Check Out: Funky Chain Dampers, Crafty Bike Pack Gear, a Caffeinated Protein Supplement, & More

Aug 11, 2023
by Matt Beer  



A lot of gear comes across our desks here at Pinkbike. Check Out is an occasional round up of everything our tech editors have gotten their hands on. Sometimes it's products we're doing long-term tests on, other times it's stuff we're stoked on but don't have time to fully review. And, sometimes it's crazy shit someone sent us unsolicited and we're having a laugh.




STFU Chain Damper and Stay Guard

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Features

• Models to fit any size drivetrain
• Soft rubber reduces chain feedback
• $29.95 - 34.95 USD
• Customizable frame fits
• Includes zip-ties and baseplates
stfubike.com




bigquotesI’ve seen a lot of homemade chainstay protectors over the years, including everything from garden hoses to old tires. Maybe they keep your chain quiet, but they sure aren’t pretty looking. STFU Bike has two types of products to silence chain slap. They even claim that it can improve your suspension. Whether that’s totally true, there’s no arguing that a silent bike feels faster on the trail.

These loops of dual-density rubber are what STFU label as Chain Dampers and they come in four sizes to fit anything from a single-speed drivetrain to an ultra-wide range cassette.

The softer rubber loops, similar to the durometer of a handlebar grip, are molded around the firmer plastic spine that holds the damper upright. They’re designed with a cut-to-fit for any chainstay height or shape. Included in the packaging are sculpted plastic footings for the damper to rest in place. On the website, you’ll find instructions for fitting the chain dampers.

I cut the damper down the middle for a speedy install. That avoids breaking the chain, and so far the zip ties have held everything in place just fine. I’ve also experimented with using the shorter of the two dampers on the underside of the chain stay, which has also reduced any clanging.

Here’s solid evidence that they calm down the chain from flapping like a flag in the wind.


The Stay Guard is STFU Bike’s latest product and stands out from other protectors with its row of angled fins. The raised portion is 1.5cm wide and runs 3.9 cm in length, while the sticky flat portion is 3.8cm wide. A sticky 3M adhesive covers the entire backing and uses a similar soft durometer rubber as the Chain Dampers.





Nemo Tensor Ultralight Sleeping Pad

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Features

• Spaceframe baffle construction w/ Tensor 3” cushion
• Vortex pump sack
• $179.95 USD
• 390 - 470 g
• 2.5 R value (insulated - 4.2 R)
nemoequipment.com




bigquotesIf you’re into bikepacking, one of the main challenges, besides route planning, is keeping the weight of your bike to a minimum. Another hurdle to overcome is comfort, and that means your time spent sleeping too. This Nemo sleeping pad is one of the most effective and efficient that I’ve tried to date.

The Tensor Ultralight comes with a lifetime warranty, repair kit, carry bag, and has a built-in pump. By simply waving the inflation sack in the air, connecting it to the pad, and rolling it closed, the pad will inflate to a comfy 3” cushion.

There are model options for every size and shape of person, plus an insulated option only tacks on 35g. That will bump the R value, the measure of thermal resistance, from 2.5 up to 4.2. Two layers of Thermal Mirror, a "metallized film" that remains quiet when you roll around, adds to the effectiveness of this packable sleeping pad. Even with that insulating technology, the materials are 100% Bluesign certified and made from recycled 20D polyester fabrics.




Opinel No.10 Folding Knife

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Features

• Virobloc locking safety mechanism
• 10cm stainless steel blade
• $22 USD
• Beech wood handle
• Custom engraving available
opinel.com




bigquotesI can’t remember when I first heard the phrase, “A dull knife is a deadly knife,” but I can attest to that. A dull knife requires more pressure to cut, often leading to slipping off of the object. You could think of a thousand ways to use this well-recognized and cleverly designed Opinel pocket knife.

Opinel knives have been made in Savoie, France, since 1890, but Marcel Opinel came up with the Virobloc safety lock ring mechanism in 1955. The folding blade secures the knife in the open and closed position by twisting the ring at the blade’s pivot, which is also protected from wiggling loose.

