Check Out: Alien Socks, Grips, Carbon-Soled Shoes, & More - December 2018

Dec 17, 2018
by Pinkbike Staff  



A lot of gear comes across our desks here at Pinkbike. Check Out is a monthly round-up of everything our tech editors have gotten their hands on. Sometimes it's products we're doing long-term tests on, other times it's stuff we're stoked on but don't have time to fully review. And, sometimes it's crazy shit someone sent us unsolicited and we're having a laugh.



Bontrager XR Trail Comp Grips

Bontrager XR Trail Grip

Bontrager XR Trail Grip
The grips are held in place by a nylon lockring and a 3mm bolt.
Bontrager XR Trail Grip
There are five color choices, including olive green and fluorescent yellow.

Features

• 31mm diameter
• Nylon CoreLock clamp
• $14.99 USD

• Single clamp design, 3mm M4 bolt
• Colors: black, blue, olive green, orange, Volt
www.trekbikes.com


bigquotesBontrager's new XR Trail Comp grips are extra-affordable thanks to the use of a nylon rather than aluminum clamp. They clamp down securely, and the 31mm diameter gives them a 'just right' feel - they're not too thick and not too thin. The finned pattern is very comfortable with or without gloves, although they can get a little a little slippery in the rain compared to options with a more aggressive design. The five different colors facilitate that next level color coordination, and the reasonable price tag makes it easy to justify buying more than one pair at a time. Mike Kazimer



Alien Socks

Alien Socks

Alien Socks
Alien Bizness Man
Double Dog Dare

Features

• Color combinations only an alien ginger could come up with
• Long-wearing nylon, polypropylene and Spandex blend
• Small/med or large/XL sizes

• Seven different alien dioramas to chose from
• Perfect holiday gifts
• Buy 3 pairs, get one free!
• $9.95 USD
Shop for Alien Socks Here


bigquotesGregg Bagni has forgotten more about the bicycle industry than most of us will ever know. He's known for bestowing odd gifts to his many friends. The most coveted are stickers and socks adorned by alien creatures. Eventually, this led Bagni to spring forth from retirement and launch Aliensocks.com. The socks featured here, Alien Bizness Man and Double Dog Dare, are a few examples. Colors are unsympathetic to the human race, but the fit and quality will make us happy. RC



Leatt DBX 2.0 Windblock Gloves

Leatt DBX 2.0 gloves

Leatt DBX 2.0 Windblock glove
Leatt DBX 2.0 Windblock glove

Features

• WindBlock upper-hand material
• MicronGrip palm
• Silicone grip print
• $34.99 USD

• Microinjected 3D Brush Guard reinforced pinky and knuckles
• Sweat / snot wiper on thumbs
www.leatt.com


bigquotesI don't like frozen fingers, but I also can't stand gloves that are overly thick and bulky. That's where the DBX 2.0 gloves come in. The palm is super thin, but the softshell fabric on the other side keeps the wind out, and your hands a little warmer on those cool fall or winter days. Mike Kazimer



Specialized S-Works Recon Shoe


Removable traction pins, titanium hardware, and a hearty rubber grip on the carbon sole.
Dyneema mesh is integrated into the uppers to keep the shoes from stretching and blowing out.

Features

• Carbon outsole
• Alloy BOA dials
• Reinforced toe
• $425 USD

• Ultra stiff (13.0)
• Shaped heel cup
• 605g (pair, size 43.5)
www.specialized.com


bigquotesYes, they're very expensive, but the previous generation Recon shoes from Specialized stood up to three years of my walking through rivers and doing hike-a-bikes and don't look any worse for the wear. The Recon is a good all-rounder that is a little more versatile than an XC race shoe, and a little stiffer than most all-mountain/trail shoes. Specialized call it the evolution of their XC shoe.

The OG has been my go-to for a number of trips, and what I have worn more than any other shoe in the last several years. The new S-Works Recon takes everything that was good and adds some performance, plus a BOA closure system, making them easier to get off and on.
Daniel Sapp



Rev Grips Race Series Shock Absorbing Grip System



Features

• Shock Absorbing Insert
• Soft goods (Grip, Inserts, etc.) are replaceable
• 30-Day Money Back Guarantee
• $59.95 USD

