Cannondale Introduces the New Jekyll 29

Aug 13, 2018
by Mike Kazimer  
Cannondale Jekyll 29


The Cannondale Jekyll received a fairly extensive makeover back in 2017, emerging as a more, well, 'normal' looking bike, a departure from the Lefty and pull-shock equipped version that preceded it. Of course, there were still a few Cannondale-esque features that kept it from being exactly like anything else on the market, but the revision undoubtedly helped help increase the number of riders who would consider this all-mountain / enduro machine.

Cannondale are now adding a 29” wheeled Jekyll to their lineup, a bike that shares almost all of the features found the current 27.5” model, but with a touch less travel (150mm vs. 165mm), and slightly different geometry. There are three complete models of the new bike, all with carbon front triangles and alloy swingarms, with prices ranging from $3,800 USD up to $6,500 USD.


Jekyll 29 Details

• Intended use: all-mountain / enduro
• Wheel size: 29"
• Rear wheel travel: 150mm / 120mm
• Carbon front triangle, aluminum swingarm
• 65° head angle
• 442mm chainstays
• 12 x 148mm rear spacing
• Sizes: S-XL
• Complete price: $3,800 - $6,500 USD
www.cannondale.com

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Cannondale
Riders can chose from either 150 or 120mm of travel on-the-fly via the Gemini air spring equipped Fox DPX2.
Cannondale
The rocker link location provides just enough room to fit a water bottle.

Details

The new Jekyll 29 is still based around a link-driven single pivot suspension design, and uses a Fox DPX2 shock equipped with the dual-mode Gemini air spring system that Cannondale and Fox developed together. Pushing the handlebar remote works in a similar manner to stuffing the shock's air can full of volume spacers – it reduces the amount of available travel from 150 down to 120mm of travel. The bike's geometry remains the same in both modes, but the travel reduction is designed to give the Jekyll a more lively feel on mellower terrain.


Cannondale Jekyll geo


Geometry

The Jekyll 29's head angle and seat tube angle are the same as the 27.5” version (65-degrees and 75 degrees respectively), but the chainstay length has grown to 442mm in order to make room for those bigger wheels. There's also a reduced offset fork, in keeping with the latest trend when it comes to longer-travel 29ers.



Cannondale Jekyll 29
The Jekyll 29 1 comes with Fox Float Factory 36 fork, Fox Factory DPX2 shock, SRAM Code RSC brakes, and a SRAM Eagle X01 drivetrain for $6500 USD.


Cannondale Jekyll 29
The Jekyll 29 2 is spec'd with a Fox Float Performance Elite 36 fork, Fox Performance DPX2 shock, Shimano XT 4-piston brakes, and a SRAM X01 / GX Eagle drivetrain for $5300 USD.


Cannondale Jekyll 29
The Jekyll 29 3 receives a Fox Float Performance 36 fork, Fox DPS Evol shock, SRAM Guide R brakes, and a SRAM GX / NX Eagle drivetrain for $3800 USD.



Cannondale Jekyll 29
Jerome Clementz taking in the scenery aboard the Jekyll 29.



165 Comments

  • + 112
 that 2nd stanchion is just an on-board spare, right?
  • + 18
 Correcty.
  • + 39
 Took me forever to understand what you were saying then it hit me like a one sided fork.
  • + 28
 Your comment came out of left field
  • + 21
 I hope that Cannondale has left their fork design behind
  • - 6
flag iduckett (Aug 13, 2018 at 12:33) (Below Threshold)
 Your question is the right question.
  • - 3
 @PHeller: but now its unforkgetable...
  • + 6
 Leftis ruining my country
  • - 2
 Not a fan of the seatstay pivots, pass.
  • + 0
 This is a righty commentary
  • - 2
 I feel left behind like in that religious book series.
  • + 1
 @BillyJukes: Looks like the right is coming back strong here.
  • - 1
 Craknfail Canofsnial I see Ballistic Fubar in your future
  • + 54
 My Jekyll rode great but had a poor frame alignment that led to rotation and cracking of the seat stays during riding.

