Check Out: An Air Compressor To Seat Tubeless Tires, Stealthy Body Protection, Giant's Cycling Computer, & Mullet Links

Sep 19, 2022
by Matt Beer  



A lot of gear comes across our desks here at Pinkbike. Check Out is an occasional round up of everything our tech editors have gotten their hands on. Sometimes it's products we're doing long-term tests on, other times it's stuff we're stoked on but don't have time to fully review. And, sometimes it's crazy shit someone sent us unsolicited and we're having a laugh.


Viair TLC Pro Air Compressor




Features

• Tubeless tire seating capability - holds a 150 PSI charge
• Weight: 5.4 kg / 11.8 lb
• $449.95 USD
• 30 ft coiled hose, 8 ft leads
• Presta (x2), Schrader, pressure gauge, and blowgun attachments included
viaircorp.com




bigquotesHave you ever been stuck at the campsite or trailhead, frustrated by a tubeless tire that just won’t inflate? Viair has a huge fleet of compressors to suit all kinds of work environments, but the TLC series is bike specific because it can hold a charge of 150 PSI to blast that tire onto the rim. Sure, there are pumps out there that can be charged up, but if you're changing tires frequently you might find it worthwhile to splash on the mechanical advantage of this compressor. Whether you're kitting out a road-tripping vehicle or investing in a race trailer, the TLC Pro could be the ticket for stubborn tires.

This unit runs off of a 12-volt battery and comes with two wiring harnesses; one for portable use and the other for a more permanent hard-mount option, which draw 30 amps. A nifty carrying bag kept the 30-foot coiled hose, 8-foot SAE battery clamps wires, and all of the attachments neatly stored, like an inflation trigger with a built-in pressure gauge, Schrader and Presta chucks, plus a blow gun. Underneath the compressor, the baseplate uses a sand tray to reduce vibrations dramatically and at the front is a threaded air filter to quickly change out between the two spares that are included.

Once the air filter is connected, the TLC Pro receives a waterproof rating of IP54, which is suitable for outdoor use, protecting it against limited dust ingress and water spray from any angle. It's also capable of inflating up to 37" vehicle tires. Lowering the pressure of such large boots adds more traction on unpaved, washboard-like roads, but also so much more comfort on long, off-road journeys. That allows the TLC Pro compressor to serve double duty for an overlanding (cringe) mountain biker.




Fox Baseframe Pro SS Chest Guard




Features

• Flexible and removable D3O padding on chest, back, and shoulders
• Sizes: S-XXL
• $199.95 USD
• Extremely breathable fabric also holds padding in place
• EN1621-1 level 1 back and shoulder certifications
williamsracingproducts.com




bigquotesI once worked at a bike shop near a film studio and stunt actors often would visit in search of body protection that was both low-profile and had enough protection to save them from injury in controlled fall. Fox Racing's Baseframe series is a collection of stealthy bodyguards covering the hips and torso, specifically developed for mountain biking and motocross. This short-sleeve version is a choice piece of kit for enduro racing where staying dexterous and managing your core temperature is crucial. There are no bulky straps, buckles, or velcro to catch on your jersey either - simply slip it on like a T-shirt.

Proven D3O inserts dissipate energy from impacts in three key areas: the sternum, spine, and shoulders. They actually soften slightly with the increase of body temperature to become even more flexible. Each bit of padding is removable to extend the life of the D3O material during washing machine cycles, or simple customize the amount of protection you are looking for. The Baseframe Pro SS retails for just under $200 and the D3O Viper spine protectors meets the EN1621-1 level 1 certification.




Giant M200 Cycling Computer





Features

• IP57 dust and waterproof rating
• Two sizes: M200 (), L200
• $279.95, 329.95 USD
• GPS, accelerometer, barometer, thermometer
• Connections: BLE, ANT+, WiFi
giant-bicycles.com




bigquotesGiant might not be the first brand you'd think of to enter the cycling computer world, but they've partnered with Stages Cycling and have packed a lot into their Dash M200/L200 units. We could go on for days to talk about what these two little devices can record and how customizable you can make your personal settings. By downloading the Stages Cycling app, you can play with even more settings, connect to third party apps, create and upload courses, workouts, and of course, sync power meters, heart rate monitors, and smart lights.

As for the basic specifications, the smaller M200 unit gets a waterproof rating of IP57, weighs 76 grams, and measures 81x51x22mm. The battery can last up to eleven hours during regular use of maps and sensors and uses a standard USB mirco-B port, which is covered by a rubber plug. Included is a standard length, aluminum Garmin-style locking mount, suitable for mountain bikes and fits 31.8 or 35mm bars.

Stages uses Everbrite technology which quickly adjusts to the ambient light conditions, although it's not a touch screen. To me, physically feeling the buttons while riding makes more sense and allows you to keep your eyes on the trail or road as much as possible. The main page is broken into four categories: a "Start Ride" selection, "files", "connections", and then "settings'. Sifting through all of the display pages is fairly intuitive, but basically the app is used for any pre or post-ride info gathering, whereas interacting with the Dash unit is more about reading what is happening on the ride.

Although cycling computers are more commonly viewed as a training tool to measure and track outputs, the map functions come in handy for a heads-up display for staying on track with GPX file routes uploaded from Trailforks and the like. Tracking location and displaying text message notifications is when I've found the Dash M200 to be most useful on non-competitive rides.




