Check Out: Bike Storage Racks, Bearing Presses, Sunglasses, & First Aid Kits

Sep 23, 2021
by Mike Kazimer  




A lot of gear comes across our desks here at Pinkbike. Check Out is an occasional round-up of items our editors have gotten their hands on recently. Sometimes it's products we're doing long-term tests on, other times it's stuff we're stoked on but don't have time to fully review. And once in a while it's crazy shit someone sent us unsolicited and we're having a laugh.



Smith Leadout PivLock Sunglasses



Features

• 4 lens tint options
• 5 frame color options
• $119 - $219 USD
smithoptics.com
• Includes hard case, 2 nose pads, and low light amber lens
• PivLok design allows for quick lens changes

bigquotesSmith's new Leadout classes have a casual style mixed with grippy nose pads and arms that help keep them securely in place even when you're pinballing down a rocky trail. They don't wrap around quite as much as some performance sunglasses, which Smith says helps improve airflow to prevent fogging. They're categorized as having a large fit and coverage, but I've found them to be comfortable and unobtrusive, with a low-key look that doesn't scream out for attention.

There are four different lens tints to choose from, including a photochromic option that changes from clear to grey depending on the conditions. A set of amber low-light lens is also included, which can be easily swapped into place thanks to Smith's PivLok design. Rotating the arms slightly downward opens up the frame, and the lens can be switched to suit the weather.

The Leadout glasses seem like they'll work well for a wide range of light conditions, but I do have a request for all the sunglasses manufacturers out there: please make a low light / Pacific Northwest winter / English summer edition. It's dark enough in the woods where I live that running clear lenses year round is very common - I'd love to see the option to buy something like the Leadouts sold with a few pairs of totally clear lens for a lower price. Yes, safety glasses can work in a pinch, but their optics tend to leave a lot to be desired. 



Cascade First Aid Galby Kit



Features

• VX21 Xpac waterproof fabric, water resistant YKK zipper
• Includes triangular bandage for collarbone and rib injuries
• $65 USD
• Topical and oral medications
• Dressings and wound repair items from large abrasions and burns to small lacerations
cascadefirstaid.org

bigquotesCascade First Aid is a relatively new company based in Bellingham, Washington, that makes first aid kits designed for outdoor adventurers. The pack itself is handmade from a waterproof VX21 Xpac material, and can be purchased separately for riders that want to customize its contents.

The Galby pack shown here comes stocked with an assortment of items that should cover a wide range of potential mountain biking injuries. Contents include trauma shears, a triangular bandage, rubber gloves, medi-strips, bandages, wound cleaning wipes, and even a packet of glucose gel. The strap that wraps around the kit can also be called into action to help create a splint. The overall size of the kit is small enough to easily toss into a backpack, although it's going to be a little big for most regular sized hip packs.





Alt Alt Bike Products Suspension Bearing Press




Features

• Removes and installs common metric suspension bearing
• Bearing ID: 8, 9, 10, 12, 15, 17, 20mm
• Bearing OD: 17, 19, 21, 22, 24, 26, 28, 30, 32, 35, 37mm
• $95 CAD
• Currently only available in Canada & USA.
altalt.ca

bigquotesBearing presses, extractors, and drifts can cost hundreds of dollars, which can be a hard pill to swallow if you're a home mechanic who will only be changing bearings a couple times a year, at the most. Alt Alt Bike Products is a new Canadian company that's created an affordable solution consisting of a screw, a nut, and a range of drifts and sleeves designed to remove and install the most common bearing sizes. They're made from acetal, a tough plastic material that's also helps to keep the cost of the kit down to a reasonable $95 CAD.

The initial launch of the bearing press kit saw it sell out in a matter of minutes, a sign that there were plenty of riders out there looking for exactly what Alt Alt are offering. Pre-orders are currently being accepted for the next batch that's scheduled to arrive on October 8th.

The kit doesn't take up much room in a work bench, and for occasional use it seems like a good way to go, a nice step between taking the DIY route with some threaded rods and washers, and dropping a bunch of coin on a kit with anodized aluminum parts.



