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Check Out: Digital Pressure Gauges, Jackets, Packs, Tires, & More

Jan 14, 2022
by Mike Kazimer  



A lot of gear comes across our desks here at Pinkbike. Check Out is an occasional round up of everything our tech editors have gotten their hands on. Sometimes it's products we're doing long-term tests on, other times it's stuff we're stoked on but don't have time to fully review. And, sometimes it's crazy shit someone sent us unsolicited and we're having a laugh.



Topeak Smart Gauge D2X




Features

• Illuminated display, 5 - 260 psi (.1 psi resolution)
• 360-degree rotating head
• $54.95 USD
• Works with Presta and Schrader valves
• Weight: 56 grams
topeak.com




bigquotesThe Smart Gauge D2X is the latest addition Topeak's line of digital tire pressure gauges. It's light, compact, and does exactly what it's supposed to, measuring tire pressure up to 260 psi (18 bar). There's an easy-to-use lever at the top of the unit to switch between Presta and Schrader valves, the head rotates 360-degrees, and there's a pressure release valve to drop the air pressure to the desired pressure.

I have found that the display can be a little hard to read if you're looking at it from an angle. When viewed straight on the numbers are bright and easy to see, but when the device is tipped slightly the screen has a bit of a glare that makes it less readable. The D2X also needs to be firmly pushed onto the valve, otherwise a tiny bit of air will escape - Topeak's Shuttle Gauge does a better job of sealing against a valve. Other than those two quibbles the D2X is a handy little device for those pre-ride pressure checks. 




Nukeproof Blackline 2.5L Jacket




Features

• DWR-coated 2.5 layer waterproof, breathable fabric
• Underarm vents
• Colors: red, grey, black, purple, orange
• Stashes in its own pocket
• 15,000mm waterproof / 30,000g/m2 breathability
• Price: $195 USD
nukeproof.com




bigquotesThe last couple of months have been some of the wettest on record here in the Pacific Northwest, so I've had plenty of opportunities to pit Nukeproof's Blackline jacket against the endless stream of atmospheric rivers. Its packability is one of the reason's I keep grabbing it – it can be stuffed into the chest pocket, where a tiny carabiner can be used to attach it to a hip pack or backpack. Once it's all folded up it's about the side of a big sandwich, or a softball, depending on your preferred unit of measurement.

The DWR-coated fabric has a 15,000mm waterproof / 30,000g/m2 breathability rating, although on wet, humid days I did find that it got clammy pretty quickly – the underarm vents can only do so much to keep air flowing. Longer, zippered underarm vents could potentially help with this, or maybe vented chest pockets. Of course, those would add extra weight and complication.

As it is, the Blackline jacket works well for those days where the weather can't make up its mind, when its raining one moment and sunny the next. Toss it on to keep off a passing rain shower, and stash it when the storm subsides. The fit is comfortable, and isn't so cycling-specific that you'll feel funny wearing it for non-bike-related adventures. The cut leaves room for wearing a few layers underneath, but it's still form-fitting enough to keep it from flapping wildly in the breeze.



Specialized Eliminator Tire




Features

• Grid Trail and Grid Gravity casing options
• Sizes: 27.5 x 2.3” | 27.5 x 2.6” | 29 x 2.3” | 29 x 2.6”
• Black and tan-wall options
• Price: $60 - $75 USD
• More info: specialized.com




bigquotesThe Eliminator has been in Specialized's tire lineup for a few years, but I feel like it doesn't quite get the recognition it deserves. It's a great rear tire, suitable for everything from trail bikes to enduro or DH sleds, with a good mix of traction and rolling speed.

There are two casings available – the Grid Trail version, which weighs around 900 grams and uses Specialized's T7 rubber (the higher the number the stickier the rubber), and the Grid Gravity version that weighs around 1290 grams and uses a T7/ T9 rubber combination.

I've used both options on different bikes over that last year, and each time came away impressed with the predictability that the Eliminator delivers. Yes, in really wet, extra sloppy conditions it can start to get overwhelmed, but for all other conditions it holds its own. Tread wear has been even, and they haven't worn any faster than expected given the number of miles on them. I've been using the 2.3" versions, which actually measure closer to 2.4" when mounted on a 30mm internal width rim. That's a plus in my book, since all too often it's the other way around, where a tire manufacturer's 2.5” ends up only measuring 2.3”. 






100% Brisker Gloves




Features

• Insulated soft shell on top of hand
• Single layer palm
• Size: S - XL
• 8 different color options
• Price: $34.50 USD
100percent.com





bigquotesI wear summer weight gloves almost all year round due to the fact that I can't stand how bulky and cumbersome most fall and winter gloves feel. However, once the temperature drops below a certain point that tactic doesn't really work as well – it turns out numb fingers don't function any better than ones that are encased in thick gloves. That's where the 100% Brisker comes in. A lightly insulated soft shell adds extra warmth, while a single layer Clarion palm helps maintain dexterity.

Now, these aren't going to be suitable for riders trying to ride in Arctic conditions, but they're a great option when temperatures are hovering around freezing. They don't feel that much different from a regular glove, but the extra warmth that insulation provides is noticeable, and welcome on chilly days. There are a whole bunch of colors, everything from bright pink to camouflage, and the $34.50 price tag is pretty reasonable considering the comfort and functionality they provide. 






