Check Out: E-Bike Lube, Ankle Braces, Shock Absorbing Grips, Water Filtering Pouches & More

Aug 10, 2022
by Matt Beer  



A lot of gear comes across our desks here at Pinkbike. Check Out is an occasional round up of everything our tech editors have gotten their hands on. Sometimes it's products we're doing long-term tests on, other times it's stuff we're stoked on but don't have time to fully review. And, sometimes it's crazy shit someone sent us unsolicited and we're having a laugh.




Godfather's Garage Chain Lubes and Grease




Features

• Made in Canada
• E-Bike lube is most viscous in line up
• Protects in all weather
• Lithium grease is waterproof
• $14.99 - 16.99 CAD
godfathersgarage.com




bigquotesWhat does chain lube and grease have to do with The Godfather? Well we’re not talking about the infamous mobster movie, but the legend Wade Simmons, known by some as the godfather of freeride. Making his mark on the North Shore, Wade saw the need to create a line of products that held up to the specific conditions out there in the deep, dank rain forest.

The E-Bike lube sounds silly, but it has been specifically formulated for high chain torque and is more viscous than the standard Dry or Wet options from Godfather’s Garage. This one also has the highest tenacity and is a claim that I can confirm checks out.

Even though it protects against all weather conditions, I noticed it lasted much longer on that fancy Trek Fuel EX-e I reviewed a couple weeks ago, which ironically saw action on only the wettest days. You can notice how much “sticker” it is than the standard wet lube, but we’re not about to dive too far down the rabbit hole of testing chain lube efficiency.

All of the products, including the waterproof lithium grease, are made in Canada and sell for prices between about $15-17 loonies using a network of dealers.




REV Pro Series Suspension Grips




Features

• Shock absorbing elastomers housed in clamps
• Alloy expanding wedge bar end
• Multiple diameter and color options
• Replaceable parts
• $89.95 USD (30-Day Money Back Guarantee)
revgrips.com




bigquotesI’ll admit, I had my reservations about trying these grips because they seemed hokey to me in the parking lot. After a solid day of smashing laps at the Sun Peaks Bike Park with some thin and hard grips on a test bike, my hands were punched. I'm not usually one to complain about hand cramps or arm pump, but installing the REV Grips on Day 2 couldn't have come at a better time.

The diamond and waffle pattern is a crowd pleaser with no weird bulges or tapers, and the ramped ends keep your palm from resting on the metal lock ring. Sandwiched between those collars and the plastic base of the grip are a series of four rubber elastomers that provide a small amount of suspended rotation. REV makes four different patterns in four different diameters with a boat load of grip and clamp colours. The Pro Series set seen here measures in at 31mm on the diamond pattern and bumps up to 32.5mm, if you include the waffle zone.

I thought these might feel strange on the trail, but the amount of movement is not drastic enough to be concerned about. In fact, I didn't even notice it - just the benefit of the relief. At no time did I get that “throttle grip” action when regular push on grips get water underneath them.

$89.95 seems like a lot for grips, but if you’re troubled by arm pump or sore hands, these could be the ticket to solve that dilemma. It’s also worth noting that you can replace any of the parts individually, so you don’t have to buy the whole kit to get fresh rubber.




LifeStraw Water Filter System




Features

• Removes 99.9999% of bacteria, parasites, microplastics, and silt
• Durable and packable
• Independently tested to be BPA-free
• 650, 1000 mL with two color choices
• $32.95, 37.95 USD
lifestraw.com.com




bigquotesHow many times have you been caught out on a ride that goes longer than expected in the middle of summer and you risk contracting giardia to lap up a mouthful of seemingly pristine mountain water? The problem is you can't see the bacteria from a farm or deceased animal that may be lurking upstream.

This little water filtration system from LifeStraw is a beauty for so many reasons. First of all, I love how you don't need to worry about tipping over the bottle you're trying to fill with clean water. The filter sends the water straight into the drinking vessel without extra parts, like a hose, that could get damaged. Secondly, it's packable, so you could even stuff this into a chamois bib pocket or strap it to your frame.

