Inside Canyon Bikes

Jan 28, 2016
by Matt Wragg  



bigquotes A disruptive innovation is an innovation that creates a new market and value network and eventually disrupts an existing market and value network, displacing established market leaders and alliances. - Wikipedia

Maybe more than any other country, Germany has long embraced the idea of buying mountain bikes directly. In a market where customers tend to place more emphasis on value and technical details rather than brand, it is the natural home for this business model. A few years ago you could spot these bikes a mile away - they tended to feature a generic frame, decked out with high-end components and as many cables and levers as you could possibly fit onto a handlebar. It is fair to say that you could not sell many of them outside the German market they were designed for.

Canyon were one of the first of these brands to look towards wider horizons, to start to make bikes for an international market. That meant going back to the drawing board and putting together bikes that can not only win the coveted magazine tests in their homeland, but could be competitive on a world stage. In no small part due to their work with Fabien Barel, today their bikes are towards the forefront of "modern geometry" and proven race-winners in the Enduro World Series. This what makes Canyon such a disruptive force in the mountain bike market - their current bikes are on a par with the established top brands in terms of quality and performance, yet through their direct sales model they can keep the price significantly lower. We visited their headquarters in Koblenz, Germany to take a look at how they prepare the bikes for their customers.



Inside Canyon
Canyon's headquarters are an imposing affair, situated in the heart of Koblenz.

Inside Canyon
While it may not look like as much fun in this weather, a pumptrack outside the headquarters is always the sign of a bike company that knows how to enjoy itself.

Inside Canyon
It may not look like much today, but this trailer is where Canyon began. It was from this trailer that founder, Roman Arnold, first began to sell bike parts at races - and from there the business grew. Today it is on display inside the entrance to the headquarters.

Inside Canyon
Inside Canyon

Inside Canyon
In their headquarters they have their heavily-equipped testing lab. It is here that Canyon tests all of its frames, forks and components to their limits. Alongside the more common examination processes, including microscopes and conductivity testing, they have an CT scanner to examine the structural integrity of the kit. This is essentially the same technology you would be examined with if you went to the hospital, but to work with far more dense metals and composites the power is turned up to levels that would be harmful to humans (they don't turn the machine on with the door open - this was just for the photo).

Inside Canyon

Inside Canyon

Inside Canyon

Inside Canyon

Inside Canyon
Inside Canyon

Inside Canyon

Inside Canyon

Inside Canyon

Inside Canyon
Every aspect of every component that Canyon put their name to is tested against a myriad of loads and stresses - from impacts on the headtube, to how much force the dropout can take, depending on the test they may face 100,000 cycles or having the force or load increased and increased until the material can no longer take it.

Inside Canyon
While the main headquarters are impressive, it's only one of a number of sites they have around the town. The actual production of the bikes happens here - in their vast warehouse and manufacturing facility outside the town.

Inside Canyon
If you think you receive a lot of post, you should see how much a company of this size receives... This is, admittedly, more than would usually be in this area because this facility when we visited Canyon had only just opened the new facility and were still in the process of cataloguing the garagantuan amount of components you need to build as many bikes as they do.
Inside Canyon
Inside Canyon

Inside Canyon
Before the goods are sent through to the warehouse, each batch is checked by quality control to make sure they are fit to be mounted onto the bikes.

Inside Canyon
Inside Canyon

Inside Canyon

Inside Canyon
Inside Canyon
If you're going to produce 100,000 bikes per year you're going to need quite a lot of kit to do that, so you're going to need a lot of space to store the frames, components and finished bikes.

Inside Canyon
Assembly takes place in this hall - the frames enter on the left, then work their way in a "U" shape to finishing on the right.

Inside Canyon

Inside Canyon

Inside Canyon
Inside Canyon

Inside Canyon

Inside Canyon
Assembly begins with preparatory steps - preparing the cable routing, mounting the frame bolts and greasing the frame's apertures

Inside Canyon
Some steps are done separately to the main production line - for instance, the handlebars and stem are mounted with all the necessary equipment and cables to one side, they are then mounted as a single unit in one go on the main line.

Inside Canyon
Inside Canyon

Inside Canyon

Inside Canyon
Inside Canyon
Within just a few steps the frame becomes recognisable as a bicycle, rather than an assortment of components.

Inside Canyon
When the basic assembly is done, it is time for the bike to cross the floor to the right-hand side for setup.

Inside Canyon
Inside Canyon

Inside Canyon

Inside Canyon
Inside Canyon
The fully assembled bikes are setup to shop standard - all the gears are indexed, brakes tested and alignment of the contact points setup. The mechanics take each bike for a quick spin up and down the hall floor to make sure everything is working order, so the customer can take the bike out of the box and, after some minimal reassembly, get out and ride.

Inside Canyon
To prepare the bikes for shipping they are meticulously prepared and slightly disassembled to fit in the shipping boxes.

Inside Canyon
Each bike is then carefully loaded into its box and it is ready to be sent to a waiting customer.


