Cascade Components Announces Specialized Enduro and Norco Sight Links

Dec 17, 2020
by Cascade Components  
Bike links


Press Release: Cascade Components

As mid-winter rolls around we a pleased to announce two new links! We have developed links for the current Specialized Enduro and Norco Sight models. As with our existing lineup, both links deliver an increase in progression as well as travel to help keep your suspension buttery over chop while increasing bottom out resistance.

Specialized Enduro (2020-current)

Enduro link silver

Our Specialized Enduro link has been designed to take a bike that’s already known for its all-out speed and need for rowdy trails and push those capabilities a step further. With 36% progression and 180 mm of travel, this links brings the bike into mini-dh territory without making the bike any more cumbersome than before. Whether you are riding this bike in the park, pedaling to the chunkiest descents, or shuttling, we believe this link takes the ride quality to the next level. Through our testing on bikes with 230x60 shocks and between 160 and 190 mm of travel, we have found around 35% progression to be a sweet spot for aggressive riding with coils and large volume air shocks. This link puts the kinematics right in that range without altering the geometry.

Black Enduro link
Silver Enduro link
The Enduro link is currently available in black and silver

Specs and Details:


• 180 mm of travel
• Progression increased to 36% compared to 25% with stock link
• Sealed Enduro MAX bearings
• CNC’d from 6061-T6 in the USA
• Colors: Black and silver
• Cost: $358 USD.
Enduro leverage curves



Enduro with link and WRP yoke

Now I’m sure some of you are thinking “when are you going to make a mullet link for the Enduro?” Long story short, mulletting a horst link bike with the upper link makes the bike a fair bit less progressive so we won’t be making a mullet link for the Enduro. Fortunately for those of you who are keen on mulletting your Enduro, the solution is already out there! Williams Racing Products out of Australia make a mullet yoke for the Enduro. This yoke preserves the geometry without compromising the leverage curve like an upper link would. Essentially it increases the effective length of your shock, making the bike sit in a higher portion of its leverage curve. If you want to mullet your Enduro this is the way to do it.

Norco Sight (2020-current)

Purple Sight link in the wild

The Norco Sight link applies our learnings from the V2 Hightower link to Norco’s layout. This link stretches the Sight’s capabilities such that when it comes to descending it straddles the line between Norco’s all mountain and enduro offerings while handling more rolling terrain just as well as ever. The progression is upped to 25% from 18% while maintaining the stock geometry. Additionally, the travel is increased to 155 mm. We believe these changes make for a more active top of travel, allowing it to glide over roots better, while providing the support needed deeper in travel to pump, boots, and rail corners. As with our other links, pedaling remains unaffected by this one as well.

Black Sight link
Silver Sight link
Purple Sight link
The Sight link is currently available in black, silver, and purple

Specs and Details:


• 155 mm of travel
• Progression increased to 25% compared to 18% with stock link
• Sealed Enduro MAX bearings
• CNC’d from 6061-T6 in the USA
• Colors: Black, silver, and purple
• Cost: $358 USD.
Sight Leverage curves

For more details on these links or any of our others please visit cascadecomponents.bike.


159 Comments

  • 68 0
 Hey, complain all you want, but I think its damn cool that we can now change/tune a part of the bike that was previously off limits from tweaks for common folk.
As an example, the Sight is perfect in terms of geo, price, frame material options, ect but the lack of progression has me wary. Now I know I'm not locked in to one way it feels, or am going to jam tokens up in there to make it more poppy.
  • 5 0
 Can someone expand on the existing issues with the Norco Sight? I've read all the reviews and watched the videos....currently have a frame headed my way in a few weeks (hopefully).

Also, does this link work on the 29 and 27.5 Sight?
  • 8 6
 I don't fully get it. To me, this sort of tweak made sense for a bike like the V1 Sentinel, which was pretty unique in geometry when it came out. Buying that bike for geometry alone made sense at the time, but people might be looking for improvements in rear suspension kinematics.

Now, there are so many bikes with similar geometry and travel, the Sight being one example (as well as several other bikes that have Cascade links available). Why buy a Sight if you're not into the rear suspension layout when you can get another very similar bike that checks the boxes from stock? If you're going to change such a fundamental aspect of the frame design, to me that suggests you bought the wrong bike.
  • 5 1
 @deserat: the Sight is fine. Honestly unless you’re sending it really big, it’s a non issue. I have bottomed it out on big drops but it is very muted by the X2 (that Kazimer mentioned in the review wondering if it would be a better shock for the frame than the Deluxe). Mine is the C2 Shimano build 29er.

The Ride Aligned app suggested 237 psi and no volume spacers but I put one spacer in and lowered the psi to right around 195-200 and it’s been great, really matches the 36 Grip2 in every way.

