Carbon Neutral Brand Pembree Launches UK Made R1V Flat Pedals

Aug 5, 2020
by James Smurthwaite  

A flat pedal is a flat pedal is a flat pedal, right? Well, yes and no. Pembree founder Phil Law isn't reinventing the wheel with his new platform, but it's what's going on behind this pedal that's more interesting.

Pembree is a UK based components company that is entering the game with some big words. Phil says, "It’s our intention to lead the way in the cycling industry with both innovative products and green solutions to ensure we do our part in making cycling a truly low impact sport on and off the bike."

This particular pedal is aimed at e-bikers with a decent sized platform and ten pins on both sides. Its concave platform measures 100 x 110 x 20mm and it runs on sealed ball and needle bearings in the hope of keeping out the worst of the British winter muck, something that's backed up by a 5 year warranty. Law is apparently also working on a second pedal already that will be targeted on the performance enduro and slopestyle markets that will be more lightweight but apparently just as durable.
Details

Dimensions: 100mm x 110mm x 20mm
Pins: 10 on both sides
Inner Bearings: Sealed SKF Needle
Outer Bearings: Sealed SKF Ball Bearings
Weight: 624 grams (pair)
Price: £199 (≈ $260USD)
Warranty: 5 years
More info: pembree.com


More impressive than his pedals though, are Phil's commitments to creating an ethical and sustainable product. He manufactures his products in a factory powered solely by renewable energy from solar and wind and produces his pedals from 100% recyclable material, the same is true of the packaging, which is also plastic free. He even recycles the swarf produced in the manufacturing process.

Phil also works with Temwa, a charity that plants trees to carbon balance companies. Temwa calculated that each pair of Pembree pedals generates 92kg of CO2 and will plant 10 trees for every tonne of CO2 the brand produces. The full calculation can be found, here. Finally, Phil has launched a Pedals4Pedals scheme. If you send in your old pedals, of any brand, Phil will recycle them and give you 10% off a pair of Pembree pedals.


Pembree pedals are on sale now. More info can be found, here.


121 Comments

  • 67 2
 I expect there'll be a whole lot of haters on here but good on him for attempting to do the right thing.
  • 32 0
 I don't think most people commenting negatively are haters, is just that the internet, particularly in written form, is a shitty media of human communication. Criticism that would be reasonable or even constructive verbally in person tends to come up as it's most raw and extreme version when written with relative anonymity.

Let's try to do it better.
I don't mind to pay extra for:
- something made closer to home
- SKF bearings
- high quality

I won't pay an extra for:
- something that weights half a ton
- something that's doesn't look very grippy (pin placement, pin type, axle bulges next to pins)
  • 29 0
 Thank you so much for the comments. I read them all. All feedback welcome
  • 4 0
 @Pembreeuk: I applaud the idea of a carbon neutral product! My only concern after three years using NumberNine pedals with the same kind of pins (traction pins) is that they can be very difficult to unscrew from the pedal if you round them properly by hitting a rock or something hard. Pins should be removed from the other side on mtb pedals for ease of use.
  • 5 0
 @Vertik: But on these pedals the leading edge and trailing edge of the pedal body is replaceable meaning if you do get annihilated threads in one or two pins you can just replace the bit they screw in to!

Good design. I like it!
  • 2 0
 @Pembreeuk: Hi, why is the spindle made of stainless, rather than CroMo. Is it stronger? What is more expensive CroMo or Stainless? Cheers.
  • 5 0
 @Vertik: Thanks for you comments. I take them on board. The pins are manufactured by a company 25 miles from the PEMBREE factory to our design. The thread is a standard M4 x 0.7 so if there were other ones you prefer you could use them.
  • 3 0
 @haroman666: Spot on. Don't forget the Traction Rails can be returned for recycling and credit on new ones will be given as a thank you. Thank you for the support
  • 7 0
 @lev3000: Thanks for the question. 17-4 Stainless is significantly more expensive as it is designed for strength and corrosion resistance. Bearings do not perform well where there is corrosion. CroMo rusts very easily and is a much cheaper material as it is mass produced.
  • 2 0
 @Pembreeuk: this is just my opinion, but for the enduro version you just need to copy the Nukeproof Horizons pin placement and smooth as possible platform, while making them a little wider. Also, threaded pins seem to be grippier than smooth ones
  • 4 1
 Its good to see, but I dont really understand how they are that much more 'green' than for example a pedal from a UK manufacturer like Hope, Unite, or Burgtec as a product, aside from the green energy / money for old pedal thing?