MENTIONS: @Canyon-PureCycling



Posted In:
Industry News



188 Comments

  • 288 3
 @mattwragg Love theese insider series. Keep 'em comin' in the future Smile
  • 130 9
 I can't wait for the YT visit!
  • 67 0
 Thanks, @megatryn!
  • 15 2
 Thanks for this Matt, I just bought a Canyon Strive and this just backed up my decision!
  • 25 1
 It's really cool indeeed, it would also be interesting to see something more artisanal in comparison, like Nicolaï while you're in Germany Smile
  • 15 0
 I am also quite curious to the smaller German bike firms like Liteville and Nicolai. Is this also in scope @mattwragg ?
  • 4 36
flag jaame (Jan 28, 2016 at 1:26) (Below Threshold)
 I didn't actually read the words in this one, but I did look at all the pictures. I cannot wait to read all the words in the yt article though. Please give us lots of pictures of bikes Matt! Especially the new capra cf in black.
  • 53 5
 I'm afraid the YT piece is not going to happen this week now, sorry.
  • 13 0
 @mattwragg Liteville would be a good one!
  • 12 1
 And there's also Alutech considering the smaller german brands with soul mentioned from @aresiusbe!
  • 13 0
 I wonder do those assembly line guys get to switch around thru the different stages of assembly, that chick doing the routing looks less than enthused and i don't blame her, cable routing thru any frame is the biggest pain in the hole in the world, be a total nightmare if that was the main part of your day...every day.
  • 6 1
 Who neg propped Matt?! He's not a magician.
  • 9 2
 We going to see gwin with the yt lol
  • 1 0
 @HenRen, my previous fully was an Endorfin vp4 sl. It was a nice machine, but I wonder if they still exist?
  • 36 1
 I'm afraid I can't add any more stories to this series as I made my visits back in November - we still have Ion, Bliss, Ergon, DT Swiss, Gaerne, Northwave and SIDI to come though... Plus some more interviews, but they will be spread over the next few months.
  • 1 0
 @aresiusbe endorfin is still in the business, i live close to their "store" (it's mostly an outlet for outdoor clothes). But imo their geo is outdatet...
  • 2 0
 @CptObius, you are right, their geo is quite 90's :-) very steep head angle and a quite high riding position. The Endorfin served me for almost 7 years.
Last year i bought a more modern fully (Turner Flux)
  • 2 0
 love the articles
  • 8 16
flag Manx (Jan 28, 2016 at 4:56) (Below Threshold)
 Great article but Matt Wragg should clean his camera sensor, look at all the dust and dirt in the sky in the second photo among others. Amazed that he let that slip through. Healing Brush anyone?
  • 10 0
 What about CCM?? I want to see my CCM Ice being made! :-)
  • 5 1
 So gwins team won't go to press till next week then?
  • 2 0
 Awesome! Looking forward to Ergon !!!
  • 1 0
 get ready for yt......made from the heart
  • 3 1
 +1 for liteville. I literally drool over their bikes
  • 1 0
 Too many road bikes in this one. But, what interesting articles lately.
  • 2 0
 @bishopsmike the old ccm factory would be amazing to see in toronto. I have a couple of their old bikes from the 40's and 50's. But that ice sounds hot!
  • 1 0
 Exact same feeling for me as well.
  • 3 0
 Liteville have 1 email address and 1 phone number for the entire company...might take some time...
  • 65 0
 Running that internal routing guide all day must be punishment.
  • 25 0
 These guys could probably do it with their toes if they do it 100k times a year.
  • 10 4
 @Clarkeh Internal cables are sweet as. Heaps of mechanics still don't know how to do it properly. And very few frames are actually a pain to deal with.
  • 2 0
 Except they're a piece of piss on both my Canyon bikes. Smile
  • 3 3
 @orderoftheflame well you're not doing it right. By right I meant proper way with proper tools. We build +10.000€ race bike almost everyday. I had few high end canyons on the stand and I performed a full cable replacement on them. No drama, easy job really.
  • 14 5
 Internal routing is bollocks. I don't know a single professional mech who actually likes them. The general consensus is that they are there purely to make dentists bike a) prettier and b) more expensive to fix.

Anyone who just wants a bike to be a good ride, doesn't give a damn about dumbass internal cable routing.
  • 43 0
 Why does everyone pick on the Dentist who rides Mtb? Was one out there a douche that ruined it for all of them? I say lets be mean to the Proctologist, he's the real pain in the ass.
  • 3 14
flag gabriel-mission9 (Jan 28, 2016 at 9:03) (Below Threshold)
 because they get paid an extrodinary amount to do a fairly easy job. So they have plenty of cash and time to waste on bikes that spend a lot of time being shiney and not much time being muddy.
  • 5 3
 @gabriel-mission9 nah, internal cables are sweet. They look the business ... and they're good for business since many home mechanic are complaining about it. I can say the exact same thing with press-fit bottom bracket. When they came out for the first time it was not the easiest job. But now I can't see why you don't want your bike to look good: And it protects the inner and outter cables. I used to be a hater until a guru showed me the way Smile
  • 5 0
 Gabriel mission-Because all dentists are the same? Is there a pinkbike rule that someone needs to work some version of the same stupid comment into every article on pinkbike? I always thought everyone on a bike instead of a couch is part of the Tribe. I only hope the couch people don't down vote me for saying that.
  • 9 0
 You're a rabid anti-dentite!
  • 3 2
 Sorry, yeah, I am well aware there is likely an equal % of dentists who are cool and well into biking as in any other profession. I guess dentist has just (kinda unfairly) become a synonym for "that guy who we all (completely unfairly) love to hate because he shows up in a nicer car than us, unloads a nicer bike than ours, but makes it obvious that he doesnt really know much about or make proper use of either one, and just kinda uses them as fashion accessories."
The fact that there is absolutely nothing wrong with that, and the guy is having just as much fun riding as anyone else has usually been forgotten by this point Razz

It is a bit unfair to use "dentist" as a placeholder for all of the above waffle, but it's so much easier to type.

