Check Out: A Minimalist Hardtail, 3D Printed Garmin Mount, the Lightest Micro Spline Cassette, & More

Nov 11, 2020
by Brian Park  



A lot of gear comes across our desks here at Pinkbike. Check Out is an occasional round-up of everything our tech editors have gotten their hands on. Sometimes it's products we're doing long-term tests on, other times it's stuff we're stoked on but don't have time to fully review. And, sometimes it's crazy shit someone sent us unsolicited and we're having a laugh.



bc original Podsol

The Podsol's black paint job has a really nice eggshell finish.

The only branding is a cleanly embossed headtube.
Post mount brakes up to 180mm.

Features

• Designed for light trail riding
• 120mm–140mm fork compatible (542mm recommended axle-to-crown)
• 29" wheels (max 2.5" tires)
• Weight: 4.17lb / 1891g measured (size M, w/ axle, seat collar, and hardware)
• Sizes: S–XXL
• Aluminum frame with integrated chainstay protection and one bottle-cage mount
• 12x148 Boost spacing, ZS44/EC44 headset standard, threaded 73mm BSA bottom bracket, 31.6mm seatpost, post mount brakes (direct mount 160mm)
• External cable routing with stealth routing at seat-tube
• Comes with thru-axle and integrated (removable) T25 lever
• HTA 65°, STA 74°, BBD 55mm, Reach 425/442/460/485/523
• Chainstay length increases from 435mm on the S–L sizes to 440mm on the XL and 445mm on the XXL
• Developed and tested to the Zedler ADV+ standard
• Available in Black or 'Grey Beige'
• Price: 378.15€ (450€ incl. VAT)
bike-components.de

bigquotesGerman online retailer Bike Components are not very original when it comes to their name, but they have a line of in-house products called "bc original". Their newest frame is a minimalist trail hardtail called the Podsol, named after the type of soil they have on their hometown trails in the Aachen Forest.

I'm a big fan of the bike's classic, simple lines and unobtrusive branding. There are no loud wordmarks, graphics, or wacky colour schemes chosen by committee. In fact the only branding I see is the tasteful headtube embossing, although it does come with a sticker sheet if that's more your style. The frame is pretty light, and it looks like it nails all the details on hardware as well. One small nit-pick is that it's only approved up to a 180mm rotor in the back, but I'm biased and think everyone should be able to choose massive brakes.

The Podsol's geometry looks really nice. Similar to an NS Eccentric Alu Evo 29 (but almost 1lb lighter) or a Rocky Mountain Growler, it fills that not-an-XC-bike-but-dont-call-it-a-hardcore-hardtail space in Bike Components' lineup. All in all, a tidy looking package for a light trail hardtail.





Garbaruk 12-Speed MicroSpline Cassette




Features

• 12 speed cassette with 10-52T gearing (520% range)
• Designed for Shimano's Micro Spline freehub (XD and HG versions also available)
• Gearing is 10-12-14-16-18-21-24-28-32-37-44-52
• Monoblock design is CNCed from a nickel-coated chromoly steel, with a 52-tooth 7075-T651 aluminum cog bolted onto it
• Enhanced teeth chamfers are designed to improve shifting and reduce back-pedaling issues
• Available in black, silver, blue, gold, green, orange, red, and violet
• Compatible with Shimano and SRAM 12-speed derailleurs (long cage versions only)
• Not eMTB approved
• Weight: 335g (±1%, this one was 329g, weight-weenies start your bidding below); the 11-52 HG freehub version is even lighter at 320g
• Price: $250 USD
garbaruk.com

bigquotesRC was a big fan of Garbaruk's 12-speed SRAM cassette when he reviewed it back in 2019, so we're happy to see them add a version for Shimano Micro Spline as well.

Made in Poland, the brand's cassette offering is already pretty compelling, being lighter and cheaper than either of the big S brands. And while it has the same 520% gear range as SRAM's new 'Expanded Range' Eagle offerings, the gear ratios are a little different. Rather than ramping to 36-42-52 like SRAM, Garbaruk has chosen to go 37-44-52, theoretically making for a less abrupt jump to the bail-out gear. The bike shop snob in me also appreciates that it looks less like a comfort bike drivetrain.