Evoc Hydro Pro 3 Hydration Pack




Features

• Includes 1.5 liter bladder
• Zippered chest pockets
• Elastic mesh pockets for quick access
• Magnetic tube clip
• Price: $125 USD
evocsports.com





bigquotesI've been on the hip pack / stash as much on the bike as possible program for years now - lugging around a massive pack on every ride is a thing of the past. However, there are still times when it makes sense to wear a pack, usually to have more room for water, an extra layer or two, and the snacks that a big ride requires. For those instances, I'm a fan of the latest crop of vest-style packs that are hitting the market.

Evoc's Hydro Pro 3 pack is the one I've been using lately. It's a lightweight, fairly minimalist option, with room for a 1.5-liter bladder, along with 3 liters of gear capacity. There's a double zippered pocket on the back of the pack, with another zippered pocket on the main flap. Each shoulder strap has an elastic mesh pouch and an additional zippered pocket for holding a phone, multi-tool, or other small accessories.

I do wish that the main back compartment had a few more pockets or gear loops for keeping things organized, but otherwise the layout works well – I typically carry my phone in the left shoulder strap, a multitool in the right, and a tube, pump, and extra layer in the back compartment. This isn't the type of pack to load up until it's bursting at the seams, but as long as you keep your inner hoarder in check it holds everything well, and is free of any unwanted shifting from side to side or up and down no matter how rough the trail. 






180 Comments

  • 152 0
 How do much you effort give?
  • 20 0
 Effort give much do give out the performance.
  • 3 1
 Just enough to maintain my altitude below the radar.
  • 11 4
 Could have been worse: cloudia.hnonline.sk/r740x/551424c9-3cc0-414c-a5e7-a6bcbe5ed3bf
(mama means mother)
  • 56 0
 @Heath-Bar, I wish companies would put less effort into plastering inspirational slogans on gloves (or top tubes).
  • 5 0
 @mikekazimer: How much effort do you give to pedal harder dammit?
  • 3 0
 @mikekazimer:
100%. Pun intended. If you are reading the palms of your gloves, how hard are you pushing?
  • 5 1
 I own these gloves, and this is the only thing that I don't like!! Other than the whole Don't Dead Open Inside, they really are brilliant gloves.
  • 2 1
 The the more faster effort to you should give go.
  • 15 0
 I hate words on clothes/bikes in general, but this seems even worse than usual. "Pedal, damn it" and "Ride more work less" are both at least mildly inspirational/aspirational. "I like goin' fast" seems like a marketing person's misguided idea of what's cool to the kids these day, and is seriously one of the main things keeping me away from a GG frame. "How much effort do you give?" is so random and reminds me of a motivational piece of corporate "art" in a depressing office. Shut up and do you job, gloves!
  • 7 0
 @bearded-ed: Best cold weather gloves I've known. I personally thank them after every use.
  • 3 2
 @mikekazimer: kaz is alive!
  • 2 0
 @bearded-ed: the fox legion thermo is a decent (inspiration free) alternative. very similar construction (warm back, thin palm), similar price. nice mitts.
  • 1 0
 @xy9ine: I have the fox thermo legion, they whipped the first time I put them on, and all the little rubber bits on the back of the hand quickly fell off.
  • 2 1
 @mikekazimer: I think this is a perfect example of minimal effort
  • 2 0
 I think the answer is pretty self explanatory...

100%?
  • 2 0
 @foxinsocks: yeah, but is that really true? Like, when required, or all the time? I don’t need my gloves mocking me
  • 3 3
 @VtVolk: Could it be, and i'm just spitballing here, that you guys are diving a bit too deep on something really really trivial? Like, off the chart 21st century first world problems trivial? Smile
  • 1 0
 Me….effortless is….becaiuse Yoda…..marketing director….I am
  • 1 0
 I have these gloves and love them for cold weather rides. But that gave me a good laugh, nonetheless.
  • 1 0
 @initforthedonuts: I'm pretty sure it's %00L is the answer.

edited for accuracy.
  • 1 0
 @foxinsocks: not so fast....
  • 1 0
 @bearded-ed: I agree. I have one ride on mine, super happy so far. 5th pair of 100% gloves, first pair of Brisker. I don't actually GAF about what it says on palm. I like the blaze orange too for the hunting seasons
  • 1 0
 If someone asked me that, I’d hold my hands out in the exact same way
  • 1 0
 @VtVolk: put some tape over it. Guerilla gravity bikes do like to go fast. Even if the punk/rock inspired names offend some, they are still worth trying out if you have a chance to demo one.
  • 2 0
 @unrooted: Cool whhhipped or just regular whipped?
  • 1 0
 @Chonky13: having a corporation dictate an aphorism to you is about the least punk rock thing I can think of
  • 1 0
 @mammal: I completely agree! I have shitty circulation and they work for me.
  • 1 0
 @VtVolk: it's just so tacky! It's as bad as "live, laugh,love". Gag
  • 1 0
 @initforthedonuts: I have a talent for pushing hard with no hands...
  • 1 0
 @VtVolk: Ride more, wank less dammit!
  • 28 1
 Briskers are probably the best cold weather glove there is!
  • 4 0
 100%. I use these for fatbiking all winter, and they're great down to around 15 degrees F if you're working hard!
  • 2 0
 Briskers all the way.
  • 2 0
 Love my Waterproof ones! Make sure to go up one size though, they are abnormally small gloves imo
  • 2 0
 @Bkims: Can you comment on how well the 'waterproof' ones do in actual wet conditions?