Anyway yeah, that guy usually has internal routing. And points it out like it was the main selling point. I guess I can see why people like it, but I just think its a bit pointless.
Also I'm paranoid enough about not being able to see whats going on inside my frame eg weld defects or wear, without a load of cables rattling around in there. I know this isnt a problem on all frames but I'd rather just sidestep the issue altogether.
  • 6 9
 At least I'm not a rabid feminist!
  • 6 1
 internal routing = cleaner bike, I'm in!!!
  • 2 0
 as said internal routing is easy with practice, proper method (and this varies from model to model) and equipment. after 7 years as a mechanic it is certainly fine but i would still take external any day, the thing is you get better in general and while I am much quicker now with internal I am also very confident with external thanks to day in day out of custom road builds and can work much quicker to a higher standard. one thing i hate with internal is bedding the cables in properly and compressing the outer cables and ferrules into place. it takes much more time to do effectively on internal. external 4 life :p
  • 3 1
 I'm with Gabriel-mission9 on this one in that I don't give a rats ass about internal cable routing, That said, if I did have internal routing, it would be a snap for me. "Unload bike at bike shop. Tell'em I want new cables. Wait for a phone call. pick up bike. Pay. Go riding" That's the "luxury" and perhaps the cultural unfairness of making more at my day job than a bike mechanic. What my day job does share with a bike mechanics though, is that I make my living off what people want, not what they need.

GM9-I do appreciate your gracious response to my earlier post. I have no experience with rabid feminists, but regularly get my ass kicked by rapid feminists.
  • 2 0
 What's up with folks hating on dentists?? I know several dentists personally and they're all fine people.
  • 2 0
 My friend just built himself up a brand new transition scout with internal cables. He assembled the whole thing at home. No problems.
  • 1 1
 Yeah I met a dentist on a cytech course a while back. He was a really nice guy, and not bad at fixing bikes either. He did tell a few stories about other dentists who were "less cool" however. He'd get models coming to him with bleeding gums after expensive laser whitening treatments and stuff. But yeah, thats nothing against dentists as a whole. There are just as many cowboy bike mechanics I'm sure. Probably more.
They're not as rich tho Razz
  • 4 1
 I met a dentist once (through my insurer) who told me I needed several thousand dollars worth of work before they could even clean my teeth. I then went back to my old dentist, paid a $100 in cash and they told me that my teeth were just fine. Out of those two dentists, which do you think owns the $12k bike they rarely ride?
  • 38 0
 "And zis is where we will fuse Aaron's skeletal structure with adamantium.."
  • 8 4
 Wrong german direct sales company tho
  • 4 0
 Actually it's arborium
  • 36 4
 great insight into a company that still has a lot of very disappointed strive owners , broken shapeshifters after a handful of rides , 3 - 5 months to get it replaced , little or no customer service . My understanding from various forums is that there are problems right across the road & mtb community . With substantial growth so must come greater responsibility , this simply has not happened with canyon .
  • 5 2
 Unfortunately this only works is you are Peter Parker! Most companies only go after profit and all the issues that you have correctly described is a proof of that.
  • 11 1
 everythin about aftersales service is really poor in direct selling
canyon should tell their customers: "hey, you want to pay less, you better like long lines"
  • 12 2
 Vanalan - I totally agree. My experience as a Canyon customer has been absolutely terrible. I had really poor communication during my 3 month delay and then no support when part of the frame snapped. I used to be a direct sales evangelist but my most recent road bike purchase was a GT because I have lost faith in the Direct Sales model when it comes to customer service and aftercare.
  • 2 0
 Surprising considering the testing, analysis, and technology they have and use.
  • 6 0
 While I agree for the most part with the feelings on direct sales, one exception I have found is Canfield Brothers. The service from them was top notch before my purchase and after my purchase. While they are still a small company and not comparable to Canyon, I wouldn't hesitate to get a bike from them again and I resist the urge to buy a Jedi every day.
  • 6 0
 Frame Tabs snapped off within a few months - www.pinkbike.com/forum/listcomments/?threadid=149137&pagenum=77

