Check Out: New Flannels, Gloves, Tire Inserts, Goggles, & More

Nov 13, 2020
by Mike Kazimer  



A lot of gear comes across our desks here at Pinkbike. Check Out is an occasional round up of everything our tech editors have gotten their hands on. Sometimes it's products we're doing long-term tests on, other times it's stuff we're stoked on but don't have time to fully review. And, sometimes it's crazy shit someone sent us unsolicited and we're having a laugh.



Tannus Armour Tubeless Insert

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Features

• Proprietary Aither 1.1 foam
• Weight: 150 grams (each)
• $50 USD per wheel
• 27.5" and 29" options
• 20mm of rim protection
tannusamerica.com




bigquotesTannus first entered the mountain bike world with an insert that used a tube to help it keep its shape. That product had me scratching my head a bit, since I haven't used a tube for anything other than an emergency flat fix in nearly a decade. The new Tannus Armour Tubeless insert makes a lot more sense, and it joins the extensive array of options on the market designed to protect rims from damage and provide more sidewall support.

Installation is simple, and can be performed without needing to take the tire entirely off the rim. I was able to get it installed in a matter of minutes without any cursing or broken tire levers. There's also no need for special valve stems, since there's a gap in between the insert and the valve, with holes in the insert to allow air to pass through. The insert is shaped with 'wings', which Tannus says helps add more stability in corners. It provides 20mm of foam impact protection, and weighs in at 150 grams.

The amount of support the insert provides is noticeable, stiffening up the lower three-quarters of the tire's sidewall. That makes it possible to run lower air pressure without worrying about rolling the tire off the rim – I was able to drop down to 18psi in a Maxxis EXO casing tire. Inserts aren't an absolute necessity, especially if you're not regularly denting rims or pulling tires off the bead, but they are worth considering for racers or hard riders with a penchant for punishing equipment.




Club Ride Shaka Flannel & Gold Rush Pants

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Features

Shaka Flannel
• 97% polyester / 3% spandex
• Mesh underarm vents
• Brushed metal snaps
• Reflective accents
• $89.95 USD
clubrideapparel.com
Gold Rush Pants
• Mid-weight stretch polyester, reinforced knees and cuffs
• Treated for water & wind resistance
• Reflective accents
• Hook waist adjustment
• $99.95




bigquotesClub Ride's line of apparel is full of casual looking shirts, pants, and shorts that have performance-oriented details designed for cycling. Take the Shaka flannel – it's made of polyester rather than cotton, and has mesh underarm vents to keep air moving and prevent its wearer from overheating. I'd call it a mid-weight flannel, one that would work for chilly fall rides. Club Ride also make the Go Long Shirt, which feels more like a dress shirt that works on warmer days.

The Gold Rush pants' fabric is heavier than what you'd typically find on a DH race pant, making them better suited for colder conditions, or maybe for a day of digging out on the trails. The fit at the waist does seem to run small – I'm a 32 / medium for most pants, and with these I had the built-in belt at the first notch, and even that was a little snug.





Crankbrothers Cigar Tool

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Features

• Aluminum storage case with threaded top cap to hold CO2
• Weight: 55 grams
• $29.99
• Includes tire plug tool, 5 plugs, CO2 head, mounting bracket
• 5 year warranty
crankbrothers.com




bigquotesCrankbrothers' Cigar Tool keeps a tire plug tool close at hand, and a CO2 cartridge threads into the top cap of the canister for use once the plugging is complete. It does require an extra step compared to something like the Dynaplug Air or Lezyne's Tubeless CO2 Blaster. Those two tools have a port that allows the CO2 to air up the tire before the tool is removed, while with the Cigar Tool you plug the tire, and then use the CO2 head that's stored in the canister to get it inflated again.

I'm still a fan of bringing a mini-pump along rather than a CO2, but in a race situation something like this could certainly come in handy. It's also nice that it comes with a mounting bracket for easy access in case of a puncture.



Shimano ME702 Shoes

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Features

• Speed lace system and ratcheting buckle
• Neoprene ankle cuff
• Michelin rubber sole
• Carbon fiber composite midsole
• Size: 38 – 50 (standard), 38-48 (wide)
bike.shimano.com




bigquotesThe latest version of Shimano's popular ME7 shoe has been updated with a slightly roomier toe box, and a new tread pattern and rubber compound from Michelin for the sole. Other highlights include a speed lace system for the front of the foot, and a ratcheting strap at the top. The shoes aren't waterproof, but the lace cover and small neoprene gaiter around the ankle do help to keep water and debris out. There's also a wide range of cleat mounting positions with raised indicators that make it easy to match the cleat location on one shoe to another.