Mossy Cog Designs TS-4 Bike Rack



Features

• Holds 4 bikes with a total weight of up to 175 lb
• Adjustable arms available for wheels smaller than 26"
• $375 USD
• Materials: zinc galvanized steel, zinc plated steel, UHMW and bronze bushings
• Dimensions: 40" wide, 26" max extension from wall
mossycog.com

bigquotesFinding a spot for one or two bikes in a garage isn't much of a challenge – screw an inexpensive hook into the wall or ceiling and you're good to go. It's another story once the size of that fleet starts to grow, especially if you want to avoid taking up too much room. That's where Mossy Cog Designs' TS-4 bike rack comes in. The wall mounted rack hold four bikes (it can be expanded to hold up to 6 with a kit that's available seperately). The front wheel tray for each bike can pivot from side so side, and it can also rotate. That means getting the middle bike out of the lineup is quick and easy, with minimal handlebar wiggling required.

The USA-made rack does require a fairly substantial amount of time to put together. It's not a difficult process, but it is time consuming - I'd recommend budgeting at least an hour, if not longer for the assembly and install process. Once it's mounted in place it's very solid, and works exactly as promised. The trays pivot smoothly, and the force required to get them to pivot is enough to keep everything in the desired position.

The $375 price tag is obviously higher than buying those simple hooks, but it's actually a cheaper option than buying four Steadyrack brackets, and those ones don't allow the wheel to pivot.






134 Comments

  • 149 3
 Um, $375 is a bit steep for a garage bike rack. I have six bikes hanging with hooks for under $10
  • 49 79
flag hi-dr-nick (Sep 23, 2021 at 8:11) (Below Threshold)
 That rack screams “gentrified remote workers who ride twice a summer”
  • 94 2
 @hi-dr-nick: Why would a remote worker only ride twice a summer? Now that I am remote I ride 3-4 times a week!
  • 28 7
 @crussell: Lol, same, except right now since Idaho has zero capacity in the ER.

Honestly though, I dig small businesses coming out with products, but you gotta understand the value proposition of your product. If this were $125-150, I would maybe say "hey, this is a big more than my current setup, but it will maximize the space in my garage, so maybe its worth it." At $375, there is zero chance I purchase it.
  • 53 2
 I feel like the venn diagram for this would be two circles with zero overlap: In one is people who would spend $375 on this rack and in the other circle would be people who are capable on installing this rack themselves.
  • 7 4
 @crussell: you obviously haven't seen what's happened to the mtn towns
  • 6 3
 also that weight limit seems a little low. 43 pounds per bike? There e bikes in my fleet that weigh more than that, and my enduro is 37. Feels like you could start approaching that maximum weight pretty quickly. A good hook screwed into a stud can hold as much bike as anyone could ever need.
  • 6 64
flag jclnv (Sep 23, 2021 at 8:59) (Below Threshold)
 @hi-dr-nick: Really? I get more of a “trans vegan with long covid who can’t ride” vibe.
  • 21 0
 Same. Works amazingly well, hardware store hooks. Big hook for the fat bike.

Although now if I were to do it, the 2 2x4's I also used to thread the hooks into might send that price tag close to that $375
  • 6 0
 I'm not digging it at all personally. Price is only one reason why. It's nice I guess if you don't have any space and want to smash bikes into a small area. Or if you're the only one with bikes. But I have an 11 year old who puts her bike up on her own and takes it down on her own. I really don't trust her being that close to $14k worth of my bikes.

Beyond that, the arms adjust so they can hold the smaller bikes but guess what... they're smaller. Which means you have to lift them off the ground to hang them. My kid would not be able to use that rack.

Steady rack is where it's at. You can mount them at different heights so they work with specific bikes. Only drawback is that when my kids gets a bigger bike I"ll have to move it up and repair a couple holes. But so what. Least she can use the rack. I have all of mine at slightly different heights. My e-bike is way longer than my hard tail for example.

Put the bikes that get used a lot on the steady racks. The ones that don't get hung on $10 hooks from the rafters.
  • 1 2
 For that price it should definitely not require “extensive assembly”.

I have three bikes, my wife’s sits next to an outlet for charging, my two less as n against each other by a shelving unit.

The only things I have hanging are extra wheelsets and munis.

Hooks are just so easy, require limited assembly and they're inexpensive.