This meant losing my chain on every race stage due to not being able to run a chain guide as Canyon decided not to use an ISCG standard for their chain guides and their own staff didn't know what adaptor I needed.
  • 4 0
 I'm sure Canyon makes excellent bikes, the problem comes out when snapping the frame. I dont own any Canyon but when my Reign cracked I had a new frame in two weeks, and a friend of mine has been waiting two months for canyon to sort out a problem with his Spectral. Customer service comes with the final price, I guess if Canyon wants to get better its customer service they would've to raise the final price, and don't think this will happen. Canfield has a good customer service, most likely a jedi will cost more than a strive.
  • 5 1
 I've got nothing but good experience with Canyon customer service, even with stuff that could be attributed to my own mistakes. Maybe it's to do with the service centre in the country you live in. Also a company can have a very good quality control process and thus very respectable fault rates, but if the numbers sold are high enough, you're going to read some legitimate issues on forums. That allways comes with a lot of hearsay and some stuff that really is down to rider or customer behaviour. That should say nothing about the reputation of a company, but in people's mind, it unfortunately does.
  • 10 1
 @Benito-Camelas My Santa Cruz snapped and i waited SEVEN month to get the wrong part, after a couple more weeks they swapped the remaining part just to find out that the rear shock wasn´t the right length for that combo ... I guess it´s pure luck, what´s in stock and whom you´re talking to. I can tell you there´s absolutely no difference in brands ...
  • 4 1
 @Benito-Camelas The problem, or better my problem started way earlier... I'm still a pupil and I managed to save enough money to finally purchase on a Canyon MTB. This was in September 2015, since then I ordered 4 bikes, because the 2015 models always were't avaiable anymore after I ordered tham and then suddenly they reappeared in the store. So after some weeks and 4 orders I decided to grab a little more money to get a 2016 bike for the last weeks of autumn. I ordered it between October and November and the delivery date was shifted further away in every month. The delivery date now is during April! So I'm very disappointed of Canyon and their reliability!
Of course they had problems, because of the move to another HQ simultaneously with an IT changeover to SAP, but the way, they treat their customers, is just poor!
  • 1 0
 @infinitetrails seven months!!! you must be the famous patientman, the new Marvel superhero
  • 1 0
 @Benito-Camelas Indeed i`m not. I had had a feeling it would end ugly and had bought a new bike already ...
  • 4 1
 Canyon is in serious trouble at the moment, check their twitter feed, it's full of im sorry, please provide your customer number and order number and i'll look into it. There's hundreds of these responses. Twitter isnt the first resort when you have a problem, it's the last. Behind the scenes it's Kaos!
  • 34 21
 No wonder they're having issues. As a person working in an industrial environment I see many things wrong. For example:
1, That area with the inbound goods is a mess. There are boxes likely to fall down from the pile, not organised. It must be very hard to find something specific there if you need it and hard to reach.
2, People in an industrial environment shouldn't be wearing casual clothing imo. For example the guy with that big watch. I bet he sometimes scratches the frame with that thing while working on it. In any decent factory it is forbidden to wear jewelry.
3, The ergonomic carpets are too small. Sometimes you're standing on it while assembling a bike, sometimes not. If you've worked on one of those you know it's the most annoying thing. The place where you stand should be consistent.
These are just a few minor things an outsider could notice based on a few pictures.
To me a chinese factory seems outdated but more organised, more efficient.
  • 72 9
 jesus, you're having a bad day aren't you?
  • 7 0
 The visit was made when they moved to their new facilities and I am not sure if it's their normal inbound area it more looks like it's in the middle of the transition.
I agree on the watch/jewellery comment but looking through the pictures the asian looking guy was the only one wearing it so he might just disregarded something and caught on camera. As long as they have one of the best bikes on the market for great prices and good warranty service I don't care if they are not wearing uniform when assembling them. Smile

I would like to see a follow-up with their new facilities though...
  • 2 0
 As I saw Rose and Cube weren't much different regarding their assembly line and dress code...
  • 2 9
flag MSVF (Jan 28, 2016 at 3:33) (Below Threshold)
 Thanks for the feedback, McKinsey. Maybe they should also reduce salaries?
  • 19 4
 It's called constructive criticism. Considering the amount of complaints regarding delivery delays and poor customer service they need it. Sorry if my opinion has offended you in any way.
  • 2 8
flag Srdan (Jan 28, 2016 at 4:19) (Below Threshold)
 It is a plastic watch so there's no scratching involved.
  • 1 0
 I don't know what the workers' clothing and the size of the carpets have to do with the delivery delays and the alleged poor customer service (I have two bikes from them and couple of warranty claims but all issues were solved to my satisfaction)
  • 4 4
 It's only recently that most German factories banned drinking beer while working. Having worked for a couple German manufacturing companies I would definitely say that the stereotypes of efficiency and quality are completely false.
  • 1 0
 I actually agree with that feedback, my only concern would be the casual wearing, if a growing company starts asking their employees to wear uniforms some of them would get bitterer than they already are, it wouldn't help the customer service. Regarding the messy warehouse, they probably ordered extrainvetory in order to avoid YOY surcharges like Cube did. But they should've been prepared for that.
  • 16 4
 Ok - since it looks and smells like a Deutschland-driven editorial series (coincidentally Rose is also featured as well as a generic rise-of-the-German bikes piece) I'll post my own experience with Canyon.

In a nutshell: great, until it turned bad.

Was a proud owner of a 2011 Nerve AM9 SL top of the line, top of the euro rig.
Since I am in Switzerland and back then Canyon had trademark issues with the alpine country, I was forced to have the bike delivered to Italy. No problem with that, got my full VAT refund asap BTW.
Any little issue I ever had was properly handled by whoever was on the line in Germany.