If you take a look at the stats, the might of this product is impressive. The filter will stop 99.999999% of bacteria (yes, to the sixth decimal place), 99.999% of parasites, and 99.999% of those terrible microplastics. Of course, it will stop silt, sand, and cloudiness as well. That means it meets US EPA NSF P231. The membrane microfilter will even tell you when it's reached the end of its lifespan by no longer letting water flow through, but that should get you through 2000 liters.

There are two sizes, a 650 and 1000-milliliter option, with the smaller one weighing just over 100 grams. The filter and cap will work with other products in the "Peak Series" too. Clean and safe drinking water seems highly worth the $32.95 if you find yourself regularly running out of water and don't want to carry a full day's worth of fluids.




Bigfoot Ankle Brace




Features

• Three sizes from 4.5 to 12+ (UK)
• Ambidextrous
• 50% Nylon, 30% Neoprene, 15% Polyester, 5% Other
• Speedlace inner closure system
• £30 - single, £54.90 - pair
bigfootbrace.co.uk




bigquotesAnkle braces might not be the first item on your list when you suit up to send, but their popularity from BMX has carried over to the dirt jump and slopestyle crowd, and they've even made their way to more traditional mountain bike trails. This Bigfoot Brace is my first experience with such a protection product, so I can't compare them to any others on the market.

To wrap up the ambidextrous brace, regular laces with a velcro closure at the end distribute the tension evenly and don't pinch when you flex your forefoot. Two opposing nylon straps take a figure-eight style lap around, down, and under the arch of your foot while a stretchier closure wraps around the lowest part of the shin bone.

On their own, they are quite comfortable and stuffing them inside a shoe feels surprisingly normal underfoot. I do prefer a snug fitting riding shoe laced up tightly, so if I were to rock the Bigfoot Brace permanently I'd step up a half size in footwear. They are something I would advise you to try on with the purchase of a new shoe and the height of the shoe cuff can vary - that's where I noticed they took up the most volume.

They basically feel like you're wearing a much higher, tighter fitting boot or extending the grasp on your lower leg. I thought that might mean a restricted amount of articulation during pedaling, but even on trail rides this didn't pose a problem. Our Pacific Northwest "summer" arrived late, so I didn't get a chance to wear them on any particularly hot days, but in full DH attire I never noticed any hot patches underfoot or particularly sweaty socks either. For park riding, the Bigfoot Brace would something to consider even if you aren't the kind of rider who purposefully leaves the pedals in the air.




RMU Hip Pack

RMU

RMU
RMU


Features

• Made from 95% recycled materials
• Waterproof main pockets
• External bottle and helmet holsters
• 5L storage
• $79.95 USD
rmuoutdoors.com




bigquotesYou may not have heard of RMU before, but if you’ve spent any time in Breckenridge, Colorado, Whistler, B.C. or Truckee, California, ski hardgoods and apres patios come to mind. Their shops are a mix of pubs filled with their own branded skis, snowboards, and packs. 

The Enduro Fanny 5L seems like just the right size for a hip pack and has a taller, flatter shape that keeps it closer to your body and doesn’t bounce as much when loaded down. 



Inside, there are endless possibilities for organization and separation, including a fleece-lined pocket for delicate items. While the 5L refers to cargo capacity, it has a pouch for a 3L water reservoir too. There are plenty of pockets, including a fleece-lined one along the side, which is handy for a phone or multi-tool, plus the mesh basket and elastic loop locks in a water bottle. There’s even a helmet carrying fly basket that is stuffed into the lower zipper and connects with plastic hooks.

My favorite part of this waterproof hip pack is the utilitarian aluminum belt buckle that doesn't protrude outwards too far. That won't break down over time with exposure to UV-rays or get crushed if it's stepped on by mistake. The materials are hard-wearing, like the nylon seatbelt back webbing, and 7mm EVA foam provides comfort. RMU also makes a sleek utility belt that can be worn inconspicuously under a jersey and larger 15L pack that features similar construction attributes and styling.