William's Racing Products MX Specialized Enduro Yoke




Features

• Accommodates a 27.5" rear wheel for 2020 Specialized Enduro
• Virtually identical geometry to stock configuration
• $295 AUD
• Maintains the stock progression curve
• Enduro 6802 LLU MAX Black Oxide Full Complement Sealed Bearing
williamsracingproducts.com




bigquotesBased just outside of Melbourne, Mic Williams, who created WRP, has been whipping up all sorts of components in his shop from mullet links to impressively innovative concepts like his mechanical engineering final project, the CentreHub. One of the products that first put WRP on the map might have been their shock yoke that adapted the 2020-present Specialized Enduro to accommodate a 27.5" rear wheel.

By carefully altering the measurements of the shock yoke, Mic was able to keep the leverage curve nearly identical while using the low-BB setting. This does raise the starting and ending rates slightly, which means you may have to play with your current spring rate ever so slightly, but the yoke will bring a totally different ride that was otherwise confined to the dual 29" wheels.

There are also a surprisingly large number of other bikes that WRP has successfully made mullet conversion kits for, including the Commencal Meta AM 29 and Norco Range. By fitting at longer 225 x 72.5mm shock to the Range and using the mullet yoke, you can achieve 205mm of travel too.





208 Comments

  • 191 0
 Have you ever successfully seated a tubeless tire on the trail and then fixed your buddy’s Tacoma with two bacon strips, three beers and four guys operating a floor pump? If so, then maybe a $450 air compressor isn’t for you.
  • 162 0
 Just look for the guy in the parking lot with every piece of overlanding gear he owns permanently attached to the rig. That guy has onboard air and is frothing for an opportunity to whip it out.
  • 3 0
 @usedbikestuff: Seriously, this thing uses a rechargeable battery or the included 12v car adaptor, what a deal, and only at your local Home Depot!
  • 3 0
 @cthorpe: like the guy who winched me out at the boat ramp during low tide. Total overkill but it was new and I made his day.
  • 12 0
 Or if you've ever shopped outside bike world. I've seen the Milwaukee M18 compressor with a free 5.0Ah battery for nearly $200 less ($279). Hell, a quick search for Viair on Home Depot shows compressors for $100+ dollars less, as well as ones capable of filling larger tires for over $50 less: www.homedepot.com/p/VIAIR-450P-RV-Automatic-Portable-Compressor-Kit-12-Volt-12v-Tire-Pump-Class-A-Tire-Inflator-For-up-to-42-Tires-45053/206743926

You don't need to compare to cheap compressors to find this deal laughable, this is bike prestige pricing all the way
  • 1 0
 sounds kinky
  • 5 0
 My lezyne overdrive pump goes up to 220psi and works better on tough to seat tires than any compressor I have tried. Best set up though is just a portable nitrogen tank with regulator on it.
  • 3 0
 Bro I can go to Walmart and buy a compressor with integrated jumper cables for 60 boccs.
  • 20 0
 @cthorpe: had me at frothing and whip it out
  • 1 0
 @defm06: this, portable, works like charm
  • 1 0
 yeahhh husky from HD will do...
  • 5 0
 @cthorpe: LOL! I love seeing brand new Hi-Lift jacks mounted on trucks that don’t even have a scratch. I bet most of those guys wouldn’t know how to operate such a lift.
  • 24 0
 If you don't have a fully converted Sprinter with a $450 air compressor to seat your gravel bike tires at the sick gravel race with 400 other gravel dorks, you are not winning.
  • 1 0
 @defm06: Had one since 2019. Changed the head out to a lezyne. One battery lasts forever, gauge is accurate enough, and it’s cheap. You really can’t beat it for what it is. It will not air up anything real like your truck though, but who cares.
  • 4 0
 @SlinkySammy: bonus points if they have it mounted to a ridiculous bed/roof rack system but with no legitimate jack points for a farm jack on the vehicle.
  • 3 0
 Mmmmm... bacon.
  • 4 0
 @usedbikestuff: www.freeairpump.com speaking of free, here's a list of gas stations that don't charge for air. Might not be parking lot pimpin with a 450usd air compressor to impress the ladies but the options there to seat your tires for free 99.
  • 2 0
 youtu.be/9bAtlQOh5b4 I much prefer the Joe Barnes edition compressor any 7:15
  • 1 0
 @defm06: been thinking about getting one of those. I've been super impressed with Ryobi tools.
  • 1 0
 @defm06: does this thing seat a freshly mounted tubeless tire? Or you just use it pre ride to set psi?
  • 3 0
 @usedbikestuff: but does it seat tyres, or just inflate them?
  • 1 0
 @usedbikestuff: yes but no. No Tank, so while an "inflator" can rattle your tyres up from low to moderate pressure, it wont be seating a tubeless tyre, unless youre lucky.
Not saying you would need to, but its not quite the same thing.
  • 1 0
 @usedbikestuff:

You are the hero we need. Money savvy yet sophisticated.