• All parts are upgradeable and interchangeable between Race and Pro Series
• Available in: Small (31mm), Half-Waffle (31mm), Medium (32.5mm), Large (34mm)
www.revgrips.com


bigquotesIf you thought that the concept behind the Rev Suspension Grips that Mike Levy tested back in 2016 was interesting, but weren't willing to shell out over $100, you're in luck. Basically, the new Race Series grips are a bare-bones version of Rev's Shock Absorbing Grip System. The more budget-friendly version foregoes the fancy CNC'ed locking collars and comes with only the most commonly used medium stiffness bushing. Sure, they still cost four times more than the aforementioned Bontrager grips, but with the same tech and damping benefits as their more expensive siblings in the Pro Series, it sounds like a fair price to pay to ward off arm pump.Sarah Moore





108 Comments

  • + 104
 I'm just hoping that Specialized can come up with a S-Works socks and shock absorbing grips to match their shoes. If in a midlife crisis I decided that my degenerating forearms and shriveling calves need these products - that I can get them with the specialized label on them with a significant markup. The grip should be at least US$125 and the socks a minimum of US$25. If you buy 3 pairs of socks you should be able to get the 4th one at full price too.
  • + 5
 To be fair, their xc shoes have lasted me much longer than mid-level Shimano or high end Pearl Izumi (yes I know Shimano owns them now, they didn't when I bought them) has. Shimano was barely a year, Pearl was less than a year and they didn't have the same model or size available for a replacement. Luckily I sold the replacements for good money and bought my Specialized shoes last year. Gloves, definitely don't but S stuff anymore...
  • + 6
 @yzedf: I've had great luck with my S-works shoes. I have thousands of miles on mine and they still look fantastic. That said, I ride for a shop that is a Specialized dealer and I got them for less than half-price. No chance I'd pay retail on them, despite how much I like them.

I do have to say, Specialized makes great shoes. My cliplites are fantastic and way more reasonably priced.
  • + 1
 @yzedf: Can't afford S-Works, but for clipless, my Spesh XC shoes have lasted 2 years and aside from some wear, are still great. I managed to find an extra pair on clearance recently but don't even think I'll unpack them for a few more years... on the other hand, my Giro shoes (2 pairs) didn't last more than 1 season. My Five Ten freerider contacts, I have to replace yearly. While I'll never pay retail, they are still more than $100 on sale and their soles just don't freaking last, unfortunately.
  • + 6
 For that price they should have Louboutin red soles.
  • + 4
 Favorite cycling shoes are the lowly Specialized Sport mtb shoe. Simple, cheap, very durable, and flexes just right for riding and walking. Velcro straps, no mesh, all black.
  • + 4
 @yzedf: If this was an article about Pearl Izumi I would start ranting about the fact that Shimano had bought them and their customer service would be in deep trouble at least here in the Great White North. I do not think anyone can fault most specialized products on anything but cost.
  • + 1
 @dldewar: Pearl Izumi customer service did fall off... Specialized usually offers the reasonable priced product that usually lasts longer than the stuff that's marginally cheaper as well as the S-Works aka "I'm never buying that" stuff.
  • + 30
 I found REV grips to be pretty legit. I run them on my DH bike and trail bike. For me, they nearly eliminate hand fatigue and arm pump and I'm able to ride laps at Whistler until I'm beat, and not have to stop early because my hands/arms are done.
  • + 7
 They definitely work as advertised - their grip compound leaves a bit to be desired though. You can burn through that rubber in no time, and is almost baffling how a grip that can be as tacky as they are dry lose all manner of tack soon as they get wet. I have to run different grips during our PNW winter riding season. Given their a la carte component model, hopefully they get a better wet compound in the works to swap out soon.
