Cascade Components Releases New Brake Calipers - Sea Otter 2021

Oct 7, 2021
by Mike Kazimer  

Not content with making aftermarket shock links for what seems like nearly every bike in existence, Cascade Components have now added brake calipers to their catalog of CNC machined components. The new North Fork calipers are compatible with all of SRAM's Code levers, and are said to deliver 20% more power than the stock Code calipers.

That increase in power is achieved via the use of larger diameter pistons – the North Fork caliper uses 16 and 18mm phenolic pistons, compared to the 15 and 16mm pistons in a standard Code caliper. The lever throw remains the same in order to maintain a familiar feel, just with more available power.
North Fork Caliper Details

• 6061-T6 aluminum
• 18mm and 16mm pistons
• Designed for use with any Code levers
• Colors: Black, purple, electroless nickel
• Made in USA
• Price $283 each / $530 USD pair
cascadecomponents.bike


The calipers are priced at $283 each, or $530 for a pair, lever not included. For reference, the MSRP of a SRAM Code RSC brake lever and caliper is $250 USD. On my scale, one North Fork caliper weighed in at 137 grams, just 18 grams more than a Code caliper.

The calipers are machined in the USA from 6061-T6 aluminum, and are compatible with SRAM's Code pads, as well as their Bleeding Edge system, with the bleed port at the top outboard portion of the caliper. While Cascade Components makes or sources their own parts for the North Fork calipers, there's a large amount of cross-compatibility in order to make sure spares are relatively easy to find, and everything except the two bolts that hold the calipers together could be sourced from SRAM if necessary.

The calipers house 16mm and 18mm pistons.
Aside from the two bolts holding the caliper together, all of the other parts are designed to be cross-compatible with SRAM's Code parts.

For riders who want to tweak their brake setup even further, Cascade Components also has a new cam kit that works with Guide and Code RS and RSC levers, the ones that have SRAM's SwingLink design.

Cascade's cam is designed to ramp up the amount of force more quickly, creating less lever throw and a faster bite. The cams are priced at $37 per pair, although Cascade do warn that they're not going to be everyone's cup of tea – riders that tend to drag rather than stab their brakes may notice more hand fatigue from the change in lever feel.
Brake cam
The cam kit works with Guide and Code RS and RSC levers. Photo: Cascade Components

The final brake caliper prototype
Photo: Cascade Components

Ride Impressions

I've had a set of the North Fork calipers in my testing rotation for the last few months, and I've been able to take them on plenty of long, brake burning descents during that time period. Getting them up and running didn't pose any hassles – the bleeding instructions are clearly written and easy to follow. It's worth noting that not all post mount adaptors are compatible with the North Fork calipers due to the larger dimensions – Cascade Components has a list of what will and won't work. The good news is that there aren't any known fork incompatibilities; for instance, if you're using a RockShox Zeb, which has a 200mm post mount, the caliper should bolt right on.

On the trail, the extra power is noticeable, but it doesn't smack you upside the head. There's still plenty of modulation, which is handy for creeping down dust covered rock faces without fully locking them up and doing the skid of doom. The extra power was most evident during heavy braking, on really steep sections of trail where the brakes were constantly engaged. Again, it's not a night and day difference from the stock caliper, but it is a definite improvement, and it could be the ticket for bigger riders, e-bikers, or anyone who's typical trail selection varies between steep and steeper.

There's also the fact the that calipers simply look great, at least in my eyes. I'm a fan of the slightly chunky, machined look - they take me back to a time when aftermarket brake levers were all the rage for riders eager to hop up their Hayes and Avid brakes.

Given the substantial of cost, I'd recommend that power hungry riders give SRAM's new HS2 rotors a try first, and then consider the North Fork calipers as the next step if that bump up in power still isn't enough.

As for the cams, those are a little less straightforward to install – there's a pin that needs to be pushed out, and spring that needs to be oriented the right way. I did it sans instructions; I'd imagine Cascade will have a little manual that'll include some tips and tricks.

I have big hands, so I tend to run my levers a little further out, and have them bite a little quicker. For that reason, I got along fairly well with the different cam installed, although I personally didn't find the new leverage rate to be that much of a benefit over the stock configuration. The modulation of SRAM's Code RSC levers is one of the reasons I tend to prefer them over Shimano, and the cam took some of that away. For some riders, though, the change in feel the cams deliver could be exactly what they're looking for.






220 Comments

  • 145 10
 Over $500 for callipers to use with some likely quite manky / used levers you already have?

Why wouldn’t I just buy a decent brake in the first place and for less money?

Come on Cascade - do it properly and make the lever too.
  • 121 8
 Hayes Dominion A4 will cost less, and are way better than codes anyways!
  • 54 1
 @Caiokv: just jumped to a set of A4s after running RSCs forever. They are definitely leagues above the codes in every way possible.
  • 50 1
 You want the levers too huh? Calipers are already $283 each which are way more faster and easier to machine.

If they release it and are priced at $1000 per side I'll be waiting for youre comment to say "finally, I am buying this shit"
  • 9 0
 @tonkatruck: No, I am not going to be a customer for an ultra expensive brake like the trick stuff but at least it makes sense as a complete package - a high end boutique brake, not a boutique calliper connected to run of the mill, likely used levers.

The bike industry has a market for the ultra expensive boutique component now, just look at absolute black, trick stuff, intend etc
  • 8 0
 They look great though! Wish I could afford something like that. But I’m happy with my cheap shimanos
  • 7 1
 I will say it is cool they are trying to do this in the US. I am not aware of a hydraulic brake made in North America. For those with unlimited money, this is a cool option.
  • 12 3
 Just to swing in the mix and match theme that is going on since Magura thought it would be a good idea to produce a MTB "break" lever* from carbotexture... I bet the Shigura is still more powerfull and has a better feel.