Cheers!
  • 1 0
 @cthorpe: Truth!
  • 1 0
 @Toryt7: seat tubeless tires, pre-ride to set psi, to inflate my son pool, to set my car tires psi, etc etc and the battery keeps the charge for weeks
  • 1 0
 @txcx166: can I ask you what Lezine's head?? I use one of those copper adaptors
  • 2 0
 Hacked a 2L coke bottle with old tubes, no need of a compressor.
  • 2 0
 @usedbikestuff: these are great for cars but not for this application. this doesnt give a big shot of air at once.
  • 1 0
 @Toryt7: I would actually say no on seating tires. The volume isn’t there. We run Maxxis exclusively in my family of 5 and I’ve rarely had to use a compressor. Can’t speak to other brands if that’s even a thing.
  • 1 0
 @txcx166: Awesome!!
  • 1 0
 @usedbikestuff: These most certainly wont work on Yetis
  • 1 0
 @usedbikestuff: ok I’ll bite. Does it produce a high enough volume of air to seat a tubeless tire?
  • 1 0
 $10 Home Depot garden sprayer hack: www.youtube.com/watch?v=bxNWiLQKxOs. In addition to what he shows in the video, just remove the yellow pressure relief valve and thread in a tubeless valve stem to allow inflation with floor pump. Works great, no 120V or batteries to depend on.
  • 1 0
 @zoobab2: I used to have a Coke bottle air tank and it scared the shit it of me anytime I got it over 100psi even tho it was wrapped in enough duct tape to sink the Titanic. The fire extinguisher that replaced it can go up to a few thousand psi.
  • 1 0
 Schwalbe has an portable air tank for inflation of tires. Makes any floor pump tubeless seating capable.
Probably better than a 450$ compressor, though not as "cool".
  • 1 0
 @sanchofula: doesn't actually come with the battery if you read the reviews.
  • 1 0
 As one other poster already stated, Viair has been around a long time and they make ALOT of different models of pumps.

Best to shop the different ones. This one being "bike specific" is redundent. Can easily buy any Viair that is high flow and mate it to the PrestaFlate trigger for a much better experience seating tires.

"Overlanders" often use either the Viair (always good marks for durability & heat management) or ARB (which has had recent quality issues) and an on board air tank to blast a possibly unseated 35" $350 mud tire when it gets unseated in their roadside squatters paradise of choice.

The true hacker's weapon is to use a standard $20 air tank with a fast flow Prestaflate nozzle atttachment. Then fill it with whatever piece of garbage battery or cigarette lighter air compressor of your choice.

So you can spend a few bucks on a steel tank from FB Marketplace or Craigslist, $65 on a Prestaflate trigger & buy whatever electric inflator is on sale & have a hellacious blast of air.
  • 2 0
 @bikebasher: No ultra gravel rig would be complete without this attached to the compressor.

www.enve.com/product/air-pressure-station
  • 1 0
 @cthorpe: FROTHING!
  • 88 3
 this peasant uses his manual floor pump to seat his tubeless tires.
  • 3 1
 It works well only on moderm rim-tire combos (without using a sh*t load of tape in the middle of the rim). On the other hand, maybe it would be not so much more expensive just to buy proper rims and a floor pump Wink
  • 6 6
 For some casings it's super easy. Heavy casing/dh casing tires not so much. Some compressors barely get the job done
  • 16 2
 @Beaconbike: I use DH casings. I've had no problems.
  • 11 0
 I just consider it my pre-ride cardio warm up, cheaper than a personal trainer
  • 15 2
 @Beaconbike: You have got this wrong man, it is easier the heavier the casing, harder for lighter casings
  • 3 1
 @aln1230: an new maxxis exo tire pops on like nothing. A new maxxis dh casing tire is a royal bitch. Installed 2 this summer. Literally just did it. When was the last time you did a new wire bead dh tire?
  • 1 0
 @k2theg: what tires and rims?
  • 3 0
 @Beaconbike: maxxis dhr2 on WAO Strife.
  • 20 0
 Living high on the hog. Some of us still have to use our mouths balloon style.
  • 1 2
 @k2theg: agreed. Zero issues.
  • 1 0
 @Beaconbike: I’ve done both wire bead and non-wire bead Maxxis, and wire bead Schwalbe DH tires with my cheap Bontrager floor pump. I’ve also needed a compressor to seat the bead of a couple trail tires. It’s just random sometimes.
  • 8 0
 @Chondog94: if you flex your legs at the same time it’s almost a riprow LOL
  • 6 0
 @somebody-else: Oh you know I’m engaged through the stroke
  • 2 0
 @lkubica: try out using a rim strip on top of your tape next time, weighs next to nothing and a lot easier (and cheaper) than a half roll of rim tape.
  • 4 0
 @Beaconbike: same experience here. Light tyres have never been a problem, but some Schwalbe bike park (wire) have been almost impossible, even with a compressor and 6 hands, 2 of them operated by a mechanic
  • 1 1
 @Uuno: @Beaconbike maybe I'm stating the obvious but, make sure you have the tire installed on the rim first.
  • 1 1
 @k2theg:

Yup.
I think I just had to breathe near the valve to get it seated.
  • 2 0
 @k2theg: wow, I hadn't realized that's how it works, thanks.
  • 1 0
 @k2theg: I'm dhr2 on dt fr560. Idk I can't even get close with a floor pump...
Any other casing is cake. But not that one for whatever reason.
  • 1 1
 @k2theg: I can easily seat a tire with a mini pump (running Schwalbe Procore).
  • 4 0
 @Beaconbike: Same set up but no issues.