I might look at the CC link down the road, but I don’t see any want or need for it at this point.
  • 5 1
 @DMal: It's a money grab. The v1 sentinel did need a change to make it better as far as being more progressive. I put one on mine and it did make it better.
  • 3 0
 @DMal: what bikes are you thinking of that have the same geo as a sight 25ish percent progression and a reasonably light frame. I'm not thinking of any off the top of my head.
  • 3 0
 @DMal:
availability, price, individual preferences...
Moreover, when you progress, you ride faster and more agressively, You may not want to change your bike or even frame, and a bit of progressivity may be a key to make your bike suit you better.

When you change frame.. you know different headsets, bb, steerer tube lenght, seatpost diameter, different shock.. come on.

Bike, is an art of compromises. Just somethimes it's biggest compromise is kinematics.
  • 7 1
 @DMal: So my options after I purchase the wrong bike are A: Purchase $5,000 new bike plus any upgrades I usually do to new bikes. B: Purchase $300 linkage from a cool made in USA brand that makes my bike more personalized.
Man that is a tough choice..........
Also I think you underestimate the people out there who just want to purchase everything out there for their bike. These people are constantly upgrading just for the sake of fiddling with their bike and trying something new. They probably get a new bike every 2-3 years and tinker with it every season.
  • 2 0
 @hmstuna: Sentinel v2 isn't far off.
  • 1 0
 @floor-tom: True I had forgotten about the sentinel. Still no size specific chainstay length, so if your a small you might have an issue, also slightly less progression compared the cascade link. I would think that it is enough different that for some riders the Norco + link may make more sense.
  • 2 0
 I think the way to upgrade the sight would have been to make it take a longer stroke shock. I would have bought one, but being 200+ lbs means I would max out pressure in the shock.
  • 2 0
 @hmstuna: Yep, rode both Sight and Sentinel. Very, very similar bikes, but Sight was what I ended up deciding on. Guess the Sentinel did feel somewhat more progressive, and I thought it was a bit more efficient pedaling. But, I kind of chalked it up to the variables of demo bikes. Again, Sight was what overall felt better to me specifically.
  • 3 0
 I really liked the Sight but want a coil next year, whatever bike I have! Sight was plush with air but easy to go throught the travel....forget it with a coil. I hesited for a couple of weeks because of that and when I decided to go with that frame, it was sold out, too late! Wasn't that sad but now seing this, yeah, I'm really frustrated that I didn't buy it!!! All black frame with purple components and I could even have a purple link, fuck me!!
  • 2 0
 @DMal: People invest a lot of money in their bikes. If you're not happy with the way it rides or want just a specific thing to be different (rear suspension progression) it makes sense to get something like this instead of seeking a different bike with its own set of unpredictable issues.

This product is aimed at people who hang on to bikes for a long time and try to make them perfect. I don't own bikes long enough to justify something like this, but I completely get why people would seek custom linkages.
  • 1 0
 @lefthandohvhater: When my friend owned an LBS he had one customer that would drop off a frame and a box of parts for him to build up a custom bike at LEAST twice a year, sometimes more. He only put a few hundred miles tops on each bike before selling it. It was crazy. I think he just liked the Insta attention.
  • 46 0
 Pretty cool to see them give the shoutout to another business with the Enduro mullet link. Sort of refreshing to see some "sportsmanship" in the business world.
  • 33 1
 I’m personally offended they haven’t made one for my bike. What about me?
  • 11 4
 Right! the amount of entitlement here is crazy.
  • 2 0
 I’m trying to be silly, these things always end up this way. As a non engineer or machinist I’m fascinated they can do what they do! @map-guy:
  • 4 3
 @chileconqueso: Totally! It's all magic to me. All I know is that my link was a game changer and i'm happy for that.
  • 1 0
 Your bike is too good to mess with!
  • 1 0
 I think so! I’ve not ridden a better one. @unrooted:
  • 2 3
 @map-guy:

Oh so you’re aloud to have one but the rest of us are entitled for making the suggestion. yOu’Re mY fAvOuRiTe kINdA pErSon durrr
  • 2 0
 No cascade link for your bike? That just means your bike's already perfect.
  • 2 0
 @Maverick18T:Lol "allowed" like the Cascade Gods granted me permission to have one!
  • 22 0
 The concept of these is really interesting, would be fun to have Kazimier do a blind test on a couple of bikes. Swapping the link in and out between park laps. Curious how big of an difference the links make on different bikes and whether it's a positive one on all of them.
  • 1 0
 I think you pointed something intresting,
It wuold be good to perform tests of bikes (not sure on how to do this), shocks, forks, and this kind of custom links, I am sure we cld learn that marketing is more important than performance.
  • 1 0
 Actually, THAT is a part where 3D printing would make sense, give everyone the custom spec link for their bike...
  • 2 0
 I have one on my Patrol and I noticed the difference immediately just in my driveway. Actually surprised how different it is. Had to lower air to get it right, but now it's amazing. I also tried a coil and the link is more noticeable.
  • 22 0
 They need to make some for hardtails
  • 10 2
 I rode my new Sentinel link yesterday for the first time and it blew me away. Turned a great bike into an incredible one. Cascade is making a quality product for an important niche within the sport. Everett, Washington represent!
  • 13 3
 Cascade should be nominated in some of the product of the year categories. They are killing it!
  • 11 1
 5th gen nomad link will be out next week
  • 2 0
 First ride dropping Christmas
  • 1 0
 You'll be able to put it on when you get a nomad in early 2023
  • 6 0
 That is my gray Enduro in the pictures/write up from Cascade. I have no affiliation with Cascade or WRP. Here’s my take. It’s not for everyone. No doubt the price will scare some people away. Cascade has built a reputation of making some really cool products that flat out work. Ive seen many of their links on different models and I have yet to find a person that didn’t rave about it. When they released the Enduro link, said why not give it shot. I was happy I did. I couldn’t be more stoked with how the bike performs with the link. Paired with the WRP mullet link, it’s like a whole new bike without having to buy a new bike. Everyone is entitled to their opinions, there’s no lack of that on Pinkbike but companies like Cascade and WRP are small operations just trying to build cool shit. Embrace it!!
  • 6 0
 Thanks for providing your feedback and for letting us use the image! We always love seeing the wide variety of set ups that people come up with. The "elite rear end" Enduros are definitely some of the coolest we've seen roll through. There aren't many reviews for our products out there so little bits like this is all people have to go on really without experiencing it for themselves. With some of the frames we make links for, like the Enduro, we definitely would agree that the link isn't for everyone. If someone doesn't need/want more progression then there's nothing wrong with that. Everyone has their preferences and we're just happy we can provide a tuning path that wasn't widely available for normal riders not that long ago.
  • 1 0
 @CascadeComponents: hey guys just wondering about the norco sight link. If it increases the travel to 155 and I'm already on the RS deluxe with a 52.5mm stroke. Is it long enough stroke to get 155mm of travel or do I need a different shock?
  • 2 0
 @doctorfuzzz: No need for a different shock. The listed travel is with the stock shock size.
  • 11 3
 lol no one will ever be satisfied... but hey that’s ok
  • 4 0
 Legit question, but does anyone know if these void factor warranty?? I have a 2021 enduro and though this link looks amazing, I know the frames have had some cracking issues right at that main horst link. I think this would be a sweet upgrade but would hate the forgo the lifetime frame warranty
  • 10 6
 Just swap the stock one back if you break the frame. Not sure they’d ever know.
  • 1 0
 They've had issues? I also have an enduro, but hadn't heard about this. I did actually crack my frame the first month I owned it. Granted, I plowed it directly into a very pointy rock.
  • 1 1
 If the frames already have cracking issues at that main link, maybe these would make it better somehow? Or not matter?
  • 1 0
 @grnmachine02: I personally have had no issues with my frame and absolutely love the bike. I have just heard about it in forums and also a few fairly relevant mountain bike youtubers have cracked theirs (I know these are not the best indicators of a frames durability).
  • 1 0
 @Pilsner-power: Interesting

One thing I can tell you, is watch your seat stays. They are in the direct line of fire if you broadside something.
  • 2 0
 I believe Transition explicitly said this wouldn't void warranty, but im sure it differs for every company. As others have said, swap the original back on if you need to warranty.
  • 2 2
 The only company that’s cool with you changing the rocker or other parts of the linkage is Santa Cruz. Their lifetime warranty won’t be affected unless the changes you made directly caused the failure.
  • 1 1
 @BenTheSwabian: This is false. Modifying the linkage will void Santa Cruz's warranty.
  • 1 1
 @toomuchgrease: Inofficially, it apparently doesn't. At least thats what @CascadeComponents Pinkbike account has been commenting under other articles about their linkages for Santa Cruz bikes. Apparently they were told by Santa that an aftermarket linkage would only void your warranty if frame damage is evidently caused by the linkage specifically.
  • 3 0
 Here's my interpretation of the Enduro link: needs more pressure to offset higher leverage curve and to keep normal dag for climbing meaning shock gets more wear and heavier riders might get outside maximum shock pressure.

Then, as the shock goes deeper into the stroke it gets harder to use remaining travel especially since you had to bump the pressure to offset the initial high leverage.