This No.10 model features a 10cm long stainless steel blade gets a 55-57 HRC rating on the Rockwell hardness scale. The beech wood handle keeps the weight to 75g and custom engraving is available.

Opinel says that the No.10 blade doesn’t require any special treatments, like carbon steel - just avoid long contact with any aggressive cleaners or saltwater. They also state that it works best with whittling wood. I prefer to cut through expensive jerseys when snacking on meat and cheese in the Chilcotins.





Evoc Duffel 26L

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These Stay Guards are a tidy solution if your stock one is flapping about or you've pieced together your own frame.

Features

• Waterproof and 100% PVC-free upper material
• Up to 30L capacity
• $200 USD
• Aluminum buckle
• Laptop sleeve
evocsports.com




bigquotesEvoc makes some bomber gear and this Duffle Backpack 26 is a simple, water resistant option for lugging my day to day gear around. The basic design has a padded laptop sleeve with a aluminum hook closure.

26L of main compartment storage allows for enough room to stuff a half-shell helmet, along with three mesh pouches and one zippered pocket to separate smaller items. Two of those mesh pockets are situated to hold drink containers upright, just in case they decide to leak. The inner compartment is waterproof from the laptop sleeve too.

This isn’t designed as a mountain bike pack necessarily, but the sternum buckle keeps the padded shoulder straps in place well enough for a few hops off of curbs between bike paths.





Osmo Rapid Recovery Whey Protein


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Features

• Chocolate and vanilla flavors
• 17-18g of whey protein per serving
• $56.98 USD
• Added green tea extract
• Caffeine claims to accelerate glycogen replacement
osmonutrition.com




bigquotesThere are a thousand supplement brands on the market and I’ve tried most of the popular “healthy” options out there. Given my dietary complications (allergies and Chron’s Disease), replenishing after activities without upsetting my stomach isn’t as straightforward as visiting the nearest gas station for chocolate milk and Haribo candies, like Kazimer.

Osmo Rapid Recovery is a whey-based protein with green tea. Osmo claims that, “The small amount of caffeine with carbs and protein has been shown to accelerate glycogen replacement by 66% over carbs and protein alone.”

17g of whey protein in each serving doesn’t have a funky after tastes or that dry, chalky texture either. Best of all, it doesn't cause any bloating for me, like some pea-based protein drinks.




Author Info:
mattbeer avatar

Member since Mar 16, 2001
375 articles

99 Comments
  • 42 2
 Ive ridden with the STFU on my bike for three years. When I ride anything else the chainslap startles me and I think something is broken because I never hear it what the STFU.
  • 5 1
 Same here, mine just bit the dust and I've got a new one on order.