Have you tried removing the valve core to seat it? Sure, it will deflate but you can get the air in far easier to get it to seat. Replace the core and inflate. I used Peaty's sealant and didn't need to add air the following day.
  • 2 0
 @Beaconbike: Just to be clear I'm talking about how easy it is to seat the bead on the rim once the tire has already been installed. This depends on the wheel and tire combo, basically how tight of a fit it is. The heavier casing tires are a tighter fit, so it is more effort to get it installed, but much easier to seat the bead. It's a tighter fit on the center rim channel in this unseated deflated state, so that volume inside the tire is already sealed pretty well.
Note that Maxxis wire bead DH casing tires are not really tubeless ready, you can kind of make it happen if you are determined and are OK with using up sealant and it not working all the time. I only use DH casing tires, and I have used the wire bead DH casing Michelins (they're tubeless ready), seated them with a floor pump.
  • 1 0
 @Mfro: oh yeah, even with a brand new valve core. I mean I make it happen, not a big deal, just not with a floor pump. Maybe my floor pump is worse than I realize, idk.
  • 1 0
 I just tracked down an old Lezyne dirt drive pump. High volume floor pump they discontinued right as the tubeless revolution came along. They make a gravel pump now but it’s not as high volume.
  • 1 0
 Obviously when at home I just resort to a floor pump too, even though I could install my tires with a mini pump. The floor pump is a Joe Blow Duallie. It has two gauges. One is accurate to 0.05 bar (or at least the scale is like that) and goes up to 2 bar. Then the other one goes up to 5 bar. So for the inner tire I need to use all my weight to go just a bit over 5 bar, for the outer tire the other gauge gives me all the accuracy. I usually inflate the front tire up to 0.9bar and the rear tire up to 1.3bar. It only takes a few strokes though fair enough, the volume inside the tire is limited by the inflated tube. But it is nice and high volume and I'm pretty sure one could use it to install a tubeless tire too if there is no insert in there.
  • 1 0
 @Beaconbike: fair call. I did an EXO the other day no troubles. I was fitting them to Ibis 35mm rims (Stans) with a bit of bead cream to make it easy, they popped on super easy. EXO+, DH casing might be different. Usually the hardest part has just been getting it on the bloody rim, after that, not so bad given how flat the inner rim profile is, almost seals without any sealant (the rim profile helps a lot with this).
  • 1 0
 @Beaconbike: Remove your valve core first. I kind of pinch the sidewalls to spread the beads close to the rim edges, then with a regular floor pump start pumping as a put some downward pressure on the wheel. DHR2 seats in less than a minute. (I always forget to use soapy water to help it too.) But taking the valve core out is a game changer.
  • 1 0
 @rrolly: I do that
  • 1 0
 @k2theg Indeed. If a floor pump doesn't work you probably have the wrong rims. My old/spare bike has a dented rim for which I sometimes use the coke bottle hack. But my go-to bike has always done just fine with the floor pump.
  • 57 2
 My $50 Harbor Freight air compressor works just fine.
  • 12 3
 It's loud AF though. Walmart had a sale on a quiet goodyear(?) a while back (under $75), that combined with the Via Air presta gun gauge thing is all-time & was under $150 total.
  • 2 0
 Came here to say this
  • 9 0
 @VersusTires: calling it loud AF is an understatement, but it gets the job done. I just have to plug it in and go to the the other side of the house for a few minutes.
  • 4 2
 The Harbor Freight compressor loves to blow reed valves. I upgraded to the Viair 400P after having to drive home with 13psi in all tires, and the Viair likes to have you believe it's dead because the fuse contact is crap.
  • 2 0
 @mtmc99: True. As long as it's an occasional use item, it'll totally do that job. Our first one died in 2 days, then we got a California Air Tools on one of the 20% off amazon warehouse sales. Mounted 1000+ with it, often 8hrs a day & was really happy with it until someone wanted it more than me & took it from the back of the van when I ran inside Shake Shack to get lunch on the way to Bootleg Canyon (they wanted the bike but it was thankfully locked).
  • 4 0
 @VersusTires: my nitrogen tank is silent and has all the PSIs
  • 2 0
 @mior: this is too expensive. I made one with a plastic juice/soda bottle.
  • 1 0
 @mobil1syn: this is the way.
  • 2 0
 @coyoterun: nice.
  • 1 0
 @zmums: You're freaking everywhere! Impressive. like you said, it becomes a joy to put on tires
  • 1 0
 Pretty ubiquitous yourself @andrewfif:
  • 2 0
 @mtmc99: My old yard sale compressor used to was like that. Thankfully it conked out and I bought a quiet series Makita compressor. That thing is soo quiet and is so much more powerful and fast. Overkill for inflation duties but I'd buy it again even if that was all I did.
  • 2 0
 @acali: I don't know about the Makita compressors being quiet. I've got a MAC2500 and it's loud but powerful as hell with lots of CFM for everything I need. Frickin half the price of this little toy.
  • 2 0
 @CSharp: Looks like yours is a lot more powerful (2.5HP vs my 1HP MAC210Q). But mine works great for framing nailers and general use.
  • 2 0
 @acali: You can't go wrong with the Makita compressors. I wouldn't look at the horsepower of any motor. It's similar to buying a shopvac where manufacturers show their motor output in horsepower or wattage. However, the real thing to consider is the CFM output for the compressor. For vacuums, look not at how much power the motor has as it has nothing to do with how much it can suck up - look at the water lift value. I know that some compressors have bigger tanks and even bigger motors but the CFM is so low that you can't even run a nailer or other higher air consuming tools.
  • 21 0
 I literally just found 6 more powerful 12v compressors for under 150 USD from respectable German manufacturer's. Can someone please explain why any MTB based products equals a massive hike up in price.
  • 14 0
 Easy targets. We’ve been groomed to be susceptible to these marketing tactics.
  • 25 0
 Earth-tone carrying case - +$300.00
  • 6 2
 those are not bike specific, let alone tubeless specific, 29er specific, or boost specific pumps. it'd be like using a generic 5mm allen key instead of a silca 5mm allen key. Don't be that guy.
  • 3 5
 Silca hex keys are great
quality and don’t strip out your bolts.
“There are times when quality tools matter. And then there are times when your just being a tool.” GCRider @ACree:
  • 5 0
 @gcrider: It's a PB Swiss Hex key set that you can get for $80.00 less without the pretty colors and wood box.
  • 2 4
 You are almost right as it is pbswiss but better. I have the HX-two set. I wasn’t keen on the box and the little bits to lose.