This might work ok for coil shock but it's going to suck on air.
  • 2 0
 I am genuinely curious if it is possible to increase progressivity while decreasing the leverage ratio. I just love bacon and booze too much to lose that last 10kg off my body.
  • 1 0
 I agree that it makes much more sense for coil. But to be fair the leverage curves at sag are very similar and this is probably better for someone who rides the bejeezus out of their bike. I for one have a hard time imagining that I would use 180mm of travel on my local trails.
  • 1 0
 @Unrealityshow: Yes. The product increases progressivity while simultaneously increasing and decreasing the leverage rate depending on where you are at in the travel. All other factors must remain the same; air pressure, volume spacers.
  • 1 0
 @Unrealityshow: the leverage ratio (average) is set by the travel and the shock stroke length. Without changing the shock its not really possible to decrease the average leverage ratio.
  • 1 0
 I was wondering if any Norco links were in the works... any chance there will be one for the current generation of Range?

I know the Sight has kind of made the model obsolete... but there are still lots of us out here riding them. Smile
  • 3 0
 I am feeling that the three piece sight link should be cheaper than the one piece enduro link. Machining much more difficult & raw material larger for the enduro unit.
  • 1 0
 These are interesting but I have to wonder if you put one of these links on and increase your rear travel wouldn't you have to get a new rear shock as well? I see the opportunity to upgrade your current shock or try something new. Maybe a coil shock or something.
  • 1 0
 Spec Enduro already has 176mm rear travel as measured in a few tests (170mm advertized) stock. Stock superdelux I was surprised to find did not have enough ramp full of tokens for me on Enduro, which would have pushed me to this product...if not for Megneg that put me back in the middle of tokens again, with better mid stroke support. If I wanted coil I'd reach for this, but bike already 36 pounds with full carbon frame, wheels, cranks. Coil F/R would pork it up even more, though weight not a major concern...but trying to keep the mini DH bike within realm of full DH weight.
  • 1 0
 Nukeproof Mega 2016-2020 link,fixed progression,more travel and mullet please. =)
It can be done even without a custom link,just a 235mm shock with 70mm of travel,but the short link,starts regressive and then,almost halfway through,turns progressive.
It would be nice,if one didn't have to create a custom shock size and have a dip in progression in the midstroke,have to admit.
  • 5 1
 Mullet yoke? Unfortunately I can only have egg white mullets.
  • 1 0
 Doctor told me I need to hold back on the cholesterol.
  • 5 1
 Come on boys, bring on the The Norco Optic rocker link. Dooooooo it!
  • 1 0
 I emailed them asking for more travel and a slightly higher BB. They said it wasn't currently on the short list. Maybe it will get there??
  • 10 0
 @notenduro: Maybe Norco already nailed the Optic’s link?
  • 1 0
 @notenduro: if the sight link sells well I'd wager the optics comes out.
  • 6 1
 megatower MX link pls
  • 2 1
 Does the Enduro link add any weight?

I think an Enduro with this link, a Zeb or 38 at 180mm and your favorite coil would be pretty amazing for a park bike or super enduro type terrain.
  • 1 0
 Make the Enduro even more enduro!
  • 1 0
 Why not make rockers with multiple positions to increase or decrease leverage ratio? Great that they are making an option. What if I want less progression instead of more?
  • 2 1
 It amazes me that every manufacturer who makes a frame does not make it progressive enough. Fair play to cascade though they have convinced a lot of people to buy into this.
  • 5 0
 While some bikes just simply miss the mark, its worth keeping in mind that companies design bikes for the widest audience. Cascade only needs to please a subset of folks.
  • 1 0
 Everything is a compromise. Personally I don't think I'd want this enduro link...too much leverage in the beginning of the stroke. Going to have to add air pressure or run a stiffer spring, and then why do you want a higher final ratio when you're doing that?
  • 2 7
flag getsomesy (Dec 17, 2020 at 12:47) (Below Threshold)
 Sam hill runs his nukeproof in the least progressive setting.

Progressive isnt neccisarily better. Its basically a crutch of shitty suspension and frame manufactures thats been pushed on dumbass pb readers till they believe it. Watch friday fails, mist Ppl dont know shit.

shocks feel less stiction and more like they have decent bottom out resistance when used with progressive linkage, which allows brands to get away with spec’ing cheap shocks to keep bike msrp down and profits up. That is why we have been getting progressive rammed down our throats.

If you have a very progressive bike it will tend to move through most of the beginning and mid travel with little resistance, minimizing traction which is created by pushing wheel agaisnst ground, and allowing the bike to progress so deeply that pedal /chainring/ foot strikes are likely, and then having little more availible travel to absorba real big hit.