*I know it is written brake...
  • 2 0
 @tonkatruck: same price as trickstuff, if it’s good enough people (not me) will buy them
  • 1 1
 because people will still buy it for show
  • 7 0
 Pretty much. I've had a pair of levers set aside in anticipation of these dropping and now I'm having strong second thoughts. I figured between 300-400 was ballpark for a set of boutique calipers. This industry never disappoints on pricing. A4s after all it seems!
  • 4 0
 @jj12jj: Except as I said trickstuff is a whole brake including lever and meant to be incredibly powerful, this is a calliper to be used with a mass produced and likely used brake lever, quite a difference.
  • 2 0
 @tonkatruck: go full stupidly expensive or go home, half decent at that price though it's mehhh
  • 5 0
 I'd be all for a way to improve or revitalize Codes with reasonably priced after market components. But it's awfully hard to see buying them when you can get an A4 complete setup WITH DISC for the same price...
  • 6 4
 I personally don't want more ramp in my SRAMs (which I think are quite good despite the comments here). What I would buy is a Shimano unramp - something to decrease the initial bite of their brakes.
  • 2 0
 @stumphumper92: they will want calipers to match thier links lol
  • 2 1
 @shredddr: I want the opposite! A ramp thingy for Shimano.
  • 6 2
 You can buy individual Code RSC lever assemblies for $126.00 each if you're worried about used levers. $252 for brand new levers, and $530 for a pair of the calipers, plus $90 for the brake hose assembly and $54 for the brake pads. You're in it for $800 before bleed kit and install.

Still, all brand new parts and much more powerful Codes for $470 less than Trickstuff Maxima's (as a comparison). It's not crazy... The "holy grail" of brakes are powerful, modulate well, consistent, and quiet. I think there is a good chance that these would deliver a premium braking performance, especially if paired with the new sram rotors.
  • 5 0
 I actually am a fan of the idea. I feel power is one thing that could be improved with the code, and this seems just the ticket. Sure it’s expensive, but it’s also not mass produced extruded pieces. I think this is a friendly mixture of increased performance without going totally proprietary. I for one tend to break levers and such, so to have a cheap option to replace those parts that are readily available, sounds good to me. I have yet to damage a caliper. I guess one mans trash is another mans treasure. In seeing your responses, you seem to be after a boutique brake without the boutique prices. Realistically your gonna have to compromise. One is cost, the other is performance... and the now 3rd potential option is partial upgrades.
  • 4 0
 @KJP1230: So $800 for a DIY build your own brake?

The review didn’t indicate these would then be a ‘holy grail’ brake - just a little more powerful than the SRAM calliper and you still have any drawbacks of the mass produced SRAM lever.

I honestly think they need to get the lever made here - give everyone a full brake, bring it in for sub $800 (which is still rather expensive) and then would be into something.
  • 10 0
 @jomacba: The Hope E4 is sub $250 a brake l - fully CNC made in house, not an ‘extruded’ part in sight - sure they are proprietary but you could buy a whole lot of extra levers for the change if you are that worried about breaking them.
  • 2 1
 I've been running some cheap Deore Non-Servowave levers with my Saint calipers and it does help with modulation and adds a more consistent lever feel. Downside is that the lever blades are 3 finger and huge, and finding aftermarket XTR lever blades is both challenging and expensive. Outside of Trickstuf, Shimano makes the most elegant and minimal levers on the market. I'd be down for the Hayes Dominions if there master cylinders were the size of a city block.
  • 3 0
 @rain164845: It's called ServoWave, and it's been attached to your shimano levers for many years.
  • 1 0
 Check out "Radic", they released a gorgeous brake and are still working on their 3D printed one as well...
  • 3 0
 I quite like the idea of small manufacturers making hop-up parts for existing products. There is no real reason it shouldn't be possible to mix and match levers and calipers, so if a company wants to make a caliper that is a bit nicer than a code caliper that people can just bolt on to their current lever set up I think thats a good thing.
  • 2 0
 bit pricy though....
  • 2 0
 @x-rider: I run shingura MT5/saints... they are really really good!
  • 6 0
 @justanotherusername: I get that it's popular to pile on against SRAM... but there are a LOT of people that have terrific experiences with their SRAM brakes - especially the current Code RSC's. I've personally had 6 different types of Sram brakes over the years, and I have yet to run into an issue. Similarly, a few of the guys I ride with are flat out fast, and they all ride Code RSCs. Hell, one of them is a bike shop employee, and he got ride of his Maguras to go back to his Codes.

Maybe the most popular and most popular OEM-spec brake lever is a great place for Cascade to start when designing a customer caliper.
  • 3 0
 @KJP1230: yep - nothing wrong with my codes, or my guides. Reliable and consistent for years . Many riders I know have the same experience. I don’t really get the hate
  • 1 0
 CNC is all they knows
  • 2 0
 @KJP1230: I’m not ‘piling in’ on SRAM at all, I would be saying the same if a Shimano lever was being used - it’s the fact an ultra boutique, very expensive calliper is being mated with something mass produced and probably well used in the SRAM lever.