They use the same vendor for the s2 steel bar stock but have higher quality chrome coating (vs nickel of pbswiss) and nonslip grip polymer coating rather than just paint
There tolerances are also higher than pbswiss due to rejecting the lower 50% of bar stock in the iso band and the slow growing and more controllable chrome coating they use
@OnTheRivet:

From Josh at Silca

S2 steel is 50% harder than the regular steel used in most cheaper tools, and 20-30% harder than that used by other high-end tool manufacturers like Wiha, Wera and Bondhus.

S-2 steel displays very high-impact toughness and relatively low abrasion resistance, and it can also attain relatively high hardness. S-2’s hard surface results in prolonged tool life.

Silca only allow tools in the upper 50% of the ISO tolerance band, Silca’s smallest allowable tool is at ISO nominal, but we do this by using a very slow growing thin-dense chrome plating which grows much slower and harder than normal chrome plating, so it's allows for greater process control.

PBSwiss tend to be right at or slightly below ISO nominal due to the very thin electroless nickel type of coating that they use, so coming from the same hex bar stock, we typically measure 0.02-0.025mm larger across the flats due to the different finishing.
  • 2 0
 @gcrider: The Project Farm YouTube channel tested some PBtools allen keys and found them not as strong as other tools.
  • 2 1
 He has a great channel and very good methodology in general ( but not test lab standards)

Strength is only one factor. and for bike tool hex keys once it is strong enough , surface hardness and size tolerance is more important so you don’t strip out bolts.
I admire the effort he puts into his testing. Great channel.


@femto505:
  • 2 1
 @femto505:
Here is a good video about hex key tool tolerances from josh at silca
youtu.be/7dDVVAcGoZU
  • 2 0
 @gcrider: I actually have silca Allen wrenches. Just because I am a tool dork doesn’t mean I can’t make fun of them, and especially a surcharge for bike tools just because they can.
  • 1 0
 Not condining the silly price of the thing advertised, but they do make a cut-down model for $160USD. viairbike.com/products/tlc-lite-compressor-kit

They have a bunch of different models with varying flow rates and accessories. Again, couldn't see myself forking out for it, if you were a race mech and space constrained, one of their models with an air reciever might actually be pretty good, but for the most part also paying for items / accessories that you probably don't need.

Still using my old mans floor pump that is literally older than me (42). I've had some awful experiences trying to seat tyres, but did one on the weekend no troubles at all.
  • 19 0
 I don't know why there are so many different, expensive ways devised to seat tubeless tires. If you don't care to have a full-size compressor, you can get an 18 volt 1 gallon Ryobi compressor for $160 that can also pack away in ANY vehicle of choice capable of carrying a bicycle. Any of the other big-name 18-20volt cordless tool manufacturers also make compressors if you are already invested in that battery platform.
  • 1 0
 I agree. I have a battery powered Ridgid brand1-gallon compressor I bought for $100 (plus battery, which I already had for some of their power tools). I charge the batteries before I leave and take it with me for bike trips in the event I need to reseat a bike tire or even top off the car tire.
  • 13 0
 If you’re gonna spend $500 on a compressor, spend $380 on Milwaukee’s M18 compressor instead. It’s totally portable, incredibly quiet and runs off their battery system.

It’s really a great little compressor, and excellent for bike stuff.
  • 1 0
 I have the M12 and it works a treat. No need to step up to m18.
  • 12 0
 I’m actually happy to see so much hate in the comments towards this clearly overpriced air compressor. I hope no one buys it and they’re forced to come back down to this planet.
  • 11 0
 Agreed, that is a giant bike computer.
  • 3 0
 I was looking for this comment.
  • 6 0
 Maybe its just me.... I use a 12V car tyre inflator with presta adapter, It gives a nice constant flow of air and seats tyres perfectly - no fuss, no big rush of air with possible bukkake side effects. It just works, and most people have one of these in their car anyway. Come back tomorrow for more money saving tips...
  • 3 0
 I usually need the rush of air to set the bead. If I am feeling up to it I frequently can set it with a hand pump and the valve core removed, but, it's much easier to use the compressor.
  • 1 0
 @Ososmash: put a ratchet strap around the tire to force the bead to seat
  • 1 0
 @pargolf8: or use my compressor.... But your approach is a good vanside repair.