Cannondale reluctantly warrantied the first frame (cracked in less than 2 months of ownership) and refused the warranty the last one calling it "crash related" (there was no crash and no scratches or impact on the frame). I have owned 10+ previous Cannondale bikes (2002-2009) but now that they are firmly under Dorel their craftsmanship and their sense of responsibility/customer service are gone

Their lifetime warranty is garbage and I wont be buying any Dorel bikes ever again.
  • + 22
 Crack-n-fail.
  • + 1
 Damn, that's too bad.
  • + 3
 I learnt that leason on my 1995/96? F500 in 1996/97 when I did a half foot high jump and snaped the seat stays and then refused warranty. Never been back
  • + 11
 You guys actually paid money for a Cannodale hahahhaha
  • + 15
 Looks like they finally nailed their build kits. 4-piston brakes and a piggy back on even the GX model. They 27.5 Jekyll I rode last year in a demo was a blast to ride, I’d definitely want to give this a go. It might not get me to get rid of my Ripmo, but it sure looks like a blast.
  • + 1
 How is the ripmo? Any comparisons to other bikes you have ridden? Anything small or large you don't like about it?
  • + 11
 Guide R? that brake is joke...
  • + 4
 @kyytaM: I was referring to the Jekyl 2, as it’s mostly GX except for the derailleur. It’s got the 4-pot XT.

I’d call the 3 an NX build.
  • + 3
 @ibishreddin: not to go off tangent too far on a different bike, but I love the Ripmo. Especially, once I put on a 35mm stem with a 40mm ride Renthal Bar, which brought out a more playful feel for me. I’ve done 6k vert days and lift days on it and am happpy with it as a daily driver. In an XL, it’s a big bike with a 1250 wheelbase, but once you get used to it it’s actually pretty quick to turn and fun to jump. I’ve even been tempted to play with an angle set to slacken it (closer to the Sentinel numbers) just to see how it would ride, but haven’t yet, only because it’s dang fun as is. I also want to try it with some lighter tires like a 2.6 Rekon just to make it more of a backcountry machine, but I’ve also been pretty happy with the stock DHF, even if they do drag a little on 4K climbs.
  • + 0
 @whambat: When I demoed the Jekyll, I felt it was really unstable in steep, loose, gravely (so 80% of Utah trails) sections. It just seemed like the chainstays were maybe too short, and since it was a demo I didn't have time to set up the suspension properly, AND the float X wasn't a very good rear shock. It looks like they remedied all my concerns with this update.
  • + 3
 @hamncheez: I didn’t get to try it in those conditions, mainly just manicured bike park trails. I could see the stays being a lttile short for some, looping out being more the concern.
I found it to be very playful and very quick to corner on the trails I rode. I did like the short travel option for the smoother trails for how responsive and poppy it would get.
I, too, was bummed by their build kit options on all but the very expensive versions. Crappy shock being high on the list. I really don’t get why companies put an inline shock on a $5k bike enduro bike when they have room for a piggy back. At the end of a 2-3k descent, I don’t want my bike turning into a hardtail from a heated shock. Charge us the extra $100 for the better shock so we don’t have to shell out $500plus later.
Maybe it’s my bias as a light Clydesdale, but 4-pots should be the standard for a bike with over 5” of travel. Bigger rotors help, but the extra piston and bigger brake pads really help me still have brakes at the bottom of a descent.