RC noted a slight drop in shifting performance on a SRAM system, so I'm curious to see if it plays any nicer within a Shimano ecosystem. Time will tell!





Wolf Tooth Quick Release

Unfortunately they haven't released a matching Hite Rite.


Features

• Low profile design claims secure, precise clamping
• Machined from 6061 T6 aluminum, with an M5 stainless steel bolt and an integrated bronze washer
• Made in the USA, in Wolf Tooth's Minneapolis facility
• Clamping diameters: 28.6mm/29mm, 29.8mm/30mm, 31.8mm/32mm, 34.9mm/35mm, 36.4mm, 38.6mm/39mm
• Clamping height: 11mm
• Available in black, red, blue, purple, orange, gold, green, and silver
• Weight: 34g (28.6mm), 34.5g (29.8mm, verified at 35g on my scale), 35g (31.8mm), 36.5g (34.9mm), 37g (36.4mm), 37.5g (38.6mm)
• Price: $36.95 USD, $50 CAD
wolftoothcomponents.com

bigquotesWhat year is it? Quick releases?

Jokes aside, I've been loving the repurposing of old, under-appreciated 90s steel hardtails into fun beater bikes for cruising mellow trails and general around town mayhem. And while the classic Salsa QR is always a good choice, I'm happy to see Wolf Tooth bring a slightly more angular, modern looking option out. They've also got all the colours if you want matchy matchy bling across your controls and drivetrain.

There are lighter options, but for the bikes this will go on, I'm glad it's sensible. The bronze bushing should keep the action smooth, and the lever is fairly low profile to reduce snags on your JNCOs during urban assaults. I also prefer QRs like this which let you set the torque while closed with the bolt.

I have to say I'm a fan of the shape. Now back to trawling the Buy & Sell for a 1995 Altitude T.O.





76 Projects Enduro Garmin Mount


I don't know enough about 3D printing, but it looks nice.
VHB tape is super strong.

I don't think it'll end up on this bike, but it's very clean.
Need a spacer under the stem for clearance.

Features

• Designed to mount Garmin or Wahoo units onto your toptube behind your stem for more protection and less distraction
• 3D printed out of laser sintered nylon
• Mounts to your toptube with 3M VHB tape (very high bond)
• Recommended for smaller computers like the Wahoo Element Bolt or Garmin 500 series
• Available in Flat (minimum of 26mm wide flat area) and Flex (pictured, for curved toptubes)
• Price: £12.50
76projects.com

bigquotes76 Projects is a small outfit from the UK making small products to solve issues that the market doesn't address. They make all kinds of straps, mounts, and bags for mountain, road, gravel, and tri bikes. 90% of their components are made in the UK.

I've gone down a 3D printing rabbit hole (after a fever dream of frustration with nobody having stock of 2.5mm x 30mm bottom bracket spacers for less than $40 after shipping. ugh), so I was excited to check their Garmin mount out. The nylon print material is tough and it seems more than up to the task.

I'm a big fan of mounting your Garmin in this location. It's a little more out of the way, less distracting, and protected from crashes. While the VHB tape is super secure, I'd like to see this design integrate a small slot to throw a 5mm zip tie around your toptube for extra security and peace of mind, or if you want to use a larger computer.



122 Comments

  • 50 8
 I'm sure it'll never be a problem for most people and 76 Projects has done their homework, I just don't know if I'm comfortable strapping my $600 dollar computer on to my bike with a sticker
  • 22 2
 Same, that’s why I wish there was a ziptie hole, just for peace of mind.
  • 72 1
 Works fine with GoPros
  • 4 0
 I’ve got 3 of them on different bikes and they are brilliant. No issues at all with My Garmin 520 and they’re rock solid. The elastic cord wraps round the bottling stem spacer (or top tube) for reassurance.
  • 2 0
 I love the mount but you have make sure to get the flat one for slightly rounded tubes like my Remedy. I broke two. One I have no idea how it broke but the second was my fault. I stumbled getting off and kicked it. I think most Garmin come with a safety strap too which I use in case the unit is dislodged in a crash. Someone else makes one that will bolt to the knock block mount too. I’ve gone back to using the long rubber rings and mounting the bar mount to my top tube. Less aesthetically pleasing but it works.
  • 7 0
 My garmin 530 came with a thether you can loop around your stem/handlebar to prevent it from getting lost. Would probably work here too.