I'm only a few rides in, but so far I'm very pleased with the ME7's comfort level on and off the bike. They're stiff enough for long rides while also retaining a good level of hikeability - I recently spent some time scrambling up frozen roots and rocks while wearing the ME7's and found that there was plenty of traction to safely get to the top of the trail.



100% Racecraft 2 Goggles

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Features

• Triple layer face foam
• Increased field of view from version 1.0.
• MSRP: $65 USD
• 6 frame colors
• 45mm strap with silicone strip
100percent.com




bigquotesThe second generation of the 100% Racecraft has a 17.5% greater vertical field of view and improved fit around the nose. Outriggers make sure the goggles play nicely with helmets, and a wide strap with a silicone strip in the middle helps keep them securely in place.

There are six different frame colors and a variety of lens tints to choose from. The mirrored lens models come with an extra clear lens and a stack of tear-offs (please don't litter), plus a microfiber bag.






Specialized Trail-Series Thermal Gloves

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Features

• Wind-resistant 3-layer softshell upper
• Hydrophobic suede palm
• $40 USD
• Touchscreen compatible
• Sizes: S-XXL. Colors: black, redwood
specialized.com




bigquotesSpecialized's Trail-Series Thermal gloves are designed for those chilly rides where summer gloves are too cold, and big, bulky mitts are overkill. The fabric at the back of the hand helps keep the wind from cutting through, and the palm isn't overly thick, so you can still have a good grip on the bars. The cuff is a little longer, which helps protect that strip of wrist skin between your gloves and jacket that often ends up exposed.





148 Comments

  • 95 0
 Does anyone know of a riding apparel company that give an alternative waist and inseam fit. Most manufacturers seem to assume the longer your legs, the wider your waist, meaning I have to buy pants with a 38-40" waist to get a 34" inseam. WTF is the reasoning behind this?
  • 41 0
 I also need suggestions. I'm really skinny with really long legs and it's insanely hard to find stuff my size.
  • 23 0
 @slimjimbikes: buy norrona. scnadinavian/nordic style for long and slim folks.
  • 17 4
 @danimaniac: The price scares me!!
  • 24 0
 Scandi brands are ace if you are tall and slim/fit: Norröna, Haglöfs, POC. Outside of bike wear but more general outdoor wear you also have Bergans, Lundhags & Fjällräven
  • 22 2
 It's a bit mad, really, isn't it? It is sports clothing, so the people doing it are likely to be slimmer/fitter than the average sedentary human. Yet the waist: height ratio seems wrong on most cycling gear
  • 2 0
 Endura Singletrack light shorts come in two lengths
  • 4 0
 I'm 6ft2 and built like a beanstalk and found the specialized demo pants are perfect. Even in a 32 they don't hang around my ankles like tld and other trousers do.
  • 3 0
 I've got long legs and really wanted long riding pants, so i went to Cathro's youtube and found a video of him trail building in long riding pants made by endura, hes quite a bit taller than me and they went all the way down to his ankles. so i got a pair and i've worn them almost every ride since, absolutely love them! cant remember the exact model, but theyre endura and mostly waterproof.

10/10 recommend
  • 10 4
 @slimjimbikes: your long ass legs scare me
  • 1 0
 I have the same problem, want 34" leg but not a massive waist. I've found the nukeproof black like pants to be a nice length. Plus they've got adjustable waist as well anyway
  • 7 0
 @RossD123: According to their size chart, if you want a 34" leg you have to have at least a 40" waist. I literally have to sew extra velcro onto the waistband in order to cinch them up tight enough. Bugs the shit out of me that almost every company out there does this. If anything a lot of taller riders are slimmer, not fatter.
  • 3 0
 @lawrence-s: According to the Specialized size guide, the longest inseam is 32.5" and to get that you need a 46.5-48" waist. Mental.
  • 6 0
 If someone knows of a 36" inseam with a 34" waist (i promise I'm not a mutant) link it plleeeaaassee
  • 2 0
 Kitsbow, has huge selections of sizes when they are making clothing at full capacity since most of it is made to order. They are just a little behind right now since they are still making mostly PPE.
  • 9 1
 I struggle on the other end of this. I'm short and need a 30" inseam and everything is always 32" or longer.
  • 4 0
 @StumpyandhisBike: Same here. I just tend to wear shorts all year to avoid the problem.
  • 4 0
 Buy NF. Travis the tailor will make sure they fit.
  • 3 0
 I think 7mesh has cut to fit cuffs for tall, skinny people.
  • 1 0
 @commental bro im 16. i know exactly how you feel. ive got a 27'' waist
  • 1 0
 You don't need to buy pants riding-specific. Try any outdoor pant made of poly+spandex, or nylon+spandex. They all work great and you'll have far more fit options.
  • 1 0
 @slimjimbikes: they’ve got a hell of an outlet section on their site.
  • 1 0
 @yerfdogtnarg: I've been offered a discount on their gear and live near their factory. They seem to be good people and are ramping up the economy in Old Fort with their move there.