The regular briskers are a go-to for me every year when it gets cold.
  • 1 0
 @Bkims: I normally wear a size L in other gloves but actually sized down for the Briskers
  • 4 0
 @jcrr: In the wet, instead of getting soaked through in 10 minutes, they take 20 minutes. The waterproofing helps, but isn't magical.
  • 1 0
 @labiker9: That's what I've heard, thanks for confirming.
  • 1 0
 @labiker9: They have a waterproof version that is a little more bulky.
  • 1 0
 @willdabeast410: Waterproof ones are what I've got, the "brisker hydromatic"
  • 23 0
 FFS I always thought nukeproof's apparel was reasonbly priced, their blackline pants can be got for around £60 these days. But $195... does it need to be that expensive? When did nearly $200 become reasonable for a lightweight coat? This isn't a criticism of the review, just the mad pricing. Christ
  • 3 0
 Agreed. I will spend a lot of time in my waterproof jacket during winter. $200 is a LOT of money, especially up against some of the other outdoor brands, that are also likely to be offered cheap at the end of winter. Last winter I bought a lightweight outer shell from one of the workwear brands, it cost about $50usd. It is fully waterproof, extremely breathable, and packs down small enough that it fits in my pocket without encumbering movement or looking like I have a pocket filled with a jacket.
  • 7 1
 Seriously, even a 3L Patagonia shell is $150. I guess most of Nukeproof's accessory lineup is intended to be sold at 40% off on CRC.
  • 3 0
 Had the same thought when I heard they had a stuffable jacket. Then I saw the price and thought it was a mis-print. I've got a pair of the Blackline Trail Pants and I hate to gear whore it...but really love them for fall through spring rides.
  • 10 0
 If it's all made in China anyways, why are these so expensive? It seems like you are just paying for the logo. You might as well get a decent one from a workwear store.

You'll run into the same issues with every single jacket out there. The sleeves are too short/long, it doesn't fit fit great here or there. In other words Its not a perfect fit for your specific physique, which you will experience to some degree with every jacket on the market.

If these brands want to make money, they should focus more on making their products more affordable, then people might pick them up as an add on item at the LBS. That's designer clothes money for something that is going to get covered in mud and can potentially get ripped on the trails or in a crash.

195 USD for a rain shell, pfft, is what I say
  • 5 0
 Well I assume it's because of whatever technology they use that allows it to withstand a nuclear blast.
  • 1 2
 Exchange rates mate. £60 is $100
  • 1 0
 @Worley1: you think we pay the equivalent in £? Not how it works mate. £150 rrp in the UK, means we actually pay $205

nukeproof.com/products/blackline-2-5l-packable-jacket
  • 3 0
 @Worley1: Also as of right now £60 is $82.00? thanks for your input though
  • 1 0
 @Rexuis-Twin: you guys keep saying "work wear store" but not posting a link to the product you're talking about?
  • 2 0
 @sorryiamtheboss: bought mine on CRC sale for £80. Worth it and It’s spent this winter as an outer layer for 6hr lakes expeditions in proper sh*t weather. I rate it. The fit is also very good for me.
  • 1 0
 I’ve been using this for the past two years. Their older model folded into its own pocket without a need for a pouch and rolls to slightly larger than fist size.

www.uniqlo.com/us/en/men-lightweight-packable-hooded-jacket-163520.html
  • 1 0
 @bikingnrugby: How small does it roll up? Wondering if it’ll fit into a Dakine hot laps stealth pack. My MTR did, just can’t find another one that’s waterproof and that small.
  • 2 0
 @philstone: I can fit into my dakine 2l hip pack. Not sure about the stealth. It does fold and scrunch pretty well. Wouldn’t pay £150 but on offer at £80 it’s definitely worth that. Try it, free returns with CRC.
  • 3 0
 I've been running various configurations of Specialized tires since 2017, and this season I'm on my 2nd set of Eliminator Grid Trail 2.6's and I can confirm they're an excellent rear tire (I have it paired to a Butcher Grid Trail 2.6 on the front) on my V2 Ripmo with Ibis 35mm internal rims. These are far and away the best iteration of the tire (I've run the last 2 generations on my 650B Whyte T130) in terms of both tread pattern and casing.
Super predictable and I've run them anywhere from laps at Trestle to just about every trail in Bentonville and they haven't flinched once. I even bought a backup set of the "Soil Searching" tan-wall's since they look fantastic.
I'd probably opt for the "Gravity" casing if I were doing more park days or racing enduro, but I've also run both of the Trail tires with CushCore Pro on particularly rocky DH days and had great luck as well.
  • 1 0
 While I agree that S tires have good performance to value ration, they were out super fast for me it is like 2 S tires for the same of riding as one M tire
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer How does the 2.3 Eliminator compare to the new Ground Control 2.35, size wise?
I was thinking of running an Eliminator as a front tire paired with a Ground Control both T7 Grid casings on a bike such as the Spur, or Epic EVO until I noticed the Ground Control is technically bigger.
Should I stick with two Ground Controls?
  • 3 0
 @nickmalysh: The new compounds do wear out quickly, but at half the price of some tires, they’re still probably worth it. The T9 compound for front tires is so sticky when I install a new one it throws dirt and gravel in my face for the first few rides.
  • 1 0
 I'm rocking the Hillbilly for a front tire and have ran the Butcher for a rear tire. Reasonably priced tires and good performance. The Hillbilly is a very good tire, but the Magic Mary is slightly better for my dry loose conditions.
  • 1 0
 @gnarlysipes: did not try newest, last summer tyre later 4 out of 5 days in mammoth, last day was ass, since side knobs disappeared, however happy for the price
  • 2 0
 @deoreo: the Eliminators are probably one of my favorite tires. I run them in Grid f/r or Eliminator f slaughter r for 99% of my riding. For dh park trips, I either run Eliminator blk diamond f/r or Butcher blk diamond f/r. The Eliminators roll pretty fast and give way more predictability than grond controls. No experience with T7or T9 compounds. I just picked up a bunch of Eliminators, Butchers, and Slaughters for all our bikez in both Grid and blk diamond 2.3 and 2.6 for like $15 a tire. Highly recomend getting some for those prices. My son has pretty much surpassed me with his insane aggressive riding, and he also loves the Eliminators over all others. They make a great front tire as well as for the rear. They track just fine. Dont know why most people think to only try them on the rear.
  • 3 0
 Anyone have problems with the side knobs on the Eliminators? I tried two of them and in both the side knobs started peeling of within a handful of rides. Not sure if I got some from a bad batch or what. I’m not a good enough rider to regularly rip off tire knobs! Otherwise liked the tire.
  • 3 0
 No issues. I put 120+ miles of park laps on my first set in a week and they still looked fantastic.
Another few hundred miles of regular trail riding and no issues whatsoever.