But @mattbeer you actually cut it? That's one way to decrease the longevity.
  • 14 1
 Same. I don't generally write reviews for, pretty much anything ever. But I felt inclined to PM Chris Kovarik and tell him how awesome such a simple thing made my bike. I love how much noise it took out of riding. Now I just hear all the other bullshit on my bike that's breaking or worn out haha.
  • 4 0
 I wish my 2016 Remedy liked them more. Have tried both mounts and tightened the zip ties as much as I can but it still ends up going into my spokes. I now ride with them and have another zip tie that goes around my seatstay. No issues and a quiet bike!
  • 5 1
 I have the STFU on 3 bikes. Do I need to say more?
  • 3 0
 I bought one for my DH bike, that runs a pre-clutch XO derailleur, and it cut the slap noise by at least 70%. Based on that success, I bought one for my trail bike, and had similar success. One of those products that I wouldn't go without now, and at a price that's WELL worth it.
  • 4 0
 STFU is amazing. So is the Aenomaly seat angle thing. Both these products have been my favorite things in years.
  • 4 0
 I had one on my Transition Spire, made a huge difference. I did add a cable tie around the seatstay and looped it through the rear stfu so there was no chance of it getting sucked into the rear wheel, Also have one on my supreme v4.5, you can run the front stfu upside down a couple of inches from the idler
  • 7 0
 @BarryWalstead: I only cut the lower portion, not the loop itself. The zip-ties hold the sliced section together.
  • 1 3
 No, STFU! Big Grin
  • 1 0
 @mattbeer: aha, that seems like a better version of a 'bad idea' lol.
Follow up question, do you never reuse quick links? Or do you feel they are too expensive for this upgrade?
  • 3 0
 It’s a great product. Seems to fit Horst link bikes best. I run just the small one on the DH bike kinda in the middle of the chainstay and still works great.
  • 6 7
 I’m sorry that you paid for that overpriced thing.
  • 3 0
 @nickfranko: not overpriced. I removed it. Hated it. Replaced it. Moved it to another bike. I prefer silent bikes and that includes at the park.
  • 4 0
 STFU worked great. Did a big difference on my Transition Patrol. Too bad one of the two got sucked in by the wheel and got destroyed. Yes, I've checked several times position and tension of the zip ties. I've felt very bad when happened, damn noob myself. Then I started to notice then most of the other people also have only one loop mounted. So maybe I'm not the only one. And it still works.
  • 2 0
 @BarryWalstead: For some reason it typically says "not reusable" for the quick links that come with the chains. So for that reason I just stuck with the breaker pins as those are cheaper. I do carry the quick links for emergency fixes though. Anyone knows why these links aren't reusable actually? Is it because they stretch just like the rest of the chain does?
  • 1 0
 I haven't been able to get my STFU to work on my last 3 bikes. I sent them an email with my concerns and they sent me a new set with different mounting things but it's the same result. Larger rear loop gets sucked into the spokes within seconds of riding downhill. Doesn't matter how many zip ties I use or what quality of double sided tape etc. The rubber is too flexible and as soon as the chain hits it, it bends considerably directly into the spokes. The only way I can get it to stop is to zip tie it to my seatstay. I did that for a season and had a groove dug into my alloy frame so I had to stop that. I have managed to get it somewhat workable but using only 1 of the loops and installing it directly in the middle of the chainstay. This results in some slap at the rear end of the chain but it is still better than nothing. I have the rear loop on one bike and the front loop on another. Chain rubs on the loop when in the smallest gear. So for me this somewhat works but I could not get it to work as advertised and found the process frustrating/annoying. Nothing worse than needing to cut my chain on a ride and carry cable cutters with me to snip the zip ties off because I knew at some point it was going to be sucked into my spokes and ruin another ride.
  • 1 0
 @vinay: Oh, I know the official word is not to, but I've reused several and they've lasted until I needed to break them again.
The three year old one currently on my bike is a 3 time reuse at this point and going strong.
I do also carry one for Hyperglide+ 12 speed, and a KMC 12 speed four my wife's bike.
  • 2 0
 @gbeaks33: interesting, mine just wore to the point of needing to be replaced after 3 years.
I've never had any issues with it getting into my wheel either.
The fact you have been unsuccessful on three bikes says more about your installation (probably) than the product.
And I assume it's you because you say you're using one on the middle of your chainstay which directly contradicts the install instructions. You are supposed to mount them on thirds. I'm not surprised you can't get it to work well.
  • 2 0
 @gbeaks33: what bikes? Sorta sounds like user error….
  • 1 0
 @vinay: They always snap together tightly the first time, but some of them snap together less tightly on subsequent uses. Worst-case scenario, you can un-snap them with your bare hands. In this case, if that one segment of chain were to slap around in just the wrong way, your chain could fall off. I choose not to take the (admittedly tiny) risk since the quick links are cheap anyway