But they've not adjusted their price structure to reflect the cheap labor force. Just chugging along at the same super expensive rate. I can't justify their prices. More expensive than Patagonia and maybe even Arcteryx.
  • 27 0
 I can lend a little insight into this. I'm the founder of LIVSN Designs and we have studied size availability way too much because we predominantly make pants. The reason is the bell curve of people shapes. More often, a 34 inseam is present on someone who is waist 33 and up, by a significant margin. Now that gets to why small brands don't offer something like a 30x34 - because they'll sell 5 of those for every 50 of a 34x34. When manufacturing low quantities (think 1500 or lower) you have to limit size/color options to be able to hit minimums for production. A lot of factories won't make less than 20 units of any given size, for example. If by adding a 34 inseam across all waist sizes you end up adding 100 or more units in those variants, you end up with too many pants in sizes that don't sell. Or you can put those units across 32, 34, 36 waist sizes and have more availability for more people.

I'm not saying it's right, and it sucks to leave people without their size, but there is a real reason for sizing being the way it is.

On our part, we're adding all 30, 32, and 34 inseams on all waist sizes for next year because we have hit the scale of production necessary to do it. But we'll still get flamed by people who need a 31x36 until we make that one too. I want to make all sizes, but we just can't yet. That's just the way it goes.

...Also, that roll-up tab with button and reflective strip looks awfully familiar to our pants.

@mikekazimer want to review some LIVSN britches?
  • 1 0
 same, and I can't understand why ION makes long versions of their shorts but not their pants. I don't care if my ankles are a bit exposed on riding pants because there are long socks underneath anyways, but the fit for knee pads is just in the wrong position!
  • 5 0
 Not a riding apparel company, but you should check out lululemon ABC pants. Lots of people wearing them and they come long.
  • 1 0
 I'm 6'1 (186cm) and have a 31in waist and 32in inseam for pants. I've had this same issue with 100% and Troy Lee pants - too short or too baggy.

I just got the new Leatt 4.0 pants on medium and they're fantastic. They're definitely a 32x32 sizing. Exactly the right length. I don't know if the inseam on the large pants is longer though.
  • 2 0
 I have a pair of Medium Club Ride water-resistant pants that fit pretty spot on. 32x32.

My Fox pants in sz Medium (32) would be fine at the but the crotch is super tight, so I had to buy a sz Lg which fit well in that dept, but the waist and butt area is way too big. I have some other shorts like Dakine where the length and waist are fine, but the crotch again is too short. It’s make me split my sac so I look like I have Cameltoe, or Mooseknuckles. WTF?
  • 4 0
 Eddie Bauer Guide Pro pants in Slim fit. Offered in WAISTxINSEAM style sizing, the inseam goes up to 36" for us tall folks and the slim fit model has a tapered, athletic fit that fits close to the body and won't get hung up in the chain guard. Guide pro fabric is breathable and has stretch so its great for gravity or pedal biking plus zippered pockets keep your stuff secure. I have at least 3 pair and i dont bother even looking at MTB clothing anymore.
  • 2 0
 Story of my life... I need 33/34W and 36L which is easy enough to obtain on jeans or something like that, but bike apparel? Not a chance.