200 Comments

  • 113 4
 ebike lube. Is that on the shelf next to the KY?
  • 47 0
 E-glide
  • 12 0
 @KK11: next to the E-Skyn condoms...
  • 32 3
 Why do you keep your wife's lube in your garage with your bikes?
  • 52 3
 Has PB gotten pressure to mix in ebike shit with the other stuff so it makes it past the filters to make the ad/sponsors happy?
  • 21 6
 @Whataboutism: Why so viscous?
  • 101 2
 Nope. The KY is next to the regular bike lube. The E-Lube is over in the section next to the Viagra.
  • 17 0
 Specifically designed for your "5 Litre Enduro fanny"
  • 8 0
 Literally wondering what they’re going to try and bend us over for next
  • 2 0
 Lube is sticker? Is that code for nice or high sticker price? Or meant to spell stickier?
  • 18 2
 @Whataboutism: Pink (e)Bike should be an entirely separate site
  • 6 0
 @scallywagg: should rename it brownbike
  • 4 0
 @mtb-scotland: lol or clownbike
  • 11 0
 Ebike lubed is probably aimed towards solo use. Normal bike lube is better suited for multiple participants.
  • 2 0
 @skill7: going Enduro is how she probably ended up at that capacity.
  • 3 0
 @sonuvagun:

I dunno I was reading enduro fanny as that mate we all have that just fannies about all the time on rides

“Oh my god my gears aren’t working I need to stop and adjust them”

“f*ck sake Steve, they haven’t worked for the last 3 weeks just get on with it you enduro fanny”
  • 3 0
 @rudymedea: "f*ck sake Steve," got me laughing.
  • 3 0
 @Compositepro: At least they‘re going to use lube…
  • 1 0
 I supposed it works in conjunction with stiff suspension and it prevents eSparks due to friction
  • 1 0
 Thats funny!
  • 43 0
 Next up, ebike specific socks, ebike specific water bottles and ebike specific energy bars - only 10% the calories of regular energy bars, because you don't need the energy Wink
  • 15 8
 Some of the E specific components are nice for any heavier rig that takes abuse, they’re usually just beefed up a bit.

Glass half full
  • 17 1
 @nvranka: So, you're saying we need ebike specific underpants too. Good idea
  • 27 0
 @redrook: Well, that /Depends/
  • 5 14
flag Greeta25 (Aug 10, 2022 at 9:56) (Below Threshold)
 @nvranka: STFU lube is not a component
  • 7 2
 What about E-Pink Bike? Seems like a logical next step.
  • 7 2
 @Greeta25: clearly my comment was broad brush and not specific to the lube….

Smooth brains on PB, just another day.
  • 4 9
flag Greeta25 (Aug 10, 2022 at 10:08) (Below Threshold)
 @nvranka: And clearly @redrook didn't mention any components, he was clearly talking about things being unnecessarily "ebike specific". Obviously there are loads of things which should be ebike specific, but that was clearly not relevant.

Smooth brains indeed.
  • 7 1
 @Greeta25: sigh. Well, hopefully you can invest your PB points into some more crayons to chew.

Good luck.
  • 1 0
 @Greeta25: @redrook *did* mention components. That was obviously a typo in "e-bike specific shocks".
  • 2 1
 @nvranka: Don't know why you're getting the downvotes, as it's a good point. In particular, it's nice to see some burly chains, cassettes, chainrings, and hub drivers to handle the extra load. Those items see several times as much force on e-bikes, so an e-bike-specific drivetrain may be overkill for a human-powered bike, but many riders won't mind maybe 100 - 200 grams more weight for a tremendous increase in strength and durability.

We're also seeing improvements in CSUs to reduce creaking and improved tire casings that can benefit any type of bike.
  • 2 0
 @jaytdubs: I think "Pink E-bike" is a better name. But yeah, 100% support that idea of a separate site and so does my pinky.
  • 3 0
 @jaytdubs: Anything with the word eBike in is an excuse to charge more money so the riders are used to being ripped off. Maybe they could be some targets/victims for Outside+
  • 1 2
 @mi-bike: Lol no it wasn't, I meant socks. I am implying that ebike lube, just like socks, water bottles, and underpants, is completely unnecessary.