  • + 16
 those 425 dollar shoes don't even say SUPREME on them...
  • + 1
 Yeah they initially scream bull$hit product, but after hearing really good feedback from others (and Reece Wilson's downtime podcast about them) I'm considering buying a set
  • + 2
 I picked them up as well. Figured they were bs but worth a shot. They alone eliminated about half of my arm pump, with changing to sq labs 12 degree post getting rid of the rest. They have been great!
  • + 1
 @esander: wish they would team up with odi on the actual grip compound and design.
  • + 9
 Gotta love the glove industry. Take a mass produced blank glove, screen print some super sweet silicone graphics, and glue on some "protection" pads. Then charge $35, or even upwards of $50 for fox/tld What a deal!
  • + 4
 I agree, but I will say not all gloves are created equal. Coming from a moto background I know what works for me, and what doesn't.
  • + 5
 @N9netn9ne: I hear ya, MTB specific gloves single layer gloves are laughable. I typically stick to the moto variety myself for more protection/longevity.
  • + 1
 @PhoS: yep I do the same
  • + 1
 i am currently riding in mechanix "grip" gloves. I had them for working on my car but they only saw use every couple of months when i needed to fix something in the garage, started using them for mtb and they lasted maybe 10 rides before started to fall apart at the seams. Those were $20. I just bought mtb-specific gloves for $22 so if they hold up twice as long ill probably be happy.
  • + 10
 Anybody got actual experiences with the Revgrips? Seemed gimmicky, but listening to Reece Wilson praise them in his Downtime podcast episode got me curious.
  • + 40
 I too love the things that get me paid.
  • + 10
 Yes. Best upgrade after dropper post. Has removed pain in elbow ( 2fractures 1reconstruction ) pain would start on road ride to bike then increase with each lap. Now no pain !! Elimiated 99% of arm pump. I used to have so stop during laps because of arm pump. No stopping now. I put off buying these for a year because of the price . So glad I bought them. I have the pro version on the loose settings. Found it way more comfortable and less arm pump. The ability to choose size of the grips is also great.
  • + 8
 I have them and ran them for a while. I've had chronic hand issues since I started riding stemming from compression of my ulnar nerve. I was hoping these would help resolve it, but they didn't, mainly because the issues I have stemmed from too much pressure on the outside of my hand, which these grips don't do much to resolve. They did help dampen vibrations, you don't really notice their movement that much when you ride, which is good. They have an effect, but I feel like it was roughly on par with what I got from the ESI Extra Chunky and comparably thick foam grips. They are really well made, but I ended up going with something more ergonomic to help with my specific issues. The grip surface is really grippy, they seemed to wear well, and are really well constructed. The only downside I found was that the grips tended to rub the bars a bit. When I removed them there was scuffing under the grips on my carbon bars. It wasn't significant or enough to be of concern, but something to know about. Tough to tell if I'd recommend them or not. I guess it depends on what you need them for. If you are looking to cut down on vibrations and help damp out sharp impacts, they work great. If you have nerve issues in your hands or something similar, they didn't help me much.
  • + 3
 I've used them for a few years and love them. I can't say they are the only reason my hand pain went away, but I'm guessing they helped. Even if the grips were regular lock ons, I would still use them. They feel way better than my ODI elite pros.
  • + 1
 Sounds like you need these.
www.specialized.com/us/en/body-geometry-gel-long-finger-gloves/p/151216?color=243651-151216
I have the road bike version that worked great. You could glue some foam to your gloves in that pattern if you are a hacker. Prob not as good as there gel though.
@shinook:
  • + 1
 @shinook:

What'd you decide to go with? i've been looking at some Ergons (mini wing) and SQ Lab options. also have really liked my Wolf Tooth Fat Paws so might just stick to those.
  • + 2
 It does say they have a money back guarantee.

For anyone that experiences minor amounts of discomfort I actually found that Ergon GD1s solved all my problems. They grip well, add a bit of effective backsweep due to the taper, have a comfortable/soft rubber, look sweet, and they're actually super durable (had them for over a year now, which is quite a bit longer than normal for me). I doubt they'll solve extreme arm pump, but they totally solved the wrist and hand pain I'd been getting on normal rides.
  • - 7
flag Thustlewhumber (Dec 17, 2018 at 14:00) (Below Threshold)
 They twist on landing, so I got wrist pain after 2 jumps.
  • + 4
 I absolutely love mine. They definitely help against arm pump and hand fatigue. The rubber compound they use in the grip is also far above anything else I've used. Super soft and grippy. I stopped wearing gloves they're that comfy Totally worth the extra money
  • + 3
 #deathgrips
  • + 2
 @rezrov: I thought the gd1s didn't have any backsweep. they are tapered from inside of the grip towards the outside. but aren't made with built-in back sweep like the ge1
  • + 5
 They are amazing. The float experience is quite unique. The grip themselves are super tacky. I didn't get arm pump before I bought these. What I like like is the float that they create separating the grip from the bar. I run mine on the loose setting with a tuning washer on both sides of the clamp. I have the pro series.
  • + 1
 @rezrov: +1 for gd1s
  • + 2
 Love them. Have helped me with fatigue and take out some of the soreness too. Worth the 100 bucks for me. Have it on a couple bikes now.
  • + 2
 would recommend. reduce the chatter which helps with concentration and handpain. Feels similar to dropping a couple psi in the tire. Grips are also really soft and gummy which feels good without gloves. similar to a well worn tld odi. On the medium setting they've got as much movement as my tld odi's (sloppy locking collars) had anyway so don't notice the flex.
  • - 1
 Stopped using the Rev Grips after a handful of rides. Found them less comfortable than any other grip. The rubber bushings are a joke; one friend's worn out ODI lock-on's happened to have more movement. Switched to Ergon GE1 and hands are happy. Even did a 30k day in whistler no problems.
  • + 3
 I've been running them for a solid year. Even tried to go back to another grip and within an hour put the Rev Grips back on. Very good grips, they are worth the money. Eliminates small vibrations and I never get arm pump. When I see my buddies shaking their wrists out after a run I just tell them to try some rev grips. They have no problems running through ESI foam grips every couple months, but think 50 bucks is too much. Try them, if you do not like em send em back...but you will like them!
  • + 1
 I’m confused, does everyone get arm pump? Could it maybe be some death grip? To much air pressure? Riding the brakes? Clapped out fork? I don’t know, I find it hard to believe this magic grip solves all the MTB problems...
Makes no damn sense... OTT that’s what’s up.
  • + 2
 I've used them for the past year or so and I'm convinced. They do not give me aching pain afterwards, have good grip, do not slip, and are durable. They are obviously a bit complicated but worth the setup and price in my opinion. I've tried various ODI, ESI, Ergon, and other grips over the years and they all had drawbacks but I feel that the RevGrips are the best all around. I'm sure they're not for everyone though, kind of like saddles.
  • + 1
 @gcrider: I tried those and they made it worse for me, I'm not sure why, possibly the fit of the glove or that I had to grip harder to stay on the bars. In either case, glad they worked for you! I wish I knew why they didn't for me.
  • + 2
 @WasatchEnduro: I went with the SQLab 70X, they provide a little more distribution of pressure on the outside of my hand than the foam ones at the expensive vibration damping, but they worked well for me. Be sure to use SQLab's sizing chart and get the right size.
  • + 1
 I have a pair on my rigid 29er. They defiantly take a bit of the sting and vibration out.
  • + 2
 @splsce: i used to get arm pump when i started. at the bike park a pro rider was giving me tips and told me i was deathgripping. havent had arm pump problems since i loosened up a bit and learned to ride with hands more relaxed. when i started out everything was scarier so grabbing on hard makes sense. i still am interested in these grips though simply to take away some vibrations to the handlebars through chattery rocks and stuff
  • + 7
 Those socks are...uh...somethin' else, I tell ya.
  • + 1
 they will change your life.....
  • + 5
 I have those Leatt gloves. They are the real deal! My next pair of spring/summer gloves will definitely be Leatt!
  • + 5
 Extrapolating out the price curve of those $425 shoes, $1000 usd shoes should be here by 2022.
  • + 3
 Mavic Comete Ultimate... availible now!!! (I know it’s a road shoe, but still)
  • + 2
 Those Bontrager grips are surprisingly good. I've assembled a few trek bikes with them, and every time I go to shift or check the brakes I find my hand gripping the bars longer than they should and thinking to myself "wow these are pretty nice!"
  • + 3
 Those S-works shoes mmmm... if only Bike shoe makers realized that all mtb shoes should have inside ankle protection. Come on, this would weigh 10g more per shoe....
  • + 5
 50g+ per side, 10g for the side cuff, 40g worth of skin and blood that's staying put on your ankle.
  • + 0
 Mmmmmm...Rectal Randall don't need no ankle pro on his ti blah blah xc shoes, he's raw doggin' it. Drop the soap, bruh
  • + 1
 the sworks shoes are worth every penny. they last forever and are the only shoes ive ever been able to step into without needing an aftermarket insole for and mine are earlier generation and still look pretty new even after several salty winters on em.
  • + 2
 I have a base level Spaz mtb sport shoe, by far the most comfortable cycling shoe I have owned, at a great price. I like to rip off the Spaz brand, but their contact points and clothing really is top notch stuff, even the entry /base level kit.
  • + 2
 The Rev grips are sweet but the little red bushings are tiny and kind of fiddly for fat fingers on the install. The Leatt gloves are sweet, got the Leatt flow really grippy palms and really thin. Have held up fine too!
  • + 1
 $425 no Thanks buy three pairs then you can rotate two pairs and keep one pair super nice for Sunday rides.

I have some mavics and the sole is super grippy, so when I get stuck on an steep rock I can hike up/down.