The only side knobs I've had start to wear/peel are on my Butcher that now has ~600 miles and still going strong.
  • 1 0
 My stock tires on my SJ Evo had the same issue after ~200 miles. They rode well and similar to a dissector, but I wouldn't buy them again based on that experience.
  • 1 0
 I had the side knobs ripping off after 600 miles. Great tires, but I won't be buying more since they don't hold up.
  • 1 0
 Happened to me but after ~200+ miles.
  • 1 0
 Im surprised to see any good remarks on Spec. tires after reading countless complaints about the knobby’s tearing off. Theres a ton of articles and threads from Spec Status owners who’s bikes came spec’d w/ Butchers complaining of this same prob.Seems like this is only time I've ever heard anything good about Spec. Tires TBH. I wonder if the Status comes w/a cheaper version or diff compound or something? They sure are tempting though being a cheap-er alternative to Maxxis ,which seem to always develop the crooked/warped tread pattern after one good shralp or not so straight landing w/inserts or not. Id love to find a tire that holds its shape for more than a month. Nothing worse than a new $ 80/100 tire w/a damn wobble. Freakin wobblers ,pffft
  • 1 0
 I think it was a bad batch, mine have been fine but that happened with my friend's eliminators and Specialized sent the shop store credit so he could get new tires (any brand).
  • 1 0
 @lyzyrdskydr: Darn, I should have taken it to the shop before I threw it out.
  • 3 1
 That pressure gauge is not worth it. Mine has is terrible at making a seal, an old D2 is much better. And the DX2 still doesn't live-update the pressure when using the bleed button, despite claiming to. Just get a plain DX or a Shuttle (which has the bonus of being able to be a consistent gauge for any pump or even cartridge inflators)
  • 6 0
 The D2X does have a live update - you need to press the button that's to the right of the on/off button. Then the display will blink, and show the pressure as it changes. I do wish that feature was integrated - it seems silly to need to push a different button to activate it. And I agree, the Shuttle and D2 both seal better.
  • 1 0
 @mikekazimer: it’s nice for when you just need to check pressures but don’t want to bend down to keep an eye on the screen…. Ive only ever used the one-time readout for checking my car tires though
  • 4 0
 Every one of these products is hilariously overpriced. $54 for some mediocre digital tire gauge? Get outta here.
  • 1 0
 These prices seem to me about the same, relative to current inflation, as they would have been two years ago. Get an accugage at half the price just because it's not specific to the bike industry.
  • 2 0
 @AndrewHornor: The problem with analog gauges is that they're usually more susceptible to damage/inaccuracy from rattling around in a pack. If you only keep it at home, or in the car, great. But not the best for packing with you.
  • 1 0
 @mammal: good point
  • 2 0
 Not sure why everyone raves about 100% briskers? Got some for Xmas. Used last night, fingers frozen within 10 min. Swapped to my mates Madison gloves which I should have ordered wife to get me for Xmas
  • 1 0
 What was the temperature? And I ain't trying to be a dick, I actually want to know because the Briskers look like what I need with the thin palm and fat back. My current gloves are warm but I lose dexterity.
  • 2 0
 I like them for the thin palm dexterity combined with a back that cuts wind effectively. They're at their best from maybe -4 to +8°, give or take. Not a true winter glove, but a pretty good compromise if your winter weather is more rain than snow.
  • 1 0
 I felt the same way about my Fox Legion gloves, they definitely do work, but they’re simply not enough for actual, snow-on-the-ground “winter”. Even just at freezing temperature they became uncomfortable after 1-2 hours. I have a feeling the briskers are also more “chilly fall/spring” gloves (just because they look similar I guess)
  • 1 0
 Depending where you are in the UK, it wasn't brisk last night, it was bloody freezing.
  • 1 0
 @AndrewHornor: is that fahrenheit or celcius? I don't know which Canada uses...
  • 1 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: Canada is Metric, so the values would be celcius. So, converted values 24.8 F to 46.4 F
  • 1 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: ha! Would be a 100% valid question except in Fahrenheit that's too cold for rain to be possible. Besides, the whole world knows: in Canada we measure distances in metric except for our own height or when building a house, volume in metric except when cooking, weight in lbs for our bodies and whole bikes but metric for components and anything heavier than a metric tonne, and temperature always in metric - unless we have a fever, in which case 98.6 is normal body temp and not close to water's boiling point. Guess typing that was redundant though because I know you know it.
  • 1 0
 Cold hands ruin rides for me more then anything else. These days I have Briskers and pack merino liners, but for proper below freezing that is not enough for me.

