Check Out: 6 New Riding Packs for Spring 2019

May 3, 2019
by Sarah Moore  



Riding with a backpack may not be on trend as the popularity of storage bibs and fanny packs has soared, but opening up your closet and having the right bag for the occasion can make or break a day. With these six riding-specific backpacks coming out in the past year, it looks like bags, love 'em or hate 'em, won't be entirely replaced by the new standard anytime soon.





EVOC Explorer Pro 30L Pack



EVOC Explorer Pro 30L Bag Features

• Gear Capacity: 30L
• Weight: 1350 g
• Dimensions: 27 x 53 x 19 cm
• Includes waterproof cover
• Reservoir not included
• 4 colours
• $200 USD
evocsports.com
From the manufacturer:
The Evoc Explorer Pro 30L is a versatile bike touring backpack for unlimited adventures. With enough room for storage and a dialed compartment management everything you’d need on tour has its space, exactly where you need it. The Air Flow Contact System offers an outstanding carrying comfort through maximum back ventilation and absolute load neutrality.

bigquotesThanks to its oversized waist belt, the Explorer Pro is one of the most comfortable bags I have ever ridden with. At 30L, it's too big of a pack for an after work ride or even most regular weekend rides, but it doesn't move around when you're wearing it so it feels like a much smaller back than its volume suggest. That being said, you can really load it up and it's definitely a good choice for overnight excursions and for all day rides in the alpine when you don't know what weather or obstacles you will encounter.

There are several storage pockets to keep all your gear organized and accessible and clever features like a second entrance from the bottom of the bag, a stowed away helmet carrier, a waterproof cover and a fleece-lined glasses pocket. As someone who sweats a lot, I really like that the Air Flow Contact System keeps the bag away from your back so the bag doesn't get soaked and heavy by the end of the day. Another nice touch are the whistle and the safety panel on the inside of the bag with key tips on what to do in an emergency backcountry situation.
Sarah Moore






Hydroflask Journey Series 20L Pack



Hydroflask Journey Series 20L Bag Features

• Gear Capacity: 20L
• Weight: 1585g (S/M) + 1630g (M/L)
• Dimensions: S/M – 18.5” H x 11.5” W x 10.2” D / M/L – 20” H x 11.5” W x 10.2” D
• Coated waterproof fabric
• 3L HydraPak IsoBound insulated reservoir included
• 3 colours
• $200 USD
hydroflask.com
From the manufacturer:
Our Journey Series Insulated Hydration Packs offer the revolutionary insulation you expect from Hydro Flask, with our Cold Flow system that keeps water cold for over four hours. The insulated reservoir and neoprene sleeve with reflective lining maintain cold water temperature, while the articulated back panel lets air flow between you and your pack to prevent body heat transfer. Our Insulated Hydration Packs are the perfect solution to stay cool on your favorite ride, with enough capacity for trail essentials.

bigquotesI'm intrigued by this insulated Hydroflask bag and its Hydrapak insulated reservoir, but have yet to test it out on a hot summer day. I have friends who swear by filling their hydration reservoirs with water and freezing them before a big ride in the desert and I've definitely had days when dehydration and carrying a heavy pack filled with water around seems preferable to drinking the unpleasantly warm and plasticky tasting liquid in my reservoir, so it seems like a good idea if it works.

The Journey Series packs have a minimal design with a couple organizer pockets. They are on the heavier side since they are made from a very sturdy material that they say it is a coated waterproof fabric. While it does look like its sturdiness should make the packs as long-lasting and resistant as the insulated thermoses that Hydroflask is renowned for, I find it curious that a bag that is made for keeping water cool on hot rides has a waterproof coating. I'd also like to see Hydroflask go the whole nine yards and pair the insulated bag and insulated Hydrapak reservoir with an insulated hose since regardless of how cold the water is in your pack, you always have to drink the water out of your hose before you get to it. A nice touch is the articulated back panel that allows some air flow between you and the pack to battle sweat. It also helps keep the reservoir away from your back, and therefore cooler.
Sarah Moore