images.singletracks.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/k-edge-mount-2.jpg
  • 6 0
 VHB (the stuff the mount is using) is ridiculously strong. Company I work at uses it for all sorts of applications in its products. I think a GoPro mount might use VHB or something similar.
  • 14 0
 3M VHB is used in place of fasteners in lots of engineering and manufacturing applications. Applied correctly, it's virtually permanent adhesion. I can't see what grade of VHB it is from the pictures, but if anything I'd be more worried about it pulling the paint off your bike than your Garmin falling off.
  • 12 1
 76 Projects not to be confused with 77 Designs or 78 minute abs.
  • 3 0
 @j-t-g & @brianpark also worth checking out https://www.racewaredirect.co/ for 3D printed goodness.
  • 2 0
 I use their wahoo mount and love it, cant recommend enough! 3m sticky pads have ridiculous ratings when applied properly; think gopro on a plane wing kinda stuck Smile
  • 2 0
 The same stickers are used to stick my €400 BT headset to the side of my motorcycle helmet at 160+ km/h (in Germany). I was skeptical at first, but after trying to remove the old set after 5 years, I'm convinced they stick.
  • 1 0
 Some advice. 100 percent agree with the Garmin and a sticker comment. The way these typically fail is water or dirt gets under the edges. I run a bead of Aqua Seal around any stick on mount I have to minimize the potential for this. Also it adds a bit more adhesion. Works well with go pro mounts.
  • 1 0
 It’s all well and good until you crash in tall grass/sand/snow. The computer gets knocked off and you won’t find it.
I used to Velcro my DRC x-monitor in this exact spot on my bike and yes it did get knocked off a couple of times. Luckily that also had a wire clipped to the handlebar. No wire, no tether and there’s a decent chance you will lose it one day. I would tether it myself.
  • 4 0
 I have the same anxiety with my regular mount. My solution was to use the included Garmin GPS string loop/strap. I wrap the loop around the bar, loop the GPS thru it to secure it in a loose lasso. That way if the mount breaks (or in this case) if the tape fails, the GPS will not get lost on a trail somewhere. It may fall and bang into your frame for a minute, but at least it won't be lost or broken for good. Cheers
  • 4 0
 @j-t-g: The world is held together by high strength adhesives
  • 2 0
 Having lost a computer when my "good" mount broke in the past, I always use the lash and would not rely on the mount being the only thing keeping it from getting away. I've even done races where leashes are required.

I still would go for more than just the sticker. I also am not eager to put a sticker directly on the paint that I may want to remove later.
  • 3 0
 Go pro's been doing it for a very long time? Either way a $600 dollar bike computer should have lanyard hole for a safety tie no matter where or how you've got it mounted. Always a chance it's gonna pop out of the mount in a wreck.
  • 1 0
 I've been using the 76 Projects mounts for over a year with a Garmin 520+ and it's rock solid.
  • 2 0
 @goldfly: for sure. I'd be more worried about ripping off the clear coat
  • 1 0
 ive got this mount for my garmin 530 and have been using one for over a year with no issues at all . i do use the garmins lanyard and just loop it around one of my bikes cables for security though that way if it does for some reason come off it will still be attached to my bike and not lost in a bush
  • 2 0
 @brianpark: The bonding area is huge. I would be more worried about the interface to the Garmin breaking.
  • 2 0
 Please don't be bissed to "bondage" Smile and embrace & bond the future.
All carbon fiber bikes are bond, for example, back in 93, the Suzuki DR350 had a bonded aluminium swingarm.
Yes, it's special adhesives that are cured and on this particular application the End User is responsible for:
- Cleaning & degreassing process --> meaning, some will be top notch, while others will be.... less!
- Pealing and Bond --> it sounds simple (and it is!), but so many things can go wrong!
Saying this, I agree, and I woudn't place my $600 computer on that support, because it can snap.... (and the second one, and it's a controversial one, is that I stopped using all devices, and just hit the trail and focus on what matters: FUN and Pushing myself, but like I said, it's controversial topic, and I respect all!)