But if you want to discuss how good the Code is, then why would anyone want to make a calliper to improve it? (I have no problem with SRAM brakes I have tried btw) - surely it’s more than ‘because we can’
  • 3 0
 @justanotherusername: just wait till you find out about what kind of ultra boutique stuff is being mated to $1000 Honda Civics lol

All (semi) joking aside, I would love to set these up but the value proposition is verging on borderline madness.
  • 2 0
 @PHeller: Flo motorsport makes nice aftermarket levers that fit slx/xt/xtr master cylinders. $90 for a set with lifetime warranty. I love them
  • 1 0
 @Tracefunction: Nope those are for ServoWave brakes.

Also, XTR Race Levers are $35/ea and are identical side-to-side so a pair is $70. Also carbon composite.

In total, my BL-M4100 (pair) was $54, a set of XTR blades would be $70. That'd make the total lever setup $124. Not as light as XTR, but similar ergonomics and more modulating lever feel.
  • 1 0
 @Caiokv: Yup. I held off on Hayes since they're track record had been questionable at best. One ride on a set of A4s changed my thinking. They're definitely the best brake out right now when you consider the price:performance ratio.
  • 1 0
 @shredddr: I kind of like them and I own both...
  • 1 0
 @Caiokv: fellow Code to Dominion Convert here. Absolutely blown away at how superior they are to my Code RSC. Better modulation, power, and looks!
  • 2 0
 @PHeller: have you tried the formula cura 4.Powerful with good modulation and they look as good if not better than shimano IMO.

i've had my set for 3 years with no issues.
  • 1 0
 @rideonjon: I came here to say this. I'm running a Cura 4 in the front and a Cura 2 in the back. Best brake set I've ever had.
  • 2 0
 @justanotherusername: Look, man - you said "drawbacks of the mass produced SRAM lever." And my point is: I don't think there are inherent drawbacks to SRAM levers. Sure, across 100,000's of units produced each year, you're gonna have some warranty issues. And some of those folks are gonna scream from the rooftop on Pinkbike that every SRAM product is garbage. But there are a great many people who ride SRAM levers and have a top-tier experience.

Designing, engineering and producing a lever assembly is much, much harder than doing the same for a caliper. Especially as Cascade is a company specializing in single-piece CNC. So Cascade Components sat around a table and said, "How could we make an existing and popular product a little bit better?" They opted to go after the most popular brake set, and address the primary concern with Codes: great modulation and feel, could use a little bit more power.

Lo and behold! For $300 more than a set of Codes at MSRP, you can have Codes with 20% more power and a blingin' caliper on your ride.
  • 1 0
 @Fullsend2-13: I have yet to ride a set of dominions, and I have heard nothing but good things in terms of performance, but I will agree to disagree on the looks.
  • 1 0
 Both the Codes and the Dominion have ugly, overly huge master cylinders. Hope levers are atrocious, despite all their CNC goodness. It's my understanding that the large master cylinders allows them to produce more power with a lighter lever feel. The Formula levers are a little bit better (slimmer/smaller). Shimano is best. However, Trickstuff has got relatively small masters as well, and they make some the most powerful brakes on the market.
  • 3 0
 @PHeller: Master cylinders on the codes (can’t speak to most other brands) is actually to give the reservoir more fluid for thermal expansion. I find that saints seems to not have enough fluid for full pad wear, forcing the user to add fluid. (This is when bled with the pistons fully retracted) To your point however, the Size of the piston in the lever (diameter) is always a balance. The smaller the diameter, the more power they would generate, however, this also means less fluid is displaced over the same stroke, and therefore the leverage on the piston itself, can lend a hand into reducing lever throw or increasing power. By using the same piston setup in the codes and guides, sram has gone the route of changing the piston diameter at the caliber to increase power. This of course requires more reserve fluid (hence the larger lever body on the codes) to make full use of the pad life. Shimano also uses a left right lever which means the architecture can be stacked allowing for what appears to be a smaller footprint. Adding into the fact that sram uses the swinglink on the higher end brakes which creates a variable point of leverage to maximize power and minimize lever throw.
  • 1 0
 @jomacba: good info, I learned something!
  • 1 0
 @jomacba: Fun fact of the day, Codes, Guides, and Levels all use the same master piston & seal parts as far as I recall, which would indicate they have the same master piston surface area. I'm no brake engineer but this would suggest power at the MC in these cases comes primarily from mechanical advantage of the lever ratio.

To that end you could probably run Guides with the North Fork caliper although you may run into displacement issues with both heat and pad wear, and of course the lever ratio is likely different. SRAM brakes are a rising rate leverage ratio IIRC and I suspect there is a significant difference between each model.
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: not to mention the actual magic happens at the lever.

So cascade are just making the part thats easiest and has the least influence.