When it's properly cold out I give up some dexterity and recommend these:

www.galibier.cc/product/barrier-black

Roadie brand, bloody warm and pretty cheap. Either wear or chuck in my pack for when the Briskers can't cope.
  • 1 0
 @GT-CORRADO: British, so celcius aka logical over here too.
  • 1 0
 @AndrewHornor: I genuinely didn't know, because of the connections to Britain, because that sounds exactly like Britain. 500ml bottle of coke, but you buy a pint in the pub. Buy 1kg of potatos, but I'm 19 stone in weight. I'm 6ft 1, but work in mm at work. Unless it's timber, then it's a 2.4m of 4x2. Or skips for waste disposal, they come in 2, 4 of 8 cubic yards, but we order concrete in cubic Meters. Temperature is always celcius though, I know there's an equation for it (9/16+32? Something like that?) and I know -40 is the same, but that's all I know. Yay to the remnants of the imperial system /s.
  • 1 0
 @inked-up-metalhead: I was joking about people should know. It's a pretty goofy mix. Would love to see everything in metric, but also inches and their fractions do work well for construction. I'm a veneer stone mason and measure to 1/8" all the time. A cm is too big and a mm is too small.
  • 1 0
 @AndrewHornor: yup, being versed in both systems is handy, there's definitely times they're both useful, even if I think imperial is the most illogical thing ever.
  • 1 0
 @AndrewHornor: how about measuring to 5/16 cm then? Comes pretty close.
  • 1 0
 @AndrewHornor: Thanks for the answer.
  • 2 0
 @iamamodel: Temp was about 3deg C.
  • 1 0
 @Superfli: I can see them being cold at that temp, especially on a longer ride. My rides are usually short, and very "winch & plummet" which keeps the heart rate up
  • 1 0
 @Superfli: Ta. That's not great as I still want to train when it's below zero.
  • 1 0
 Those vests are nice. Tired of hip packs that move around too much,, although nice once it gets hot again. Looked at the evoc but got the camelbak chase vest since it has a slightly better layout. I have an evoc hip pack and back pack also and not a fan of their double zipper pockets that pour everything out.
  • 2 0
 Nothing beats a long sweep mechanical Viair tire gauge w/ air down release button.

And yes, you always need to use the same gauge for repeatable results.
  • 2 0
 No battery gauges for me, like my normal ole Accu gauge. My pump is WAY off so I just keep both in thr car and check each time I ride. Don't understand the difficulty in that.
  • 1 0
 @gmoss: Same here. One of my wheel sets is fat like me so I need to measure far below 5 psi as well. I like the analog gauges for low pressures.
  • 2 0
 @gmoss: you could also just check how far off the pump is... if your desired pressure is somewhere near the middle of the range, then chances are it is reasonably precise, just inaccurate, so you could easily figure out what the pump should read to then get the "correct" value on the AccuGauge, and then you don't need both all the time.
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: I could. When I got this pump (as a gift from my wife), I was wondering how everyone else was running such low pressures when I was at like 40 psi. I tried riding at what I used to ride at, lowering by that gauge to about 25 and the bike got unrideable. When I finally compared to a more accurate gauge, it was about 25 psi off or so and I was at like 11 psi on the front tire! I know what pressure I used to ride with tubes and I knew what I liked the tire to feel like under me, but without correct knowledge of the psi I was at, it was hard to wrap the noggin around what was going on. I am a need to know correct #'s kind of guy. 40 psi just had me chasing my tail. no thanks.
  • 1 0
 @gmoss: You can still know the "correct" numbers. Example: I have two Specialized Air Tool floor pumps, one with the 0-60 psi gauge and one with the 0-40 psi gauge. The 60 psi one reads within ~1 psi of my three (I like gauges) stand-alone gauges, which are all within ~0.5 psi of each other. But the 40 psi one reads about 4 psi low: 15 psi on that pump reads as 19 (my usual front psi on the 60 psi pump) on the other pump and gauges, and 18 is to 22 (my usual rear psi). So I just marked it "+4" and thus I know the "correct"* numbers despite that gauge being wildly inaccurate, and it is precise (repeatedly indicates that same 4 psi off) within the range of pressures I need.

* (still potentially not the absolute "correct" pressure, just what all my gauges happen to read and what I'm used to)
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: I could now, but when I was getting back to riding, it was all I had and for some time, I was confused with what other folks were running vs what I was. The accu gauge is accurate enough and my process is fairly simple. I am not sure the pump gauge reads the same from use to use either. Just don't trust it. Its not an expensive pump. LOL
  • 1 0
 Late to the party, my comment is that Kazimer writes clearly and succinctly. I would like to see his take on the industry regarding meta speak and marketing both best and worst.
  • 2 0
 Size up on the 100% gloves. I'm a medium in most gloves but the briskers are quite tight an don't give over time like most.
  • 1 0
 Agree, great gloves if they fit right, I thought mine would give but they haven't budged after a winter and a half
  • 1 0
 That jacket looks fine, got similar from Endura but it lacks the vents which can be a bit sweaty given what conditions it's made for
  • 9 8
 Any review of a pressure gauge without testing it for accuracy, especially at lower mtb pressures, is worthless.
  • 7 2
 *consistency
  • 15 0
 These aren't reviews, they're ads.
  • 15 4
 @watermonkey, accurate compared to what? Another gauge? The key is to use the same one for your measurements - like @AndrewHornor notes, consistency is the goal. In that regard, I haven't had any issues with the D2X.