Camelbak Women's Chase Bike Vest 1.5L Pack



Camelbak Women's Chase Bike Vest 1.5L Features

• Gear Capacity: 2.5L
• Weight: 330g
• Dimensions: 34 x 24 x 14 cm
• Women's specific fit
• 1.5L Camelbak reservoir included
• 2 colours
• $100 USD
camelbak.com
From the manufacturer:
Light, Fast and Stable. Whether you're an elite XC racer or a minimalist enduro enthusiast the Women's Chase Bike Vest is designed to fit a woman's body and deliver top performance on the trails. Harness-based cargo storage keeps nutrition and essentials within easy reach and it's Quick Stow compatible for days when you're going to need more hydration than the 1.5-liter CRUX reservoir can offer. Lightweight, breathable materials ensure you stay cool and focused on the trail, not on your gear.

bigquotesThis ultra lightweight pack allows you to carry all the necessities for a long, fast day on the bike in a comfortable, secure way. There's no hip belt on the Chase so it doesn't cut into your waist and I felt like I stayed cooler than I do with a pack with traditional waist belt. The two chest straps keep the pack securely in place and allow you to put your tools, snacks and phone right at your fingertips so you can easily grab them out of the well-organized compartments without taking off your pack. I appreciate that even my giant Google phone fits in the pocket.

It might not look as cool as stuffing everything in your storage bibs and hiding it away under your jersey, but it does make everything a lot more accessible and less likely to be lost. This is the pack that Jill Kintner wore for her first Enduro World Series race this year in Derby, Australia, where she finished second. The styling is reminiscent of the vests that runners wear, but the pack has been thought out for mountain bikers. There's a version of the Chase Vest available in a men's fit as well. Will we see more riders in the EWS with packs as they become more compact and created specifically with that rider in mind?
Sarah Moore






Camelbak Women's L.U.X.E LR 14 3L Hydration Pack



Camelbak Women's L.U.X.E LR 14 3L Hydration Pack Features

• Gear Capacity: 11L
• Weight: 930g
• Dimensions: 50 x 23 x 21 cm
• Includes waterproof cover
• Women's specific fit only
• 3L Camelbak reservoir included
• 2 colours
• $150 USD
camelbak.com
From the manufacturer:
Water where you want it, ample gear storage, and a women's specific fit—the L.U.X.E. LR offers a lower center of gravity and more upper mobility on the trail. The LR or Low Rider technology moves the weight from your shoulders to your hips, keeping your upper body free and lowering your center of gravity for increased stability on steep, technical terrain. Combine this with being designed to specifically fit a woman's frame and you've got the perfect set-up for epic days on the trail.

bigquotesWhere to start with this pack? It has a smorgasbord of options and at first, every time I rode with it, I discovered something new. I'd say the biggest difference between this bag and others is the lumbar reservoir which gives the pack its "LR" or "Low Rider" designation. Basically, the reservoir sits in an entirely separate compartment in the bag at your lower back. This keeps the water lower on your body and the idea is that it keeps the weight on your hips instead of your shoulders and lowers your center of gravity.

One of the features that is worth highlighting is the external overflow pocket that allows you to carry stuff on the outside of your bag or store your helmet on the bag. While I don't find the big white portion of the backpack that hides it aesthetically pleasing, it is convenient to have that extra storage. The one feature that didn't do it for me was the phone pocket on the shoulder strap. Unlike the pocket on the Chase Bike Vest, this one is too small to fit my phone. Perhaps my favourite feature of this pack is the removable tool wrap, which is so handy I've been moving it from one pack to another and even just carrying it in the pockets of my bib shorts on short rides.
Sarah Moore






USWE Airborne 3L Pack



USWE Airborne 3L Pack Features

• Gear Capacity: 3L
• Weight: 450g
• Dimensions: 38cm x W: 29cm x 8 cm
• 2L HydraPak reservoir included
• 3 colours
• $119.99 USD
uswe-sports.com
From the manufacturer:
Our new Airborne 3L is an action backpack beyond anything else out there, full of high performance features that will make you fly without cramping your style. This is every singletrack riders favourite: it’s superfast – except there’s no rocket engine included. Sorry, you’ll have to do the pedaling. Here you get our award winning NDM Race Suspension Harness that guarantees zero bouncing on your back, but still allows you to feel 100% free in action.

bigquotesThe unique strap system used on USWE's packs is based on the 4-point harnesses that parachutes use. As of Sea Otter in April of 2019, the bags and their unique harness are available for North Americans to purchase. I'll have to ride the bag more to draw conclusions on whether the brand's tagline that refers to the bag's claim to stay in place on your back, "No Dancing Monkey," is accurate, but my first impressions are that the harness is easy to use and not having anything around your waist which is really nice. The Airborne 3L pack is lightweight and small so it barely feels like you're wearing anything, although the harness can obviously withstand more weight as the brand uses the same system on its bigger bags as well.