@R-M-R: He's probably getting downvoted because he's missed my extremely funny joke and started talking about components. There's nothing in my original comment which implies ebikes don't need specific components (they obviously do).
  • 2 1
 @R-M-R: He's getting downvotes because he's missed OP's point.
  • 2 0
 @R-M-R: these guys just want to make jokes about e bike underwear lol, don’t worry about it.
  • 1 0
 @nvranka: Electric underwear is no joke.
  • 1 0
 @R-M-R: electric underwear? What does that do? Now you’ve peaked my interest.
  • 1 0
 @nvranka:handy in warmer climates, to keep everything in tip top shape.
  • 2 0
 @nvranka: Haven't tried it, personally, but I hear it helps old people get up faster, with less effort. Some young people who shouldn't have trouble getting up also use it, ostensibly to do more with the same effort, but I have my doubts.
  • 47 2
 Were still talking about Rev grips like theyre a new product?
  • 142 7
 Yes - because at $90 a pop - they're still trying to sell a pair.
  • 9 21
flag CSharp (Aug 10, 2022 at 8:18) (Below Threshold)
 Rev Pro grips are like a the Specialized waffle grips I used to use (forgot what they're called) - really good grips until I got ODI Rogues, which are probably one of the best shock absorbing grips. I'd buy the Specialized and ODI Rogues over the Rev Pro ones since you can get those grips for like $20 - that's like 4x less and either just as good or better.
  • 72 3
 @CSharp: I respectfully disagree. Tried grips of all flavors to reduce hand pain, Revs were the only thing that helped. Granted I'm an old man (51) but $90 is cheap to alleviate pain and keep me riding.
  • 7 2
 @CSharp: another great one for shock absorption is the pnw components grips in the XL size. Not actually that much bigger in diameter but the extra rubber does a lot. $24 too
  • 22 0
 @CSharp:I strongly disagree with you. I used odi rogues and specialized fat ones for years, until I found revgrips (fat option for my large hands). They are not the same in comfort levels. Revgrips are much more comfortable on long, rough trails. The difference is between almost not able to hold the bars on the next day, to ride with minor discomfort on the next day. You might thing it is similar, but ride a difficult trail one day and then change to regular grips on the following day. Then tell me it is same.
  • 14 0
 @gravity354: Been using them for about a year and a half. Had an elbow dislocation over the winter so I have some weird nerve & strength issues in my hand. Going from Rev grips to anything else is a night and day difference. I'll spend the money on Rev grips everytime!
  • 6 15
flag CSharp (Aug 10, 2022 at 8:37) (Below Threshold)
 @gravity354: You may also want to try work gloves over the branded full finger bike gloves. I find that the high priced branded bike gloves for mountain biking are way overpriced and they break apart after a few rides (seams coming apart on the palms, between the fingers and especially the the index and thumbs), and paddings on the palms are thin. I've also had others saying the same thing.

I stuck with the ODI Rogue grips as they're really grippy and beefy. The waffle grips were nice but the grids wear out super fast!
  • 10 0
 I tried out Rev Grips. They didn't work for me. Slip on ODI Locknecks are way better for me.
  • 14 0
 @two-plank: "the extra rubber does a lot"
@CSharp: "ODI Rogues, which are probably one of the best shock absorbing grips"

Yes, among locking grips. Wait until you try push-ons.

I agree with Rev that rotational (shear) movement is important for comfort. Elimination of the locking core leaves a lot more room for soft rubber, which accomplishes the same thing and adds a little radial compliance at a fraction of the price. Use safety wire if slippage against the bar is a problem.
  • 4 0
 @gravity354: I'd be interested to see how Oury grips stack up to ODI Rouges and Rev grips.
  • 13 2
 @R-M-R: Yep. Lock-on grips are plain shit.

There are only two good grips on the market: Rev grips and push-on grips.

I've never tried Rev grips, but i've never ridden any lock-on grips after trying push-on's for the first time.I decided to try them because that's what the motocross guys are using, and that sport is far more developed than mtb.