I ended up buying various hiking gear because those brands often have separate tall sizes. Still looking for some waterproof riding pants though Frown
  • 3 0
 @slimjimbikes: I'm the opposite haha I have a 29/30 inch inseam and find it difficult to find riding pants that fit right! 32 waist, but most pants end up being super baggy..... would love for a mtb company to make pants similar to how jeans are sized with both a waist and inseam size!
  • 3 0
 7mesh makes the Thunderpant that is designed to be cut to length.
  • 1 0
 @commental Loose riders made the most awesome pants on the market, had same issues, like need 32'34'; they are on steeper price range, however you will not regret buying tho
  • 3 0
 @FredrikWestman: I’m going to
Check all of those out haha! Never thought to look at scandi brands but it makes so much sense

Cries in 6’3
  • 2 0
 I'm long-legged, 6'1 with a 32" waist. I usually buy 32x34 or 32x36 (when available) pants. I've been nervous about buying MTB pants for this reason. But, I recently got the Pearl Izumi Trail pants and they fit awesome. Great fit, tapered at the ankles, but not 2015-slopestyler tight.
  • 2 0
 @mountainsofsussex: I call it "The North Face Fit". To get adequate sleeve and pant length, one must go to at least one size larger than what I would wear to properly fit. TNF makes their apparel to fit the average sedentary human. They have a couple of pieces that are a slim fit, but the majority of their clothes would fit F@t B@st@rd.
  • 1 0
 @ozarksagd: Pants look great! Any thought of doing one with an elastic cuff at the bottom? I know there is the risk of looking like a toddler or douche canoe wearing them as a grown ass man but I do like them for casual biking around, outdoor stuff, and fall activity to keep the cold out and pants away from the drivetrain...just a query. Either way I think I'll be ordering some of you current crop as they look well thought out and well made...like a modern Mountain Khaki type thing.
  • 1 0
 @wiggywhild: Endura have a stretchy tape measure, shorts I have vary from M, L and XL
  • 1 0
 +1 on the Eddie Bauer Guide Pro pants. They're my go-to pants also. I ride where there's lots of brush and brambles always clawing at my lower legs, so I use long pants almost all year. I try to wash the Guide Pro pants as infrequently as possible to keep the water repellent treatment intact. And they're on sale now - $60. You can't do better for 60 bucks. I just bought another pair.
  • 2 0
 @FredrikWestman: Not familiar with most of these brands except POC and Fjallraven, the latter of which I know is $$$. Scandi do tend to be taller and skinny though, so I can see why there would be more offerings for that demographic amongst those countries. I would say the same holds true for the Danes too.
  • 1 0
 @wiggywhild: $$$$. Not everyone can or wants to spend 3 figure sums on every article of clothing. I think for most the sweet spot is $30-50 per article of clothing, maybe a little more ($20) for some additional technical capability.
  • 1 0
 What material are you looking for? I searched for something similar for years, couldn't find anything ideal, and now ride pretty frequently in Reebok running pants. The recent move to trimmer cut exercise apparel has benefited mountain bikers. They aren't perfect (the rear waist band will occasionally scooch down if I'm moving forward and back on my saddle a lot), but I've loved them for lightweight riding pants.

Plus, compared to branded bikewear, they were ridiculously cheap at Sierra Trading Post.
  • 1 0
 @MarcusBrody: I think this might be a two-fold thing. There is what brand(s) to you want to be associated with and what brand(s) make products that fit an individual rider's budget. I don't think this is so much a matter of shopping for specific materials, that's irrelevant. It's more about performance/$. Whatever yields the highest performance at the lowest price that has a good company image and makes an attractive product will win over for a particular rider. That mix varies from rider to rider though, and each rider has slightly different motivators in what product they pick. I for one would never wear Reebok since it doesn't represent the core activities I like to partake in, and if it did it would be a fringe niche that would support their core ball-sports, cross training, and hockey equipment lines.
  • 1 0
 @jzPV: the long version ION shorts are not long enough for me.
  • 1 0
 @SuperHighBeam: Interesting. I don't often buy clothes based on company image or whether the brands represent the core activities that I partake in. I just care about the first thing you mention (price/performance ratio). I might think twice if a company really represented an image I didn't like and the apparel was heavily branded (say a high performance Tapout! jersey) and if I'm flying blind I might trust a company that focuses on the activities I'm buying for, but If I can see my options in person and try things on, I can't imagine putting much stock in who makes it. The pants in question have an inch and half light grey on dark gray logo. I honestly feel sillier wearing some of my Fox shorts with their loud branding, even if they are from a "core" bike brand.