If some I were to go this route I would
Get the maxima levers and run mass produced calipers.
You'd end up with a much better end product and cheaper.
  • 1 1
 @justanotherusername: This is how you speak truth! There has always been excessive excuse making about SRAM brakes. I get it, people want them to work as well as Shimano, and I'll never figure out who exactly managed to equate "better modulation" with SRAM brakes, but that is the biggest farce I've ever heard. Their lack of power is confused as modulation, but modulation comes from the application of the brake; it is not an inherent part of the design. If you want modulation, you do it by squeezing the lever harder or not squeezing it as hard. The benefit of Shimano over SRAM is braking power, which Shimano has in spades.
  • 2 0
 @rcybak: people who "managed to equate better modulation with SRAM brakes" possibly just have a fundamental understanding of how brakes work. Modulation does not come from the application of the brake, it begins with the rate at which the MC piston moves through its stroke. Servo wave is a falling rate ratio with a sharp initial ramp, which is why they deliver braking force quickly. SRAM brakes have since the Avid days been smooth rising rate ratios, which translates to consistent, increasing braking through the lever stroke (read modulation).
  • 1 0
 @HaggeredShins: do you know - are the Deore levers (non-servo) more or less linear? I'm tempted to run XT calipers with deore lever/MCs
  • 1 0
 @HaggeredShins: You fundamentally are correct. The pistons differ based on the use of swing link vs non swing link, but the bore diameter is the same. (I can’t fully speak to the levels as I have not torn one apart). The body’s for each lever appears to come from
The same extrusion, with more machining to accommodate the additional parts in the RSC/ultimate brake systems, and the higher end models being anodized vs painted/powder coat. But yes the mechanical advantage comes from the difference between piston diameters and the lever leverage point. The system is extremely simple in how it works. I would argue that using anything but a code lever would be an issue given that codes currently only have enough fluid in the reservoir for the current code caliper with little as a reserve. Either way, I love the idea of these calipers.
  • 1 0
 @jomacba: I can see where your coming from. But they just happen to go really well with my bikes color scheme.
  • 2 0
 @shredddr: You can definitely do this. Shimanos are pretty safe in recent generations to mix/match with a lot of shared lever parts down to the base lever body (and therefore reservoir). Mixing XTR race levers without servo wave with Saint calipers has been a popular combo for riders who want better modulation with less initial bite.
  • 1 0
 @Fullsend2-13: Lol, no hate here. I used to be a huge fan of Hayes brakes, and I fundamentally follow function over form for most things, brakes are definitely no exception.
  • 1 0
 @adespotoskygo go full expensive, wait at home 18 months
  • 1 0
 Just get some hope V4 Calipers for about 110€/$ a peace and get the same result.

I did this on my GF bike with CODE RSC in the back and CODE RSC lever + V4 caliper in the front.

It's about the same feel and power as my Trickstuff Direttissima on my bike. But SRAM pumps tend to not hold up longer than 3 years.

On my other bike I'm using Shigura and ShiCura4 in the front. Really aggressive setup!
  • 2 0
 @Caiokv: Been a Hope fan for the longest time, have had 4 sets of Hope brakes, and never really been dissapointed.
Got a set of Hayes A4 brakes this year, and I'm hugely impressed, they are little bit more grabby than Hopes, but holy shit they have some power!
Modulation is fine after getting used to them, and I don't see any downsides to them so far, and no need to bleed them yet.
The final test will be long term durability compared to Hope.
  • 66 3
 At $280 per caliper, I Hope they've considered their competition.
  • 9 1
 Agreed, may as well start looking at trickstuff if you want to drop that kinda $ on brakes....

That being said, I love what they're doing and want to support it, just can't justify the price personally. I do imagine their markup isn't huge considering, the R&D, custom pistons, and then lower volume of this part.
  • 18 2
 a lot of people wont get this pun lmao
  • 9 1
 Will they keep Dominion over the market?
  • 11 2
 A4 I buy these I like to see a Level test, and have an A2 ZEE Guide with Juicy details to tell me if it's the right choice. I feel like these initial reviews are written in Code.
  • 9 0
 @stephenzkie: a lot of people on a bike forum that has a pun thread in almost every popular post won’t catch the word that’s capitalized that is also a bike brand?
  • 4 1
 I “HOPE” they consider other options from across the pound.
  • 2 1
 Also Hope they consider colors, purple Hayes would be good.
  • 3 0
 anyone tried mating a SRAM lever to a Hope caliper?
  • 2 0
 @shredddr: ha. That’s an interesting one. I’d be stoked to hear if someone ha actually done that
  • 1 0
 @shredddr: comes out at the same leverage: Will work.
Hopes V4 caliper is the same piston sizes...
  • 27 1
 Ah yes %20 more powerfull code is saint, why should i spent 280 bucks for a caliper when i can nearly buy a whole set of saints
  • 5 0
 People like bling, and many people don't prefer the on/off feel or lever design offered by Shimano.
  • 4 0
 @KJP1230: then get magura or trp and treat yourself with new rotors and tires for the same price
  • 1 0
 @KJP1230: Just wait for the cool kids on instagram to flash that bling on their $10+k custom builds and everyone else will want to have a sip of that koolaid.
  • 23 1
 Hayes Dominion.
  • 8 0
 Yes sir. No one needs anything else.
  • 2 0
 Yea love my Dominions, although I'm curious to try some TRP dhr evos, just to compare. Also running 220 rotors I'd like that thicker 2.3 rotor (which won't fit in the hayes caliper, even the 2.0mm magura was super tight). Wonder if anyone has experience with both.
  • 3 0
 @Wormfarmer: I'm definitely getting to the point where it is time to try some new rotors. My local shop is a big Hayes dealer and love to experiment in general, I'm going to work with them to figure out what rotors we can try.
  • 2 0
 @Wormfarmer: I'd be curious to find someone with experience with both as well. i just ordered a set of trp trail evos (90% of the power of the dhr evos), but hayes were up there on the list as well. wanted to try mineral oil this time around.
  • 1 0
 @whiteranger3: Yea it seems like people switch from shimano/sram to hayes or trp and once they switch they don't feel the need to switch again. Which indicates that hayes/trp are great but also means practically no one has experience with both.
  • 1 0
 @pisgahgnar: Yea so hayes only goes up to 200 on their rotors, in terms of 220 rotor options that are 2.0mm you have magura, galfer, and the newly released sram ones. Just a heads up even though hayes are 1.95mm the jump to 2mm makes it damn near impossible to not have rubbing on the first couple rides. After that you can reset the pistons and you'll have enough room to work with. Also if you go the magura route be aware that the magura 180-220 adapter does not clear the hayes caliper, I grinded off maybe 1mm off the adapter and it worked. I've got the magura mdrp 220s and despite the solid carrier they do seem hard to keep true, hence why I'd be curios to try the 2.3mm (which sadly won't fit the hayes).
  • 1 0
 @Wormfarmer: in the last few years I've owned XT (4 piston), Guide RSC, Hope Tech 3, and demo'd MT7 and TRP Slates - so I haven't tried everything, but definitely a good spectrum. My current Dominion A4s are by far the best, in my opinion.
  • 1 0
 I’m running both galfer and sram 220mm discs on my bikes with dominions. Also MTX pads take them to a whole other level. I can’t imagine how a better braking system could possibly exist. I had a local DH rat try my longer travel bike out (he was interested in the dorados) and the first thing he mentioned at the bottom was the brakes. His supreme with code rsc’s and boxer wc forks was so unbalanced after coming from mine.
  • 1 0
 @Wormfarmer: I've ridden shimano 4 piston, sram code r, and currently on sram code rsc. I just got the trp trail evos put on last night, will give them a shake down run this weekend. i'm hoping i won't need to go back. the 2.3 thick rotors were definitely a selling point as i'm 240lbs and tend to warp/overheat rotors pretty easily.