Linear bikes can be run with a softer spring, provide more consistent support from the beginning of the travel, the main damping circuit behaves similarly throughout the travel, which is good, can resist too much dynamic sag and compression early -Mid in the travel better, and maybe most importantly the wheel can get out of the way of a big rock by compressing more when its alrady half way through its stroke, rather yhan a progressive bike which would be further in its travel, and also not be able to move the rear wheel out of the way of the hit deep in the travel wirhout transmitting
Much more of the impact.

Of course you’d never have this problem if you just ride your ultra progressive piece of shit on a bunch of lame ass flow trails And never try riding a properly set up linear bike in demanding terrain.
  • 8 0
 @getsomesy: What you're describing is a shock packed full of volume spacers not a progressive linkage.
  • 1 0
 @getsomesy: well I had an Sb6 and now an sb165 and the rear end feels better on the sb165, sb6 is super linear and had shit traction on loose rocks so maybe you need to rethink that statement, there is no use being able to apply more force to the ground if your bike is near the top of its travel and skipping along the surface, more sag meeans more negative travel aka wheel stays in contact with the ground for longer. I agrre there is a balance to be had and that overly progressive can result in harsher mid size hits but overpy linear is just as shit, my sb6 had terrible rear suspension, coil helped it a lot but it's still a bike that sits too high in it's travel threatening to throw you over the bars whilst simultaneously the rear tyre is skiing across the ground. Sb165 is a much better bike in every way and yet it's aroumd 3 x as progressive as the sb6.
  • 1 5
flag getsomesy (Dec 17, 2020 at 17:40) (Below Threshold)
 @CascadeComponents:

No, its not.

What i was describing is a frame with progressive linkage. The damping rate and spring rate is progressive on a progressive linkage bike, whereas only the spring will be progressive on a shock full of spacers on a linear frame.

Less damping/ more wheel movement to shock movement initially will wallow more and provide less of a pedal platform. If you turn the hsc and or lsc up to firm the beginning it will magnify the damping increase later in the stroke and me more likely to spike harshly without using maximum availible travel to absorption a bump.

@danzzz88 im not gonna argue that the 165 dentist bike is not better, but to attribute it to being more progressive is conjecture as there is a number of variables at play. Your shock tune is likely different, geometry is different, probably some different components tires and a different point in time. Just cause your new bike has more traction the way you ride it doesnt prove to ur point.

Generally, Any bike should be run at the correct sag. Changing the linkage ratio will not change sag point as long as you set up your shock with a correct spring rate. A cavieat to that is the dynamic sag may Likely change because the leverage rate adjacent the sag point might like to sit deeper/shallower, but thats totally adjustable for regardless of leverage ratio.

A good setup will only skip as much as one wants it to. progressive linkages may be easier to keep from skipping around and in a good dynamic sag if you dont have a good suspension setup for yourself and or are not good at keeping the bike pressed against the ground. I think Most hard chargers would agree that they want a bike that resist blowing through its travel yet readily swallows big impacts with square edge bumps, such as when landing into a rock garden. Everything is a trade off. I dont need my suspension to move easily to absorb itty bitty bumps, my tire absorbs those small bumps better. I need my suspension to resist sitting to deeply so theres some travel left to absorb larger bumps beyond my dynamic sag point. I also need the leverage rate to be high enough and spring rate to be low enough that the wheel will actually absorb those deep square edge impacts instead of just bucking me or destroying a wheel or tire.
Ps yeti’s are dentist bikes.
  • 4 1
 @getsomesy: That is so wrong it is painful to read. There is no such thing as a progressive damping rate, and you shouldn’t be using damping to try to firm up a specific portion of travel. Compression damping isn’t position sensitive, so you should only use it for changes you want to apply everywhere in the travel.

Every bike has to have progression baked into the suspension somewhere if you don’t want to be stuck choosing between rock hard suspension and bottoming out constantly. If you opt for a linear suspension design, you have to compensate with a progressive shock, which has the same curve regardless of what bike it’s on. If you run a linear shock, you have to build the progression into the frame, but you have a lot more control over where and how the progression occurs. Plenty of bikes with a lot of progression have quite a bit of support through the midstroke.

Progressive suspension only equates to wallowing if you try to increase progression to fix the wrong problems. If stiction is a concern, either run a larger negative chamber and better seals or run a coil on a more progressive frame. If you want to run a more linear shock or bottom out your current shock all the time, increasing frame progression is the solution.

The bike industry may see every problem as a nail and progression as a hammer, but that doesn’t mean all of the people looking for more progression are sheep. Plenty of them understand suspension well enough to make informed choices about the best way to make their setups sufficiently progressive.
  • 1 5
flag getsomesy (Dec 18, 2020 at 4:47) (Below Threshold)
 @Helium89:" There is no such thing as a progressive damping rate" if the linkage is progressive, then the damping rate at the wheel is progressive.

I dont adjust my low speed compression that blows off easily to control bottom out. and i dont adjust high speed compression to control shallow gentle compressions.