But I own hundreds if not thousands of dollars of coldweather outdoor gear and my favorite high output midlayer after hundreds of hours of wear and theoretically purchasing its replacement multiple times is a merino Banana Republic sweater that I bought at a thrift shop. So I might be an outlier on branding.
  • 2 0
 @slimjimbikes:

Go and work a bit more.
Norrona rules. Really.
  • 1 0
 @Marquis: Costco usually has techy pants like those in various seasonal weights for ~$20, which makes them disposable, even though none of mine have ripped. Usually Gerry and Weatherproof brands, but like all their stuff it comes and goes frequently...
  • 2 0
 @ccrida-pnw: thnx for the tip, also they covered with full proof warranty I believe
  • 2 0
 Not riding apparel, but Prana makes pants that fit slimmer individuals. I'm 27" waist and 32" inseam, and they make pants in 28x32 that fit me well.
  • 1 0
 @zokinjo: I'm too young to get a job at the moment.
  • 1 0
 @Tylerjacobsen229: That's exactly the kind of size I'm looking for! I'm 27" waist and 34" inseam.
  • 1 0
 @lawrence-s: I concur with you on this.
I’m in 34waist and 34 leg and these are perfect. I’ve got pairs of these demo pants that are now 6 years only and faultless.

Would definitely recommend.
  • 2 0
 @danimaniac: Expensive but so worth it, top notch quality and great customer service.
  • 1 0
 @ozarksagd: Thanks for the insight, but how many of those 34x34 buyers would have bought a different size if it had been available to them? Sounds like there might be a bigger market of longer, skinnier buyers out there but they don't have the option purchase the correct size.

I'm taller and skinnier and have always bought 34x34 because that's all I can find. I would definitely buy a longer size if it was available, cool to hear your working on that
  • 1 0
 @Marquis: can you get knee pads under them? Real ones not super low-profile ones like g-forms
  • 1 0
 @zokinjo: Norrona, no doubt rules, in the same context that Arcteryx does. If I were a doctor of any discipline (including a dentist) or perhaps a lawyer, or some other professional that yields 175k+ per year sure I'd be all over those brands. Such high dollar items though on a low six figure income in a place with a high cost of living and a family of 4 to support just doesn't permit buying from brands like that. Maybe when my spouse finishes her education for her second career (first was a pilot for the USAF). Plus I don't have the privilege of work more earn more. If I work more than 40hrs a week I'm actually earning less per hour. I'd do a side gig, but my time is all already accounted for. So no, Norrona is not an option for me. Nor is it an option for most. $400+ tops and bottoms are something most people will simply laugh at and walk away from.
  • 1 0
 @MarcusBrody: This " I don't often buy clothes based on company image or whether the brands represent the core activities that I partake in" seems to be in direct conflict with this "I might think twice if a company really represented an image I didn't like and the apparel was heavily branded (say a high performance Tapout! jersey) and if I'm flying blind I might trust a company that focuses on the activities I'm buying for".

Most people are buying their clothing online these days, since that is often the only place that provides all of the options available for given product (brick and mortar store will have a limited selection to keep inventory low). When buying online brand perception becomes important, as does adequate marketing of capabilities backed by supporting customer reviews. When you can't touch a product, you've got to make a decision based on other factors, otherwise I absolutely agree with what you're saying. If two products look to be equivalent, in person, of course I'll buy the less expensive one unless I know something about the less expensive product's company that just doesn't sit well with the conscience.
  • 1 0
 @SuperHighBeam: I don't think it's particularly contradictory as I mentioned in the previous comment that I don't like heavily branded clothing even if the brand focuses on activities I like (the aforementioned Fox shorts) or seems better than most in regard to issues I care about (e.g. Patagonia). If the imaginary Tapout! garment was a pair of wind pants with a tiny subtle logo like the Reebok ones I mentioned, the branded wouldn't be an impediment at all. That brand just seems to consistently go for a very different , very loud aesthetic, so I mentioned it as an example of how I might understand your position.

As a counterexample, I thought Under Armour's self presentation was somewhat silly for many years, but I own and wear a number of things from them as I tried it out, was impressed with the product, and they make options with reasonably subtle branding.
  • 17 1
 The Tannus inserts are legit. Been running them for about 8 months and have only great things to say about them. My normal setup is Exo front, DD rear or with other brands, and I’ve been able to drop from 28f/30r to 22f/23r before it starts to feel squirmy to me. Other friends have dropped lower, such as Kazimer, but this has been my sweet spot.
  • 5 0
 Seconded. I almost can’t imagine going back to riding without them for mtb.
  • 3 0
 Agreed. I tried them out on one rear wheel and now run them F/R on all my bikes. Easy to install and there is a real performance benefit without too much of a weight penalty.
  • 3 0
 Yep, same here... have been on them for a couple months and found the same benefits as CushCore Pro:

Tons of support, almost additional suspension like feel, insane grip and added bonus of rim protection. but, way cheaper and way, way, way easier to install. When I installed, I only broke one bead and didn't even have to dump my sealant. Also wuch lighter!! I think once more people find out about these, CushCore is going to have to have a major redesign to keep up.