The cushiest grips i've ever used we're Lizard Skins Northshore (they are rather thick at 33mm in diameter). Right now i'm on Renthal grips since i have exceptionally small hands and the Northshore grips felt to large with gloves on. The Renthals feel too thin tho, soo i'll probably be going to other push-on grips in the future.
  • 7 0
 Rev grips are great. Reduced hand and wrist pain for me and several friends.
  • 5 1
 @SacAssassin: I guarantee you the Oury's are far better because there is no plastic sleeve inside, but they will feel thinner than the Rogue's because of the additional deformation allowed by the lack of the inner sleeve.
  • 6 0
 @SacAssassin: Oury push-ons are much more comfortable than the ODI Rogue. As they say, "there's no replacement for displacement".

@c-radicallis: As you've clearly discovered, a thin diameter with a locking core leaves little room for rubber. Years ago, one model was advertised as the thinnest ever locking grip and had only 0.5 mm of rubber; it was even less comfortable than it sounds. If you want to try a ribbed / "mushroom" texture for additional compliance, the Sensus Swayze is the nicest I've tried.
  • 3 0
 @R-M-R: Yes, Oury grips - I was going to mention them as well but totally forgot the name. But I agree, Oury grips are known for just one thing! ODI also makes a very similar pair - I think either as lock-ons or slip/push-ons.
  • 5 0
 My first two trips to Whistler I used Odi grips, my hands got blisters and terrible arm pump. My third trip I heard about Rev Grips and said what the hell I will give them a try. If I get blisters and arm pump again, I will return them when I get back. They worked great! Zero blisters and zero arm pump. It made the trip so much more enjoyable. Replacement grip sleeves are only $25.
  • 1 0
 @CSharp: Oury lock-ons are similar to the Rogue. Oury is more compliant, if I recall, but it's been a while since I've tried the locking version.
  • 2 0
 They solved issues I was having with inflamed joints in my hands. Maybe not necessary for some/most riders, but as we get older or depending on how and where we ride they may be worthwhile.
  • 1 0
 I've just fitted some cannondale trailshroom grips (rebranded Funn FunGuy grips) and they've been great; so far they've been the comfiest grips I've had, way comfier than the Ergons and Odi Rogue grips on my other bikes.

The mushroom textured bit gives way more squidge than other grips I've used, but the waffle side means you still have some grip. Well worth a try if you suffer from sore hands like I do.
  • 5 0
 @R-M-R: It's almost a religion for me to spready Oury push on grips these days. It's the bets thing around. I've used lots of push ons, and as long as the OD isn't too big, Oury is the way.
  • 2 0
 Tried Rev grips for a couple of seasons. Made no difference in terms of the arm pump and hand fatigue to me. Still looking for options.
  • 2 0
 @gravity354: I ride rev grips too. Bought the widest they had and am very surprised at how much difference they make
  • 1 0
 @CSharp: Yep, I agree. I have tried the Rev's to alleviate pump/hand and wrist numbness but didn't like the raised lip on the outer lock and they didn't feel more cush than the lockon's I used before. Had been on the Oury single lock and ODI Rogues for years prior and went back to them.
I do prefer the Oury and haven't tried the push on version, as I am skeptical I will be able to wire them down tight enough. I will try them once the lock on's wear out but at this pace, that will be a few years.
  • 4 0
 Spray spray paint inside your push-ons before you install. Makes them easier to slide on and keeps them stuck when it dries. Use safety wire for extra security. No throttle grip so far over two years of doing this. There is also a whole world of cheap BMX push-ons out there beyond ODIs and Ourys.
  • 1 0
 @kr2ranger: I'd that didn't work for you, I expect that the Fasstco Flexxbar would. It has worked amazingly well for me
  • 3 0
 Rev grips didn't blow me away either. They were fine but not THAT much better imo.
My issue is that the grips are mounted on a hard plastic sleeve to allow the rotation. That meant that the depth of the rubber wasn't as much as that of a standard grip, and therefore wasn't as comfy. I think that most of the comfort gained through the rotation of the grip was therefore lost through the shallow rubber.
(I was on the largest grip size too, just for info.)