The one thing I find confusing about USWE's naming system is that the Airborne series is in fact their slightly more robust series, with the Outlander series being the super lightweight bags that Cannondale's Manuel Fumic and Henrique Avancini used during the Absa Cape Epic. The Airborne 3L has slightly more padding on the back, helmet attachment points, a removable phone holder on the shoulder strap and a removable outer bag to stow a snack or one of those windbreakers that stuffs up into the size of your hand. At only $119.99, this bag would be a good one to try for minimalists.
Sarah Moore






Osprey Salida 12 Women's Pack



Osprey Salida 12 Women's Pack Features

• Gear Capacity: 12L
• Weight: 600g
• Dimensions: 43 x 23.0 x 23 cm
• Women's specific fit
• 2.5L HydraPak reservoir included
• 3 colours
• $110 USD
osprey.com
From the manufacturer:
Stability and comfort combine in this svelte women’s-specific mountain biking pack that’s a great fit for any trail—from gentle fire roads to technical singletrack. With high-performing features and a little extra room for a little extra gear, the Salida 12 is the “Goldilocks” of packs you’ll find yourself reaching for to accompany meetups at your local trailhead (and meetups at your local watering hole afterward).

bigquotesThis pack is about as normal as it gets, and that's by no means a bad thing. It's basically got everything you would need for most rides. If you don't want all the bells and whistles or the additional weight that goes alongside them, but you still want to carry your lunch, a spare layer, and some tools, along with up to 2.5L of water on your rides, the Salida looks like a great option. It's the bag you would expect to be shown if you walked into a bike shop and said you were looking for a mountain bike hydration pack.

The Salida has features that make a difference on a ride like tool organization, four small zippered pockets for those easy-to-lose items, a magnetic attachment for the hydration hose, compression straps, and a helmet attachment. It also has what Osprey calls the AirScape backpanel, which means that there's no sweat-absorbing material right up against your back. Its counterpart for men is the Siskin and there are 8L, 12L and 20L versions of both packs available.
Sarah Moore





137 Comments

  • + 83
 I dont give a s**t if its trend or not. I very rarely ride without a backpack. It stores tools, phone, sos-tube, pump, med-kit and something to drink. And it has a back-protektor inside.....
To have my stuff with me helped me a few times over the years, and also helped others who went out there as lightweight as possible. But i must say: My willingness to help people out with a pump/tubeless-repair gets less with every single time i have to do it. (this does not apply to 1st aid, of curse!)
  • + 18
 I think you may be referring to me
  • + 41
 I love stopping to help other riders on the trail. It's part of what makes our community so good.
  • + 22
 I agree with this. There have been a handful of times that I have had to give someone a tube or use my pump or CO2 to get them up and running again. It's almost always someone with a very high end bike with just a water bottle attached and no tools or pack of their own. If you can afford the Yeti, you should learn how to use a few tools and what to carry.
  • + 15
 @Keepiru

I run packless and have never used my frame-mounted tube for myself. On the other hand, I've helped a bunch of people with flats, broken chains, and other tool-requiring repairs. Some of them even had packs.

Get off your incredibly lame high-horse and help people with their damn flats. If you don't want to help other riders become a roadie or something.
  • + 12
 Its mostly negligent friends that consistently ride with nothing that bothers me!
  • + 2
 I've had to walk out of the deep woods a couple times already and don't plan on ever doing it again for lack of something pathetic stupid like a tool, patch, tube, pump, or spare masterlink. And if it's above 80 and/or humid, I'm drinking a liter of water for every hour I'm out. EVOC Enduro Blackline, never looking back and not bothering with a second $100+ one for short rides - too much pain swapping tools, etc. when all I want is a quick blast.