Orthodontist or neurosurgeon.
  • 2 0
 @bblaney372: Man, I cut a sheet of plywood into a ~16" wide strip so I'd get separation for the wall mounting and then put the 2x4 into that! Luxury circa 2012.
  • 11 0
 I followed this guys tutorial and turned out pretty well. More expensive than hooks alone but cheaper than $375

youtu.be/_deob4L4AEY
  • 19 2
 @Agrey: Yeah, that guy is awesome. I have thought about making the rack. This is the other one I am looking at making, but it uses rollers: www.youtube.com/watch?v=dQw4w9WgXcQ
  • 1 0
 @bblaney372: no concern about impact on bike wheel or headtube?
  • 10 5
 So many people are so used to buying crap from China , they don’t value anything anymore. Go… buy everything you own from 3rd world countries that use slave labor, then complain about “living wages” over here. I’m guilty too. Sometimes you can’t find ANYTHING made here even if you want to , it’s very expensive . But, we’ve been doing this crap for 40 years and act offended if someone might want to actually dare make a living. It’s messed up.
  • 1 0
 @Agrey: Damn, that DIY rack set-up is wicked. We're taking delivery of a big shed (ie: bike/ski shack) in a few weeks and I'll be making one of those ASAP.
Thanks for sharing.
  • 2 1
 @HB208: you dick!!!!!
  • 4 0
 @kcy4130: This deserves a comment gold shout out. It is so absolutely spot on.
  • 1 0
 My Rubbermaid set up works great and costs way less than $375.
  • 2 0
 A few people have mentioned the weight capacity. It's 50 pounds per bike / 175 pounds per rack. That means you can't put 4 50lb bikes in it, but an individual bike can weigh up to 50 lbs.
If you want more total capacity, there are ways to get it. Just ask.
  • 5 0
 As for the price, you have to consider what you are buying. It's not a hook, it's a rack for 4 bikes. A lot of people mention the Steady Rack, so compare the price of 4 of those to this rack, and it's in the same price bracket (Cost includes shipping within the USA).
And it is made in the USA, at shops that I can and do visit in person. That costs more, but I feel that it is worth it, and many customers say that as well (even if they don't say it with their wallet).
  • 3 0
 @MossyCog: You're not wrong. That's why my issues came down to use. Doesn't fit my needs was well as steady rack.

I got lucky with my steady racks and got them for much less. So cost for me they were MUCH cheaper than this option. For other folks... they are easier to find. At least in the US. You can get them for $80 at Home Depot.

But yeah... 4 of those is $320 so you're in the same ball park. It's just more flexible.
  • 5 0
 Ignoring the product itself, spending $375 is well worth the space savings (over simple hooks) for some people, including myself. Racks can be cheap, space efficient, easy to use; pick two. Previously I had cheap and space efficient: had simple hooks really close together but it was a huge pain to pull bikes off the rack cuz handlebars and pedals get in the way. I'm actually about to purchase a MossyCog rack over SteadyRack because I'm confident an all metal made in the USA rack is going to last longer than something partially made from plastic in China.
  • 2 0
 @kzuma: If it works for you I'd do it. Thing looks like it'll hold up just fine. I'd get one but like I said earlier... my kid would have a hard time lifting her bike up to the same level as my bike. And I wouldn't want her slamming her bike off of my bikes. But if it was 4 of my bikes... hell yeah. Looks dope.

As for the steady rack. They're actually pretty stout. My office is full of them. My garage has 3. I'll be adding a 4th. My brother's house has 3. Never seen one fail. I've got an ebike hanging off one of them all day every day.

If these guys made a single bike version of this rack I'd be all over it.
  • 5 0
 So I'm one of those people that has a Mossycogs rack. Cost me a pretty penny with two extensions (good for six bikes total) and after shipping to eastern Canada.

Worth. Every. Penny.