I'd like to see:
Plastic injection part and not a 3D print.
A Silicon cover, that not only would cover the "computer", but also the support up to the top tube, in an elegant way
Maybe a strap to save the GPS in case I fell and brake the support

On final notes, personally I find easier to view a GPS screen when it's mounted on the Stem, or is ahead of the handlebar.
  • 2 0
 I crashed today watching porn on my garmin computer, best ride ever!
  • 2 0
 If you want to feel more warm and fuzzy about the situation read up on 3M VHB, it's no joke and there are many variations of it. It is used commercially to mount glass windows, elevator doors, components on buses etc. It is literally an alternative to rivets, bonding, and welding. Seriously impressive stuff. Plus it's designed to dampen vibration so MTB is a great application for it assuming one uses the correct VHB and it's applied properly.
  • 1 0
 True but six months of Whistler summer riding has gone by without any issues what so ever.
And stuck to the RideWrap with no issues.
As with any adhesive product clean clean clean again before applying it to a surface (also clamping it in place with two micro Irwin clamps whilst it cures over night probably helps).
  • 26 1
 Can people please stop saying "ecosystem' in the context of group sets. Makes me wanna smash things
  • 16 0
 How about 'conglomerated collection of harmonious mechanical components' instead?
  • 4 0
 @bigtim: it's perfect!
  • 17 0
 painfully good looking HT frame... cheesus
  • 5 0
 wait I've been told that aluminum only looks good raw on enduro bikes, not hard tails
  • 2 0
 @hamncheez: Liteville H-3
  • 6 0
 @Vertik: its a joke
  • 13 0
 Eggshell finish on the hardtail...? Looks it was bead blasted to me. And it's very good looking!
  • 6 0
 Yeah I’m not sure how to describe it. Looks really nice though.
  • 1 0
 Eggshells can be used as media for bead blasting, so maybe it was?
  • 7 5
 if only it was steel....
  • 1 0
 @fartymarty: this ^

but I didn't see if on their site anyway...? (maybe I didn't look hard enough)
  • 4 0
 I don't know much about welds. But those look like some nice welds.
  • 1 0
 On the head badge picture, it looks like a 3D renderring !
  • 7 0
 i love the idea of so many small brands finding space in the market where they can thrive. i am sure i am not the only one who has casual daydreams of running a small bike accessory/parts company out of my garage
  • 5 0
 Like the simple tubes on the podsol hardtail...usually aluminium frames have too many bends etc. Reminds me of my 97 Kona Koa, almost looks like steel but it’s a really light aluminium frame.
  • 3 0
 I have this Garbaruk Microspline 10-52 cassette and it appears that I've got lucky because mine weights 320g exactly. It shifted a little weird to start with, but now that it has broke in it shifts almost like genuine shimano hyperglide+ with xtr 9100 chain.
  • 7 3
 Man, I'd love if Garbaruk could make a 10 speed, 10-50ish cassette. It could easily be sub 300 grams and I love the wider jumps of fewer gears.
  • 6 3
 There are no derailleurs to cope with that range and to me it looks kind of pointless to manufacture a cassette that 1.costs almost as much as a whole 10s drivetrain and 2. can't really be used without some serious bodging. Even their custom cage, that allows 11s mech to work with wider range cassetes, by itself costs more than deore 10s mech.
  • 5 1
 @SanitariuszMariusz: Have you heard of 10 speed SLX or AdventX? Or Prime 9?
  • 2 0
 @SanitariuszMariusz: 12 speed derailleur works fine with a ZTTo 11-51 Cassette
  • 2 0
 @SanitariuszMariusz: I don't know if Shimano changed something or the pull ratio difference is so small doesn't matter, but they advertise some of the new Deore RDs as 10 and 11spd compatible. The RD-M5100-SGS is designed for an 11-51 cassette.
  • 4 0
 It's also interesting to see how certain people want bigger jumps between the gears. I've seen so many 1x vs 2x discussions where people deemed 1x11/1x12 borderline unrideable because the "jumps are too big" (and the discussion was about MTB riding, not road, gravel etc.). Big Grin I guess you can't please everyone.
  • 2 0
 @HollyBoni: Most of the time I use 6 gears.
A 10 speed 10-46 or 51 cassette would be the perfect match
  • 1 0
 @HollyBoni: Probably depends on where you are riding and what you are used to riding. If someone comes from a road background or rides a lot of pavement/gravel on their mountain bike (either to get to trails or commute or whatever) or have pretty flat smooth XC trails I could see it mattering more to them.