The last pair of the big "S" I had were like ice skates NFG.
  • + 4
 "Colors are unsympathetic to the human race" TLD?
  • + 1
 actually......as the creator of these socks....can honestly say the colors were picked specifically for you humanoid two wheeled types.....ack ack
  • + 1
 @ackack: haha. I'm sure They are super comfy socks, may have to try a pair. Even if I have to sharpie in the colors, just kidding.
  • + 1
 I've got the REV grips earmarked to try and pick up. I'm coming back from an exploded hand surgery so the little extra vibration help along with the grip2 I stuffed in my fork can only help.
  • + 3
 $425 for shoes. $60 for grips. That’s USD!

.......I’ll just leave that with you all.....
  • + 0
 That S-Works shoe is a great prompt to rant about BOA tension systems.

How the f*k did these things make it to the market for bike shoes?
What end-use feature do they accommodate that laces do not?
Faster on/off? Last time I checked that would be a triathlon specific requirement.
High tension? Again, last time I checked I could tighten laces to the point of physical pain.

I do own a pair of Specialized shoes with BOA ratchet closure. They are new, too: purchased within the last 12mo because I deemed the system 'mature enough' at that time to be worth a real-world trial without the typical early-adopter risks that may have been present years ago.

Ha.

Most of the times I've hit the BOA on something while riding, it pops open causing me to stop and re-tighten. This is the same failure I was looking to escape in having come from a lever-based ratchet tension product.
With the ratchet, it would only pop open if you hit exactly on the release button. This was kind of hard to do, but still happened occasionally.
The BOAs however, just need contact anywhere on the body to 'lift' away for disengage. I find BOA release happens far more frequently: presumably due to this size difference of the small ratchet button vs entire BOA body.
Losing tension upon impact is an unacceptable failure of a shoe system. It REALLY sucks during races.

What I don't understand can be summarized simply:
If the BOA product has exploded in the market (yes), one may assume it is due to high demand.
SO, either: people buy products they don't like, OR, people do not share my experiences and opinion, OR, people buy them without considering that failure mode unacceptable.

Would love to learn the who/what/why for how this system made it to bike shoes over laces.
I have the same question of the ratchet+velcro combo, but not to the same degree of 'wtf' as BOAs.

Anyone here have insider knowledge of how this BOA product was introduced, received, and proliferated?

//Totally off-post-topic. Needed to get that out to see if anyone feels the same//
  • + 4
 I've been using boa in a variety of sports for a very long time and I've never had this issue. I do have to retie the laces in my five tens occasionally during some rides.
  • + 4
 I find less striking with boa than ratchets. I have had 5 pairs of S -works boa shoes and love them. Have used giant mtb shoes with ratchets, only because specialized stopped importing wide shoes to NZ. With boa you can adjust tension during ride when feet swell in the heat. So more comfort. Also can tighten when sprinting. I also had K2 clicker snowboard boots 20ish years ago.
  • + 1
 @gcrider: Great find, thank you for sharing!
I can totally understand the BOA for use with the early markets: tall boots (snowboard, hockey skate).
Even the introduction to road cycling I understand+agree with the added ease-of-use when there is no risk for contact on nearby objects.

Due to some other opinions shared from the original post (thanks @allenfstar @gcrider !) I should make my number #1 failure case more clear:
Racing CX bikes: taking inside lines very tight striking the course-tape poles. Quite frustrating, especially through tight chicane sections.

That being said: looking closely at the new S-Works in this post: the body of these new BOAs seems to taper slightly for truncated cone geometry. It has no clear 'mushroom' top that my BOAs have which may contribute to how easily they 'lift' on contact. It seems, by this new design, that the concern has been identified and potentially improved.

I will still elect for laces on the next XC/CX shoes I pickup for racing. With all of the preparation that goes into a weekend I don't need to add 'backup shoes and BOAs' to my list in case of mechanical failure there.
I think it is a reasonable desire to limit my concern to parts like der. hanger spares or bleed kits.
  • + 1
 It baffles me too. I gave up on boas a few years ago after having them stop functioning in various ways too many times (S-Works mtb shoes). I like the way they tension the shoe, but I hated having them fail at the worst possible time. Can't understand how introducing this complexity into a shoe ever made any sense.
  • + 1
 no laces to get caught in your chain? i just run my knot through the lower laces after I've tied my shoes, but BOA is an elegant solution to that. On my snowboard boots, i love BOA, but ill probably never have them on a pair of cycling shoes, i just run laced mtb flat pedal shoes that look good enough to wear to the pub if i want.
  • + 1
 Im using 30mm grips and find i cant close my hands enough so my hands die at whistler. I think i will make the jump to 34mm and try those out.
  • + 1
 If you can't close your hand with 30mm how will 34mm help?
I found that with thick grips I can't close my hands enough and do not feel as secure as with thin grips.
  • + 1
 smaller should give you more grip/tighter grip. i've noticed that when picking up men's vs. women's barbells at work, and then there are those "fat gripz" for working out that slide over a barbell/dumbbell shaft and make it thicker, and it really gives you a forearm pump then.