The fact that the front wheel tray rotates after loading the bike makes storing six bikes so compact, yet utterly effortless to load/unload. I haven't seen a rack solution, commercial or home-made, that stores bikes as compactly and still lets you access each one so easily and with no risk of damage or scratching. That becomes a bigger deal when your whole family is using it too. The rack itself is built like a tank and will outlive the building it's mounted in. When PB first showed this rack off last year, I was immediately impressed but the comments were all bemoaning the cost and throwing up all sorts of pretty-good-but-not-as-good alternatives. The reality is that, not only is this the best rack money can buy IMHO, but as others have pointed out, it doesn't actually cost me much more than the same number of steadyracks.
  • 5 0
 After using hooks for years, I went ahead and bought one of these last week. Mainly for the space savings, but also because I was tired of the hooks bending (I have a very high ceiling in my garage and the most practical solution was mounting them directly to the wall - a 35lb bike bends the hooks like crazy). While my garage is unfinished, I've lived with other finished garages that the tires, especially damp tires, have managed to damage pretty significantly over time. Probably an easy fix with a 2x4, but more complicated with variations in wheel base. I'm pretty impressed with how this thing works. Everything is very solid, and it's very easy to use. Even with the variation in wheelbases between my XXL Megatower and my XL Stigmata, everything seems to work very, very well. I was also really impressed that each package of small parts was labelled by assembly step - so there really wasn't any guess work on which bolt or washer to use. Really if I had to get picky I could only complain that the assembly instructions should be printed on a larger piece of paper with larger type. Really impressive product that I'd recommend for anyone interested in superior function with solid form. Think of it as the more adult solution to the $10 hooks.
  • 33 0
 Omg please, please, please sunglass manufacturers take up Kazimer’s suggestion and make lower cost multiple packs of clear lenses an option.
  • 1 0
 It's either clear or no glasses here in Toronto (Don Valley). Dirt or a bug in the eye is super unwelcome. Fully back Kazimer's suggestion.
  • 2 1
 Truth. Just launched a new sunglasses brand (admittedly for roadies) and everything comes with a clear lens as standard. Just baffles me why so many companies to do dark.
  • 5 0
 Agreed. Even here in sunny California, I use clear lenses 95% of the time. It's so important to be able to see well in wooded/shaded areas that I don't really care about light blocking unless I'm on a totally exposed ride during the middle of the day. I use a different Smith model, and could use some fresh clear lenses.
  • 3 0
 @Ianjmalcolm: Shoppers Drugmart 'driving glasses' with a yellow lens have worked super well. Whopping 25 bucks, but honestly, the vision with them is great sun or dark. NEVER will I pay hundreds for glasses that get smashed on the ground semi-regularly.
  • 4 3
 Smith's pivot lock is gonna break later anyway. Just don't buy their junk.
  • 3 0
 Strangely enough I was just looking at Heatwave. They have safety glasses for like $50 that are really well made. I might actually run a pair of those.

I wouldn't touch those Smith glasses with a 10 foot pole. That hinge is begging for failure. First impact you get they're gonna push inward and pop apart. Swapping lenses will lead to joint fatigue and eventual failure of the glasses or at the very least a not flush fit (trash looking). I don't care what their marketing says, that is silly.

What would make more sense would be a giro style magnetic lens exchange system. One piece lens or two. But probably one.
  • 3 0
 @onemanarmy: I had two pairs of Smith's a pair of the same model. The pivot broke on one, warrantied no problem. pivot brole on the other pair: can't be warrantied.
Never bought another Smith anything. That was after buying pairs of their glasses for over 15 years. F them.
  • 1 0
 @Lemmyschild: Meanwhile I crashed on my face with a pair of Spy's and they sent me another pair for free. They exploded. But I did hit my face on the ground... so totally my fault.