Although I do also prefer pinned chains for a different reason: Several times I've measured chains with a chain wear checker, and they show not-quite-worn-out for the whole chain EXCEPT if I measure across the quick link, where it shows it is worn out. From this I infer that the quick link's tolerances are such that it comes slightly "pre-stretched", as it were. Which means it's adding a bit of extra wear to every sprocket or chainring tooth that it passes under load.
  • 2 0
 @barp: Ah, I see. Back when I started I was riding 9sp and the quick links could always be opened by hand. I now run a 10sp drivetrain (Shimano Zee) and as it required pliers to open the links, I didn't see the point. The pins are cheaper and, as you mention, also more reliable and induce less wear on the sprockets down the line.
  • 1 0
 @wolftwenty1: transition smuggler, nicolai geometron g16, and commencal Meta TR. All had the same issue. STFU must have changed their material or something cause both my sets are so soft and flexy. Max tension on zip ties. Tried heavy duty double sided tape as well. The anchoring part doesn't matter if the uppers are floppy.
  • 2 0
 @gbeaks33: I had the same issue on my Remedy. I ended up running a cable tie through the opening itself and then around my seat stay. It isn't tight so it doesn't affect the shape of it, but it is tight enough that it can't go into my spokes. It's an extra step but the STFU genuinely has made my bike so much more quiet so I'm sticking with it.
  • 1 0
 @BMXJJ327: I did that for a season and the cable tie dug a groove into my frame. I would advise against it. Maybe a rubber band or something stretchy would work though. I noticed pros who run STFU also are affixing to their seat stay so can't just be me with the issue.
  • 1 0
 @gbeaks33: I put some 3M mastic tape under the cable tie. I figured it would wear through the frame. And I have also noticed pros doing it. These seem to work better the more square the chainstay itself is.
  • 1 1
 @BMXJJ327: Pretty nuts this. To me it seems normal that the pros have to cope with half-baked products. But by the time the end consumer pays them money for it, it should work. One shouldn't have a chainstay damaged because of the chainstay protector.
  • 2 0
 @vinay: IMO, the system is probably best for people that are decent at finding a solution to issues, with a little trial/error. I think most of the issues come from the variability of chain stay shapes and profiles, and cable tie tension. This is why some people run the rear off the seat stay, and some people find they move around, while others can run them in the standard configuration without any movement. As with everything attached by cable ties, it will only start to wear through your frame if there's a lot of movement, and is usually best served with some protection underneath if you're worried about paint finish.

I don't think the product is best for people that expect a perfect solution to 100% of the possible applications, but I also think it's priced low enough that that's OK.
  • 2 0
 @gbeaks33: what kind of cable tie and how loose was it to rotate enough to cause wear? Mine have literally never moved but I'm also very handy at fixing things and not bodging it.
  • 1 0
 @BarryWalstead: Re: poor setups... Yep, one single damper taking the beating of the full length of chain will put a lot more force into moving it out of position, compared to using 2 of them. I also see from his pictures that he has it mounted on top of existing chain stay protection, which will obviously limit the stability at the base.
  • 1 0
 @mammal: exactly.
Seems like a product where user error is the biggest hurdle for more mainstream adoption.
Fun fact though is that I've run mine on top of the chainstay protection with no issues, but it does have a squared off top.
  • 14 0
 "That's not a knife, This is a Kmife"
  • 12 1
 Knife.... too many beers
  • 9 1
 Pfft. Show me the $600 carbon fiber Yeti scalpel and I'll consider purchasing one for my oral surgeon build.
  • 2 0
 @threesixtykickflip: perhaps a kmife if a knife for your mum?
  • 5 0
 @Stoaks: Cannondale makes the Scapel (obbbviously)
  • 7 0
 knoif
  • 7 0
 I see you've played knifey spoony before
  • 1 0
 One up knifes are better!
  • 8 0
 Don't put your Opinel in the dishwasher, wood doesn't like it and the lock will be useless after that. Don't ask me how I know that..
  • 38 0
 Don't put any knife you care about in a dishwasher is a good rule of thumb.
  • 3 0
 @farkinoath: I've heard this, and never do it. But why? What happens if you do?
  • 5 0
 @rrolly: the handles that high end knives use get absolutely ruined by the combination of high heat and detergent. Had to leave the country for an emergency and didn't think to tell the friends house sitting for me this rule about my collection of chefs knives, took me weeks to restore all my handles.
  • 4 0
 @rrolly: If its a solid metal knife then nothing. But if there's a nice handle made of wood or other grippy materials you can expect the dishwasher to possibly destroy it. The water gets extremely hot and you mix in detergents and whatever else you didn't rinse off your dishes. It will assault the wood, warp it and any epoxy or resin will take a severe beating. The drying cycle will then bake the knife which will help kill bacteria, but will cause havoc on a nice, wood or bone or plastic or whatever handle. If you have a nice folding blade then you'll also have a bit of oil that will be removed in the wash. If the knife is made of ferrous material then you will invite the onset of rust if the water isn't removed from all the nooks and crannies.
  • 2 0
 When knives are bound to become so dirty that I really want to clean them thoroughly (like dirty with food), I'd rather not use the folding ones. Especially not ones you can't take apart (like those from Opinel, afaik). I prefer those simple fixed Morakniv knives (affordable Swedish knives) for that. Then again, folding knives are more compact so branches etc an Opinel is still easier to bring. I generally prefer carbon steel over stainless anyway as I find it easier to sharpen and I also like the patina it develops. That said, I do carry that half-serrated stainless Opinel in my pack (the one with the flute in the handle) to quickly clear the smaller branches on my local trails. It is always good to have the option to be careless and put the knife back in my pack and forget to clean or dry it.
  • 3 0
 @rrolly: because you have hands that can hold a damp sponge and a dry cloth?
  • 1 0
 I'm not a savage. . .
  • 1 0
 @rrolly: Bosch makes an electric brush you can charge from USB. It is really un-savage. Would this do? As the brushes and pads are (obviously) replaceable, you can even keep separate brushes for your drivetrain Smile . Then again I understand the real mountainbiker is a dentist who's been using electric toothbrushes on his or her bike for decades.
  • 2 0
 @farkinoath: all knives matter bro,