All of these guys make pedals in the UK, all of them make a product that lasts ( I have heard of hopes and burgtecs lasting years, know of someone with a 5+ year old set of hopes) and the materials Pembree have used are almost identical - a Hope pedal is no less recyclable than a Pembree unless you split hairs with things like 'traction rail'.

I think the environmental thing is pushed to an extreme here, the product and production method really are not that different to any domestic manufacturer that uses common sense.

My 2 pence, make a product that is more accessable in terms of cost and design, scale back the claims of the product being somehow tangiably more recyclable than any other UK made pedal and move forward pushing your general environmental credentials.
  • 2 1
 This is an exact copy of multiple sets of pedals I've seen on Amazon for $20. What an outrageous price.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: if only we could find a way to recycle old carbon into new pedals.
  • 1 0
 @littleskull99: we already can, but I’m not sure how green it is as it’s combined with plastic injection moulding - they mince up the carbon and use it to strengthen the structure.

Maybe they could use it with a recycled / recyclable plastic, i don’t know much about it but the general idea exists.
  • 3 0
 @willdavidson9595: which costs $20 for literally all of the bad reasons
  • 1 0
 @Pembreeuk: CrMo pedal axles are typically galvanized, which inhibits corrosion. I understand that galvanizing can be uneven.

Could it be, that it's more cost effective to manufacture stainless axles locally, than it is to manufacture CrMo axles and galvanize them to a certain standard of quality? (Honest question)
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: the eco ticket is an interesting one. I have just bought several hundred lockers at work. Made here in the UK by a UK company and made from steel (recycled) from Wales. Very small travel distance in terms of world travel, recycled, etc. Yet zero marketing on the environment. Just marketing about supporting other UK business. Its whats cool in the circles you mingle maybe?
But its good the effort is made.
  • 2 0
 @ilovedust: I think that is part of it and I’m sure many business practices are more common sense than green planning, until you look at it from that perspective anyway, just like your locker example.

I am also unsure of this whole carbon outsourcing stuff, using another company in your behalf to make you more carbon neutral - stinks a bit to me. So I could ruin my local air quality but pay a company to plant trees on my behalf thus I am therefore ‘green’? Suspect for sure.
  • 18 0
 92kg of CO2 for a pair of pedals? That's around 50 cubic metres at atmospheric pressure. That's incredible and puts it into perspective that these things we'll use for a year or two and then discard generate so much of that greenhouse gas.

At least he's trying to reduce the impact, and at that cost is going to be very niche and an uphill battle against large scale producers. I wonder how much CO2 is generated per pair by the big boys?
  • 5 0
 Yeah it's probably the aluminium, it's horrendously bad for the environment, between the bauxite mines and the smelting, to transporting the ingots for refinement into useable shapes etc.
  • 9 0
 One of the challenges with "the big boys" is that products travel so far to get to their home market (usually from the Far East). Which adds an enormous amount of CO2. The R1V manufacturing emissions are carbon balanced, including the delivery to customers.
  • 6 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: The benefit of using aluminium is that it is infinitely recyclable. That is why we have set up #pedals4pedals .If we can recycle all of the old pedals that we all have in our garages manufactures will rely less on "virgin" material. However even virgin aluminium has a lot of recycled in it
  • 3 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: Check out their calculation. It appears to be the transportation costs not the mining process that have CO2 majority. Of the 92, 50 are aluminum transport cost, and 20, aluminum manufacturing (mining etc.)
  • 4 0
 I test oil refineries; nat gas power plants; boilers; etc all day. They burn so clean they rarely fail a test...lots of nh3 scrubbing.
Its mainly china and the cows doing all the bad stuff.
  • 17 0
 Good for him. Amazing that a small outfit like his is trying to do something positive. In the main I think the cycle industry is one of the most hypocritical industries out there. They all promote cycling for health, and the positives of getting out into nature, yet their efforts on sustainability, reduced packaging, , protecting the very environments we enjoy, carbon reduction are in the main non existent.
  • 7 0
 Thank you so much. You are 100% right
  • 1 0
 What about companies like Hope, Chris King, Burgtec, Works Comp, Unite, Wolf Tooth etc etc who all domestically produce, many use raw material from the country of manufacture, all will recycle, all make products that are quality and last?