That's good customer service. Ha!
  • 1 0
 The Melon Optics low light lens is absolutely phenomenal - better than anything I have ever used. Can be used for night riding and even sunny days. Cant recommend it enough. Unfortunately the glasses fit like crap as they don't have adjustable nose pads so you still get an eye full. Now have Scott Shields. Their low light is like a pair of sunnies. Clear lens available not available thanks to covid.
  • 1 0
 @onemanarmy: I'll keep them in mind
  • 1 0
 @Lemmyschild: Too much truth to this. I have two complete sets of Smith glasses/lenses, because pair 1 broke and I bought pair 2 (I know) to wear while waiting for a warranty replacement on pair 1. Now I almost never exchange lenses (one stays clear, the other tinted/polarized) for fear of breaking the pivot lock again.
  • 1 0
 @MtbSince84: @Lemmyschild: I believe the mechanism has been redesigned to address some of the previous issues. I'm willing to give it a shot before passing judgement.
  • 2 0
 Guessing he didn't actually try the amber low-light lens. It is near-clear and still sharpens up the gloom Ewok forest nicely...
  • 3 0
 @MtbSince84:meanwhile I have some Native Throttles that cost less and have replaceable lenses you can get from Revant(highly recommended Oregon company) in a variety of colors and configurations at a fraction of the price. I'm a super loyal customer, and I like stuff like nice glasses but I wouldnt buy anything from Smith again, ever.
  • 3 0
 @Lemmyschild: Solid suggestion on revant! Just looked into them and they have an impressive array of lens. No time to find a good frame haha
  • 1 0
 I’m a fan of the transition lenses on these $25 Amazon specials lol.
  • 29 0
 That bearing press is intriguing. They're right - I never could have justified the cost of a bearing press before given how little I change my bearings. N+1 Tools....
  • 2 0
 It's unclear if it can blind pull bearings, which on several of our bikes they're a mix. $100 is a lot to replace the threaded rod and washers I already have, but if I can do both than it's a steal
  • 3 0
 @plyawn: What does blind pull bearings mean?
  • 6 0
 @Grantma: Blind Hole Bearing, when you only have access to the bearing hole from one side. Pretty much in most suspension linkages. You need a blind hole bearing puller (like a dent puller with a slide hammer) to remove them.
  • 4 0
 I have always been surprised by the high price of bearing presses. I'm fortunate that my dad has a lathe and when I need one makes a bearing press very much like this one to fit the size bearings in my frame. Nut and bolt and a few bits of aluminium, very simple.
  • 3 0
 Check these guys out. Found just what I needed for my bike and didn't need to buy an entire set.

www.bearingprotools.com/collections/presses
  • 2 0
 @plyawn: It can't. To remove and install bearings with the Alt Alt tool you need access to both sides of the bearing.
  • 3 0
 @plyawn: It won't remove blind bearing configurations. Check the front page of the website as well as the part of the video that says you need flat front frame surface, flat back frame surfaces as well as access to the back of the bearing.
Also consider checking out our how to video to learn why DIY washers are probably damaging your new bearings. youtu.be/IKd0ygphlus
I developed the tool because I started using a DIY setup and then read the instructions from the major bearing manufacturers. That's how the tool was born. It's real important that you push the bearing in by applying the install force against the outer bearing ring. Not saying that a DIY solution isn't possible, it's just more tricky than picking any old washer that pushes the bearing in.
Thanks for letting us know how important bearing pullers are.
  • 1 0
 @Grantma: It's a configuration where you don't have access to remove a bearing by putting something directly behind the bearing. Like on a wheel hub. You only have access to the front side of the bearing.
  • 2 0
 @rcoc: +1. I've got their headset press and would recommend. Alt Alt looks like another great option (for N American folk at least).
  • 2 0
 @AltAlt: Hey, can you please tell me the ID of the drifts? I have a 3/8” press that I’d like to use with them.
  • 1 0
 @jclnv: Our parts are made to fit a M8 screw.
  • 2 0
 @AltAlt: Thanks for replying.
  • 13 0
 That bike rack is nothing but stamped galvanized sheet metal. Should be under a $100...
  • 2 0
 Yea it looks like it's made from metal wall framing which is dirt cheap.
  • 3 0
 @fektor-b: @greenpistol not exactly. The pictures don't show the whole story. Aside from the formed sheet metal (not the thin gage stuff you can bend by hand), there is also a pivot and a swivel, so that you can easily access any bike