It's worked well at measuring the pressures I typically run, which are in the low 20s.
  • 5 2
 @mikekazimer: Exactly. I don't care what the actual pressure is in my tires. I only care about getting them to the pressure I know that I like.
  • 3 0
 Here you go. The smartgauge D2 is included and tested for accuracy on certified equipment. But the SKS airchecker wins out. www.youtube.com/watch?v=QVb4nqx1GMI
  • 3 0
 Is psi really that arbitrary that consistency is all that matters.
  • 4 0
 I’ve tested my friend's Topeak digital gauge against a precision calibrated Fluke digital pressure gauge and it was within .2psi at 27psi so I’m satisfied. Its way better than my pump mounted analog gauge which is more than 5psi over at the same pressure. (I made an adaptor for the Fluke to test against my pump gauge, then curiosity took over and I stated checking all gauges)
  • 2 2
 @stainerdome: yup. Find the pressure that works for you in your conditions and maintain it. That is all that matters
  • 1 0
 @pisgahgnar: he said that his gauge is certified not calibrated, so it’s accuracy isn’t guaranteed.
  • 3 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: Yeah I never trust the pump. My process is add air to the tires above what I know I need while at home, when I get to the trailhead use the digital gauge to drop it to exactly my preferred 21/23 and hit the trails.
  • 1 1
 @AndrewHornor: I disagree but ok
  • 2 0
 @stainerdome: How do you decide how much pressure to put in your tires? Most people use some kind of recommendation as a starting point and adjust from there based on how it feels, conditions, etc.

So yea, if you are generally always using the same gauge all that matter is that its consistent. Once you find what you like you know what to fill your tires to using your gauge.
  • 3 1
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: accuracy doesn't really matter for tire pressure, precision/consistency is more important.

In other words. the value of the PSI numbers shown on the gauge don't really matter: it's preferential; but getting the same actual PSI into the tire every time does matter.
  • 3 2
 @stainerdome: I'm curious why you like to know the actual pressure. I don't feel that need, as long as I can duplicate what I like
  • 1 0
 The pressure cells used in all of these cheap gauges aren’t worth the packaging they come in. They tend to have a high hysteresis.
  • 1 0
 @justinfoil: I agree, but the video posted they guy says his gauge is certified which states nothing about its accuracy. Without and annual calibration a certification is useless. I figured my gauge was low so I checked it against a calibrated gauge. I made a deviation table for my pump and use that for the pressure I use my commonly ridden bikes.
  • 1 0
 @Afterschoolsports: They certainly work well to consistently choose the pressure that you've found to work well.
  • 1 0
 @mammal: hahaha. The only gauge I use on my bikes consists of four fingers, a thumb, and a palm.
  • 1 0
 @Afterschoolsports: I hear ya! I was like that for 20 years, until two years ago. Now I dial my pressure within about .1 or .2 of a psi before every ride, and it's really helped with consistency in tire performance, and reduced the occurrence of rim damage.
  • 1 0
 I don't like pressure gauges. They make me loose precious 0.00001 psi that I'll need while not ripping berms. Seriously tho.
  • 2 0
 Evoc creates the new XC nursing/sstorage bra for 2022
  • 1 0
 I highly doubt that jacket has 30k breathability.
  • 1 0
 Shrader valve? Fark, another new standard!
  • 1 0
 Check Out: A New Podcast Episode for 2022?
  • 1 1
 I have a tire pressure gauge. It's called a thumb. Pump up tire push on tire with thumb. Yep it's inflated.
  • 1 0
 Cool hydropack, again not for women!
  • 6 9
 The prior Topeak gauges were garbage, battery went flat in them in no time. I was even dumb enough to buy a second in case the first was faulty. Not going down that pathway again.
  • 14 0
 Yours is an experience totally opposite to mine. Battery lasts a couple of years being used every ride, on the motorbike and cars. On my second and my son still uses my first though its got a bit temperamental now - it is about 7-8 years old
  • 6 0
 really? Have mine for 5 years , use it every week, still going strong! ( same battery too )
  • 3 0
 I've had the opposite experience with the previous gauge. Mine is going strong 3 or 4 years now. Get's used before every ride. Replaced the battery maybe 4 or 5 times during its life. Maybe try a more expensive battery to get extra life out of it?
  • 1 0
 I'm with you, I picked one up and it was complete crap. I replaced it with an analogue gage that's been doing it's job for years without issue.
  • 2 0
 I'm on #2 of theirs right now and had to slip in a piece of paper to keep the battery snugged up enough to actually work
  • 2 1
 The issue I had was they seemed to get clogged with sealant very easily and there's no way to clean them out
  • 5 1
 I've had my Topeak for about 18 months on the original battery and it's still going strong.
  • 2 0
 I've had the original Topeak Smart Gauge for 7 years. I've replaced the battery once. It comes with me on all of my rides and when I bought a new gauge to keep in the shop they read exactly the same, despite the age of the old one and it being bounced around in my pack on a thousand rides.
  • 1 0
 @badbadleroybrown: It wasn't even a battery-going-dead issue. The gauge itself needed more pressure on the battery to function. Seems to work fine now but what a pain in the a** it was for a while.
  • 1 0
 I love my Topeka gauge and use it 4-5 times a week with no issues. How is this new one different or better other than the display?
  • 1 0
 Nothing beats an accu gage in my experience. Fraction of the price of a digital gauge and much more reliable
  • 2 0
 I've had the Topeak Smart Gauge D2 for 5+ years and it's been awesome, don't think I've even changed the battery.