@mangochaos: A bit off topic, but same about negligent friends for photos and videos. Zero reciprocity means buddy old pal is never going to get anything but a selfie for their Facebook feed.
  • + 5
 @JWadd: Interesting as I carry every item you mentioned on my bike. EDC in headtube modified with a dynaplug kit, a Oneup pump with air canister stored inside as well as asprin and bandaid. Tube straped to frame and a bicycle with a water bottle cage mount allowing 20oz. Cant forget any of it becuase it is on bike. It doesn't move around, get lost in bag, nor does it not end up on ride because I forgot to put it all back into a backpack.
  • + 6
 @H3RESQ: your not going to patch much up with a band aid and an asprin.
  • + 3
 @mangochaos: or better yet that friend who brings his water bottle, phone, keys and snacks but expects you to carry them all in your backpack.
  • + 4
 I hear you, a pack is hot and heavier, but for me 20oz means no summer rides longer than an hour. I'll sweat off 5 lbs even after drinking 2 liters on a good summer ride.
  • + 5
 I gave an injured dude a beer the other day. How ya gonna do that - possibly the noblest act a fellow MTBer can perform - without a pack? I like to drink hella water as well - I can drink 3L on a 3 hour ride easily. Then I blow up the empty bladder for a spine pillow.
  • + 2
 @endlessblockades: Beer in the bottle cage, ya Joey.

The water thing would be a concern of mine, but I'm lucky enough to have a few water fountains spread out on my local trails. 750ml bottle in the cage, angle towards a fountain once I'm out. Toronto also has a large grocery store that sells booze (not normal for Ontario) at the trailhead :>.
  • + 6
 Ever told someone you don't have a tube when you're about to go down a gnarly descent you love to rip and tend to get lots of flats on?