Usually remove the valve core and pump like crazy works for me if I don't want to use a compressor.
  • 4 0
 We got the Viaair presto valve handle thing (not the whole compressor). It was $60ish @ the one of the races. Really really happy with it. Like it blows away all the other nonsense doodads we've tried for inflating/seating tires. Highly recommended.
  • 8 0
 Blows them away? I see what you did there...
  • 2 0
 @VtVolk: No, I'm even more depressed now.....
  • 2 0
 I modified my Park Tool Shop Inflator with a 3 foot hose to the chuck head. I don't like being that close to tires when seating..... still snaps beads on like mad.
  • 4 0
 That "Fox Baseframe Pro SS Chest Guard" is using the exact same piece of d30 for back protection as is used in the 661 evo jacket. Does D30 just make certain pieces and sell them around or what's the story there I wonder?
  • 1 0
 I wonder if the certifications are based on the actual piece (rather than material), which would then make more sense to reuse. I have a race face one I love, no D30 on sternum though, just padding, but more importantly to me, it has top of shoulder coverage - if I tuck and roll, that is usually my impact point...
  • 2 0
 D3O to the best of my knowledge, has a catalogue of 'parts' (or impact foam inserts) for knee guards, elbows, hips, chest, back....you can purchase those parts for your design of guard and insert them-ya know "LPT1 please" etc etc....I believe you can work with them to create custom shapes, imprint your logos, etc, but its more economical and shorter lead times to just buy their pre-made 'parts'.
And most of their catalog has parts that are certified to different levels depending on what you as a brand are looking for....so you want a CE2 knee insert, they have some options, same for all limbs, etc...
  • 3 0
 @ccrida-pnw: I have the same raceface one you described. Second ride in my handlebar brakes on a rough downhill section and I crashed hard at speed. Those shoulder pads saved my collarbone as they absorbed some impact but also slide. I still needed surgery as I snapped my thumb in half, but it saved the shoulder.

With so many broken collarbones in the sport, I am blown away that shoulder pads in these kinds of protective shirts are not more popular.
  • 3 0
 My cheapass Smittybuilt compressor sets beads all day. Next up is a Morrflate system to equalize air-ups and air-downs on my hoopty 4runner - 4 tires at a time.

Edit - I wholeheartedly approve of the '(cringe)' being applied to all things Overlanding. That's as played out as Vanlife and YEEEWWW!
  • 6 0
 "It's also capable of inflating up to 37" vehicle tires."

If you try to do a 38", does it explode?
  • 4 1
 No, but these little ones overheat and might not complete the big tire air-up in 1 pass. I've seen ppl sitting around waiting for their compressor to cool down.
  • 1 0
 @suspended-flesh: actually, bigger tires need less pressure, so the overall volume is similar.
  • 2 0
 @Kainerm: Fair enough - seen it happen, though. Maybe just a crappy compressor. I stick with 33's.
  • 6 0
 Using Micro USB, the devil's preferred connector, on a 2022 device, should be forbidden!
  • 3 0
 California Air Tools 2.0 Gal. 1.0 HP Ultra Quiet and Oil-Free Aluminum Tank Air Compressor. End of discussion. Seriously. Don't underestimate the value of "quiet".

www.homedepot.com/p/California-Air-Tools-2-0-Gal-1-0-HP-Ultra-Quiet-and-Oil-Free-Aluminum-Tank-Air-Compressor-2010A/205910463
  • 3 1
 Said before here, but I’ll repeat it. A $150 compressor, inverter, and a presta inflator and you’re good to go.

If you insist on running flashy aftermarket cranks, boutique suspension etc. this might be a perfect fit for your spotless/always detailed Tacoma.

Looking forward to seeing the Dangerholm version with the high polish/custom paint version with a useless but stylish tucked power cord and hose.
  • 2 0
 Fancy suspension at least works better
  • 1 0
 @IsaacWislon82: but does it? An aluminum Ibis, Specialized or Trek rides great……
  • 2 0
 @wyorider: ...yes, I would definitely argue it does, at least to a point. I just replaced my Revelation RC and Deluxe R with a Lyrik Ultimate and a Super Deluxe Ultimate on my aluminum GT Force and it is an absolute night and day difference. But, that is bottom of the barrel suspension to relatively high end. Upgrading Fox Performance elite to factory, by contrast, I don't think you get much for your money.
  • 1 0
 @IsaacWislon82: Those aren’t boutique suspension brands.
  • 2 0
 Things I will never understand with body armour.
1. Why would anyone buy a back protector piece that is „level 1“ rated?
2. Why would anyone buy a back protector piece that only covers two thirds of your spine?

Having something in proper length and level 2 rating has no downside. Not a single one.
  • 1 0
 I have a pretty curved spine -not exactly a hump, more of a curved lower spine, longer backprotectors just dont work for me, so i have been ditching it for the last years. I saw Bruni in Val di sole with the Fox MX-Strap version of this, its on my bucket list.
  • 1 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: I do get that. But thats a rather special case, right?
80% of available back protectors do seem to only cover two thirds or so of the average persons spine. (e.g. IXS beeing one of the rare exceptions) Why is that the case?
  • 1 0
 @qbensis: I honestly dont know but maybe it is done to make it viable for all torso lengths, just do one backplate for all sizes. With onepiece softprotectors this could make sense, productionwise.
  • 1 0
 I took one look at that and saw it not protecting my broken rib 6 weeks ago
  • 1 0
 1 matches and 1 air spray push does the job , much cooler too. How come nobody has 3d printed a small fuel can with a lighter that fit your steer tube? I personally never used a tire plug kit and what is the point if you cant seat your tire after?
  • 4 0
 Just because your tire flatted and needed a plug, doesn't mean the bead became unseated. If the bead/rim combo is a tight fit, the bead will usually stay put.
  • 2 0
 Normally the tire stays on the rim when you have issues that require a tire plug, so you can pump it up with any small pump.
  • 1 5
flag plpl (Sep 19, 2022 at 14:30) (Below Threshold)
 @barp: usually things never happen like they should to me..I use tubes just because cuts where always too bad for plugs. Had to do a knot in tube once and put knot where the cut was in the tire to avoid tube blowing out through the cut. Cut the tube, do a knot and stretch to the thing on your wheels if you have to do so... pedal back home. If you can save some stans fluid from your cut tire, put it in your tube it helps getting slow leak at the knot instead fast leakSmile
  • 1 0
 So I always have a mini pump and floor pump on hand, and if I really wanted to I could fill the tank on my air compressor at home and then take it with me in the car... what's so special about this air compressor other than its price?
  • 3 0
 About time WRP got some love! If you think the mullet links are cool (and they really are), take a peek at the wizardry that is his CenterHub crank spider.
  • 1 0
 and then take a look at the Instagram of the other project he's involved in - the Trinity MTB! Wink
  • 2 0
 @hitarpotar:

For sure! The “gearbox” project is a mind blower too.
  • 1 0
 @MichiganMachete: yeah, i thought Supre Drive from Lal Bikes is great, but then i saw the gearbox-like project of the Trinity. Seems even better in my view. Smile
Also neet is the idea of a changeable bb-section. Btw, not sure if it was Mic Williams himself or any other from the Trinity’s trio of builders, but 1 of them teased the possibility of the Trinity mtb becoming an e-bike thanx to this bb-section… Wink
  • 1 0
 @hitarpotar:

I believe I heard one of them say that too. The different bb section options, in regards to geo as well as drivetrain, are an incredible innovation, and one that strikes me as something the big companies would never do. Supre drive is cool too. It’s still a little too traditional in a way: similar shifting action, heavy cassette still on the rear wheel, less versatility in frame design.

I always look forward to the Beyond the Tape podcasts, but REALLY enjoy their Tech Talks.
  • 1 0
 I have a Bontrager pump with the chamber for seating tubeless tires. It’s awesome until I have to mount a maxxis exo tire to a Santa Cruz Reserve rim. Then I find myself back at the gas station running a compressor with a presta adapter. Is there a lesson here? Just buy a presta adapter. 7-11 has slushees and hotdogs on treadmill along with free air if you ask nice
  • 1 0
 As for air compressor for 450$:
literally every air compressor can seat your tire. How dump those bikers you think are?!..


As for Giant computer for 280$ and 81x51x22mm:
nah, thanks, will use Unihertz Jelly 2 with andr11 and all about it.
  • 1 0
 How does that mini phone work? I was considering if last ime I got a computer and need a new one soon since I snapped a wing on my garmin
  • 2 0
 @mtb-thetown: that mini phone works just fine. )
  • 1 0
 I may be missing something here, but are the 18V tool-battery powered compressors/inflators that are out there nowadays insufficient for seating beads? I haven't tried it with a Milwaukee M18 Tire Inflator (no tank) but I'm betting it will do it. And it kicks posterior for general inflating tasks of all kinds. Including full size trucks.
  • 1 0
 Too much Dentists around here...

p.vitalmtb.com/photos/forums/2015/03/07/2054/s1200_image2.jpg

Can we place our palms up and just show how to do it through KISS theory!


Reminds me of the story about a pen to write in space or water.... millions spent and voilá!
Then, others just used a pencil!
  • 1 0
 Love when an overpriced item is advertised on this website (because all the articles are not critical and basically an ad), you can count of the comment section to point you to existing products that are cheaper and have more testimonials to prove their reliability.

Let's go PB comment section!
  • 1 0
 I just use a £44 Makita 18v cordless compressor, set the psi and come back to it when it’s done pumping up whatever. Use it with a can for tubeless. Flipping best £44 I’ve spent in ages. You do need to already own Mak stuff tho.

www.powertoolmate.co.uk/power-tools/cordless-other/makita/makita-dmp180z-18v-lxt-inflator-bare-unit_1.htm?opt=5577&gclid=CjwKCAjwyaWZBhBGEiwACslQo1q_3tnB1bPHbcYmTsuJjBDccAsGBtdZPQUdGZQ_1jkJJIujQCoA3BoCUQUQAvD_BwE
  • 2 1
 I've successfully seated tubeless tires with my 25 CAD amazon mini pump, yeah it took me 8 minutes or so but it's a not big deal. Also, this compressor won't fit into my camel back so just that renders it useless
  • 1 0
 What is a "sand tray"? How does it "reduce vibration"? Why is the tray (the sand tray?? Is the sand just supposed to go in that, and vibrate all over the place?) in the pics looking so warped already.
  • 3 0
 This compressor was designed for off-roaders and is often placed on soft earth/sand when you air-up/air-down. The tray elevates and protects the vents and motor? Just a guess.
  • 2 0
 Why would you get a Stages computer from Giant when you can get a Stages computer from... Stages? Is the Giant one different?
  • 5 0
 It’s much bigger
  • 3 0
 @VtVolk: Giant in fact....
  • 3 0
 Also, a $450 compressor is ridiculous, unless it also replaces tires for you while getting you your beer.
  • 1 0
 If they made that pump with a mount specific to Tacoma's, they would sell out to all the bro's in no time. I'll stick with a battery operated one as most everyone else pointed out.
  • 1 0
 Range Rover compatible-approved for Enve and Reserve wheels….
  • 4 1
 Doesn’t every compressor seat tubeless tires?
  • 3 3
 No, many portable 12v compressors don't have a tank.
  • 3 1
 @PhillipJ: Mine has no tank and seats the bead.
  • 2 0
 Article would be complete without Yeti coolers, $500 sunglasses, and Breitling watches.
  • 1 0
 Regular floor pump works 90% of the time for me, the other 10% I just temporarily remove the valve core and use the gas station air pump. Easy.
  • 1 0
 That air compressor specificaly for MTB > the delirium continues.
Everybody seems to think mountain bikers swim on money.
Ridiculous!!
  • 3 0
 WRP!!!!!
  • 1 0
 You can go to Home Dumpo and get a battery powered air compressor for under 1/2 that. Works even better then that 12V one.
  • 1 0
 A small 50$ compressor and a 30$ inverter and your good to go on seating a tire. If your pump can't handle it.
  • 1 0
 Anyone else wondering how the guy in the chest protector picture got his arms on backwards?
  • 5 5
 A properly fitting tubeless tire and rim combination shouldn't need an air compressor at all. If you cannot install it using a hand pump you're doing it wrong.
  • 1 2
 Amen my dude, i use a 10 buck kmart floor pump and just remove the valve core. Never had an issue. What's wrong with all of these people?
  • 1 0
 Living in the land of groomed fat bike trails-I’d say a compressor makes that chore a LOT easier.