I use EXO+ on both ends and am running 18/21 PSI on 29" 2.5 front and 2.4 rear tires and I'm 175 lbs
  • 4 0
 I agree also. Tannus Tubeless inserts are pretty awesome. I have dented rims running ARD inserts as well as the home made ones. I rode on a flat with the Tannus in some rocky stuff and not a ding. I also really appreciate that you don't have to use special valve stems..............and they don't suck up sealant.
  • 2 0
 Confirm Tannus Tubeless are awesome inserts. Impact protection is great, has great sidewall support (think the foam is shirking down under pressure providing the sidewall support), the damping is very very good, they are light and easy to install.
  • 6 0
 When will PB do a comparison test of inserts?!! I feel they are the next evolution revolution after dropper posts and it's hard to find info where unbiased riders compare the different types
  • 1 0
 @TJD17 I'm gonna have to try these!
  • 19 2
 Isn’t the flannel clad mountain biker becoming a bit of a meme now? He just needed to be holding an IPA
  • 8 1
 Flannel will never die.
  • 8 0
 Always has been...
  • 1 0
 An MRP IPA
  • 9 0
 Personally I want a Hawaiian print flannel just to confuse the park rats.
  • 2 0
 @DHhack: I've got a camo flannel for that very reason.
  • 1 0
 Never been to Canada, eh?
  • 16 1
 Came for the expensive flannel, was not disappointed with it or the accompanying trousers that are usually advertised on the back of my moms Readers Digest
  • 4 0
 In Canada only grandparents use the word trousers. Confusing. Then i saw your flag!
  • 9 0
 @Jvisscher: put your trousers and sit on the Chesterfield until supper's ready
  • 3 0
 "Geoffrey. Get me my fighting trousers!"
  • 2 0
 @ybsurf: keep yer britches in the boot of the car, nice and dry.
  • 8 0
 Gotta pipe up about Tannus inserts. After adding them front and back on my 27.5 hard tail, it's been a game changer for off season riding. With that much grip from Maxterra/EXO casings, I'm writing cheques all over the place that I have no business cashing. Pretty amazing really.
  • 2 0
 Yep! I came here to same the same thing. The Tannus inserts are Fantastic. Cheaper, lighter, and easier to install than others and the added traction is amazing. On the trail and at the park.
  • 2 0
 Yep, once more people find out about these CushCore is going to have to redesign... these are so much better in every way... way lighter, cheaper and so, so much easier to install... yet all the same benefits of CushCore Pro!
  • 2 4
 Not nearly as good as cushcore not even close. But better then nothing. Yes I’ve tired both @islandforlife:
  • 2 0
 @freeridejerk888: Cushcore may have an extra level of protection, but "good" is 100% subjective. If you're looking for good protection, great traction, but don't want the extra weight and ass-pain of cushcore, I definitely agree with @islandforlife
  • 4 0
 I’m sure they offer less protection than cushcore, and if I had a Park only bike or set of wheels they’d have CushCore, but as my bike spends 3/4 of its time on trails climbing it strikes the perfect balance for me. Decreased pressure, more traction, lighter weight on the trail and substantial increase in rim protection at the park. I’m no bike park pro line hero, but until I installed the Tannus Inserts I was straightening dents pretty regularly on my wheels. They’ve got my money until I get a set of dedicated park wheels .@freeridejerk888:
  • 2 0
 @Chief2slo: Spot-on.
  • 1 1
 @freeridejerk888: agreed. Sidewall support doesn’t even come close to the lighter CC XC. Tried tannus back to back same tire, same day. CC XC all the way.
  • 1 0
 @Elkulp: haha, rode cushcore xc for a couple months, nothing but expensive rim protection. Have been on Tannus for a month now... night and day difference. Feel exactly like CushCore Pro.
  • 1 0
 Cushcore is a suspension product 1st then rim protection. I’m not why so many people miss this part about them @mammal:
  • 1 0
 @freeridejerk888: I would say the same thing about the Tannus product as well. Good support at lower pressures is the best befit of running either system.
  • 7 0
 I just couldn't recommend Specialized for gloves. I bought a pair of their Enduro gloves as they were one of the few pairs that have padding extending down the ring and little fingers (the ones most likely to get hit by overgrown gorse bushes) and the durability has been pretty terrrible.
The first pair were a snug fit, but the elastic fabric started tearing on the cuff, where you grab to pull them on, within a couple of rides.
I got a larger pair on warranty, not ideal sizing but hoped this would help avoid the issue. Well, they've had the same issue as the first, but also split seams on the side of a finger and the cuff, and holes in the ends of the thumbs.

