous cousin I can ask. I'll get back to you.
  • + 2
 @KeithReeder: any auto parts store is going to have a wide variety of grease including a lot of sticky ones like marine or wheel bearing grease. high temp auto greases are pretty thick at bicycle temperatures; perfect for headset or bb bearings in nasty weather.
  • + 1
 @KeithReeder: oh dear
  • + 3
 So excited for this shock, can't wait to try one out on the Norco Sight!
  • + 1
 Me too, my stock Xfusion 02 Rl just doesn't cut it for me!
  • + 1
 Looks promising if they have truly fixed their reliability issues!
  • + 1
 So what's the point of a coil shock when all forks are air?
  • + 3
 for real. rear ends have 2.5-3:1 leverage that minimizes the effect of seal friction, while forks are 1:1. i'd take a coil fork and air shock over the other way around any day. Make Coil U-turn great again!
  • + 1
 I've got one on my Airdrop Edit and it's good.
  • + 1
 The very last paragraph - spot on.
  • + 1
 Seriously considering this, looks awesome
  • + 1
 @cane creek: will you ever offer a Vault spring heavier than 550?
  • + 1
 I can hear the frame cracking under the pressure of being photographed Big Grin
  • - 1
 Some how, some way, this will leak air... even as a coil...like the other garbage they produce.
  • + 0
 I wonder what Push (Darren) would think after reading this article?!
  • + 1
 It's sponsored content.
  • + 0
 Y tho?
  • - 2
 What travel options do they make this in?
  • + 2
 did you check cane creek's site?
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