Personally I ride a decent amount of singlespeed stuff so jumps don't bother me when I am on geared bikes.
  • 2 0
 @HollyBoni: On my road bike I love 2x11; I've ridden 2x10 on road and I like closer gearing. It makes sense; when you're chugging on flats into a headwind, its nice to be able to get in the exact cadence you need. When most of us mountain bike, however, we are doing the old winch and drop. All the middle gears are rarely used.
  • 1 0
 @93EXCivic: For sure. I have no problems with bigger jumps, even on my gravel bike I have a 1x11 with a 10-42 and I ride that bike on pavement as well. I'm not hunting Strava times, not racing etc. No one is forcing me to keep a certain speed, so I can keep whatever cadence I want.
While I had a few road bikes with stuff like a triple and a 10spd 11-25 or something, I spent most of my time on stuff like 7-8spd 11-28s, 10spd 11-36s etc. So I guess i'm kinda used to "bigger" gaps as well.

It was just interesting to see how some people flat out hate the bigger jumps even on mountain bikes, and some people actually want it.
  • 1 0
 The 11-30 cassette on my road bike now is right on the limits of what I like for road riding, but I also do a lot of climbing so the gear spread is nicer (compact crank). But I do WAY more climbing on my MTB and rarely ever stress about the jumps on the Eagle or XTR12.
  • 5 1
 Don't get me wrong that color is gorgeous but what's so minimalist about it? Nearly every HT frame looks about the same without components on it...
  • 11 0
 The lack of wacky tube shapes, gussets, graphics, or extraneous "features".
  • 3 2
 @brianpark: Set up for a derailleur means it already fails the minimalist test.
  • 4 0
 Would love to see that Podsol frame when they release the DH tandem racing version. Can't wait!!
  • 5 0
 That hardtail looks tight!
  • 2 0
 Every 3-D printed mount that I had only lasted a few rides before it snapped. Seems they can’t handle rough rock gardens or colder weather. Something about the material needs to be flexible.
  • 1 0
 Which ones did you try and what were they made of? Seems like some materials are just wishful thinking.
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: to be honest I’ve never tried a actual branded one. I tried several that buddies had made with their 3-D printers and then I bought some off of a website again made by a private person. Not sure of the materials but when you feel an actual Garmin mount compared to the printed one they seem way more malleable to impact shock. The 3-D printed ones I still use are on my road bike.
  • 4 0
 @brianpark: laser sintered nylon... That should work. Not your typical FDM 3D Printer.
That being said, I printed some GoPro mounts out of carbon fiber reinforced PETG on my homemade 3d printer, and they are just fine. There is some impressive strength in some of these materials, if they are printed right.
  • 1 0
 @Kainerm: cool, we have a Matterhackers printer coming for some projects and it’ll work with chop carbon nylon materials. Curious to experiment.
  • 4 0
 @Kainerm: exactly. 3D printing covers a wide range of technologies from $100 hobby printers which are great for playing around with but in our opinion are not suitable for end use saleable products. We use SLS or MJF as they are the only technologies that can make end use parts that are as strong as injection moulded or even aluminium ones.
We've sold thousands and have only had a handful of breakages, nearly all after a crash which would destroy most mounts or the computer if the mount held up.
  • 1 0
 I just got an FDM printer and have been printing RC car gears and other parts in Nylon-X. It is ridiculously strong and if they can hold on up in an rc car a bike is no problem. What material you use is everything in 3d printing. Now granted my machine is a highly customized Ender 3 but at $300 it's printing pretty much every material I have thrown at it.