Best get something with sturdier fabric and better stitching if you want them to last more than half a year.
  • 2 0
 I have two pairs of Specialized's Lodown gloves. Both lasting well. It's almost like their different gloves are different. Weird, eh?
  • 3 0
 Not a fan of spe gloves, too fragile. By the way, endura danny macaskill gloves are total garbage.
  • 2 0
 Same with RaceFace gloves. I bought a few sets and they disintegrated within a handful of rides (no crashes).
  • 5 0
 On some 100% gloves for awhile now and really like the fit and durability. Highly recommend them. Currently using the Airmatic for most rising and the Brisker for cold weather.
  • 2 0
 Weird. My Spech gloves outlast Fox about 3-1 with the same use. My Fox ones always split at either the fingertip seam or the thumb/ forefinger seam.
  • 4 0
 @SCCC120: The briskers are a life saver right now! Seem to hold up good too, one season in and zero issues.
  • 1 0
 I've had great luck with the TLD Air Gloves. Some of the most durable gloves i've owned and i wash mine almost weekly.
  • 1 0
 I have good experience with Specialized apparel and gloves. I only had the Deflect gloves for winter riding and they have been super, on my second pair now. My first lasted two seasons, and they still can be worn in case of emergency.
  • 1 0
 @SCCC120: +1 on the brisker for cold riding! I'll need to check out their other gloves, I've only tried the Brisker.
  • 11 0
 "Flannel"
• 97% polyester
• $89.95

yeah right.
  • 7 0
 Everybody needs an Annus Armour insert.....
  • 8 0
 Not sure about Enis recommending our Annus but we'll take it
  • 1 0
 @Tannus: phrasing
  • 1 0
 @Tannus

Awww coming. You guys have a great looking annus
  • 3 0
 Why is it that bike goggles cost pennies on the dollar compared to ski goggles? Mind you, I’m a dyed-in-the-wool cheapskate, so I’m not complaining. Just curious. Surely there’s not that much more that goes into making ski goggles, is there?
  • 4 0
 Largest difference is in the lenses. MTB lenses are inexpensive because they are going to get covered in mud and dirt almost every ride. Snow lenses are all 2 layers, most are injection molded and spherical, colors and tints and heaps have the ability for quick lens changes with magnets or other fancy methods.
  • 1 0
 @snowfiend: Makes sense. Thanks!
  • 13 9
 How many times will we see that cigar tool featured in different articles?! How much are they paying you guys?
It's had more press than Clinton's Grand Reserve Gurkha!
  • 2 0
 Exactly. Mine doesnt have the CO2 head, but can ve easily fitted into hollow axle or bars...

m.pinkbike.com/photo/19685960
  • 3 1
 Anybody ride the Shaka flanel? Especially if anyone tall and slim/fit tried it, how's the sizing?

The look of the fit on their 5'11 175 lb in size M makes it look like more athletic/euro fit than typical, eh..american fit.
www.clubrideapparel.com/collections/mens-flannel-shirts/products/shaka-mens-flannel?variant=32502334586951
  • 1 0
 I have a few club ride items but not that particular shirt. I usually wear large shirts but have XL in their stuff. I'm 6'2" 210lbs.
  • 2 0
 Take a look at the Overland stuff, They have a bunch of really cool flanel shirts

www.overland-store.com/collections/overland-store-tops

The shirts are flannel style but work like riding tops, they're two way stretch and wind/water resistant then have a couple of big pockets down the back like roadie riding tops. Well good for riding/looking stylish AF*

*this part subjective Wink
  • 2 0
 @FredrikWestman - I have several MD and LG Shaka Club Ride Flannels and I'm 5'11", 165lbs. I would suggest the size Large if you want to use it for riding in. I wear the LG for riding in and the MD for casualwear. All of their stuff is awesome BTW.
  • 7 1
 Is it just me or are tire inserts unreasonably expensive?!
  • 3 1
 Yes. Until you grenade your rim....
  • 2 0
 @Dustfarter: that’s does not justify a 50+$ price tag for what is essentially a fancy shape pool noodle
  • 2 0
 Had to visit CB's website to confirm that they really, actually, expect you to store the CO2 cartridge screwed into the tool barrel while riding. www.crankbrothers.com/collections/co2/products/cigar-tool-plug-kit-co2-head
Lay the bike over on the trail or parking lot and psssshhhhshhhshshhhhhhhhh.....
  • 2 0
 @chrod unless you throw an axe at the perfect angle that's the only way I see this happening. I've been riding this tool with "Lay the bike over on the trail or parking lot" even more with crashing and no "Psssssshhhhh"