Asking for a friend.
  • + 2
 @rezrov: Water fountains on your trails? Sounds pretty core: signed, Joey.
  • + 2
 @matttauszik: my every day trails have 4 water fountains available over a 25 mile loop. Plus, 3 breweries.... no need for a pack, EDC with plenty of cash for the fresh IPA’s
  • + 6
 @Foolcyclist: Funny. Last time I pulled over on my Evil to help someone they were riding a cheap bike. It's like the price of the bike has nothing to do with it or something.
  • + 1
 You don’t need a pack to be prepared. Between my small frame bag and fork tube stash I’m more prepared than most: every tool, valve cores, zip ties, helmet, gauze, wrap, bandages, headlamp, phone, water treatment, TP, etc. I like going 1:1 when pack carriers talk shit and always come up with more
  • + 2
 ^ don’t know why I said helmet. It’s late.
  • + 4
 Same here. I get ridiculed for carrying a pack that probably weighs close to 20 lbs with 3L of water fully loaded. Yeah, it slows me down on the climbs, I don't care. I'm 6' tall, 210 lbs butt naked, and I'm riding a Nomad with 170mm fork and a coil shock. Not gonna be the fastest guy to the top in any event, but I will have tools (when) something breaks at the worst possible time.
  • + 1
 @Stinky-Dee: That's cool. My everyday trails have pretty steep climbs, cool features, rocks, roots, trees, and jumps. But no water fountains or breweries. We call that town.
  • + 0
 You probably just don't ride fast, and that's ok. For myself I never use a pack. Just a bottle on the frame, bottle in shirt pocket, and a few tools. Ill walk out if needed. If I can't shred because of a giant turtle on my back then there's no point in riding.
  • + 2
 @Foolcyclist: you cant just enjoy helping? Why base it on the demographic of the other person? Either you like helping others or you don't.
  • + 1
 @matttauszik: my every day ride has real mountain bike trails - rocks, roots steep up & down jumps & drop. Plus homeless camps, but no needles...
  • + 1
 This. I happily listen to friends talking about how great they are riding without a backpack, knowing full well that most of them have, on more than one occasion, had to beg me for something they haven't got.
  • + 2
 @chrismac70: Beside you missing the point, a band aid and asprin is still more than 99% carry, but you are right. I have only once ever seen a rider with a actual first aid kit with him. It was just last month at Tiger mt. He pulled out to help a trail runner that fell on the climbing trail. Kudo to him for lugging it around in his hip pack.
  • + 1
 @mangochaos: I've found over the years there has become a certain air of "he's always got everything, so I don't need anything" from some people I ride with & that's just annoying. So bad that on one occasion I was asked if I had a spare tube to which I had to answer, "no, you've already had it".
  • + 0
 @rrolly: Yes. 100% Aggree on that. But there is a difference in "helping" und "supporting lazyness".
I like to help And sometimes it helps when people have to walk home 10 miles to learn something.
There is a difference between a flat tire, and something like a tacoed wheel. Both can be "fixed" in the woods. the flat tire with simple tube and pump, the wheel-taco if you know how. I just expect from any rider (not absolute rookies, of curse!) to be able to help him/herself in the 1st case, in the 2nd case or similar i'm more than willing to help.
  • + 2
 @Keepiru: Ya, I'm not making that judgement on the spot with a stranger. I'd rather just help. With my riding buddies, if it was a repeated thing, that would be a little different. But I ride with good people.
  • + 1
 @H3RESQ: I allways have a complete kit with me: Band-Aid, Tape, Tension-Strips for cuts, a rescue-blanket, desinfection and some medics. Together with the other stuff in my backpack its a good kit to handle the most stuff what happens, and allmost anything that happens day in day out .... out there. It is stored in a small pack, its only a few grams and saved our day more than once. It really sucks if you have to head to a hospital because someone has cut his arm a little.
I can only encurage anyone who does more than the occasional backyard-lap to be prepared. Stuff happens, and it happens to all of us. Be it a bail, a technical issue, or both. Smile
  • + 34
 I own 2 Osprey packs and they're really great. If someone is looking for quality pack he should definitely check Ospreys products.
  • + 41
 Whoa there careful with the gender there.
Don't forget the she's; he/shes; she/hes; its; others; dentists and the unchosen
  • + 12
 @timbud: in Polish, the noun "someone" is masculine, hence the "he" pronoun. Obviously Endurorider should've used "they" in this context
  • + 10
 @nhp890: sorry about that Frown
  • + 38
 @timbud: I am a dentist. Thank you for mentioning me.
  • + 3
 @nhp890: sorry yes you're right. I forgot to add the gender that is blind to sarcasm Wink
  • - 3
 Will do Mr Osprey????
  • - 2
 Damn incorrect emoji
  • + 9
 @timbud: I was fully aware of your sarcasm, but I explained the origin of this particular error. The more you know Wink
  • + 8
 @timbud: or maybe it just wasn't your best attempt at sarcasm Wink
  • + 1
 @bananowy: eh it was alright Wink
  • - 6
flag timmyelle (May 3, 2019 at 4:21) (Below Threshold)
 @timbud: I hope this is a joke. If not (frank) off!
  • - 8
flag timbud (May 3, 2019 at 4:39) (Below Threshold)
 @bananowy: whether you think it was good or not, does not make it not
  • + 2
 @timbud: lol you'll probably find this amusing:

youtu.be/WtftZPL-k7Y
  • + 0
 @nhp890: In English, "he" is the gender-neutral pronoun. Obviously Endurorider got it right the first time.
  • - 17
flag castlemtn (May 3, 2019 at 5:21) (Below Threshold)
 its ok, girls don't ride anyways, they just look good and bat their lashes:0)
  • - 1
 @PJD1: thanks man. Thats a good watch tup
  • + 9
 @castlemtn: was that supposed to be funny?
  • + 1
 @timbud: its going to take some thumbs down, but I'll live. Really controversal topic thease days!
  • + 2
 @LaXcarp: really eh, I could have a list pit together in under 5 minutes of nothing but girls that can send harder and faster then I can dream of! And another list within 6 months thats similar stacked with all uknown weekend warriors that can do the same!
  • - 1
 @PJD1: I took more downers just for thanking you for the link Smile
Think we'll both live though
  • + 29
 My favorite backpack is the one from last year on sale at 60% off.
  • - 2
 @smithcreek yes but if noone buys them at full price , they cease to exist.
  • + 21
 ok, forgive me on this one, but pricing of everything MTB specific is getting retarded. From 30$ velcro straps to this.
And I say so comparing these with other mountain sports backpacks. The fact that an Osprey is the cheapest speaks volumes.
The new golf.
  • + 9
 I don't know why the industry insists on trying to make mountain biking only for rich people. It wasn't this way 10 years ago, was it?
  • + 9
 Backpacks come back in style soon like early 90s sneakers. I LOVE my Evoc FR Lite 10 liter. 2 liters of water, light jacket, elbow pads, snacks, pump, tube, tool, pressure gauge, small first aid kit. Smart outside clips for trail or trail helmet or fullface. Enough space for a whole day out if the weather is nice. And it has a integrated back protector! Innovation happened some years ago people.
  • + 1
 Yup black FR Lite for me too. Das German design ist gut!
  • + 8
 'I have friends who swear by filling their hydration reservoirs with water and freezing them before a big ride in the desert and I've definitely had days when dehydration and carrying extra weight...'