"you shouldn’t be using damping to try to firm up a specific portion of travel" thats exactly what climb switches, propedal, spv are , damping applied to the beginning of the compression stroke, which blow open and have lesser effect on deeper stroke

Some shocks historically and just released use hydraulic or adjustable bottom out. that is also position sensitive damping.

furthermore as the gas in the piggybacks pressure increases by the shock compressing , more pressure is applied to the side of the backside of the shims of the compresssion piston ; the increased pressure on those shims makes them harder to oped the further the shock is into the stroke; which is related to the shaft position .

as you can now hopefully understand, All shocks are position sensitive, you fuggin jackoff.
  • 1 0
 @getsomesy: Very few shocks have hydraulic bottom out controls, so you’re citing the exception to disprove the rule. The only sense in which damping is progressive results from the nitrogen pressure, as you pointed out. Since nitrogen pressure is fixed regardless of the shock’s spring curve, the damping isn’t made more progressive to match a more progressive spring. The damping adjustments aren’t localized to a fixed shaft position, which is what I’ve always seen described as position sensitive. If you increase low speed compression, you are increasing it for all shaft positions. Propedal and the like don’t just add damping around the sag point because they can’t, at least not without much different damping circuits than they currently use. If you are at the bottom of a compression and pump down with propedal on, you will still be pushing against the pedal platform, even though you are deep in the travel.
  • 2 0
 @getsomesy: Well Chris porter would disagree with you on having dampers that blow off, aka poppet valve shocks such as the X2 series. The shock itself is not position sensitive it's the leverage ratio of the frame that changes the force and velocity the damper is moving so yes as the bike gets deeper in the travel the shaft speed is higher and subsequent damping will proportionally increase. Damping is all based on the viscosity of the fluid and piston orifices resisting shaft speed, where the shaft position is in terms of the shock itself is irellevant, that's all dictated by the kinematics. Additionally a progressive bike offers more traction, better small bump and better bottom out resistance for jumps, depending on the shape of the curve it cpuld be more or less harsh on mid size hits than a linear setup as the midstroke support of a linear setup is higher therefore offering more resistance through said midstroke and harsher square edge hits. Thr only place you can say progressive kinematics are harsher one hundred percent of the timr is in the last part of travel, but then that is thr price you pay for bottom out resistance..
  • 1 0
 @Helium89: @Danzzz88: almost any shock including shims, various base valve designs can be valved to have sort of multi stage valving with an initial threshhold that holds up to the likes of gentle pedaling then blows open then had lesser resistance till oil flow rate catches up and provides significant pressure on the high speed stack or valving.

I’m not totally against progressive designs, especially on long travel bikes with a fairly flat curve and short steep bit of ramp at the end. Also straight lines with a low degree of progressivity are not too difficult, there are lots of progressive curves where the beginning and mid are very soft, which makes it difficult to generate support in the early part and mid part of the travel and yet have the later portion of the travel not feel difficult to access or harsh.