Until october last year, when I really started to get upset by a creaking noise I was hearing. Checked everything, cranks, bushings, rear cassette, etc. Then a terrible thought dawned on me, and I grabbed my camera and micro lens. I checked around and then found a hairline crack in the rear chain stay.
Took a hi-res picture and sent it to Germany, as usual, asking for the price to to buy the whole rear ass'y.
Some time later someone from Canyon Italia writes back wanting more pics of the bike of the serial number, yada yada. OK.
I organize a 8 hr trip back home to take the pics and I send them back to Germany, asking once again to purchase the rear triangle, etc, etc.
Canyon Italy writes back saying I *must* send the required docs to them, otherwise.
The whole theater with Canyon Germany and Canyon Italia goes on for some time.
The last email I get thanks me for the pics, and that they will decide the fate of my request and will let me know through ... Canyon Italia.
As of today both parties are MIA.

On the other hand my riding buddies by now know the whole story by heart.
Over Christmas drinks they're still ribbing me and shaking their heads over the fact that mail order, you know, never as good as buying from a store....
Come New Year's eve more of the same.
Planning the new 2016 rides? Hah - wonder if Paul will have his bike ready by then tsk, tsk..!

So not only did Canyon manage to piss me off, but they shot themselves in the foot in front of the whole club (last count = 12 active riders) - in any language it's spelled marketing suicide.

So as far as I'm concerned - no more mail-order and no more Canyon or Rose Bikes, thank you.
Apologies if I pissed on anyone's parade.

Paul
  • 7 0
 At least you're not like some people who ordered bikes in October 2015 (with an estimated delivery of mid december, fine), who still don't have their bike while at the same time some people who ordered EXACTLY the same bike (same model, same size) in early january had them within weeks.

And forums are crawling under such feedbacks ...
  • 14 0
 your camera needs some cleaning... hehe
  • 1 0
 I was going to say the same!
  • 1 0
 wow, why is that? seriously, I have always been bad at recognizing quality of pics, I am starting to think I might need to wear glasses or something
  • 1 1
 @narro2 it isn't because the quality or anything like that, i think you can see a few "spots" on the first pics, at the top left, or over the sky, that means the DSLR sensor of @mattwragg 's camera is dirty and needs to be cleaned.
  • 9 1
 Purchased a Canyon Torque DH bike this year, thing is great, would 100% go back for more from them. Just the constant delay/changing of delivery times and pretty shoddy/abrupt customer service when trying to find out where my bike that would put doubt in my mind and giving them more of my hard earned money. Hopefully they will sort those absolute basics out though and go from strength to strength.
  • 8 2
 I have bought a new Canyon bike last year and I got to tell you, that it was one of the best decissions I made in my life. Great, great bike for a price about 30% lower that competition. There were some issues with the delivery (two weeks longer, delivered to my home address even when I specified other delivery address), but the bike came perfectly packed, with no scratches. And now I just know for sure - this bike will stay with me for years. There is no single reason I would sell it.
  • 6 0
 I ride Canyon Torques for about 7 years now! First the FR and since 2012 the FRX Type.
Can't even think about a better one for all Bike! 200mm bike and you can even climb that Thing pretty easy in my opinion. Great kit.

I really do my best to crack it (just to have reason to get the DHX) but .....it's still going strong! Ok tehy have some issues with the Service, but it's no big deal. I experienced the same issues with traditional Brands via local bike shop.
  • 6 0
 I had no idea Canyon was as large as that.
Great article, great pics, and great promotion for all the manufacturers featured in these articles.

I am 99% more likely to make a purchase decision based on articles of this caliber than any banner ad or anything like that.

Thanks again Pinkbike and Matt
  • 1 1
 Too bad they don't sell to the US...
  • 5 0
 They need to step it up drastically if they are going to sell here.
Bikes are 3-4 months out. Parts for brand new (and broken) bikes are months out. So much so that you cant get on the list, and they havent began production. Emails go 2 and 3 days without a response, and then its usually so short and vague its like a tweet. They have this "Youre lucky to even have a canyon" attitude and care nothing about customer prior to or after the sale.
  • 3 0
 owlie is right, Americans would not stand the way Canyon is operating right now. Cancelled my order after 4 months waiting, trying to have German patience.
  • 3 0
 I'm sorry to hear that to company has issues, but I guess I was speaking more to articles like this in general. To your point, if I am going to buy something, I will do a ton of research. Articles like this just get me thinking
  • 2 1
 They do not care about customer complaints . I'm give up.
  • 7 0
 Sincerely I advise you because I did love you. Please do not hide the failure of 'STRIVE shapeshifter' publicly acknowledge the mistake and recalled. It should do so . Because you lost a lot of customers and more to more.
  • 6 0
 Great article, although Canyon doesn't appeal to me in any way. I'd like to see a series on small manufactures. Nicolai has been mentioned. But I would like to see Turner, Ventana, Transition, Cotic, Propain, Alutech, etc.
  • 2 0
 LOL, just posted a comment and when looking up I saw yours so we share the same opinion here!!
  • 7 0
 quality,if it was not for companies such as this,we'd all still be paying top coin for middle of the range bikes..
  • 4 0
 Something i see little evidence on these company insights is torque wrenches on work benches. If i was building a bike, especially carbon, i'd make sure every bolt was torqued correctly, from bottom bracket, to stem, to bottle cage bolts. I'd expect any company worth their salt to wrench everything correctly.
  • 9 2
 They shouldn't need storage space for their bikes given the huge wait you have between ordering and delivery lol
  • 16 0
 that's exactly why they need storage. they build them and then store them for 6 months, just to f*ck with you Smile
  • 4 0
 Anyone considering a Canyon bike should read this thread:
www.pinkbike.com/forum/listcomments/?threadid=149137&pagenum=167#commentid6109574