you know ice doesnt weigh more than the water it was before it froze, right? its less dense so its higher volume, but no heavier.
  • + 8
 oh, is that the point they were making? That part of the sentence made no sense to me at all.
  • + 3
 Jesus, is that really what she's saying?
  • + 1
 i think so, its what i got from it. basically, the dehydration bit is true, if it doesnt melt quick enough you can be left sucking on nothing, but as for the weight...
  • + 6
 She's saying she'd rather carry around the water than drink it, because of the taste. The ice part was to keep the water colder because there was no insulation.
  • + 2
 @DPfilms: oh, that makes a lot more sense, but at the same time it isnt worded very well, its in the middle of a sentence talking about freezing bladders being a good idea.
  • + 3
 She probably meant she rather choose dehydration and the extra weight *from the insulated reservoir* rather than get plastic-ky taste on hot days. But yes, the sentence is poorly written.
  • + 2
 ... I've definitely had days when either (a) dehydration [from avoiding plasticky warm water]; or (b) carrying the extra weight [of an insulated reservoir] around seemed preferable to drinking the unpleasantly warm and plasticky tasting water in my reservoir...
  • + 1
 A dessert in the UK ?
  • + 6
 @nick1957: milton keynes
  • + 15
 @nick1957: There are loads. Personally I like Sticky Toffee Pudding, or apple pie and custard. Sometimes just go for Ice creme though.
  • + 4
 @bigtim: you love Spotted Dick ?
  • + 0
 I think the "extra weight" part comes from the portion of the ice that never melts and so never becomes available to drink.
  • + 3
 @pigman65: Only if it's a proper big portion.
  • + 2
 @inked-up-metalhead: freezing bladders? Sounds like a bad winter ride. . . or an 80's punk band.
  • + 3
 @bigtim: username checks out
  • + 7
 I've edited for clarity (I hope!) Basically I meant that the insulated bag seems like a good idea since I don't drink the hot water in my backpack anyways so it's probably not worth carrying around. And my friends already have a hot-weather reservoir hack, freezing the reservoir the day before. Which always melts if you ride in the desert long enough to deserve my favorite, dessert!
  • + 1
 @sarahmoore: yeah, much clearer now, it really did seem you were implying the frozen bladder idea made it heavier, but yeah, i know the feeling, and its not like we get that high temperatures in lancashire on average.
  • + 1
 The great Cornwall Desert
  • + 1
 @bigtim: with loads of custard
  • + 7
 I'm riding with the USWE pack, it doesn't move or bounce which is great for jumping. One big bonus is no strap around waste or belly which for me helps breathing and comfort.
  • + 3
 +1 for USWE packs. especially when riding motos, as it just feels like part of the roost guard. Osprey is a close second. Their warranty is awesome. Wreck one in a crash, and they will fix it.
  • + 1
 I love my Camelbak Skyline. On the climbs I unclip the chest strap and the pack sits nice and low and a little off my back. Then when it's time to descend I clip it and it's good to go. There is a little movement, but if you set the pack up properly it is very little.
  • + 3
 Oh aye, the USWE Airborne 15 is amazing! Handles everything for a full day's ride and doesn't move all over the place. Boob-friendly as well [so I'm told].
  • + 1
 @rrolly: the skyline is great. Anyone 6' or taller would benefit from a low positioned pack. All these options above would basically be strapped around the top of my spine.
  • + 2
 I love my USWE pack as well, I hate waist straps and bouncing bags this solved both those issues!
  • + 8
 Uswe claims are true those packs don’t move
  • + 2
 Best packs going. Love mine.
  • + 3
 Can somone told me how that Evoc Explorer Pro 30l compare to the Dueter Trans Alpine Pro 28l(2019) or Osprey Escapist 32l ?
Of course is a good backpack but better than Osprey/Deuter? It is worth a money? I need a transalp/multiday carry bag that will be glue to me during downhills. I also heard about Camelbak KUDU TransAlp 30l but no real reviews yet. I got KUDU 20l and its amazing but a little bit to small for bigger rides.
That long backpacks names...
  • + 1
 Escapist 32l is incredibly spacious inside so you have to think do you really need that much space inside. The pack itself is really great Smile