Its really hard to make a very progressive bike feel initially supportive to resist squishing under compressive forces like pumping, but still gobble boulders and gnarly muddy roots. On the other hand if you want a linear linkage bike to feel progressive Or supportive deep in the travel there wre a number of easily achievable ways to do that, such as increasing ifp pressure, decreasing ifp volume, increasing high speed compression damping, using a longer bottom out bumper, using a progressive spring, using a shock with hydraulic bottom out, running a higher spring rate with less preload and low speed compression damping. Valving a progressive bike to have good initial support with a smooth break into bunp damping almost requires some funky threshold valving, spv, propedal type of setup, which sometimes seems to easily lack midstroke support.
  • 1 0
 @getsomesy: Most bikes aren't progressive to the degree you are saying though and likewise most bikes aren't linear to that degree either, yea the Capra is pretty damn progressive and my sb6 was super linear but they are outliers. The way you put it is assuming progressive bikes sag in the middle of their travel, they don't, yea they are deeper in the midstroke relative to wheel travel than linear bikes but it's not so much that they basically are absorbing square edges in the last 30% of wheel travel. Obviously there is always going to be extreme examples of either linear or progressive bikes that perform poorly but I can say the kinematics of the sb165 are much better than the sb6, you want enough sag to prevent skipping on loose terrain, create traction and keep the head angle nice and slack. I was super disappointed when I bought my previous sb6 after I tried a friends Capra, granted the sb6 was slightly better in square edge hits but it was less supple everywhere else and felt like a trail bike rather than a dh bike in comparison to the YT.
  • 2 2
 Waste of money...
My 2019 sight is perfect and the cascade links looks cheap with the 3 torks bolts ...looks like the old norco links( 2018 and older)... and for this price no thanks !
  • 2 1
 Yeah because it´s looks it´s supposed to improve. Jeeez...
  • 1 2
 @Mondbiker: If you think you improve your bike with this buy it man this is your money you waste not mine! Maybe you just dont know how to tune your suspension ...
  • 1 0
 I don't understand why you'd want more progressive, won't it make the window of practical travel smaller (in that the last 10% is only for oh-shit moments)
  • 2 0
 Do these void warranties?
  • 3 2
 Not if you put your old link back on the bike I guess
  • 1 0
 I would have thought a megneg air can would be a better solution for the Sight. Unless you have the Fox build I guess...
  • 1 0
 Yes a megneg would be good and a lot cheaper! But I wanted coil so that would be good if someone want to do this and is not 130lbs lol
  • 2 0
 Does that violate the warranty?
  • 18 19
 $530cad for a claimed 10% increase in the Specialized... .No thanks. Typical pricing, and "progression" for the bike industry though.
  • 9 1
 Also does more progression not equal to better.
  • 15 2
 @cky78 : its a tuning tool. With more progression you can setup with lower air pressure or move to a coil to gain traction over high speed choppy roots and rocks while still maintain bottom out control. Its a good combo for people that ride faster than average, bike park, or fast trails like in Pisgah NC. Cheaper than getting a new bike or frame.
  • 7 3
 @bmxRC009: except that’s not what this link, or most of their links do. Look at the curve. It’s starting off much softer which requires going up in spring rate (or air pressure) to maintain your previous sag. Add a little at the end of the curve and there’s your new curve.
  • 3 1
 @DHhack: As we know, every bike is a compromise and maybe a new link moves the bike from good to great for a particular rider. It doesn't have to work for everyone in every situation. Can't we just be happy that there is a small company doing something that some people find useful to them? I am so stoked that there are boutique brands producing high quality products for those that want them. Perhaps we don't need 72 different types of toothpaste but I'd say more choice is a good thing in this case.
  • 3 0
 @twonsarelli: Agreed, and well said. But, does the toothpaste need to cost $1,000? haha
  • 2 0
 @cky78: haha well I hope not.. or at least, I won't pay $1000 for toothpaste. As for the links, I would definitely consider one if I were in the market for this type of change and had a bike for which the link was available. A few hundred dollars might seem like a lot of cash for one component, especially one that replaces a piece of the bike that is already functioning as intended. In fact, some of these links cost more than the first mountain bike I ever bought. I am just glad that someone is fulfilling their dream and exercising their talents while also providing a custom feel for the right customer. I would be so stoked if I was running a small component manufacturer. I am sure I'm not the only one with those types of daydreams.
  • 1 0
 @twonsarelli: Again, well said. I guess I was getting hung up in the numbers. Typical of, and for me. Have a super day!
  • 3 0
 These links are pushing the leverage ratios up to the same numbers that remind me of what some folks were doing in late 90's and early 2000's. That did not equate to 'better' performance back then and I struggle to see how that would improve things now. Higher spring rates, increased demand on seals due to higher shaft velocities, and higher damping/valving demands....
  • 3 1
 @DMal: it's funny how people always joke about ridiculous pricing in mtb, but then something like this comes out and immediately people are screaming "take my money! I want the new shiny!" No wonder prices are so ridiculous lol. Unless you're an elite rider, I really question if the vast majority of pinkbike riders could even tell the difference in a blind test. I'd bet not, but that doesn't stop anyone from telling themselves it's the greatest upgrade ever lol.
  • 5 0
 @DylanH93: If you're bottoming out your suspension all the time and you get a link with significantly more progression, I think you'd notice. At the end of the day, we're adults playing with toys. Sometimes we can add cool parts to our toys, but we don't have to. Like others here have said, it's cool to live at a time when anyone with the internet and a credit card has the option to experiment with their toys.
  • 2 0
 @DylanH93: Couldn't agree more.
  • 1 0
 @Inclag:

Exactly
  • 1 5
flag getsomesy (Dec 17, 2020 at 12:31) (Below Threshold)
 @bmxRC009: on a trail bike you cannot use less pressure or lighter spring with more progressive link; you set air pressure or coil weight&preload to achieve proper sag.

Only way to lower pressure is if your yotally ignoring sag and were using shock pressure or tokens to avoid bottoming, which is acually supposed to be the duty of damping, damping adjusters, bottom out bumper, ifp pressure.

I would assume you like so many pb’ers dont know jack about shocks and think bottom out should be / is controlled by spacers and pressure in your monarch / float etc, and that dampening is the evil lockout switch
  • 2 0
 @twonsarelli: it’s a big deal if you’re on a coil shock. It’s a new coil. People that buy this link and run coil are probably on a $130 Fox one because it’s orange. Are those back in stock yet?