I dont know how they get their energy and they dont offer cash for old parts but they are probably 90% as 'green' just through domestic production and common sense.
  • 5 1
 @justanotherusername: Thanks for the question. I am not going to be specific about companies in the industry but there are many that are misleading riders/customers in where their products are manufactured. We are 100% transparent with where our materials are ultimately produced and are working with companies to try to reduce the distance this material needs to travel. One challenge we have here in the UK is the availability of domestically produced aluminum. We are a small company trying to influence a massive industry. I will always be looking to reduce our carbon footprint further still and aim to be carbon negative ASAP.
  • 7 0
 Reading through all the information on the website you really do feel like you are buying more than just a set of pedals, but owning up to the "cost" the majority of the cheap products we buy come at to the environment. As a bit of an engineering nerd I love the exploded diagrams with the info on each component. pembree.com/r1v/?v=79cba1185463
@Pembreeuk thank you for not going down the bushing route to save costs!
Sod the extra grams, my weight fluctuates more than that each day Smile
  • 2 0
 Thank you so much for the comments. PEMBREE is focused on quality, durability and the environment.
  • 5 0
 'This particular pedal is aimed at e-bikers' why? What makes this pedal more suited for an ebike?
  • 4 0
 and what’s the point of them if the lighter weight version is going to be just as durable?
  • 2 0
 weight, I guess
  • 3 0
 624g in weight is what makes them ebike specific, as commendable as the goal and motivation is, I'm not adding nearly half a pound to my bike for no good reason, especially not spending over double a 420g set of dmr vaults.
  • 1 1
 @inked-up-metalhead: heavy like an ebike
  • 2 1
 @inked-up-metalhead: "Shit, we made it too heavy, no one will want to buy it." "Hmm, say it's e-bike specific, that'll trick... I mean... convince them it's fine to be heavy AF"
  • 1 0
 @just6979: the funny thing is, I have an ebike, and yes it's heavier than a normal bike, but that doesn't mean in gonna add unnecessary weight. I'm not about to go all weight weeny, I'm pretty happy with the weight but I wouldn't want it heavier unless it was for a serious performance gain (heavier tyres, rims, coil shock etc).
  • 1 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: The R1V pedal is designed to cope with additional load an eBike has on components such a pedals. With some being over 30Kgs.
  • 1 0
 @Pembreeuk: that's fair, but Id imagine me being 110kg will put higher loads through pedals on normal bikes vs someone 70kg on an ebike (and then you get me on an ebike, when kitted out I'm nearly at the 140kg max system weight for my merida). Out of interest where is the extra weight? It's always been axles that's the weak point for me, I've literally snapped dozens over the years, I've only ever killed 3 or 4 pedal bodies, and at least one of them has been from the axle snapping and ovalising the inboard hole.
  • 2 1
 @Pembreeuk: interesting. I would’ve thought the vast majority of load the pedals see is from the rider weight on them and the occasional interface with something on the trail. Where have you found the extra load from the bike isn’t coming from?
  • 1 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: This is a huge topic as there are so many variables to the load on a pedal. Rider weight, strength of their legs, weight of the bike, the angle of the ground in relation to the bike when you jump, tyres, pressure of air in the tyres, suspension, type of ground the list is almost endless. The R1V was designed to be more durable than any other pedal, including bearings. The benefit is that you wouldn't snap the R1V spindle.
  • 2 0
 @Pembreeuk: the article states that your (lighter) Enduro pedals are going to be just as durable as the heavy ones. Saying things like that whilst also saying you need these because your bike is heavier is a bit of a confused message
  • 1 0
 @mashrv1: 100% this!
  • 1 0
 @mashrv1: apologies for the confusion. When designing I target a specific need. Our next pedal is for the Enduro, slope style rider who generally will have lighter bikes. Can’t wait to release it
  • 2 0
 @Pembreeuk: thanks. Still struggling to see why an bike pedal needs to be stronger. Vertical loads won’t change, horizontal loads (rock strikes etc) will due to the increase in inertia from the heavier bike. Is that what you’re trying to overcome?
  • 1 0
 @mashrv1: Horizontal loads aren't going to be any greater for a 85kg rider on a 15kg bike than a 65 kg rider on a 25kg e-bike....
  • 5 0
 Machine shops recycle dwarf because it has value, not just to be green. Not doing so is literally throwing money in the bin
  • 6 0
 Yup, practically every machine shop I know of has a swarf skip that gets emptied regularly, because why wouldn't you get money back on the waste material?
  • 2 1
 Correct, the PEMBREE factory also uses only wind and solar power to operate the production machines. We also recycle old pedals and will credit 10% for new PEMBREE products as a thank you
  • 1 1
 @Pembreeuk: can I send in 10 sets of busted pedals and get a free set? I'm pretty sure I've got that many old pedals laying about, I was going through a set every few weeks at one point (cheap atomlabs, bought vaults and I've only had to replace them once in 5 years lol)
  • 5 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: I hear you! I have been through so many pedals in the past 25 years, this has been one of the driving forces for me to start the business. I recently met a rider who seemed to think it was ok to go through 3 composite / plastic pedals a season and throw them away each time. PS it would be 10% per order maximum, we need to build a viable business too! :-) thank you so much for you support
  • 1 0
 @Pembreeuk: my biggest pedal problem is size. I've got size 16 feet, my shoes overhang the side of my vaults by around 45mm, could do with some 140x140mm pedals.