maybe 30mm is too small for your fat hands or something so this general knowledge doesnt work for you? or could be as simple as needing to adjust how you grip the bars, but then again going with what feels most natural to you probably makes sense to do
  • + 1
 those bontrager grips came on my trek slash, took one week to switch them, I ride gloveless and the grips are simply too hard
  • + 1
 Best grips I have ever ran. After long days of Enduro racing my hands and forearms are not sore. In fact, these grips make me want to ride more.
  • + 1
 Those Rev Race Grips are more reasonably priced. The price tag for the Pro is insane
  • + 1
 $425 for a pair of shoes! Think you can even purchase an over-priced SRAM GX drivetrain set for that price.
  • + 1
 The last thing i want is flashy socks, I dont want to look like our moron prime minister out on the trails.
  • + 1
 agreed...flashy alien socks aren't for everyone. too bad...as these socks will change your life! :: ))
  • + 1
 Stop with the gender neutral colors, there are men still left in this world that pee standing up!!!
  • + 1
 Those socks are kinda expensive. Aliexpress have a lot of awesome socks just for $1-$3(or more).
  • + 1
 i buy plenty of stuff from aliexpress and the quality is pretty shit compared to a lot of higher-priced, premium stuff ive bought in my time. my stance socks i had (not for mtb'ing) were pretty good socks, so i was planning on buying some socks for mtb'ing soon, but they dont have to be a mtb-specific brand, im just going to buy some decent socks
  • + 1
 pay peanuts get monkeys dude.......step up....these socks will change your life....
  • + 1
 Man i know i am on this site too much when i can recognize someone by their calves!
  • + 1
 yet another pair of boa clipless-sigh. All I want in the mountain biking world are a good pair of boa flats.
  • + 2
 Rev grips really work! I love mine never going back to regular grips.
  • + 2
 $60 is still too steep for a set of lock-on grips.
  • + 7
 But they're shock absorbing grips..........they will take away the chatter your fork can't
  • + 0
 $60USD for "lock-on grip" that feels loose....? lol
  • + 1
 Once you wear out the grip, you can buy new ones for 25 bucks.. The initial investment gets you the system.. They are totally worth it. Eliminated arm pump and hand fatigue for me. Also, I always ran carbon bars on my trail bikes for vibration dampening effects. I tried a set of these grips on my newest bike with the stock bar before I bought a carbon bar.... 2 years later and I am still on my alloy bar. So 60 for grips hands down beats 200+ for carbon bar..
  • + 1
 I have a $1000 fork to take care of trail chatter.
  • + 3
 @JohanG: high frequency resonating vibration is much different then high speed compression hits.
  • + 2
 Bicycle prices are just insane. All this shit would have been 60 dollars combined 20 years ago.
  • + 1
 @Kramz: i guess you did not ride 20 xears ago, back then everything was already stupidly expensive- and it was bad too.
  • + 1
 Those Rev grips remind me of the Oury Pyramid I ran on all my dirt bikes. Great mud grips.
  • + 1
 Snot wipers on gloves are priceless
  • + 1
 Where is the Alien Shock?
  • + 0
 Why do mountain bikers pull their socks up. It looks lame. Why not ankle socks?
  • + 2
 I personally ride with mid calf wool socks most of the time. It gives me a small amount of protection from my pedals if I happen to slip off.
  • + 1
 Some people ride trails that aren't ten foot wide bike paths. You know the thing people call single track. There are bushes, branches, vines, briers, ect and mid length socks offer a degree of protection. They also get less dirt and small pebbles in them. Many people would say ankle socks look dumb. Tan lines prove you ride a lot. For XC types the bright and crazy socks give people something to look at other than your junk.
  • + 1
 Id like shock absorbing socks
  • + 1
 Welcome Pinkbike users to the 2018 North American Winter season content...
  • + 1
 I might pass on the socks.
  • + 2
 please don't.......:: ))
  • + 0
 Those shoes are so tech, I want a pair just to oogle over them
  • + 1
 nice bits of kit
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