see here:
www.pinkbike.com/video/529023
  • 2 0
 I posted above, but I'll mention here that I have one on my wall. It's solid as a rock. I thought from the photos that it'd be a bit flimsier. When it arrived, I was blown away by how solid it really was. In terms of how it works, the swivel and rotating hardware is very well made with lots of brass, aluminum, and steel parts. That swivel and rotating feature is also what makes it better than any bike rack solution I've ever seen. If you have more than two expensive bikes and/or a family-sized bike collection but limited space, the thing is worth every penny.
  • 1 0
 @big-red: I didn't assume it wasn't solid it's just like the garage door track next to it. The price is what I take issue with.
  • 8 0
 I have a box of hooks in the garage if you want to come by and grab 4 of them for free. And if you want to hang 4 bikes in a small space hang them front wheel up and front wheel down and they will take up the same space as this thing….
  • 6 0
 Where do people come up with pricing. Is it consumers that are dumb and are willing to pay whatever price is set or are these boutique and mainstream manufacturers/brands getting out of touch with reality? It's like car racks are going at around $800 and now bike racks for the garage for $375 that doesn't hold one e-bike?!? I think some hooks and a 2x6 and some screws works just fine! Pricing in the bike industry has gotten stupid these past 10-15 years!
  • 7 0
 The prevalence of these mini first-aid kits makes me think there might a lot of money to be made in bundling together a toothbrush, a few tubes of toothpaste, and some floss, and then selling it for a 50% markup.
  • 3 0
 @ $65 for that first aid kit, you're onto something. The last first aid kit i bought had over 200 pieces of items and cost $17.
  • 2 0
 Give it a waterproof upgrade with a ziplock bag and you'd be at $18 @riddenagenda:
  • 5 0
 We do extensive first aid and medical training at work. We have stopped using first aid kits now. Simple reason is that if you have them thats great. If you dont then you still need to crack on.
Why on earth are you carrying a triangle bandage??!! Stick your arm in your collar (done. Works). You can also use a tube to good effect. Everything else in the kit is pretty much live without. You are already carrying water to clean wounds. The tube can also be used to make a frac strap (so can pack), tourniquet (so can bladder hose etc).
To be fair…..I do carry one on much longer rides….but only because I have it. And if it was between that or a few chocy bars, the grub wins. Mine does not have triangle bandage but does have a space blanket.
  • 2 0
 You'll need a snake bite bandage too if your in the land of Aus. @ilovedust:
  • 1 0
 @fektor-b: I've decided to go with a carbon fiber toothbrush handle and $30!
  • 6 0
 Dear Home-Mechanics-of-MTB, we have sold out of the Oct. 8th shipment of ALT/ALT Suspension Bearing Presses. We are now taking pre-orders for our Oct. 22nd shipment of inventory. We're so sorry that we can't keep up but are working on larger inventory solutions. We just never dreamed that so many home mechanics needed tools.
  • 9 0
 If you need something now, you're gonna need an ALT/ALT alternative.
  • 5 0
 @MtbSince84: Too funny. ALT/ALT/ALT
  • 6 0
 Video showing how the TS-4 rack moves, allowing the bikes be as close as they are without clashing. The idea is to have both tight storage, and easy access. The rack holds 4 bikes between 3 studs, closer than you can get with hooks or any other single-bike wall-mounted rack.

youtu.be/T1mOIPyjD5s
  • 4 0
 I went from outraged (at the price) to intrigued in 30 seconds. This needs to be part of the article! Considering there is an active market for single-bike ceiling winches at the $200 pricepoint...
  • 2 0
 Pinkbike should have definitely showed the video. The rack is priced similar per bike to other wall swing type racks.
  • 9 2
 Goodr sunglasses are 25-35 bucks, $219 is an insult. Ketchum hipster prices!
  • 1 4
 Whoops 119, still too much for me, at least until I finish paying off my sworks kenevo
  • 5 0
 The more you spend on sunglasses the sooner you lose them. It's a proven fact.
  • 1 0
 @bocomtb: I've had my wildcats for two years and know where they are. I am actually the opposite. If I don't spend much money on something I mentally don't keep track of the item.
  • 3 0
 @bocomtb: Still have my $4 work protection glasses. Can't lose them if I tried.
  • 2 0
 @jesse-effing-edwards: The protection glasses seem to throw my vision off. I would love to only spend $4, but they give me a headache instantly.
  • 7 0
 Please make this bearing press available in Europe!
  • 4 0
 We are working hard on it. We're ramping everything up now. Thanks for letting us know who needs it!
  • 4 0
 Note: 2 triangular bandages needed for shoulder / collarbone injuries: one to make a sling, the other to secure the injured arm to the person's body so it doesn't bounce around.
  • 1 0
 Or just roll up the hem of the shirt to stop the bouncing. If you're being fancy, couple of safety pins to hold it in place. It always used to be an inner tube, but I CBA to carry one now I've got inserts...
  • 4 0
 This needs re-titling: ‘The World Cup is done and there aren’t any new bikes, here’s some shit we found in our mail trolley’
  • 6 1
 First aid kit with no tourniquet?
  • 7 1
 They're expensive and not everyone wants the same style. Regardless, nobody should be buying a first aid kit and expecting it to be perfect. You should really be buying it for the bag and modifying the contents for your needs. There's also an argument to be made for ditching the tourniquet in exchange for things you're more likely to need. That could even mean more gauze, which would help you control all external bleeds and not risk killing the person if they don't get to a hospital in a couple hours.
  • 5 0
 Use your spare tube attached with the Granite strap you bought yesterday!
  • 1 0
 I guess you could use your spare tube as a tourniquet…
  • 4 2
 A makeshift tourniquet can be built from a solid stick and a shirt.