endurorider.pl/osprey-escapist
  • + 2
 @EnduroriderPL: ooooo Smile Dzieki Smile czytałem Twoje art a tego nie widzialem
  • + 1
 @Zeeober: proszsz Smile Rzuć okiem na zdjęcia: tam wchodzi 5l bańka po wodzie Big Grin
  • + 1
 @EnduroriderPL: Potrzebuje coś na namiot/śpiwór/materac + żarcie,narzedzia,ubrana, bo torby bikepackingowe nawet te dobre (apidura,topeak,triglav,seatosummit) mimo ze genialne to w górach mi osobiście nie podpasowały. Oglądałem ostatnio tego Deutera na 2019 i na żywo zrobił na mnie wrażenie. Ale Osprey jest tańszy.
  • + 2
 @Zeeober: z Escapistem 32l musisz uważać bo można do niego napchać nieprawdopodobnie dużo rzeczy i przeładujesz ten plecak. Poza tym jest naprawdę fajny i jeżeli szukasz czegoś takiego to zdecydowanie powinieneś go dokładnie obejrzeć Smile
  • + 2
 @EnduroriderPL: no wiem ze 6-7kg to super powyżej może być ale tak do 10kg :p dzięki ślicznie! Bo w dzisiejszych czasach szczera opinia to skarb
  • + 1
 @Zeeober: mam cały czas ten plecak więc jak Ci będzie potrzeba to daj znać Wink
  • + 2
 I had the Deuter Trans Alpine Pro 28l backpack before, but within the warranty period the harness started to come loose. That took 3.5 months to repair. To bridge the repair period, I bought the Evoc Explorer Pro 30l, which is better by classes (it sits really well on the back), and I also had problems with the Deuter backpacks rubbing on back of iliac crest(hope thats the right word). Evoc also has a bit more volume, which really helps with overnighters or camera equipment. But I have a used Deuter to sell ;-)
  • + 1
 @mensch-mueller: thank you Man!
  • + 2
 The design of the Hydroflask 20 very closely copies the old Blackburn Mississippi in that there's visible space between your back and the pack's back panel. It really works well. I've still got the Blackburn, and I still like it, not matter what is kewl with the kids today. Tomorrow it will be something else.
  • + 3
 I love my Deuter Race exp air 14+3. Air ventilation in your back, perfect capacity for knee pads, light jacket and helmet, integrated rain bag and les than 100€...
  • + 1
 Used to rock an Osprey 30L pack but after a doozy of a crash including heli rescue and disintegrated collar bone just can't use it anymore - the shoulder straps aren't comfy. Got an Evoc Freeride Trail 20L now and I love the design, how it sits and comfy even on day long trail rides. Such a personal thing but Evoc feels like a class of its own.
  • + 1
 I rinse my USWE out every now and then with warm water and lemon juice (doesn't really matter how much) and run it though the bite valve and tube and I don't have a plastic-y taste in that reservoir at all.
  • + 3
 Someone explain what gear you need that would fill a 30L pack while mountain biking. Thats so much stuff!
  • + 1
 Those are for overnight trips incl. camping in less than hot climates (food, tent, sleeping bag). I've done 3-8 day rides with a 30l pack and it was the perfect size (i.e. I was able to squeeze the essentials and forced to leave out any excess weight).
  • + 1
 Did you use framebags too for that many days out?
  • + 1
 When you fit everything for an overnighter(sleeping bag, cooker, small air mattress and perhaps a camera and something to eat), the bag is pretty full.
  • + 1
 @lognar: No, just the backpack. There were two of us though which made it easier (one tent, one cooker etc.). And to be fair, with all that stuff the backpacks were as heavy as I'm willing to wear on the bike. Frame bags are probably a good idea.
  • + 2
 Having previously used Camelbak and Osprey I now much prefer the ERGON BE3 ENDURO backpack that I have used for the past 14 months, absolute quality.
  • + 1