Won't go on a ride without it, especially since every ride starts on the road to the trailhead around here
  • 3 0
 I had mine years and only had to replace the battery once. So probably every 2 years or so. Can't complain I love mine.
  • 1 0
 My D2 gauge doesn’t turn on sometimes, it needs a little jiggle or whack. I’d believe what everyone else is saying that the battery cover/connection isn’t perfect, I’ve never changed the battery though (3 years)
  • 2 5
 tire gauges that don't double as a pump make no sense to me. Like "huh let me check my tire pressure.....it's low, shit. too bad I bought this instead of a pump..."
  • 4 0
 Yeah, I get that. But to me I'd use it by putting 40 psi in at home. Drive to my trails and drop it down to 20/25 that I run when I get to the trails. Using the gauge.
  • 2 2
 @bearded-ed: why inflate to 40 if you're going to drop? why not just buy a pump with a gauge and you can dial them in right before you head out?
  • 3 0
 @bearded-ed: exactly. especially since there is a significant difference between the pressure in my cold basement before the ride and at the trails on 25 °C+ days...
  • 1 3
 @jzPV: ...... a pump with a gauge is going to be a significantly sounder investment for both of your needs. Unless you guys just like having more tools to keep track of..
  • 3 0
 @Caligula1620: there is no proper pump I want to use regularly AND take with me on my ride. And when I inflate a tire to 23 psi in my basement (btw a track pump pressure gauge is not accurate enough) it will be 26 psi at the trailhead in the summer.
  • 1 0
 $20 will buy you a electric Ryobi pump with a digital gauge from home depot. That assumes you are already invested into the ryobi battery system like me. This was a no brainer purchase for me.
www.homedepot.com/p/RYOBI-ONE-18V-Lithium-Ion-Cordless-High-Pressure-Inflator-with-Digital-Gauge-Tool-Only-P737D/307627867
  • 2 1
 @jzPV: well you wouldn't take it with you on the ride, but at that point you wouldn't really need to? I have a floor pump with a gauge on it that I use at the trail head, and I bring a small hand pump with me to make on the fly adjustments.
I understand why you need the gauge but I just think having this on you without a pump is useless. but to each their own!
FYI there are some pretty cool hand pumps with gauges that are easy to pack and incredibly useful!
  • 2 0
 @Caligula1620: ok, imagine that: I ride my bike to the trailhead. It takes 20mins from the city center. I carry a CO2 canister, a crankbrothers sterling mini pump with a gauge, my topeak gauge and even a digital shock pump. I still don't want to use the mini pump regularly.
  • 1 0
 @Caligula1620: A large temperature differential between your home and the trail can lead to a big difference in tire pressure, if you only set it at home. I fully agree with @bearded-ed because it's way more accurate to do it at the trail head. Also, if you have a slow leak for whatever reason, you might lose some pressure along the way, and need to reset it.
  • 1 1
 @Caligula1620: By carrying a separate pump and gauge, you can accurately check/change you pressure trail-side. Most packable bike pumps with gauges have small analog gauges with poor resolution, and the digital ones are way more expensive than buying a nice pump and digi-gauge seperately. Also, by splitting those two components up, you can just replace one if it fails, instead of being tied into replacing both if there's a failure with either functionality.
  • 2 2
 @mammal: "nstead of being tied into replacing both if there's a failure with either functionality" what? you literally have 2 separate tools that are subject to their own failures?
  • 1 1
 @Caligula1620: I was comparing the scenario of using two separate components (small packable pump and digital pressure gauge), to using a single, very expensive packable pump that has a digital gauge attached (which you were suggesting to @jzPV). Scenario two, means you need to replace the whole super expensive unit, if either the gauge portion stops working or the pump breaks/leaks.
  • 2 0
 @Caligula1620: Honestly the main reason is, that'll catch any slow punctures that I hadn't previously noticed.

That said this is all theoretical as I don't own a gauge!

But I do use my track pump all the time for this anyway.
  • 1 0
 @mammal: ok but you're assuming that the cost of the hybrid pump/gauge is greater than two separate tools. Not only that, but if the gauge breaks on my hybrid pump, I still have a working pump and don't have to contribute to the land fill.
If your gauge breaks, you now have a completely useless gauge that unless you fix, is going in the trash.