  • 1 0
 @76projects: I'd been thinking about these but was nervous about the adhesive pads (which have occasionally come off ski helmets) and the material. A zip tie guide would be surely easy to print in and add some security for those who want it. I do always use the lanyard, but it would be annoying for a flapping Garmin to ruin a race run or just put you off as you're about to send that big gap...
  • 1 0
 @mountainsofsussex: We recommend the lanyard for any mount, saves time hunting in the bushes after a crash. The mounts are primed before the VHB is added (very early one weren't which meant the adhesive came away from the mount in very wet conditions). The adhesive doesn't fail and the zip tie won't help if the mount breaks in a crash. It's not possible to account for what might happen in every crash but we have designed the mount to fail before it trashes the computer.
Despite the VHB being super strong the mount is actually fairly easy to remove with the correct technique and the adhesive comes off in one piece without leaving residue.
  • 4 0
 @brianpark A garmin glued to a Solaris Max is the least Cotic thing I've ever seen :')
  • 4 0
 Ahaha agreed. I'll be honest, that mount is likely going on my gr•vel bike, but I figured I should show it on a mountain bike.
  • 3 0
 Fuck yeah Garbaruk, making sensible 10-52 cassettes, ratio wise. Finally a normal jump to the 52T ring on a Sram compatibel cassette.
  • 2 0
 when you buy a garmin it comes with a more secure frame mount than that ... also suggest using the tether and a piece of velcro underneath ... but i like the bands better than just sticky tape
  • 1 0
 Man...I've broken every Garmin mount. I wrapped the bands around the frame and had it mounted on my top tube like that. One misjudged rock and I thrust forward breaking the mount. Same with stem and handlebar mounts. Broken...all of them. The only one I haven't broken is the one that sticks out past the front of the bars. It looks stupid, but I don't break it.
  • 1 0
 I’ve been using this mount for the past season and it has worked great! It’s mounted on an SB130. I had to crash replace the frame and was able to get the mount off with no paint damage- just some gentle heat gun. New VHB tape and onto the new frame for the major part of the season with no issues
  • 4 0
 Big guys should appreciate the 655mm stack on XXL hardtail.
  • 1 0
 I do.
  • 4 0
 Boy that QR looks very Chromag eh!
  • 4 0
 I'm loving that podsol. Finally somebody gets it.
  • 2 0
 Are you that dude with the channel? Haha, I'm wearing your t-shirt in fuchsia right now.
  • 1 0
 @ryan189: atta boy. Best color out there. Yup, that's me.
  • 1 0
 I noticed that on the Podsol the welds on the top are polished somewhat, while the ones around the bb are not. Smooth polished welds all over would improve the clean look imho.
  • 2 0
 Got a bc Podsol now! Simply loving it! No fuzz and bullshit just a hands down awesome bike that does exactly what it's intended to do. Love it!
  • 3 0
 That is a gorgeous hardtail
  • 3 0
 Minimalist hardtail...as opposed to?
  • 2 0
 Single Speed Rigid....
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: You mean with components?

Jk...I dig it.
  • 1 2
 I fabricated my own top tube garmin mount two years ago out of a gopro mount using a dremel tool. It's been awesome to have it easy to read and protected from crashes. It's such a natural fit - edge 520 is narrower than the top tube of most bikes including my ripmo, so perfectly shielded, and with modern geo it's such a naturally readable position.

So... why has this taken so long!?!?! Enduro racers have been fabricating their own for years and the industry catches up years later with small batch 3d printing... ok.