The Bracket with blow up before the C02 head threads snaps.....
  • 2 0
 Really like those Shimano shoes just a shame about the speed lacing. I had speed lacing in my Shimano shoes and it was rubbish kept coming lose. Took it out an put some proper laces in and been fine since.
  • 2 0
 I love that they do a wide fit shoe!
  • 2 0
 Maybe it's just the Shimano toggle. My Northwave winter boots have a really nice solid toggle. Wonder if replacements are available to upgrade Shimano boots?
  • 1 0
 @mountainsofsussex: Yeah it was the toggle just would not stay tight. Shame otherwise the system works well
  • 1 0
 @MattP76: saloman toggles also stay tight - you can buy these separately too I think...
  • 3 0
 I have first gen of the ME7 (2nd pair) and never had any problem with the speed lacing. Works as it should.
  • 1 0
 @TheJD: Same here, no problem with an older pair. I need to replace them next year, hopefully the new ones will work.
  • 1 0
 Love the ME7's. running them for the past 4 years, no other shoe comes close to the comfort of those while riding or hike-a-biking. ive never had issues with the speed lace though, after maybe a mile ill adjust it tighter as my foot settles in and after that its solid!
  • 3 0
 i find it funny when people talk about " I was able to drop down to 18psi in a Maxxis"

You was also able to go at 2 miles per hours tops?
  • 2 1
 With the increased support at the side wall, they that combo rolls quite well. I just put Tannus inserts into my 2.5 WT EXO Minions (front and back) on my hard tail. 17/18psi, amazing traction on all the slippery wet roots and rocks that North Van has to offer, and surprisingly good rolling characteristics for that amount of grip.
  • 2 1
 I'm shocked that people need to run such high pressures. I'm 200lbs and no WC downhiller but feel like I ride pretty hard. 19psi in the front and 21 in the rear of my Exo+ Assegais on 30mm aluminum rims is the perfect pressure. Lower gets squirrely and higher makes them start to grip less well on slippery roots and rocks. Do all the bros truly shred that hard or just follow what they read on PB without experimenting with pressure?
  • 1 1
 @VtVolk: same, i run 20/21 on the front and 22/24 on the rear depending on if im racing or riding for fun. i dont understand how people NEED run upper 20's or low 30's on their tires. i mean yeah, run what works best for you, but also thats so much pressure for normal trail riding. for park laps maybe i can see it, but everything else doesnt make sense.
  • 1 0
 I picked these up for $40 and they stretch a ton for pads and won’t hurt my wallet if I rip them..also have a secured zipper pocket for key/ID if you need...
www.target.com/p/men-s-golf-pants-all-in-motion/-/A-77602745
  • 1 0
 I like the idea, a lot actually, but I'm curious about durability/abrasion resistance in the seat. My shorts seem to fall apart there first because I'll get back in the saddle and there's inevitably a bit of sand/dirt on the top of the saddle that grinds my clothes down. How's your experience been?
  • 1 0
 @sjma: for the price, it worth trying I guess..I just can’t wrap my head around $100+ for riding pants that if I go down, toast
  • 1 0
 @abueno: good enough argument for me. i'm a former fat guy so I usually just ride in shorts or shorts + kneepads year round anyway
  • 4 0
 Shimano...Bring back the AM9
  • 4 0
 Plastic shirt for $90 wtf
  • 3 1
 Am I the only who saw a mouth of inflatable doll first before figuring out it was a tire insert?
  • 2 1
 Yes
  • 2 1
 I don't know why i keep looking at this "news". Nothing new. On the bright side, Pinkbike Academy is great!
  • 2 1
 There's something wrong with that Shimano's shoes.. DHF on the rear and Michelin logo??
  • 1 0
 what are you on about?
  • 3 0
 $90% polyester...
  • 2 0
 $97% after taxes.
  • 1 0
 cant wait for the racecraft 2's to drop! says out of stock on their website. needing me a new set of goggles
  • 1 0
 Does old lenses fit to new 100% goggles?
  • 2 0
 No.

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