Idk man any way I chop this down it just doesn't make sense, you are carrying more, potentially creating more waste, and at no significant advantage in performance or practicality.
like even if we assume practicality is the same, yours is the less green option so you know.......be better.
  • 1 0
 @bearded-ed: I feel like using a gauge to confirm if you have a slow leak is really just gaining an extra few seconds on confirming a suspicion. I think it's mainly for people that like to ride at set pressures and know what they're adjusting, which I'm all for, I just think having a gauge without having a pump is dumb.
  • 1 1
 @Caligula1620: Show me an affordable hybrid pump that has a usable resolution smaller than 0.5psi and I'll agree with you. I've never seen a pump with a gauge attached where you can hone in the psi with really good accuracy (0.2 psi), aside from the digital kind, which are VERY expensive.
  • 1 0
 @mammal: nobody ever said you were going to get one with increments smaller than .5psi, I mean cmon be a little realistic here. and let's be honest are you really such a pressure whisperer that your ride is going to be drastically different from .3 psi? gimme a break.
  • 1 0
 @mammal: this is becoming silly, if you want to create extra emissions and plastic waste by buying several tools instead of a "swiss army" style all in one then that's your prerogative but it's hardly more efficient, environmental, or even sensible option. I think you need to reevaluate your consumerism.
  • 1 0
 @Caligula1620: Seriously though, which combo pump/gauge do you use? I need to get my psi within 0.2, and I have yet to see a combo pump that can do that for less than $200CAD. I honestly think that an accurate psi isn't even important to you, and that's why you're coming from the position you are. That, or you just don't care that your accurate pump/gauge is over priced. And on the environmental side of things, there's hardly any additional waste in the two tools I use, and both components were chosen for their known durability (less replacing). If you want to hyper-analyze every facet of your consumerism and environmental impact, you're probably not going to end up enjoying your time on modern mountain bikes, wearing out tires periodically, etc...
  • 1 0
 @mammal: it's not that accurate PSI isn't important but you're talking about 0.2 PSI and ya at that point I'm saying they're insignificant. I would be willing to bet that I could tweak your tires by .2 after multiple rides and if you didn't see me do it you would have no idea. Stop kidding yourself.
"And on the environmental side of things, there's hardly any additional waste in the two tools I use, and both components were chosen for their known durability (less replacing)". First off, you are buying two products so that's more production emissions, more packaging, more parts to end up the land fill. You're being pretty disingenuous or naive about "hardly any additional waste". If everyone thinks like you do that's why our landfills are overflowing, bc of these choices compounding over time across the entire population.

here is a dirt cheap option that has had worked for me for going on 6 years. The switch mechanism broke once and Crank bros fixed it and sent it back. Ya I can't get .2 PSI differences but for 99.99% of riders who aren't on some weird micro measurement kick, that's a great option.
I've wasted enough time trying to convince you to shop smart so I'm tapped. good luck
www.sierra.com/crank-brothers-power-pump-pro-bike-pump~p~5370v
  • 1 0
 @Caligula1620: Ha, ha. I knew we were completely different use cases off the bat, which was why I was originally trying to shed some light on why SOME riders might see value in using two components.

And I use Tannus inserts on my hard tail. I can 100% tell the difference between my rear tire at 18.5 (perfect), 18.3 (a bit too much roll in corners), and 18.7 (slightly more feedback in the rough). When riding my full suspension trail bike or DH bike, it's more like 0.5 psi before I can feel a difference, but you won't get that accuracy with your gauge either. It's great that the combo gauge works for you, but be aware there are more discerning riders out there than you.

And on the environmental side (which you only brought up yesterday)... In a sport where consumables fly out the window on a regular basis, it's hilarious that my additional digi tire gauge (very durable and accurate) is your hill to die on in your virtue crusade. I make many choices throughout my life to reduce environmental impact, to the point where I'm very aware that there are way more impactful areas to focus on aside from my adding a single durable component that allows the accuracy I need. Thanks for the laugh though, you must be a fun guy.
  • 1 1
 @mammal: "hill to die on" is a weird way of addressing one of the several reasons I presented why your buying patterns don't really make sense to the average consumer. I touched on practicality, cost, utility, and environmental usage. I get that you can feel the pressure because of your sensitive anus- sorry, Tannus, but still buying two tools for the majority of riders makes no sense. so congrats, you're special! glad you laughed, you must be insanely easy to get going, me thinks you're a dane cook or amy schumer fan Wink
  • 1 1
 @mammal: "And on the environmental side (which you only brought up yesterday)... In a sport where consumables fly out the window on a regular basis, it's hilarious that my additional digi tire gauge (very durable and accurate) is your hill to die on in your virtue crusade. I make many choices throughout my life to reduce environmental impact, to the point where I'm very aware that there are way more impactful areas to focus on aside from my adding a single durable component that allows the accuracy I need."
Cope. lol
  • 1 0
 @Caligula1620: I should have known you'd stoop to insults, which in hind-sight, was totally predictable I guess. I didn't say anything about the majority of riders, as I said, I was only trying to point out that just because it's not important to you, it makes a lot of sense for some riders. Perhaps you are more aware now, perhaps not, your loss.

And regarding your "Cope" comment. It's about ride quality and enjoyment, just like every bike-related decision we make. I assume you don't use a dropper post or suspension fork, because it's much easier to "Cope" than cause additional environmental disasters by choosing to buy those components.
  • 1 1
 @mammal: lol at you being passive aggressive then getting bristled when I send a few barbs your way. glass trailers must be quite cozy in Canada.
Must have really upset you on the climate issue bc you really are trying to justify that every which way you can lol. maybe I touched on some personal doubts you already had about yourself? anyways this is boring now, if you don't want people to respond with insults maybe skip the petty "that gave me a good laugh" bs, it's not a good color on you boo.
  • 1 0
 @Caligula1620: You have a weird way of explaining your point, logic slides, turns to constant insults, then you go on about how "touchy" you think I am. Sure man, whatever you're imagining here, you just keep doing you. Sorry I hurt your feelings by getting a good laugh, never considered someone would be sensitive enough to consider that an insult.

I love debating most bike-related choices, I find it fascinating, but you've obviously got some issues to sort out beyond what the hell your tire pressure is doing. You brought up the climate/environmental topic, but clearly have nothing to say about my counterpoint that you ride with plenty of unnecessary products that harm the environment.
  • 1 0
 @mammal: tldr lol, later
  • 4 5
 Is it Ergon or EVOC?
  • 1 0
 hahahah well spotted
  • 1 4
 Even if they paid me to ride Specialized tyres I wouldn't do it, I value my life

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