Amazing engineering. QA and customer service are far below what most consumers are used to.
  • 7 0
 Somewhere. In that massive pile of boxes, is my replacement Shapeshifter.....
  • 6 1
 Shame the customer service is a nightmare, massive constantly changing lead times, damaged frames, poor warranty etc. Great value but you definitely take a risk.
  • 3 0
 I'm looking at getting a Canyon Strive.. But I keep hearing bad customer service reviews. Are there any good experiences to be told? or, do we only ever hear about the 100 bad experiences, with the 99,900 others each year out there silently enjoying there new steads?
  • 5 2
 I have bought 4 Canyons , one frame & one wheel replaced under warranty , no problems. My most recent ordering experience was initially not good at all, missed deadlines, misinformation and finally a lost order but once I had reordered things went pretty smoothly and I now have a 2016 strive in the lockup. There were a lot of issues with the shapeshifter but hopefully it has been sorted with the 2016 version. For me it gives the strive a huge degree of versatility and is potentially a game changer. Yes it's not as straightforward as picking up from a local store but I couldn't find anything close .
  • 5 1
 They do not care about customer complaints .
  • 1 0
 Dealt with them twice, and really poor service, and they also make mistakes left right and center. The service side is massively under resourced. It's a minimum wait of 4 weeks to fix a faulty bike (plus shipping), just ask em. Spend the extra and support your local store. I've been waiting over two months for specific parts, and cant ride my bike.
  • 1 0
 I got my strive July last year, best 160 bike I've ever ridden! It seemed to be the perfect steed until I checked the shapeshifter prior to a ride and it was changing between 160 and 130 willy nilly! This was maybe the10th time I'd been out on it. Mailed them on the 8/12/15. Got a good response but then on the 11/1/16 the mailed me saying the replacement shapeshifter won't be delivered to them for another 4 weeks! Which I guess means i won't get it until mid Feb. I was pretty disappointed. If you want my advice. Avoid the shape shifter. Great idea but what a pain in the but it's turned out to be. If I could afford another bike (which I can't because I spent all my money on this one which is broken) it wouldn't be a canyon. Very very disappointed. Sorry if this ruins your strive plans mate. Choose wisely!
  • 4 1
 Nice photos, but take it from me, DO NOT BUY CAN(T)YON! After purchasing a Nerve 9.0 SL in Austria (now in Australia) in 2013 i have had to deal with Canyon twice, both times have been two of the worst customer service experience of my life. I thought going direct was awesome, and that I'd made a good decision, because the bikes rocks. I was sadly wrong. The delays fixing the faulty bike were endless and varied, they even managed to mess up shipping in the end, they sent it to the wrong country. I now wait since November for rear linkage bearings and bushings specific to this bike, still without a clear idea of when i might see these parts and ride my bike again. When I phone them the poor service team duck and weave questions and never have the same answer and never can tell me when my parts may ship. Something is wrong, the service guys let slip that there are loads of callers in the same situation, and try to make me feel like that makes it ok, "you're are one of very many people with this problem. I delve deeper and ask, are the parts in a container form asia? Are the yet to be manufactured? They will not tell me, and they cant explain what the deal is. The mixed up answer im getting is we have your parts here, we just need to pick and ship them (this was a month ago). Two days ago i asked again. We cannot tell you when, but it will be soon. In one week or two, or a month? They answer we cannt tell you but it will be soon. I have recently ordered a new specialized carbon camber. Canyon can suck a fat one.
  • 2 0
 I bought their 180mm Torque EX vertride last year. It was delivered exactly when they said it would be and has been perfect ever since. Decends better than the 2011 Glory it replaced, and whilst not light, climbs really tech stuff better than any other bike I've ridden. Every company has its issues. I'd definitely use them again.
  • 5 0
 Next visit to Germany- visit Schwalbe, Continental, bike-components.de and SRAM/Sachs site. Plus maybe BMC (Swiss).
  • 3 0
 Go bike-components.de, the best mailorder in europe for parts!
  • 12 0
 I visited SRAM/Sachs last year:

www.pinkbike.com/news/inside-schweinfurt-sram-2015.html

Continental in 2012:

www.pinkbike.com/news/continental-tires-manufacturing-2012.html

And Nathan just did Schwalbe a few weeks ago:

www.pinkbike.com/news/schwalbe-tires-home-story-2016.html

I was scheduled to visit BMC, but it didn't work out this time.
  • 2 0
 "In a market where customers tend to place more emphasis on value and technical details rather than brand, it is the natural home for this business model. A few years ago you could spot these bikes a mile away - they tended to feature a generic frame, decked out with high-end components and as many cables and levers as you could possibly fit onto a handlebar. It is fair to say that you could not sell many of them outside the German market they were designed for."

Yeah right.
  • 2 0
 After almost everytime having issues with their service when giving them my bike for warranty repairs (i.e. brake calipper not tightened after replacing an Elixir brake),Canyon is dead for me.
It seems that this was the right decission when seeing that they were not able to do their homework in the last 3 years,because they are still doing the same mistakes over and over again.
Now I'm with Propain and they know how to satisfy a customer!
  • 2 0
 I bought a Grand Canyon CF SLX 29er. Managed to break the seat stay somehow...still don't know how I did it. Carbon on the seat stay is only a 1mm wall thickness so very delicate. Canyon would not entertain warranty and only offered crash replacement. Fine I thought but I don't want another Carbon frame too delicate for an mtb...so can I buy the aluminum 29er as crash replacement instead...ehhh no. Like for like change only. I just got the frame repaired (risky I know) and carried on.