On road, gravel, and regular MTB-yeah. Decent tires on DT rims snap right on with a floor pump.

But I still have a compressor in the garage-and love it. But it was helluva lot less than this thing!!
  • 1 0
 My compressor is from Walmart, for like 10$. I use it inflating my car tire, also installing tubeless tires on my bike.
  • 1 0
 Another overpriced POS. Buy a decent floor pump or a $100 air compressor that works on every type of tire.
  • 1 0
 This looks like the compressor the air bag suspension kits use with a tank built in. I like it. don't need it but like it.
  • 1 0
 We need more bagged ‘64 Impalas at the trailhead. Bet those setups could inflate all the tires at the trailhead!!!
  • 1 0
 I'd totally get that compressor if it could plug into an ebike battery. No more million stroke mini pumps!
  • 1 0
 Most retailers dropped fox after the sell out debacle and fox new way of doing biz.
  • 1 0
 Fox base frame is the SHIZZ. finally a back protector that doesnt fel like like a have a door strapped to my back!
  • 1 0
 @Matt Beer talking about WRP, you should check what Mr. Williams is also involved in - the Trinity MTB project! Wink
  • 1 0
 @hitarpotar We're on it! Mic and I have had some great tech chats.
  • 1 0
 Neighbour's car tyre does the trick every time!

youtu.be/iyK5HHwGLs8
  • 1 0
 Sealy MAC07 is 1/3 price of that compressor, and has an extra 0.6 CFM … save some money and get a sealy
  • 1 0
 just came to say it's 2022 and I still run tubes...exactly because of this crap.
  • 1 0
 The bb height of an enduro in a mullet with this link would be terribly too low. It's already too low as is.
  • 1 0
 Ive not used it, but ive just noticed that Ryobi do an 18V battery compressor with a tank....
  • 3 1
 thats neat.
  • 1 0
 ARB twin air compressor, much better quality
  • 3 6
 I'm really glad I'm a machinist. There's no way I'm spending $250+ on that tiny piece of aluminum from WRP when I can make it myself for free
  • 5 1
 Your time is worthless and your stock is infinite?
  • 3 0
 For a comment about a solid aluminum link, that was a mighty agressive flex.
  • 2 0
 Stems don't even come close to that price, and they come in a variety of colours. I agree, 250+ is overpriced.
  • 2 0
 @barp: for a part like this, I can program it and have one done during my lunch break using leftover material from other jobs. Granted, if I wanted to make a bunch of them and sell for a profit, I would certainly have to charge something. But as was stated below, even stems cost less than this and take more effort to machine with multiple parts, bolts and anodizing......this is bare metal with a couple pressed in bearings.
  • 2 1
 @Highrevkev: OK then, please do 1 piece for free. Let me know when it's ready and i'll provide you with shipping details. I expect it to be top notch and to work flawlessly! And i expect it to not alter the geo.
  • 1 2
 @hitarpotar: they say "if I wanted to make a bunch of them and sell for a profit, I would certainly have to charge something." Maybe your English isn't too good, and you didn't quite understand what he wrote. Does this help?
"ако исках да направя куп от тях и да ги продам за печалба, със сигурност ще трябва да таксувам нещо"
Why the f*ck would he make one for you, for free, or did you really think you were being clever?
  • 3 0
 @barp: Not to mention the R&D time and any mistakes in prototyping.
  • 3 1
 @elgwpo: ooooh goodie, someone’s good at using Google Translate… or may be you’re a bulgarian? And may be your english isn’t that great and you’re the one missing the point in his comment. Here, let me enlighten you in his main point: that WRP’s rice is sky high and he’ll never cough it cause he can make it in his spare time with materials left from other jobs (meaning, the material is FREE). In essence, he’s disrespecting WRP’s know-how and hard work stating that’s no big job and the price is ridiculous. In the same time, we have no knowledge if this guy is really a machinist and if he knows what he’s talking about, we have no idea if he ever tried doing something like this, we have no idea whether he’s just an employee or if he’s his own boss, we have no idea if he knows his way around prototypes and perfecting the design of even the simplest parts. By the way, do you? Smile
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