a riding buddy has a set of dominions waiting to go on his nomad, so between us two, i'll hopefully know how they compare.
  • 17 1
 Lol, that's not how a hydraulic system works. You don't just increase piston size and magically have the same lever travel without changing master cylinder components. It takes a greater volume of fluid to move the larger pistons the same distance, and you've increased the area by 21%.

Pascal's principle doesn't care about marketing BS. Unless they've stuck something in there to remove that volume, which then just means you're now going to run into issues with the brake rubbing. So, it still sucks.
  • 4 0
 The pistons are most likely retracting less
  • 3 0
 I'm pretty sure that's where the cam comes in, moving pads through the dead zone faster with the same lever travel
  • 1 0
 @AndrewHornor: The cam is an extra option, they don’t specify it has to be used with the callipers and I think they state lever travel remains the same without, somehow.
  • 2 0
 @Happymtbfr: Which would make them even more of a pain in the ass than codes already are.
  • 3 0
 @justanotherusername: from the website: "piston motion has been tuned to compensate for the larger fluid volume so that your levers feel good."
It's got to be reduced pad travel then. :/
  • 19 3
 So, $650CAD roughly for a set of Code RSCs, and then $700CAD roughly for some new calipers. Really not far off the cost of a pair of trick stuffs at that point.
  • 8 0
 You don’t have to buy an entire code brakeset… If you were planning on an entirely new set of brakes and wanted these calipers Sram Code RSC levers are available on their own for about $160cnd each. Still puts these close to $1000. And at that price I think I would want some trickstuffs.
  • 4 0
 @brycepiwek: It doesn't seem like a great value proposition either way haha. I already have a set of used code rscs, but I just bought a set of Hayes A4s and can't see the cascade/code combo being much better than them.
  • 1 1
 @chwk: even if equal or even slightly better. The biggest advantage to these calipers is parts availability in a pinch. However if you keep extra pads / levers on hand who cares.
  • 1 0
 @whitedlite: knock on wood, but i've never once had to replace any parts related to a caliper or brake lever. Probably because I don't hold on to bikes long enough to deal with that haha
  • 2 0
 Last I looked, Trickstuff was also 18+ months out for any new orders.
  • 2 1
 @brycepiwek: I did a full breakdown above (in USD) for levers, calipers, pads, hose assembly. It's $800 USD, flat for new Code/Cascade brakes. Keep in mind, the Trickstuff are priced in euros, so you're talking $470 USD more for the Trickstuff.

If these offer similar performance, that is a 37% discount off the Trickstuff. I'd seriously consider these if I wasn't already on order for Maximas.
  • 1 0
 @dsweet3: they are available now on the secondary market if you look around.
  • 19 2
 What a paradoxical product: a brake caliper that causes your bank account balance to Cascade rapidly.
  • 15 0
 Just buy Trickstuff...
  • 6 2
 I did! That said, the 12-18 month lead time is a major bummer...
  • 6 0
 Order now for 2024 delivery!
  • 5 0
 @KJP1230: I'm 12 months in and was just told it might be another 8.
  • 1 0
 @chwk: I was considering trying some but my goodness… that’s a long wait
  • 1 0
 @chwk: Pretty wild. I get that they are supposed to be the all-around best brakes on the market, and clearly QA is going to be a big factor...but, man. Couldn't you outsource a bit of CNC to speed up the backlog?! I'm excited for the brakes, but its a bummer to pay that much AND to wait so long. Some boutique/custom sports cars can be fabricated faster than a set of Trickstuff brakes!
  • 2 0
 @chwk: I ordered mine early March 2020, originally for Dec 2020 delivery. That became week 27-35 2021, then when I chased for a day, was told week 51 of 2021.
  • 2 0
 @tomhoward379: Better than a Sick frame though eh ;-)
  • 1 0
 @justanotherusername: true! And I know they’ll deliver, eventually….
  • 2 0
 @chwk: dont worry every single other bike component and manufacturer is offering the same great waiting times
  • 1 0
 Exactly this. And they are available now (new) on the secondary market if you are in a rush.
  • 1 0
 @EdSawyer: with a huge premium, and no warranty. Great.
  • 8 0
 If you are just buying the calipers, I do not see how these will have the same lever throw if they are displacing more fluid with the larger pistons. There must be a special bleed block that let's the Pistons sit closer to the rotor to compensate
  • 4 5
 Bleed Block won't help, "The lever throw remains the same" can only be archieved if they use O rings that allow less clearance, in other words, rubbing brakes.
  • 2 2
 @SickEdit: that makes absolutely no sense bro.
  • 5 0
 @CFR94: seals (or O rings per @SickEdit) are what determine the pad rollback. A thin bleed block only lets you overfill the system which, yes, holds the pads closer to the rotor but leaves no room for heat expansion and obviously isn't proper in an open brake system. My understanding is that the purpose of Cascade's cam is to restore the lever to stock feel after the high volume caliper piston lengthens the throw. That doesn't really jive with what Kazimer wrote, but if Cascade is using the same seals as SRAM, it's the only solution that makes sense.
  • 4 0
 @SickEdit:
Agreed either that or you need to change the cams in your levers to push more oil for the same throw.. oh wait a minute!
  • 2 0
 @AndrewHornor: spot on
  • 11 3
 PB never misses an opportunity to tell us they don't like Shimano brakes "The modulation of SRAM's Code RSC levers is one of the reasons I tend to prefer them over Shimano"