I recently went to take the integrated headset (original from factory) cup out of the frame. It fell out of the frame!!! It should be interference fit and its not, I was able to push the new bearing and cup in by hand...eeekkkkk. Not so confident in the manufacturing tolerances. You could see where they faced the frame and its wider than the reamer because it didnt't face evenly. So that is my last Canyon...
  • 3 1
 They do not care about customer complaints .
Canyon, instability should not be selling it STRIVE.

It has many faults.
Check, please.
www.pinkbike.com/u/rocina/album/CANYON-STRIVE-shapeshifter-Of-assorted-failure
www.pinkbike.com/forum/listcomments/?threadid=149137&pagenum=161
  • 1 0
 Seven months, several emails and still waiting for the Shapeshifter unit to be replaced on my Strive CF. Canyon UK admits it was a manufacturing problem with the original unit (which has been re-designed and re-manufactured through a different company than that which produced the original) but the company has not done done a recall, are selling 2016 bikes but are not fixing the failed units on all the faulty 2015 bikes.
Typically I own a bike for a year then I replace with a new model, so far my Strive CF Race has been broken for seven months, so over half of my typical ownership- broken.
I'm in my first enduro race for 2016 in a couple of weeks, I'll have to enter on a broken bike- thanks Canyon. Still, they've offered me a £75 gift voucher to say sorry, unfortunately I have to spend it with Canyon....
  • 2 0
 @PinkBike I have to say, i really really love you photo articles you guys post. This comment is in no way related to Canyon bikes but I feel like I need to bing up how much I love these articles. The super crisp pics are just a pleasure to look at (even more than the text) and lust over mountain biking. Keep it up! Thanks!
  • 2 0
 Is it only me, or in all these factory visits that Pinkbike did to Canyon, Rose, Cube etc. All they are doing in the factories are assembling bikes. That is "just" to put together component. What keeps the different brands apart, mainly, are the frames. But none of the factories seems to be making them? Are all frames made in taiwan? Then thats were the craftsmanship is and thats the factory that would be interesting to visit and see a photo documentary from like this.
  • 7 2
 New York hat being worn by a bicycle industry worker in Germany... Nice.
  • 2 0
 Have you ever seen a German buy Jeans in the states? They buy it like it doesn't exist anywhere else in the world!
  • 5 1
 That CT scanner is a proper bit of kit, you know they mean business with a material analysis setup like that.
  • 8 4
 Ordering system accuracy and customer service. I am pretty sure that these words don't exist in German.
  • 4 1
 Never had a single issue with any canyon I've ever bought always been happy with their customer service and the bikes were always delivered on time.
  • 2 0
 As a nerve 9.9 owner this is great to read. Best bike I've ever bought, and I got such great service that I'm thinking about leaving behind Italian road bikes and let me new one be a Canyon too
  • 5 1
 It's a shame their bikes are supplied with poor customer service and shoddy manufacturing.
  • 2 1
 I had a 2006 Torque. The details of that frame were great. But the other Torques that came after that model looked quite "economic" to me. No more geometry adjustments, no more front badge (replaced by printed logo).....

It is an impressive assembly line but there is no soul there in my opinion.

Personnaly I get more impressed with small bike or components factories/workshops with full production based on their own country.
  • 1 0
 Can you name the truck with four wheel drive, Smells like a steak, and seats thirty five? Canyonero! Canyonero! Well, it goes real slow with the hammer down, It's the country-fried truck endorsed by a clown, Canyonero! Canyonero!...
  • 3 2
 German mail order corps turn catalog frames into gory bling bikes optimized for the special breed of german mag-score-counters. Resale value is catastrophic and fades faster than anodizing. It seems they have discovered pinkbike as their new marketing channel. Heute Deutschland...morgen die ganze Welt! Lets hope it puts "Bike" mag out of business.
  • 1 0
 2 Canyons Strive at home = 3 x delayed delivery of both of them, endless waiting for broken SS pistons, just a promisses and lies....It´s a good bike, but terrible service with any interest about customers! Don´t buy Strive without spare SS piston.
  • 1 0
 When did you order? I did in August, Spectral AL, and still wainting. Posts on their facebook page canceled.. Have no idea if they are still delivering, bankrupt, or what..
  • 1 0
 Shop local and have it covered.As someone said above the final price is important but so is what happens after you hand over your cash.most local stores can give you the best possible price they can and if it's that little bit more expensive than online so be it.At least you are covered
  • 1 0
 Do yourself a favour, do not buy a bike from these clowns. Couldn't run a piss up in a brewery. Hours spent on hold on the phone multiple times to rectify an order. Don't even try to email because they wont respond. Should have read the warning signs and baled then. Problems continue with the Strive CF and now I'm trapped in the mind fk that is Canyon customer service .
  • 1 0
 Good news to canyon strive riders. My local canyon official has contacted me, Canyon has decided to replace the failed shapeshfter. Maybe exchange in March, welcomes the decision of the canyon. so i will stop the movement Canyon boycott. thank you so much.
  • 2 0
 Good OH&S, the test rider is wearing a helmet on the in factory test ride, that outdoor track looks sweet, wonder which brand has the best private track.
  • 2 0
 Everyone working at this factory, for the most part looks very happy. Far cry from most large industrial shops.. yaah go bikes!
  • 1 0
 I can't help it, but the very first thing i think when i hear or see a reference to Canyon bikes is, what a rubbish name for a bike company, involuntary reaction, i really can't help it.
  • 2 0
 What about Young Talent?
  • 4 1
 The pump track looks fun, even in that weather.
  • 4 5
 Direct to consumer cuts out your local bike shop, which is often the heart of a biking community. These shops will struggle to make ends meet if they lose bike sales revenue and are demoted to mostly doing tune-ups on an increasing fleet of mail-ordered bikes assembled in soulless warehouses a continent away
  • 2 0
 In Germany many lbs have no clue about proper mtb setup or maintenance and often you are better off without having to deal with them. It's just more convenient to order a bike with some spares online and wrench for your self.
In the shop where I worked, most of the revenue came from overhauling mid to low end bicycles for everyday use and in my opinion most of the mountainbikes we sold will never be used properly.
I would say a bike shop in Germany isn't very often the heart of a biking community (maybe this stands in contrast to North America) but more or less just a service provider.
  • 4 0
 ^This!
I live in a fairly big city and in every lbs i went, each owner was either rude, indifferent, didn't know a thing about setup, or knew anything about local mtb scene. As for now i'm a regular in a skateclothing shop, because the owners are by heart mtber and decided to sell handbuilt wheels.
Direct sales doesn't have that bad rep in our community
  • 1 0
 Nice!!!