 Which Camelbak did you use, and what do you prefer about the Ergon?
  • + 1
 @rrolly: I used the Skyline and Kudu, both great packs but the Ergon is just far more comfortable.
The reservoir sits low in the pack, gives the feel of a lumbar / fanny pack so the weight is more centralised, if you have a look at it then you will see that it's hinged so as the lower sits away from the rest of the pack giving more freedom of movement, the reservoir also has an extra long hose but with enough clip adjustment so as it doesn't get in the way, the hose also detaches separately from the reservoir making maintenance very easy and inserting a full reservoir effortless.
Every strap is numbered so when attaching a full face helmet for sketchier trails you do so in the correct way, you balance the pack correctly, it has enough space in the 3 inner compartments for tools, extra clothing, secure and padded compartment for your valuables and it also comes with a rain cover for added protection and visibility when heading home after a long day.
If you buy one then make sure you also buy the back protector to go with it, it moulds to the shape of your back and is exceptionally comfortable.
  • + 2
 Free tip for Sara Moore:
After you had a drink from your pack, blow the remaining water in the hose back into the hydration pack.
No more warm first sipsWink
  • + 3
 This seems to work better with some valves than others. Plus isn't that kind of like backwash anyways?
  • + 1
 @sarahmoore: I have a €5,- hydration bag from dealxtreme and thuis works perfect.
What do you Jean with backwash?
Je blow back whatever is in the tube?
  • + 3
 @sarahmoore: You drink your own spit all day whether you notice or not
  • + 1
 @sarahmoore: I think backwash is a North American term!! Hahaha. Our overseas potnas prob don't know the term Waterfall(-ing a sip off someones drank w/o touching) either.
  • + 3
 The evoc is the only one that will fit my stihl electric chainsaw, so evoc it is
  • + 1
 Sarah, any thoughts on the USWE for ladies who are not flat-chested? Im curious where the heck my boobs would go with that strap system.
  • + 2
 Doesn't matter how trendy you look without a pack if you haven't got what you need and have to do the walk of shame.
  • + 1
 I was hoping for a review of the new Evoc Neo bag, the 30l one isn’t really what most riders would use surely.
  • + 1
 Got to say since getting a uswe bag i've never looked back, they just don't move around, quality product.
  • + 0
 I laugh at people who follow trends. Losers.

Would be nice to find a bag with ~ 6l storage, and 3l insulated bladder/compartment.
  • + 1
 As far as packs that can have a full face strapped onto it, is Evoc the only option?
  • + 1
 Ye I half fill it freeze it then Then ad water that says icy cold for the ride and gives me enough water
  • + 2
 No bottle cage, no thanks!
  • + 1
 i really like the osprey ones, simple, looks comfort, and the price is reasonable.
  • + 1
 $200? Why not $300 or $400? For a backpack?
  • + 1
 I'm very happy for my $50 trail backpack.
It's ridiculous $115 for such a mini thing.
  • + 1
 #1 fan of hydration backpacks. Greatest idea in the last 30 years.
  • + 1
 How do I get that pinkbike helmet??
  • + 1
 The camelbak is light, fast and stable! Pick two
  • + 1
 Who's hiking the PCT this summer?
  • + 1
 The camelbak vest seems like a real shitty idea.
  • + 1
 USWE FTW! Belly straps are so 2015.
  • + 1
 My favorite pack is the Osprey Raptor. Best pack Ive owned.
  • + 1
 What's thas helmet brand?
  • + 1
 It's the Bell Sixer.
  • + 1
 Bell sixer
  • + 1
 Elastic velcro waist belt is a good improvement.

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