I'm sorry, I thought this article was about cascade components?
  • 4 0
 Well, I absolutely love my mt501's.
  • 8 1
 My XT’s are night and day better than my codes were
  • 1 0
 I for one am glad when reviewers tell us when they are unhappy with a product
  • 6 0
 Something is fishy here. Increasing the diameter of ths pistons requires the lever to displace more fluid. This is basic physics, there is no free ride to getting more power. The lever blade should travel further, or maybe the pads now run closer to the disc, neither of these options are good.
  • 11 1
 You`ve removed the SRAM caliper..thats only half the problem....
  • 2 0
 Haha so true!
  • 8 0
 530 for calipers, jesus I paid less for my hope v4's if I wanted full cnc'ed brakes
  • 9 0
 Formula Cura 4 - 18mm pistons all around
  • 5 0
 I always found CURA most underrated brakes on the market, however probably one of the nicest
  • 2 0
 @nickmalysh: my favorite of anything I’ve used to far
  • 2 0
 Yes I have them fitted front and rear ,reliable and more powerful than nearly every brake out there , not touched them in nearly a year , very underrated!
  • 2 0
 Now they need to slightly increase the reservoir size. It's fine for two-piston callipers, but a tad tiny for 4-piston ones.

Also, how comes a bigger fluid volume in the calliper doesn't mean a longer lever throw? It applies to both the Cura 4s and these Cascade callipers.
  • 2 0
 @DHhack: Ive got a set on my dh bike with 225mm hope rotors.
I wish they had a slightly firmer feel and more pad rollback.

I also find their bleeding provisions to be less than ideal, with fluid running out of the caliper when you remove the syringe and reinstall the plug. I used to remove the older formulas (before internal routing) to be able to remove the syringe and install the plug with the caliper elevated above the lever. I also found it useful to use a larger than standard syringe for bleeding the rear brake.
  • 2 0
 Heard the Cura 2 piston is better than the 4 and doesn’t get sticky pistons
  • 2 0
 @stormracing: Cure 2 and 4 have different feel since have same lever on different sized calipers (in terms of fluid voile) I do like 2 - enough power to me
  • 1 0
 @nickmalysh: for sure. Aston the old reviewer from on here runs em and says he thinks they are better than the 4. I think Laurie Greenlands mechanic said the same too about his experience
  • 5 0
 Hoping an engineer can help with my understanding of this.
If the same amount of pressure is applied to pistons of a larger diameter, which act on brake pads which have the same area, don't you just have more fluid displacement (lever throw) for the same amount of force since the areaXpressure is the same?
  • 3 0
 Yes, the pressure generated by the master cylinder (lever) will be the same, but as the piston area is now larger it will generate a larger force that is applied to the pads, hence greater stopping power. Drawback is as you stated, the master cylinder must move further to displace more fluid at the larger piston area.
  • 8 1
 A masterclass in turd polishing. If you want flashy machined brakes, just buy decent ones to begin with.
  • 5 0
 Yeah that's a big chunk of change for two calipers but kudos for making it an option for those who love the Sram feel. I'm not a Sram fan and currently am running Hayes Dominion A4 fwiw
  • 8 1
 Just buy some TRP dhr evos and problem solved !!
  • 2 0
 Agreed, my DHR Evos feel so much better than saints or codes ever did
  • 2 0
 DHR-Evos with 203s front and back are the best thing to happen to disc breaks. great lever feel and great power.
  • 3 0
 I feel like I am the crazy one. Everyone talked up trp dhr evos so much I went for them. I do not think they are better than saints. I have saints that haven't been bled in years and work great, better lever feel (obviously personal preference), and way less bulky.
  • 1 0
 @adrennan: I guess it’s probably personal preference! I feel like the trps have better modulation and more power especially with the larger thicker rotors. I will say it took me a good bit to get used to the length of their lever and then the ergonomics.
  • 1 0
 @rowyoboat: the length of the lever is definitely part of what throws me off. I also think since I have always ridden shimano up til now, I have basically learned to bike with the on-off switch feeling and am more comfortable with that. My weight is basically what creates modulation for me.
  • 7 0
 They’re going to sell tens of these
  • 4 1
 so, 530 for 2 calipers, to make shitti brakes as powerful as a set of saints? and less powerful than maguras and trp that costs less with fancy rotors included? ( enduro-mtb.com/en/best-mtb-disc-brake-can-buy ) that's bullshit.
  • 3 0
 If this caliper fits 16&18 diameter pistons,how on earth it would identical to SRAM parts?

quote:"Aside from the two bolts holding the caliper together, all of the other parts are designed to be cross-compatible with SRAM's Code parts."