And that’s not even taking into account that your Horst link is going to probably bob more while pedaling.
  • 1 0
 @getsomesy: The issue is I have had to run less sag than suggested on some frames even with a full stack of tokens (2018 Vitus Sommet and 2017 Smuggler) and still bottomed out with a clap on trail rides. I am 170 pounds so not even a heavy person. A more progressive suspension design would solve this issue which is why I am now on a Tranny Patrol.
  • 2 0
 @DHhack: I can understand the concern but in search of the optimum feel from their bike, some people will think it is worth it. My primary point is that I’m glad this exists, even if I don’t want or need one. After all, some riders spend $2k on carbon wheels to do the same job as a $600 set of alloys. I bet this link is likely to have a more pronounced difference for more people than the carbon wheels would have.
  • 1 0
 @twonsarelli: it’s also a problem if you weigh more or if you run a lot of air pressure. This link could put you over max pressure. It’s all things to take into account that they mostly don’t do a very good job of telling people. Personally I buy bikes that have the progression I want, more for dh and less for trail.
  • 1 0
 @DHhack: yeah i think a lot of us are in that camp. buy the bike that will have the best downhill performance because we think that part is more fun. then you just make the most of the climbing abilities of the bike and go from there. a couple extra minutes on the 10 mile approach is nothing compared to how much more fun the descent will be on a bike that really wants to rip
  • 1 1
 @bmxRC009: sounds like you needed a better shock, or at least a shock with some more compression damping built in. high speed compression control, bottom out control will help with this.

Just curious, have you tried running the frame without any volume spacers and the correct sag?

sometimes people mistake sag, either by irregular body position or poor measuring...
  • 1 1
 @Inclag: Well, fortunately, wheels go bigger, geo got better and comparing modern suspension with the stuff of the early 2000s is like the difference between a ford model T and a 911. Even with heavy riders, if the frame maker did not f*** up proper it is going to work out fine and work a treat as long as you go with a low overall compression ratio.
  • 1 0
 @Cascade Components.
Can I get purple for my evil offering link?
  • 2 2
 Hoping that Cascades will produce also links for the DRUID to add more travel.
  • 1 0
 That's why I'm waiting for the long travel (should be in a couple of days) but I must say the druid would be perfect for me...I like everything about it but would like more like 140-150mm for those flat landing!
  • 2 1
 Can you make one for a 2021 Mega 290 plzzzzz
  • 1 1
 Has to be a no brainer. Big miss from Nukeproof not to add an MX option. If Spec can do it with the evo, they can all do it.
  • 1 1
 link for the mk1 scout and patrol would be awesome. would save buying new bikes
  • 1 0
 Anyone got feedback on their links for the Yeti SB130 or SB150?
  • 1 0
 @YemBot I'm curious too. I found the press release of the SB130 link kind of confusing. Just didn't make sense what it was actually doing. I think the stock link with the DPX2 is great, especially now that /i know my shock pump is off by 15psi, but if you wanted to run a coil or X2 that the link might make more sense.
  • 1 0
 I would kill to get an anodized purple link for my 2019 Giant Trance 27.5
  • 1 0
 There is a cheapest screws on a 358$ link for Norco
  • 1 1
 Need a long travel druid link
  • 1 1
 Evil following link please!!
  • 1 1
 Please make something for the 27.5 Firebird!
  • 1 1
 Why do the require a news post everytime they release a new link?
  • 1 2
 Maybe a Process link next??
  • 3 0
 There's already a process 153 link. They told me they do not intend to make one for the 134.
  • 3 0
 @AlexBreck: Ya I should have been specific, a Process 134 link would have been nice.
  • 2 0
 Would be interesting to try on a 134 my megneg can is full of tokens.
  • 2 0
 @JockoJones: agreed that the 134 is a prime candidate, especially since they did the 153 and the 134 could really benefit from a different leverage curve. when i reached out a few months ago, they said they had no plans for it but maybe in the "distant future." who knows what that means. in the meantime, i'm going with a custom coil from avalanche to compensate.
  • 1 0
 @AlexBreck: what shock are you using and what is your opinions on how the coil works on yr 134?
  • 1 0
 @JockoJones: I don't have it yet. It's a bomber cr custom tuned by avalanche with a bumper system because the bike isn't quite progressive enough. Should be here in the next few weeks.
  • 3 6
 Saw the Norco Sight Link in the title. Was hoping for a reduced progressivity. Oh well.
  • 5 0
 You can't possibly want that bike to be less progressive.
  • 3 2
 @TheBearDen: It's not so much about progressivity as is about leverage ratio. Like RAAW did with their two links.
  • 4 0
 @DMal: you speak of heresy! More progression is always the way. You can never have enough of it, that's the law.
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