Riding around with Stan's dart dremel'd onto a OneUp EDC inserter, with a dremel'd Garmin mount, explaining how I had to Dremel my Stans Dart into my gravel pump, it's hard to explain to outsiders why stuff costs so much. See, first you buy the ludicrously expensive components, then you start grinding through the badly designed plastic to build it yourself...
  • 4 1
 76 Projects has been in business since 2016. They've been reviewed on here before. So they ain't new and you aren't as forward thinking as you proclaim.
  • 1 1
 Interesting choice of number. I wonder if 76 lubricants had anything to say about it.
  • 2 0
 I’ve had frustrating conversations with Garmin politely asking them to supply a mount that would work well on a modern carbon frame in this location. Garmin was remarkably stubborn and insisted that their curved strap on mount was adequate for most customers. I have nothing against steel tube frames... I own a couple...but Garmin seems clueless about their actual customers.
  • 1 1
 @RelapsedMandalorian: I think you're confusing the release date of a top tube mount with the inception date of the company, but the stakes are of course PB comment section cred, aka time spent not riding your bike. We both lose this one. Cheers
  • 2 3
 I wonder where is the market for the Garbaruk cascette is. It costs the same as the XTR cassette. (As someone who rides XTR 12s 10-45) I wouldn't be willing to get someting that shifts worse to save a few grams. Also I expect that it will last much less - especially the small alu cogs (XTR is steel and titanium).
  • 4 0
 Might be different with shipping and exchange rates for you, but in the USA the XTR cassette is $380 USD and the Garbaruk one is $250 USD.

Edit: also the Garbaruk doesn't have any small alu cogs. Only the largest cog is aluminum.
  • 5 0
 The 12 speed HG compatible cassette is cheaper and lighter than the X01 Eagle and doesn't require the XD driver upgrade that cheaper GX cassettes do
  • 5 0
 I don't think that is correct XTR 12spd is steel for the small cogs, Ti for the middle and alloy for the largest 3 cogs. So in theory Garbaruk has better wear resistance as it only has 1 alloy cog.
  • 4 0
 @brianpark: SUPER curious as to how it shifts compared to the OE Shimano 12sp stuff. Any plans for a deeper review?
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: Sorry my bad. I thought it is one piece CNC aluminum.
  • 1 0
 I'm trying out Taiwan based TRW 12S cassettes that weigh 375g, HG compatible and $120. So far performance is good and shifts are smooth.
  • 2 0
 That cutting board background needs some razor blade marks to be authentic for me...
  • 2 0
 "Light trail use." Please elaborate on "light," can one shred?
  • 4 0
 They classify it as “all mountain” which means different things to different people. It’s certainly not all mountain the way Levy and Kaz use it to mean “bigger than trail, but steeper than enduro”. At the end of the day it is a 4lb alloy frame so I wouldn’t expect it to be the choice for urban assault stair hucks.
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: Hey thanks for the response!
  • 1 0
 Love the frame! I'm currently building an NS Eccentric 27.5 for my son with similar geo. Can't wait to get it rolling.
  • 1 0
 Frame looks good, but in reality it is 473 euro plus postage of 30 euro. No beef, just prefer transparency
  • 1 0
 I would recommend machining your cassette first, and than coating it in nickel second.
  • 1 0
 Hmmmmm, two rear cassettes or one frame....
  • 1 0
 Why a 65°hta for "light" trail riding?
  • 20 0
 Because it’s 2020, and hardtails get steeper as you go through the travel.
  • 5 0
 hardtails steepen through their travel, a slack baseline ha helps maintain downhill capability
  • 1 0
 @brianpark: I didnt knkw that, good to know
  • 3 1
 You’re looking at approx one degree of head angle steepenage for every 20mm of fork travel. Some people like to run 160 forks on their HTs. If you start with a 65 degree head angle at full extension, it’s going to be 73 at bottom out. Which makes me wonder, why would anyone put a 160 fork on a hardtail. Weird.
  • 1 0
 @jaame: Who cares. I'm stealing "steepenage".
  • 5 0
 @iammarkstewart: Actually, I believe correct term is "Unslackerneringness".
  • 2 1
 Garbaruk is not from Poland, it is from Ukraine.
  • 10 0
 They relocated to Poland in 2019.
  • 3 1
 They moved from Kiev to Poland last year iirc
  • 2 0
 Pretty sure they moved to Poland a while back
  • 6 0
 @wojtas7 not sure what the commenter above are trying to say, but Garbaruk recently moved their business from Ukraine to Poland.
  • 1 0
 very clean
  • 2 2
 Would do that frame. Shame it's boost.
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