I also personally believe that people don't quite understand the purpose of them. They are a last ditch effort to save life over limb. They're applied upstream from the wound and everything downstream of it will die. For example, if your homie has a femur break and tears a femoral artery and is bleeding out, tourniquet that shit. Because of you don't, they will die from volume loss. But, my understanding is that the lower portion of the leg, due to lack of blood flow, will die after a period of time.

So if your homie has a bad cut on their forearm but the blood loss is not such that they will die, don't even think about tourniquetting it. Apply constant firm pressure at the wound. If you tourniquet it they're gonna lose that lower chunk of arm.

TLBig Grin R take a good first aid course and ask questions and pay attention. You can save your friend, anyone in need, or your own life.

I also do stand to be corrected but this is what I've gathered over the years.
  • 5 0
 tourniquets are often dangerous in the hands of non medical professionals. but you could use a lot of things for a tourniquet.
  • 2 0
 @bblaney372:

True that

...probably safer to perform a tracheotomy that a wrongly applied tourniquet
  • 3 0
 @bblaney372: tourniquet is a great idea if you hang around in war zones. And know what to do with one. Which most of us don't. Trauma bandage, potentially with a pressure bar, is way more useful for the sort of wounds most of is are likely to encounter.
  • 1 0
 "The Leadout classes seem like they'll work well for a wide range of light conditions, but I do have a request for all the sunglasses manufacturers out there: please make a low light / Pacific Northwest winter / English summer edition. It's dark enough in the woods where I live that running clear lenses year round is very common - I'd love to see the option to buy something like the Leadouts sold with a few pairs of totally clear lens for a lower price. Yes, safety glasses can work in a pinch, but their optics tend to leave a lot to be desired."


I've found the Smith photochromic lens to work out great in the PNW.
  • 1 0
 Smith MTB sunglasses come with 2 lenses, one is clear. I'm on my 3rd pair of Attack MTB's. I will say that the ChromaPop lens in my Squad MTB Goggles does WAY better in low light than any of the 3 different ChromaPop lenses that came in my Attack MTB's. The Attack mirrored lenses are very dark for their intended use.
  • 1 0
 The photochromic isn’t chromapop as wel right? I hope not…
I’ve had 4 different sets of lens in attack max and every single one makes me dizzy immediately. As soon as I swap to non chromapop, I’m good!

Been wanting to try those photochromic ones
  • 1 0
 @stormracing: any chance you've been diagnosed with an astigmatism and you wear contacts?

That happens to me in alot of "tech" lenses. I get a crazy digital blur on phone screens at night with my contacts in
  • 1 0
 @blowmyfuse: fortunately, no. At least not yet. I think my eyes are still good at least. I hope! Haha

But shucks. I’m sorry to hear that! That’s interesting to know as well. Yeah for me it only happens with new chromapop lens in attack max. Other sunglasses of smith feel fine, Oakley prizm and all that is great too.
It’s just odd to me
  • 1 0
 @stormracing: take the red pill
  • 1 0
 I'm well aware of that, but the there is also something like win margins. With this wall rack the margins is like what 2000 %? I'm not even saying that it is a bad product but in the end your paying nearly 400 $ for a bit of flat steel with some holes in it.