Butter knives ain't dead.
  • 7 0
 Klymit Static V is a great inflatable pad for people looking to save some coin
  • 2 0
 Half the price and packs smaller to boot.
  • 3 0
 It also has a R value of 1.3 so great for summer and that's about it. That's the difference in money and weight
  • 2 0
 @seanwggns: The static V and V-Lux are definitely more than a 1 season pad. Ive used mine comfortably down to 25degrees with no ground cold coming through.
  • 1 0
 @seanwggns: There's an insulated version if you're concerned about that,
(old) R value of 4.4. Has done me for sleeping on glaciers!
  • 5 2
 "I’ve seen a lot of homemade chainstay protectors over the years, including everything from garden hoses to old tires. Maybe they keep your chain quiet, but they sure aren’t pretty looking."
True enough but also a bit of old tube is in the garage now, and I can fit it in five minutes. Most crucially I will avoid the feeling of spending £35 on a bit of rubber that's worth about $3.99.
Seriously, a Crud Fender XL is cheaper than most chainstay protectors. Absolute rip off most of them are.
  • 4 0
 Old tubes are fine for protecting the chains stays, but they certainly don't quiet the chain in the same way. Say what you will about the price, but it's really not a large sum for the difference it makes in mitigating noise.
  • 2 0
 That all sounds great until you actually mount up the STFU damper and experience the night and day of less chain slap. It truly is a game changer for only $35. Compare that to literally any other component upgrade and it's the cheapest way possible to upgrade your drivetrain.
  • 1 1
 @BarryWalstead: game changer, all right. Slight exaggeration there. I'm sure they reduce the noise. I was referring to the chainstay protector, however.
  • 5 0
 Did they share how much caffeine per serving?
The only thing I like more than food after riding is a nap.
  • 7 1
 A peanut butter and jelly sandwich and a nap is the real cheat code to gains.
  • 6 3
 They did no show how much caffeine. I hate the mtb industry and its supplements. Its all sugar. Soooo much sugar. If you need some good sources or carbs, raw honey, some rice, fruit. Top it off with some good protein of your choice and some sea salt water.