I know product managers want to give you a reason to upgrade to a more expensive XO1 build, but I really think they are missing out on sales when they skimp heavily on a $5k GX build. This build goes a long way to what I would want to see as a standard (but I do think the XO1 rear derailleur is a fluff upgrade dating back to the old big brand bike builds). I know plenty of experienced riders that are quite happy with GX drivetrain and would rather have their money go to better shocks and brakes (doesn’t have to be factory shocks, just put the damn piggy back on there and put Code Rs instead of Guides). Unfortunately, we still get throw away rear hubs on most of these builds, but the product managers have to keep costs down somehow.
  • + 1
 @whambat: I demoed the top tier model with the old Float X piggyback, but it didn't feel any better than the regular float. Maybe I just didn't have the suspension set well, but the bike just felt harsh. I could see how on park trails it would have done bette.r
  • + 16
 Would companies stop dropping the travel on 29 versions? Just cause the wheels are bigger doesn't mean I don't want a 160 ~ 170 bike.
  • + 25
 Because wheels are bigger and so its not always possible to keep the same travel / geo due to room you work with. It was already well talked before many times. Same with DH bikes.
  • + 4
 @kusa: Fair, but, if they took the time to re-design the bike for the new wheelsize, they'd be able to account for that. Most of these feel like they made the "real" 27.5 version, and the 29er version is just them throwing a bone to the 29er crowd.
  • + 0
 RAAW....
  • + 7
 +1 to this, 160mm+ is great on a 29er
  • + 5
 @kusa: So the excuse is that companies are half assing it? Sounds about right.
  • - 1
 YT bikes enough said
  • + 3
 @ZappBrannigan: Firebird 29
  • + 2
 @Fix-the-Spade: Half assing saves weight....cuts the weight in half
  • + 1
 @ZappBrannigan: Firebird 29 - enough said
  • + 2
 There's something launching very soon that you will like!
  • + 1
 @ZappBrannigan you are regurgitating a comment made about this by the review of the high-pivot Norco DH bike. The bigger wheels are a constraint, as @kusa said, and reducing travel likely allows bike designers to avoid grotesque geometry. The Norco high-pivot bike is less constrained by this issue since the wheel moves away from the front triangle through its travel, which probably helped them have longer travel.
  • + 2
 Zapp - but for serious... even if this had that much rear travel would you really consider it over the Firebird29, Wreckoning, Capra29, or Enduro29? Nah man.... nah.

I'll bet c'dale is just testing the waters with their first long(ish) travel 29er first. Everyone's putting out 150 29ers but only a handful the longer versions.

I'd throw a leg over it. But $5300 to get a decent spec... eesh.
  • + 1
 @WasatchEnduro: No, I wouldn't. I went with a Pole this year, 158 was close enough, still an annoying trend.
  • + 1
 @DMal: And the argument remains valid. There are more than a couple companies putting out 160+ 29ers without grotesque geometry. Cannondale could have too if they wanted to.
  • + 1
 @ZappBrannigan:

Woah. That’s a serious bike. You digging it?
  • + 1
 @WasatchEnduro: It is insane. Definitely recommend. Except for some very gnarly tight switchbacks it just hauls.
  • + 16
 Tell us about those droppers though....180mm? 200mm? Or are they just mockups?
  • + 2
 ditto. been waiting for a longer travel dropper from Fox.
  • + 4
 The Canondale website says it's only a 150mm post. I think there may have been some photoshopping going on here... Bummer. Cannot wait for a longer travel Transfer post to be released!