And to be honest, I don't really know how the prices over in the USA went up in the last couple of months. At least over here, mild steel is still pretty cheap.
  • 2 0
 Would be nice to see a smaller first aid kit for the hip pack hipsters. I could do without the scissors and some of the fluff to make it fit.
  • 2 1
 This is the bag I use (with modified contents), it holds a pretty significant amount, but still fits in my Evoc hip pack with room for everything else I typically carry.
www.highabove.net/the-shop/first-aid-trail-kit
  • 1 0
 @DaneL: Oh my gosh that's perfect!! Thank you so much for the link. Will be picking up one for sure!
  • 6 0
 dude, a "ziploc bag for freezing" and a quick visit to any place that sells the dressings and what not, will do.

Like, really, I have packs for first aid kits and they are just cumbersome when trying to make it on a hip pack or small pack.

In case you don't want to pay a visit to your local store with medical stuff, you can always rely on this guy:

medicalgearoutfitters.com/collections/small-kits
  • 2 0
 Ha, what? I ride with a hip pack and am far from a hipster. Pardon the pun.
  • 1 0
 @HopeFbn: This. If you want something truly minimal and streamlined, you just need to buy a few things yourself.
  • 1 0
 Evergreen MTB instructors have the Galby Pack for rides/classes. It easily straps to your frame, sticks in your Camelbak, etc. and has all the good stuff. I took a huge spill down Xanadu a few weeks ago and was glad to have this pack on hand. 10/10 very good pack.
  • 1 0
 Try just putting the few first aid items you'd actually use on a 2-3 hour (hip pack length) ride directly into your hip pack. Works great!
  • 1 0
 Cascade First Aid actually makes a smaller version called the Friction Kit: cascadefirstaid.org/collections/first-aid-kits/products/ultralight-frick-tion-kit
  • 4 1
 375 bucks for the COVID bike rack! Lol, kiss my COVID ass. But thanks for the idea. Home Depot here I come
  • 1 0
 I bought two sets of the mossy cog racks. Total waste of money. The lack of detents makes them way harder to get bikes in and out of then the previous hook system I was using.
  • 2 0
 That's odd. I have one with six bikes on it and it works like a charm. Never had an issue with bikes touching or getting in the way while loading or unloading. It's also a lot easer to get the bike into the wheel sling than to get it on the hooks I was using before.
  • 1 0
 www.mbuk.com/articles/my-scariest-moment-cedric-gracia/amp
You need a big wound dressing and not a lot else. Everything else is just for TLC.
Small foil survival bag pretty essential too. Wielded can be improvised
  • 2 0
 Yes, safety classes can work in a pinch, but their optics tend to leave a lot to be desired…erm…
  • 2 0
 It might be worth noting in your article that Mossy Cogs only ships within the USA.
  • 1 0
 Fair point, but are there people in other countries dumb enough to buy it? Thought we pretty much had a monopoly on those sorts of people.
  • 1 0
 anyone who have vertical rack for nike can successfully use it for bike storage at the garage, also 375 is kinda steep for that. simple shelf for the front wheels
  • 1 0
 This is the slow welcoming of outdoor magazine product placement. Check out the "bike" mag Beta. Last pages are reviews of random ass outdoor gear.
  • 2 0
 95 for a bearing press is sweet
  • 2 0
 bearing press is SWEEEEEEEET
  • 1 0
 i am actually surprised that the sheetrock wall hasnt broken with that MetaAM hanging
  • 3 0
 Well, the rack is screwed into 3 studs...
  • 1 0
 Polarized and all the cool colors Goodr.com
  • 1 0
 I imagine their classes are better than their glasses.
  • 1 0
 Think I’ll order a Parkis instead. parkis.eu
  • 1 0
 Would that happen to be the new Rallon hanging up there?
  • 1 0
 Wielded = Everything thing else . Auto correct strikes again
  • 1 2
 The materials costs for that bike rack are about 10 $... that price tag is just ridiculous.
  • 1 1
 @bnflynn: So what's your point? Justifying one overpriced product by showing me another overpriced product (as many Parktools)? And in fact flat steel or steel sheet is way cheaper than cold drawn rod material if you compare price/kg (lbs).
  • 3 0
 @jayjay1989: just showing what $10 actually buys these days. Anyone who has bought raw steel in the last 6 months knows it doesn't buy much. Besides, the customer isn't paying for raw material. They are paying for fabricated metal, and the design, and the labor to build it.

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