But this, 14 grams of sugar is a lot for just completing a ride. More detrimental than helpful. But hey theyve convinced people its “healthy”.
  • 4 2
 @chillrider199: sugar after a workout triggers insulin and has some anabolic effects. During and after a workout some sugar is fine, especially if you aren't having a ton of sugar all day.
  • 4 0
 @RonSauce: so does fruit, or white rice. Except those ones are not as addicting and at least have some benefits.
  • 3 0
 @RonSauce: how can I forget honey. Some good raw honey will give you a good bump of carbohydrates while lowering triglycerides and supporting a healthy ratio of HDL/LDL. All in all, this supplement is crap advertised as good. Theres just better simpler ways to do things that people can do.
  • 3 0
 @chillrider199: 14 grams of sugar is 14 grams of sugar. Your results will be identical but a complex carb will take longer to process, so you won't get the spike and resulting anabolic action. You want a simple carb after workouts.
  • 5 0
 @chillrider199: but I strongly agree that these intra/post workout supps are bs and real food is the real answer.
  • 5 0
 I've had my Opinel knife for more than 20 years. Love it.
  • 3 0
 Opinel makes great stuff (I don't think there is a single competitor for their le petite chef stuff), it's pretty weird it being on PB though. Am I in the minority cycling without a pocket knife?
  • 5 0
 @eh-steve:
Do you even bikepack bro?
Yeah me neither. Mine comes on camping trips with me, that’s about it.
  • 1 0
 I bring their so-called "outdoor" knife along on my rides. We agreed to cut smaller branches on our regular rides so that we'd need fewer organized maintenance days. I prefer to bring a knife as it is relatively compact and quite quick to use. I only bring a saw (I've got one from Fiskars) when it has been more windy and I expect bigger branches. But most of the time I'm just cutting brambles and nettles which would otherwise be reasons for people to swerve and widen the trail. I've got their No12 knife too (with carbon steel blade) but for this their "outdoor" knife is ideal as the stainless steel blade doesn't mind if I forget (or don't bother) to dry it afterwards and the serrated part helps with cutting branches.
  • 2 1
 I’m the Uk you could land yourself a max 4year jail sentence if caught carrying a knife without a proper excuse and I doubt going cycling would cut it !
  • 1 0
 @Matt115lamb: The webstore where I buy mine also has a UK division where they describe the UK knife law: www.knivesandtools.co.uk/en/ct/uk-knife-laws.htm. You don't need an explicit reason for knife with a blade up to 3" long it seems, though personally I find the non-locking ones more scary than the ones that can be locked (like those from Opinel). Unless obviously it just has a fixed blade. A regular Morakniv is a tad too long (9cm long blade) but their Eldris should be short enough. That said, it being shorter also implies you'll have your hands closer to the branches you're trying to cut so you'll end up with more thorns in your hands. I think the ban on lockable knives could also be primarily aimed at knives that can be opened and closed single handedly, which doesn't apply to Opinel knives.

Either way, I think my reason for carrying my knife is valid. I only use it on my local trails where most people know me already but when I hear riders approach, I do fold it back in to not scare anyone. So far I have not heard of any complaints nor have I ended up in jail Smile .
  • 2 1
 @vinay: that’s all very good but this knife is 4in Wink
  • 1 0
 @Matt115lamb: Yeah, and my Opinel No12 is close to 5". The silly thing about smooth (not serrated) blades is that it isn't about how deep you need to stab your victim, though obviously this is the very reason why there is a limit on blade length. Smooth blades just work best and safest in sliding motion instead of just forcing them through whatever you want to cut. So even when cutting bread on a picknick, such a longer blade makes a nicer cut whereas a serrated knife could catch and rip the bread and just forcing the (shorter) blade down would flatten the bread and then give you a warped slice. But yeah, I don't carry that big one on my rides as I can imagine it could be intimidating. But for this their "outdoor" model (which is similar in length to their No8 model) is nice as you can pull the serrated part through branches (most typically brambles which are hollow inside) and the smooth end is far enough away from your hand to swing through nettles and hogweed. I like the swinging as you have your hand away before the weeds can fall down on it. But yeah, I avoid doing this when anyone is watching as it isn't wise to swing a knife in public. Others bring pruners, which do the job for the occasional branch but it is much slower (as you need to be accurate to get the branch between the blades), you can't cut the brambles low (as they'll then fall on your arm) and it is pretty much not doable with nettles and hogweed. Plus of course, pruners take much more room in your pack than a folding knife.
  • 3 0
 @eh-steve: I’ve got a mini Victorinox that lives in my emergency repair pouch, because sometimes it’s good to have a tiny blade to cut zip ties, some tape or a tire plug. But other than that I kinda don’t understand why one would carry a full size pocket knife with a 10cm locking blade on a bike ride…
  • 1 0
 @Muscovir: Would you expect me to use a tiny Victorinox for the purposes I mentioned above?
  • 1 0
 Semi related, but not sure if it's still going on; for us Canaderps, MEC has/had a sale going that includes Scratch Labs product. Easy 20-30% off.