Sram stock diameter piston is 15&16,how is cross compatible with OEM caliper internals?
  • 2 0
 maybe they just mean it fits sram brake pads.
  • 1 0
 @flattire: It is confusing at least. One thing is they use SRAM pads and the other thing is you can throw there SRAM replacement pistons&seals.
  • 2 0
 @homerjm, you're right, I should have clarified a little further. SRAM's road disc brakes use an 18mm piston, so you could use those parts in a pinch.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: Ok,Thanks for the response. That is very different
  • 3 0
 Said it before, but press releases that relate to brakes are so meaningless without some kind of data or standard to use as a comparison. Should I run these or XC brakes? No idea. How do they compare to other companies? No idea!
  • 3 0
 1: @CascadeComponents the "Cam Kit" is exactly what I've been looking for. Thank you.
2: I miss the days when companies made after market brake levers. I still have a set of Dangerboy T-101 levers on a set of Avid Juicy 7's, with Goodridge 108 braided lines on my DJ bike. I may of just dated myself.
  • 7 0
 Just buy Hope lol.
  • 4 1
 came to say exactly this. Can be said in just about every article on brakes lol.
  • 7 1
 They look fecking dreadful
  • 3 0
 Why not just go with the Shigura setup? My mate bought mt7 calipers and xt levers for less than 300 quid..... I use Zee levers with mt7 calipers - perfect combo of power and modulation!!
  • 3 0
 Very cool, I just bought my second set of Saints for $440 (lever AND caliper included) and they’re more than capable of slowing my 210 lb ass down at bike parks
  • 1 0
 I wouldn't be surprised if they start making calipers for other brands. It makes sense to start with SRAM who dominates the market (especially OEM bikes). Can't believe the amount of folks complaining about the cost! Their brakes are CNC machined out of aluminum in the USA. Not stamped out steel in some factory in China...
  • 3 2
 I know I may be downvoted to hell for this but F sram brakes. And absolutely forget about buying a caliper for that price when its paired with a sram lever…. So many other options that will actually stop you when it matters
  • 1 0
 Honestly all battling between which current brakes are better and how these are only a part solution overlooks the fact that with current supply chain issues and the state of the manufacturing industry, and environmental concerns, having a fledgling USA made quality Hydraulic brake supplier is pretty amazing and deserves some applause and focus! Consider the implications of Onshore replacement parts for all the Sram brakes out there if additional issues with supply chains keep happening, what happens if the boat with the bulk of the sram brakes in shipment sinks in a storm and your left with a blown out caliper you can't get parts for and so on ( this shit happens and has happened to companies this year) there's so many ways to positively think about this and if you have the money and inclination support them! and that support will push them to make lever and systems and other components. if not thats fine to just done bag on a tiny company trying to make a great product and charging what they need to. just my 2 cents
  • 3 2
 You fella's are a bunch of cheap asses! LOL
I've had their progressive links on two bikes now, the fit and finish is on par with OEM. So I can only imagine just how good these brakes are in the flesh.
I was a diehard Shimano (Saint/Zee) rider for nearly a decade, then had my first taste of G2 Ultimate's a few years ago, then got the Code RSC's 2 years ago and never looked back at Shimano. From the insanely smooth actuation and the Bleeding Edge system, Sram just has the best system overall. I can only imagine how good the entire Cascade brakes will feel, a more progressive ramp up on power, and 20% more clamping power under hard riding at that. Lets just say I will be ordering these quite soon.
  • 2 0
 Surprising that they cheaped out using 6061 aluminum on a premium product like this. I can buy a complete Hope brake with a caliper machined form a solid block of 2014 for this price.
  • 1 0
 I thought CNC milling machines were great because they churned out parts with minimum labor. The Pistons and seals are out of a catalog.
How much for Trick Stuff caliper and lever? I wonder if the big players used forged Al and then machine . Being as the caliper body must handle massive amounts of force I'm quite certain there is a reason for one piece calipers.
Great idea . Sell aftermarket calipers but if they are being carved by a robot then they should be inexpensive. Oh what size Pistons in Magura calipers?
  • 1 0
 Some one has to set those CNC machines up right, load and unload parts, do some QC. It's not as automated as you might think it is. Yes there are robots that can achieve these tasks but they are not inexpensive.
  • 1 0
 Man I'm happy to be satisfied with my deore 4pot cheap brakes. Aside from some brake squeals, I never feel undergunned, even at the bike park under my 200lbs of weight. The idea of spending cash like that on only the caliper seems like a serious indulgence in minutiae. Less thinking more riding.
  • 3 1
 I love machined-looking parts. They take me back to the most beautiful(and worst) disc brakes I've ever owned...Late 90's Hopes.
  • 5 0
 hm useless
  • 3 0
 The price on these is hard to swallow. The nicest Maguras are about the same price and come with the master cylinder.
  • 4 1
 finally there will be a sram brake with almost as much power as a 2 piston xt LOL
  • 1 0
 Pretty promising for those who like their codes (more people than the PB comment section suggests), but wouldn't mind more power.