And yeah I was being cheeky, I presumed it was one per order.
  • 2 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: Get in touch, hello@pembree.com and I can see what I can do to help. I have thoughts.....
  • 3 0
 We recycle our scrap for both reasons - we have dedicated skips and sort material including sorting solids and swarf. Not all machine shops are environmentally ignorant, There is also a push to reduce electrical consumption, we have a more efficient compressor now, our extractors are lower KW and our heating more efficient - in 10 years I can see this stuff being mandatory. Full respect to Pembree for doing it right from day 1.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: Great to hear and I appreciate your comments. We are working with Ecotricity www.ecotricity.co.uk here in the UK who have been so supportive.
  • 3 0
 There’s only one reason why I wouldn’t buy these and that’s the price if you could make one priced around a nukeproof horizon dh or a dmr vault I would be very interested I think most others would agree
  • 4 0
 Watch this space.....
  • 3 0
 Very cool, great work Pembree You setting a good example will hopefully make other manufacturers follow in your footsteps. I'm pleased to see these kinds of products, and will be more careful to buy wisely in future.
  • 1 0
 Though I agree it’s a great idea and more need to think this way.

Other than the green energy provider and cash for old pedals - can you say how a Hope pedal would be a less sustainable purchase?
  • 2 0
 @justanotherusername: I won't comment on the activities of specific companies but I will tell you what PEMBREE does. From the material factory to the PEMBREE factory, through manufacturing and delivery to the customer all of the CO2 emissions are balanced through our partnership with TEMWA.
  • 1 0
 Thank you, I would be great if other companies followed
  • 2 0
 @Pembreeuk: Entering an all together more complicated subject, but I think we are focussing a little too much on CO2 emissions here, especially as if you have the funds to do so, you can essentially buy your way to CO2 neutrality.
  • 2 0
 @justanotherusername: PEMBREE works with Temwa to balance the carbon emissions of areas that we cannot control such as transport from the smelter in mainland Europe to the UK. The areas we have control over are carbon neutral such as the power for our factory. This is a unique approach within our industry.
  • 2 1
 @Pembreeuk: I understand that, but I find this carbon outsourcing thing a little 'iffy', alongside the green power....

Essentially, you could run the most polluting business ever from your facility (I am not suggesting you are, of course not) and if you are willing to pay to outsource your carbon emissions you can just pay Temwa to plant trees in Africa to make you 'carbon neutral'.

Basically, you are increasing the cost of the product and asking the customer to subsidise the process in order to achieve this, now I am not saying this is wrong but there are clear flaws to this process, most noticably that you could ruin your local enviroment and feel vindicated because a charity helps with sustainable farming on the other side of the globe.