What happened to the interview to the owner or majority shareholder of rose bikes tho? the one for cube was very insightful
  • 2 0
 coming, read Matts comments!
  • 2 0
 Having just ordered a LAST fastforward I would love to see something like this for LAST bikes.
  • 1 1
 Not sure if they have the funds to buy a PB article..
  • 2 0
 Anyone else thought - ''Indiana Jones and Raiders of the Lost Ark'' end scene?

It's in there, I just know it...
  • 4 3
 When are they shipping to US ???? being holding off on buying a SC or Niner just to get a hold of one of their bikes.
  • 2 0
 I see they wear their helmets to test the bikes. Safety first.
  • 2 0
 DT Swiss is the place to see.
  • 2 0
 I would love to see a similar visit to Whyte Bikes.
  • 3 0
 How about Moots?
  • 1 0
 These are great article, terrific photos. And now we know.
Matt did anyone take you for a ride?
  • 1 0
 These companies must be making some big bucks to have that kind of a operation - wow. What is their markup?
  • 1 0
 canyon strive shapeshifter has a lot of problems. However, canyon is, there is no interest in customer dissatisfaction.
  • 1 0
 I was rather hoping G the factory and warehouse were actually in a Canyon... Bummer.
  • 3 1
 Is that 50cent the last photo? I know times are tough but....
  • 1 0
 @mattwragg great article - heads up - you've got some dust on your sensor !
  • 1 0
 How about an article on all the made in italy xc race bikes. Fm bike, Paduano, Titici, Protek etc...
  • 1 0
 Still grinds my gears that they don't deliver to north america. Get with it CANYON !!!
  • 1 0
 It's cool to see the steps my bike went through! Can't do anything other then recommend these bikes, my Nerve is awesome!
  • 1 0
 it's weird to have a such wonderful plant and see that Canyon is not able to deliver its orders in time!!!
  • 1 0
 this is really weird that with a such amazing plant, Canyon is not able to deliver a bike in time!
  • 2 1
 that CT scanner is an X-ray...
  • 3 0
 A CT scanner is a special kind of X-ray machine, google it.
  • 3 2
 it uses X-rays but its not an X-ray machine per se
  • 1 0
 I thought a CT scanner used magnetic fields?

googling googling googling...

I see okay yeah my mistake i was getting confused with an MRI scanner
  • 3 1
 MRI uses a superconducting magnet and a phenomenon called nuclear magnetic resonance to produce a picture where as CT uses X-rays. MRI wouldn't be of much use
  • 2 0
 Zee Germans ?
  • 1 0
 Darth Vader voice! Impressive!
  • 5 4
 Direct sales suck big time
  • 1 0
 "The chinaman is not the issue here!"
  • 1 0
 Nice article PB thanks, great factory and photos
  • 1 1
 Why exactly does that guy need a helmet to ride that bike a hundred feet in the warehouse?
  • 1 0
 I need ShapeShifter recall.
  • 1 0
 Wow... not quite what I expected...
  • 1 0
 @mattwragg When are you going to visit Polygon bikes in Indonesia?
  • 1 0
 now I understand why my bike arrived 3 months later, its too much work!
  • 1 0
 What a lovely bunch of people
  • 2 1
 Nice!
  • 1 1
 More Very Big Warehouses with lots of stuff in them.
  • 2 2
 My next bike will be a Canyon, regardless of living in the good ol USA.
  • 1 4
 Hurr Durr my Amurican made Specialized..... Or my personal fav.... I have a Cervelo. My bike was made in Canada lirl
  • 2 5
 No Gwin? Is YT next? Smile
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