  • + 10
 I'm over the Fox dropper. It's taking forever to get out a longer travel option and there are better options anyways. The OneUp 170 for 200$ is hilariously nice and I get to pick my remote (wolf tooth light action). On a coupon sale it's less than 250$ with two year warranty and has 80$ cartridge replace if you don't want to self service the cartridge after two years. Zero play and excellent performance along with adjustable travel via shim. It's just too good for the money. Or the Revive is ultra nice too and freaky reliable
  • + 3
 @Svinyard: The one up is bar none the best post I've ever used and I've damn near had them all.. Especially for the $$!
  • + 3
 @bohns1: revive if money ain't a thing, one-up for everyone else.
  • + 3
 @sspiff: The one up performs just as good...
  • + 1
 @Svinyard: I would jump on the OneUp train so quick, but... external routing life. Fox is the king of that realm and they really have no reason to stop at 150mm travel. Unless I wanna get spicy and drill some holes because steel life Wink
  • + 2
 @bohns1: I can verify the same. It just works and I really like the Oneup lever too. Can’t believe how long I put up with the awful Reverb ergonomics in hindsight.
  • + 14
 it's hilarious that frame is designed to be fuugly just to accommodate water bottle ;]
  • + 40
 Cannondales are fugly for no reason at all. This one just happens to also hold a water bottle in the frame.
  • + 0
 @vikb: def an after thought
  • - 9
flag EnduroriderPL (Aug 13, 2018 at 9:26) (Below Threshold)
 @vikb: ever try to read with understanding of the text before putting another comment?
  • + 1
 Don't you have to put a water bottle in by sliding it in from the top. Looks difficult but I'm guessing it works.
  • + 16
 This whole water bottle thing is fascinating. A couple of reviewers bitch about water bottles, a couple of people agree in the comments, and now its a critical frame design. Riding in the real world, I hardly see anyone riding with a water bottle, its exceptional to see. Just about everyone I know rides with a hydration pack, since when they were invented by Camelback.
  • + 7
 @SlodownU: IDK, I've ridden with a hydro pack for years and will continue to, however among the people I ride with, more and more are opting to put stuff on the bike instead of carrying it on their backs....
  • + 17
 @SlodownU: almost everyone i know rides with bottles whenever possible.
  • + 5
 @SlodownU: I have honestly been trying to find a way to get everything from my pack to my bike so I can ride without a pack. In my opinion it's just better that way. I started with a lumbar pack and that has been nice but still looking to completely ditch the pack.
  • + 7
 @SlodownU: I’ve been against water bottles for years. Always thought they make the bike look uglier, less clean frame lines. Also I was probably a bit afraid of change...
Broke a strap on pack during a riding trip and the only option was to borrow a mates bottle cage and duct tape the tube to the frame. Was the best ride I’ve ever had, no sweaty little monkey hanging off my back! And now there’s no going back Smile
  • + 8
 @samjobson: Unless they invent a 2.5 litre water bottle I won't be losing my bakpack ever. You guys all seem to ride in countries with cool/cold climates... here it's 30ºC and above half the year.
  • + 1
 @vikb: sorry about my previous comment, I was leaving in a rush and misread it - sorry!
  • + 4
 @SlodownU: Everyone Inknow Rides with a bottle. Except the Capra crowd lol.
  • + 3
 @SlodownU:

SpeedupU -> most of my friends and i have ditched packs for rides under 2hrs, which is most of them (weekday dawn patrol, beotch). It's soooo nice. Some have SWAT, some do (err) hip packs, most have a bottle mounted.

When it comes down to it I wouldn't dismiss a bike for lack of one, but it is a nice convenience for most avid riders who fit in quick rides before and after work and would rather not rock a backpack for a short ride.
  • + 1
 @h-beck83: side loader probably
  • + 1
 @SlodownU: hydro packs get gross..sweat, dirt, and inside resi from mixing electrolytes.
  • + 2
 @yonibois: nah same boat for us aussies!! If it’s a longer ride in the height of summer, I do still own my camelbak. Just for as much of the year as possible it stays in the cupboard.
  • + 2
 @samjobson: werd..... in Jamaica I can put a 2L frozen bottle in my cage and in 30 minutes it's almost warm and my back is dry
  • + 5
 The travel adjust system they've got is really rad. They take what is essentially a donut shaped air volume spacer, and put seals on both sides of it. On the back side, they push air behind the spacer, which pushes it out a fixed amount to limit stroke, but still gives it a bit of cushion. When the air is released, the donut pushes back up into end of the shock, allowing full stroke. Or at least that's what I think is happenning. The other method could be a "band" the cable actuator "captures" the stroke spacer with. Either way, really cool, simple, and lightweight method of changing the shock stroke by 30mm. Employing this on a shorter travel bike would be pretty rad too, you could have a 130mm 29er that effectively becomes a 100mm 29er using the Gemini stroke adjust system.
  • + 3
 Theres no reason why it cant be used on other bikes, as there are no silly mounting options. Pity you cant buy it though, as fox dont sell it aftermarket
  • + 1
 Id like this shock for my rallon.
  • + 8
 what is the drop on that post tho!?!
  • + 4
 Had a Claymore in the past and almost got the 27.5 Jekyll but once I saw the spy shots of this a few weeks ago - I have been patiently waiting. GREAT build kit as well....
  • + 4
 That Jekyll 1 looks awesome. Cool to see a factory Transfer on a stock build too, looks killer.
  • + 5
 Yes, but I’m thinking there is some photoshop trickery going on in that image. Definitely makes it looks like it has more than 150mm travel.
  • + 1
 Tested a 27.5 Jekyll at the beginning of the year and it rode really well. Sadly all the proprietary stuff and odd offsets mean spare parts are stupidly expensive - £70 for a chain ring!!! - so it was crossed off the list. Looks like this one is more of the same. Pity.
  • + 1
 The cracked frame comments are interesting. I have a Cannondale Prophet which rides really well but I think the flex in the rear has led to a crack in the rear arm. As I bought the bike second hand Cannondale would not entertain any sort of warranty replacement, not at all sympathetic or understanding. I had to buy an new arm at a cost of £200. I had the cracked arm welded but it is cracking again.
  • + 1
 Does it have boost spacing in the back or is it using the AI offset? Only very minor flaw in the spec as far as I can see is on the 2, wonder why an XO1 derailleur and GX everything else. X01 shifter and gx everything else would give better performance...not a deal breaker though by any means.
  • + 3
 It uses both Boost and AI offset.
  • + 2
 sram shifters all feel pretty similar, but the gx eagle derailleur is noticeably lower quality than the higher end ones. IMO this was the right way to do things.
  • + 1
 @MTBrent: ah, well fair enough. The 142x12 AI seemed plenty stiff enough to me, but having it be boost would definitely make getting a new rear hub easier
  • + 1
 @YouHadMeAtDrugs: yeah, that makes sense. I guess the xo1 shifter isn’t that much more to upgrade too either for anybody really does want it.
  • + 1
 Also, the rear mech is a major part of the part of the drivetrain that is visible. So while a GX Eagle shifter vs x01 shifter may go visually unnoticed, the rear mech is more easily noticed
  • - 1
 Ai rear wheel is much stronger and well balanced. I lost a "few" spokes 2 times and the wheel was soft but keep the alignment. First time I loose 6 spokes and the last one only 4. It is really easy to true on the fly if something bad happens...That was one of my fears about the bike cos I work as trail guide,messing a rear wheel and finding an AI compatible one is near to impossible. Good thing is they put Stan´s rims,not WTB one´s,they are really soft and easy to ding very badly,I broke both rims in less than 2 months and I weight 63 kg.
  • + 2
 If I’m not mistaken that rider is Jon Buckell. Super cool dude that used to be the main mechanic at San Dimas Incycle. Bummed he’s gone, but glad for him he is.
  • + 3
 Added to the database for comparison purposes...
geometrygeeks.bike/bike/cannondale-jekyll-2019
  • + 4
 How is it nobody is talking about that awesome music in the video!?
  • - 7
flag Joelukens00 (Aug 13, 2018 at 11:39) (Below Threshold)
 Because it literally doesn't matter. You definitely are not an intellectual
  • + 1
 I want to know who it is too
  • + 0
 What is up with the water bottle obsession?? They don’t hold much fluid. They get covered in dirt and god knows what. They fly off the bike when you really hit the gnar or a big drop. Oh yeah not to mention that wonderful natural Rolfing massage effect if you go OTB onto rocks with nothing on your back but a Jersey. Sign me up!
  • + 1
 What’s that thing about the water bottle,man it’s getting stupid ,ok the frames of many brands can take a water bottle,so what ?is this now a feature a technological advance
  • + 1
 From Cannondale website:

Maxxis Minion DHF 29 x 2.5" WT front, DHR II 2.4" WT rear, Dual compound, EXO

I like where they're going with this. I like them wide and tall, myself.
  • + 2
 Ellsworth-We can create the ugliest bikes going. Cannondale-Hold my beer... I'd rather be able to reach my waterbottle then my shock just saying...
  • + 3
 Someone better call Titus and tell them the El Quapo is back !
www.bikemag.com/gear/mountain-bikes/titus-el-guapo
  • - 1
 Oy, mate- I'm feeling a wee bit thirsty. Hold on while I let air out of my shock to remove my water bottle.

Seriously? Am I the only one that sees this as a bit tight o' clearance? Hey, it might be easier to just unbolt the entire cage when you want a drink...
  • + 8
 Hello Apohlo,
I have the Jekyll 1 27.5 now and the bottle is snug but not an issue for install or removal (Chris King Ti cage too - no side mount cage.) It's even easier to remove when you are sitting on the bike, thanks to sag. Extra benefit (besides having the full bottle weight nice and low) cleanest water bottle nozzle (when riding in mud) on any bike I've owned.
  • + 10
 Side access, rather than up or forward, solves that problem
  • + 4
 @Mntneer: fabric system should also do the trick
  • + 6
 You do know that side-loading bottle cages are readily available, right?
  • + 7
 @geronimok: ***it’s King Cages, not Chris King. Different companies.
  • + 1
 @geronimok: I don't believe for a second that you can actually grab it while ridingunless you have go go gadget arms.
  • + 1
 @mhoshal: I've done it but it's definitely easier when stopped. ...and I don't have go go gadget arms but man, that sure would be cool! I would love to have the propeller/helicopter feature. I could heli drop myself to all kinds of rad places.
  • + 2
 @speed10: Good catch and correct. Morning coffee had't kicked in yet.
  • + 2
 @g-42: Absolutely am aware.
  • + 2
 @bonkywonky: The Fabric system actually didn't work for me on the Jekyll (I tried). There wasn't enough room for the bottle to slide down and engage. I run the cageless bottles on my CX bike though. Really cool that I don't have to remove bottle cages for cross.
  • + 2
 I really wish they did a 170 fork with 160 rear travel. Guess I'll keep my 2018 650b Jekyll.
  • + 1
 You do know that these forks can be upped to 170 by swapping out a relatively inexpensive internal part, right?
  • + 2
 Boring corporate bike company fills catalog niche. Is Cannondale relevant anymore outside of x/c and road?
  • + 1
 I know it's a petty complaint, but I just can't stand down tubes that run parallel to the ground in front of the bottom bracket.
  • + 2
 Yeah! Jon, looking so good!
  • + 2
 These pictures are clearly photoshopped! There is no crack in the frame!
  • + 2
 Looked good until I saw B.B. height at 360mm
  • + 7
 Finally something you can pedal off road.
  • + 2
 SO stoked for this. Been waiting for a while!
  • + 2
 Great save by including spacing for a bottle.
  • - 2
 Good geometry, but why fixed chainstay length? 442 is good for the L/XL but maybe a touch long especially for small. Yet again with propietary shock and handlebar shock control -- no thanks, I'll take off the shelf shocks and reach down to hit a climb switch for grinding up fire roads. Meh overall.
  • + 4
 it isn't proprietary, standard metric and the lil 3 pos lever is on the other side. it's like adding volume spacers, not climb modes.
  • + 3
 You can easily remove the remote lever if you'd rather have the standard off-the-shelf shock experience.
  • + 1
 Handlebar controls are Fox CTD one´s,nothing proprietary there. Shock is very close to any new float EVOL minus travel adjust thing. My trusted suspension guy service it the first time free of charge cos it was the first one he touch,but it just like any other Fox Float EVOL,only takes a few extra steps. It is not a lockout,the shock is free to move like in long travel mode and you still have the CTD dial to play with. You got 4 real shock combinations + lockout. This is the most "standard" Jekyll by far,just little touches here and there but well put together.
  • + 3
 29ers...so hot right now
  • + 2
 That rear end looks FLEXY as F
  • + 1
 It is.
  • + 1
 Cow in the vid 0:55 was like "meh, another 29er that rips"
  • + 1
 NO LEFTY.... I am interested.
  • + 1
 that front shock looks and sounds dope
  • + 0
 @madmon: It's called a fork. Get smart please
  • + 1
 @Joelukens00: Bit^^ please
  • + 2
 A fork with two tines? Ignore this guy. @Joelukens00:
  • + 1
 Linkage driven single pivots, #LeSigh
  • + 0
 Ever ridden a commencal?
  • + 1
 It only fits one muddy horse shit covered water bottle?
  • + 2
 Why so little BB drop?
  • + 1
 where is "superior" lefty???????????
  • + 1
 Flat mount brakes .... why?
  • + 4
 Because big braking isn't selling enough adapters these days.
  • + 5
 Seriously, first time seeing flat mount idiocy on an enduro bike. Post mount has no problems, so it was definitely time for a lighter and stupider standard with poor backwards compatibility.
  • + 3
 It's just an adapter. Still uses a post mount rear. The flat portion of the frame is to tuck the adapter mounting point into the chainstay assembly.
  • + 1
 Finaly nice geometry with long reach!
  • + 0
 But, it's still a Cannondale. Makes sense for factory-sponsored pros, but paying retail for one is insanity!
  • + 1
 but I thought the "Lefty" was so superior?
  • + 2
 It is, but it has limitations.
  • + 8
 It may be superior, but its not superior looking. How things look is about all that really matters if you read these comment sections.
  • + 5
 @b1k35c13nt15t: Yes, it's appeal is limited to those in the Lefty R&D team.
  • - 2
 Crack and fail can of snail just curious as if your upper seat stays will break in the same place as your old models ?ballistic fubar!
  • + 1
 30" on the way.
  • + 1
 Fugly
  • + 0
 rode one today, couldn't be more stoked !!! Well played Cannondale
  • + 0
 Worst come worsted
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