If the sale is over they might even give the discount if you hassle them enough.

Same with cliff bloks.
  • 1 0
 Smaller Opinel folding knives of this type are pretty fidly to use in cold wet weather, strictly two handed but they can be made very sharp and good for prepping small game if you can be bothered to pick the inards out of the handle and lock crevices afterwards. They have there place, have a couple but personally there are 1000s of alternatives out there.
  • 2 0
 I have the nemo tensor and while it's light as hell, it's also thin as hell. I'm on my 3rd replacement in a year with pretty lightweight use in reasonable conditions.
  • 3 1
 Must be something wrong with me as the only bike noise that bothers me is an overly loud rear hub and only when I’m riding somewhere quiet, it kind of spoils the ambience
  • 5 1
 Yay! No Stevia! Down with Stevia!
  • 1 0
 I've carried an Opinel knife in my bigger camelback for a long time. I love how light they are and it is peace of mind in case of emergency. Only thing is that it's starting to rust quite a bit, but it's still sharp as ever!
  • 2 0
 Sounds like you have the carbon steel version, not the stainless? If it's bothering you, you can give it a scrub with a Scotchbrite pad and some mineral oil (the kind you find at the drugstore, not the Shimano kind). After scrubbing off the corrosion, wipe it clean with a cloth, then give it a thin coating of mineral oil before putting it away. And the mineral oil is also good for preserving the wooden handle or a wooden cutting board.

Or you could just tell yourself it's not "rust", it's "patina" ;-)

But anyway that's how I spruced up the old carbon No. 08 that I found in a gutter. There's still a little visible pitting but mostly it's nice and shiny now.
  • 2 0
 If it is carbon steel, it says "carbone" on the blade, not "inox". I like carbon steel most of the time as I like the patina and it is easier to sharpen. But for in the pack I'd rather stay with stainless (or "inox") indeed as whatever is inside might get exposed to moist and salt every now and then.

Another thing where carbon steel is good for is cooking. I love some (quite affordable) De Buyer pans. They require some care but the anti stick properties are much better (and less toxic) than some magic coatings you'd see otherwise.

I know this is a cycling website indeed...
  • 2 0
 @vinay: My gutter find says neither "carbone" nor "inox"--just "OPINEL" and the Crowned Hand emblem. It's definitely an older version because it can lock open but can't lock closed. Pretty sure it's carbon steel, having played with a fair amount of cutlery myself.
  • 3 0
 The nemo tensor is an incredible sleeping pad
  • 2 0
 I own a Nemo pad (not the Tensor), and will vouch for their comfort and ease of use.
  • 2 0
 @thomasjkenney1024: Same. Two of them going strong ten plus years in.
  • 3 0
 As someone with Crohn's disease I'm wondering what chrons disease is?
  • 1 0
 According to a quick google, it could be a disorder of the chronostratigraphy--perhaps a geomagnetic reversal that makes you feel unwell ;-)
  • 1 0
 STFU all day, all bikes! Got myself a Nemo pad, amazing! Just got my wife and son the same upgrade, if you're a side sleeper its unreal comfort!
  • 1 0
 Nemo Tensor pads are nice but it’s seems like every REI I visit has one in their returns section marked “doesn’t hold air”. I bought the much cheaper Klymit.
  • 1 0
 Used a Opinel knife once and gave it away. Spyderco is the way to go for a smallish compact knife for mtb rides. One handed opening, regardless of the weather conditions.
  • 1 0
 STFU from the first day it came out, had it on 5 bikes since, however I only run the smaller one near the chain ring, as th rear one hits the spokes on FSR
  • 1 0
 " A dull knife is a deadly knife " I believe it means it is deadly in regards to killing the user, i.e. not ideal.
  • 1 0
 I got the Nemo pad and I like it ! I use it on my moto multiple day camping trips as well
  • 1 0
 Need me a new sleeping pad and that looks like a good one!
  • 2 0
 So Outside







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