You say the power is carbon neutral too? Does this mean you purchase power from the shared national grid, just from a supplier that adds to said supply with their green energy? This is good, I cant argue there, but surely green would mean purchasing your own solar panels etc and creating your own energy rather than using exactly the same electricity that I do with the exception being you pay a provider who creates green energy and I pay a provider that uses mixed energy sources.
  • 2 0
 @justanotherusername: Its a valid point. We purchase our energy from Ecotricity. As a start up we have to allocate our resources accordingly and that was in our production machinery and factory. Since day 1 I have set out to be "better" than any other company in the bike industry, this may not mean perfect from day 1 but the goal is perfection. I have set a very high standard for myself that I will achieve and exceed. PEMBREE will evolve and develop over time and with the fullness of time I will be able to demonstrate the benefits of this model.
  • 1 0
 @Pembreeuk: I hope so, you have given me some things to think about at work - we are trying to make aspects better but have a long way to go.

Just remember, you have to make a profit to be a green business, one step at a time.

Good luck with things, look forward to seeing that second pedal.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: thank you so much. Won’t be long
  • 2 0
 What's up with the countersink not being fully countersunk? Usually a bolt is countersunk to make it flush or inset... Another mm or so deeper and it would be nice and flush and there also wouldn't be a handful of unused threads on the other side either.
  • 1 0
 Production versions will be fully countersunk.
  • 1 0
 @Pembreeuk: Awesome! That'll look even cleaner!
  • 2 0
 Thank you all so much for your comments, as a start up family run business they are very important. There is so much more coming from PEMBREE and I am so excited to bring them to the industry. If you have any further questions please get in touch hello@pembree.com or check out the website pembree.com

Cheers

Phil
  • 2 0
 The thing that really caught my eye about this pedal/company is the "Carbon Honest" Philosophy. Has anybody every seen the carbon footprint of a product published alongside that product before? I am sure there must be some companies that do it but I haven't ever seen it and certainly not in MTB product sphere.

If every product you bought had its carbon footprint displayed with it (or maybe even stamped on it like a CE number or ISO certification.) it would allow making buying decisions based on carbon production possible. If every manufacture did this (and if Pembree are successful they will be forced to) then there would soon be a race to the bottom of the carbon production ladder. Manufactures competing to produce components with the lowest possible footprint. What and exciting race that would be!

Rock on Pembree, I can see you changing the world
  • 2 0
 Thank you so much for this. I do believe that we are the first within the industry and will continue to publish the carbon emissions of all our future products to demonstrate what we have done to balance the carbon. I hope that we do lead the way the future where carbon emissions are published like weight and size in the specifications.

Thanks for the love @swampdonkeyuk
  • 1 0
 THIS!!! I hate researching the origins and material impacts of bike parts... Wish this was mandatory!
  • 2 0
 @nhlevi: you won’t need to with PEMBREE. I agree it should be mandatory
  • 12 7
 Wants to be green... makes pedals for ebikes... hmmmm.
  • 23 0
 We can bitch about it in either direction...wants to be green, drives 10 miles to the trail head. At least he is trying, many of us aren't.
  • 15 0
 Considering that the existence of e-bikes is what's making convincing to cycle to work, there's more nuance to that argument than battery=BAD
  • 1 0
 spelling error: what's convincing many to (...)
  • 5 0
 @carlitouk: This is Phil from PEMBREE. Thank you, I am not aware of any other carbon neutral pedal.
  • 1 0
 @Pembreeuk: The replaceable rail solution (and therefore pins) is neat [thumbs:up]
  • 2 0
 @carlitouk: Thank you much appreciated
  • 4 0
 @carlitouk: I haven't seen many (if any) e-bikers on the trails that I ride who would actually ride to the trailhead. Most drive just like everyone else.


Commuter/city e-bikes are a different story but that's not what these are for.