Although ya for the money I'd probably try 230mm rotors first haha.
  • 6 3
 So they are effectively trying to make shimano brakes?
  • 16 1
 Just without the flaws and a bit more power. Kind of like a Hayes Dominion.
  • 2 0
 Insane price to make guides good enough to go up against TRP or Hayes which are cheaper than the calipers already.
  • 3 0
 $35 MTX brake pads were all I needed to like my Code RSCs.
  • 3 0
 MTX gold pads have been an incredible additions to my RSCs. Best brake pads I’ve ever used and an actual noticeable difference
  • 1 0
 Yeah as a ~215lb rider, the gold MTX pads are great. SOOOO much confidence and feel like they modulate better also.
  • 1 0
 I've never heard of these but have some Code RSC's that I love (also have some Dominions that I REALLY love). How do the MTX pads make Codes better?
  • 1 0
 @Svinyard: it’s odd to try an explain cuz it’s just pads. I definitely noticed more power and better heat dissipation. No noise either whatsoever. But not only was the power better, the delivery was smoother too. That’s the odd part that’s hard to explain. It was more power and I wouldn’t say more modulation, but just the actual delivery just felt a lot smoother. I’ve done Galfer pro pads and stock metallic pads and the MTX gold was so much better it was surprising
  • 1 0
 @stormracing: Exactly. The smoothness and predictability is noticeably better, and there’s as much or more stopping power once you lay into them. Oh and they’re quiet even when wet.
  • 4 1
 Look great, but I think I will stick with my Trickstuff Maximas
  • 5 2
 How do you like them? I have some on order that should be here in April/May.
  • 3 0
 @KJP1230: Idk why you are getting downvoted...
  • 2 0
 @KJP1230: Absolutely love them! All the power you could ever want!
  • 3 0
 @stumphumper92: It's pinkbike. Even when you state a fact, someone will down vote you. I take this to mean the 2 folks out there disagree with my decision to spend my money on my new brakes. Smile
  • 1 0
 @cameronb8: Sweet! Obviously they've received universal praise as the absolute benchmark in brakes. Even with all that power, they modulate well also?
  • 2 0
 @KJP1230: They really do, it just takes so much less effort to get the bike to slow down. Not that it takes a ton with other brakes but the difference is noticeable.
  • 2 1
 Do those new HS2 rotors give you more power? I wasn't under the assumption that they do, but just give you better heat management.
  • 3 0
 less heat = less fade= more power. No?
  • 1 0
 @themouse77: less heat=less fade =original power. Not more I don't think.
  • 1 0
 @Beaconbike: mm.original heat = original fade=less power then if cooler. so if I change rotors to dissipate heat to give better performance would that not equal more power?
  • 1 0
 I guess I'm thinking of it as just maintaining power, not actually giving you more to begin with.
  • 2 0
 Make you feel smart, buy a pair of hope and sell the code :-) (if someone want them)
  • 2 0
 even going to 220mm rotors seems not worth the 75 bucks to me right now...especially since the summer heat's over.
  • 2 0
 Got the Galfer 223 rotor for my front Code R with green Galfer pads and it is working fine. Sram rotors/pads combo never worked for me,they only made noises but no stopping power. Got the 223 rotor for 38€ and the 203 2mm thick for 36€.
  • 1 0
 The price of these will help me justify Klampers for my hardtail adventure rig. Just a bit more mental gymnastics and I will be ready to order.
  • 3 0
 But you can get them in all the pretty colors!!
  • 2 0
 North fork : "deliver 20% more power than the stock Code calipers"
Trickstuff Maxsima : "Hold my beer"
  • 2 1
 doing some math, 20% more and they'll reach saint power at 84nm, direttissima stands tall at 114, maxima even more, so maybe if you run 2 of those caliper per disk you can get close
lol
  • 3 0
 Everyone just needs to see the light by running 220/200 rotors.
  • 1 0
 I'm just glad to see companies making cross compatible upgrades. We need to get away from the, "if its not all sram/shimano it wont work!"
  • 2 0
 This is some pretty Sickstuff
  • 1 0
 To confirm the link does not work on Code Rs? Was thinking $40 to make the brakes feel less soft would be money well spend.
  • 1 0
 Something about the swing link in the lever. I have. Code R as well and dont really know what this feature is and does. Have been happy with my R, so havent looked into it.
  • 1 0
 @jojotherider1977: rs and rsc have a cam in the lever body that the r dose not. so this one will not fit.
  • 1 0
 @themouse77: what is it supposed to do?
  • 1 1
 I feel like there are better things they could offer and spend R&D on.. But knowing the bike industry, they will sell out solely for aesthetics.
  • 1 0
 Just buy a set of Cura 4 brakes less than half the price , way more powerful and more reliable….
  • 2 0
 I have no complaints about my code Rs on my Enduro.
  • 2 0
 I'm getting pretty bored of the "roughed-in" surface finish look.
  • 2 0
 Yeah, this looks like guilloché as interpreted by somebody who only saw it once, while they were drunk.
  • 2 0
 20% more progressive than stock callipers.
  • 1 0
 interesting. those look pretty cool. cascade does some neat stuff
  • 1 0
 dam thinkin bout those calipers
  • 1 0
 But there is water on the calipers already...
  • 1 0
 This is needed because codes aren’t powerful enough? Really?
  • 2 1
 i have a feeling an oil slick version is coming....
  • 2 0
 Its not lmao
  • 1 0
 But TRP DHR Evos are a thing. Problem solved.
  • 1 0
 Give me a buy one get one free deal and I'm in!
  • 1 0
 Looks sweet.... Saints all day everyday
  • 1 0
 Ooooo!!!!
  • 1 0
 Substantial of cost

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