Don't get me wrong, e-mtbs are great for doing more laps in a day, but let's not pretend for a second that their owners have suddenly stopped driving to the trails.
  • 1 0
 @bananowy: I don't think anyone argued against what you said
  • 2 0
 If the alternative is a petrol or diesel car/motorbike then and e-bike become incredibly green. It's only if you compare it too an unpowered bike that it isn't greener. As @arierep said "there's more nuance to that argument than battery=BAD"
  • 2 1
 @bananowy: maybe you dont ride the right trails? Practically everyone on an ebike at my local rides there, including a good chunk who used to throw a bike in a van but now pedal there. Your anecdotal evidence is weak.
  • 1 0
 The ultimate goal should be to reduce-reuse-recycle, in that order. It seems that making a proprietary tool to remove the end cap (I’m sure you could jam a screwdriver in there, but that’s not the point), rather that an allen or flat head like everyone else uses contradicts that philosophy.
  • 2 0
 I totally agree with the reuse philosophy. However it has to be balanced with the function of the pedal in this example. If I used an allen key, this would have resulted in a deeper end cap which in turn would have pushed the outboard bearings back towards to the crank. It was tried and tested and this negatively effected the feel of the pedal under foot. Thank you so much for sharing your thoughts.
  • 1 0
 92kg of CO2 isn’t all that much. A single carbon credit unit (1 tonne of CO2) in Australia currently trades at about $15. Hence it should be possible to offset their carbon for a few dollars. If companies quantified their product’s emissions it would be pretty simple for someone like chain reaction to offer their entire product range as carbon neutral at the customers choosing at the checkout.

I do like local manufacturing though.
  • 1 0
 As much as I hate going into this, please keep in mind that Australia is powered mainly by cheap coal, produced by corps that have some neat long tentacles in politics and lawmaking, so they can get away with their emissions cheaper. Sure this goes true for most other countries and companies as well. Other than that, integrated emission offsetting would be great! A couple airlines are already doing this...
  • 2 0
 @nhlevi: I don’t disagree re Australia’s energy mix. Gas switching is widely touted as the quickest way to reduce emissions in the near term. My observation was that as a carbon neutral product only a tiny fraction of what these retail at should be a result of the offsetting.
  • 1 0
 "a charity that plants trees to carbon balance companies"

I would better invest in keeping the forests we have, like financing activists organizations to save the Amazon from deforestation.
  • 4 0
 I have seen what Temwa (the company that Pembree seem to use) do and it's a lot more than planting trees. They work very hard to protect ancient woodlands and forests and to stop deforestation.....they also plant trees Smile How else would they repair the damage that has already been done to our worlds trees?
  • 2 0
 @swampdonkeyuk: They certainly do a lot more temwa.org Check them out
  • 5 1
 Ebike pedals huh. Right.
  • 2 0
 Translation: they're super heavy and super expensive.
  • 6 3
 I wouldn't work half a week for some pedals.
  • 1 1
 Dentists only work half an hour for this kind of moneys....
  • 4 1
 £200 for a pair of pedals? I hope they do the pedaling for me!
  • 4 1
 They do on an e-bike
  • 3 0
 Real bearings instead of bushings. Me like
  • 2 0
 They work so well.
  • 1 0
 @Pembreeuk: yes. I'm on Gusset Kamon now. Never bushings again.
  • 1 2
 Doesn't seem to be anything appealing for these pedals. They are hugely expensive, heavy and look like they lack grip. change the pins, half the price at least and remove 200g of weight. They are just not competitive. I'm all for doing out part but not when you're bent over a barrel for doing it.
  • 2 0
 Thanks for your comments.
  • 3 1
 ‘Bout to get ugly in here.
  • 1 0
 At least if I bought $260 flats it will encourage me not to always "cheat" with my clipless lol
  • 1 1
 "This particular pedal is aimed at e-bikers"

Are you f*cking kidding me? There is NOTHING about a pedal that can make it more e-bike oriented than non-E oriented.
  • 1 1
 Even if it's heavy, just cop to it: "Hey this is carbon neutral, but a little heavy as yet, so maybe it's best on an e-bike".

"aimed at e-bikers" implies it's got something that e-bikes need or are better with.
  • 1 1
 Promo of e-bike specific pedal with picture on regular MTB add cherry on top of article how ethical the product manufactured without describing why they perform better
  • 5 6
 The only way it would be remotely green is if he made the pedals from old blocks of metal with his grandfather's file and hand saw and then delivered them personally by foot.
  • 4 1
 I will consider that manufacturing technique :-)
  • 2 0
 Countersink Fail.
  • 1 0
 Production versions will not have this
  • 1 0
 This is the kind of pedal that makes Gary Fisher twirl his mustache.
  • 1 0
 whats in the tree?
  • 4 0
 Spot light, it was so dark in the woods!
  • 3 3
 Do they come in washed green?
  • 1 0
 Pretty Pedal.
  • 1 0
 Thank you
  • 1 1
 Thick, heavy, expensive = fail

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