I've some Renthal non-lock ons to try next. I've only tried lock on grips before so keen to see if they're any different...
  • 1 0
 Gotta agree with @CSharp here...been running Revs on both bikes for a coupla years now for all the reasons.
  • 2 0
 After oury lock ons I went to oury push ons. Now Im on ESI push ons. Really like them. Seems like rev grips were a gamechanger for some and but no relief for others. Maybe I try them someday
  • 4 0
 @CSharp: Rogues are really bad compared to any decent push-on.
  • 2 1
 @CSharp: yeah, but are they ebike compatible?
  • 3 0
 @andrewfif: Same! I've been trying to limit my advocacy for Oury push-ons in this thread, but yeah, I recommend them whenever the topic comes up.

@slish: It doesn't take much to get them to stay in place. Thoroughly clean the bar (dish soap, thorough rinse, wipe with alcohol or, if aluminum, acetone), slip them on with the aid of a little alcohol (not hand sanitizer, as the gelling agents will remain), and they should hold fast unless water gets in, even without wires. Oury's pattern provides four easy locations for wires, which is more than enough to secure them in the wettest conditions.
  • 1 0
 @R-M-R: This is why I prefer lock-on grips - one end or both ends. There's no fuss getting them on or off and no adding wires or hairspray.
  • 2 0
 @SacAssassin: I've got the RG7 (newer version) of the Rev Grips on one bike and Oury push-ons on another. The Revs do a better job of absorbing trail chatter (and generally doing everything that has been mentioned above) compared to the Oury. My main gripe about the Revs has to do with the outboard clamp and general lack of real estate. The overall length of the grip is fine but clamps take up a fair bit of space obviously so the usable frip surface is not great. This puts my hands over the outside clamp which, being the Pro series, has cutouts (for weight savings or some such nonsense) that are less than comfortable. The Oury does not pose these same issues and is generally a very comfy grip. I had minimal slippage on my Renthal Al bar which went away with some simple wiring I did by hand. So, all things being equal and considering price, I would pick the Rev grips over the Oury, only I would opt for the cheaper Race version without the clamp cutouts.
  • 1 0
 @abeck59: see this is helpful to hear. I had rev grips and switched back to Oury and preferred them. That said I lived in bootleg canyon and was doing short chunky runs. I am wondering how the rev grips would feel on whistler brake bumps and longer descents. I have a hard time imagining anything feels better than a worn in Oury, but only used rev grips in that particular area.
  • 1 0
 On Revs vs soft push-on grips, they are both comfortable. For me the Revs work a little better for the knuckle inflammation I was getting, but that's personal.. The Revs have a more solid feel imo, hard to describe but they feel more substantial in a good way. Also Revs are far easier to install or remove and last a lot longer than push on grips, and you can replace just the grips for $25. For me they are well worth the $90.
  • 1 0
 I am seriously struggling with my cockpit at the mo. Renthal 800mm 35mm alu bars on a hope 35mm stem. The hand pain is griefy as. Keep meaning to go back and and try the old bar diameter set up which I am more than convinced will work. Getting rid of the Deathgrips was a starter win. But thats a lot of cash. These Rev grips or even the Oury ones may work.
  • 1 0
 @ilovedust: handlebar and grips matter, but the front tire makes a big difference too. Butcher grid trail T9 is currently my favourite for vibration damping. The 2.6" has enough volume I can run 18psi, but it doesn't ride like a plus tire in the negative sense.
  • 2 0
 I try rev grip in large for a season they did not do much in fast rough chunks. I still death grip to hold to dear life, calluses underside the knuckle still thick and uncomfortable. Biggest cure to arm pump and death grip is fork damper tuning, calluses is non existent now that my forks is buttery smooth
  • 1 0
 @c-radicallis: sensus pushons FTW!!
  • 1 0
 @CSharp: Yes, that's the trade-off: more expensive and less comfortable for easy installation/removal and secure hold. For people with tough hands, lock-ons are a good solution; for those of us seeking more comfort, push-ons or something exotic, like Rev, is the way to go.
  • 5 1
 @neimbc: You’ll get the same results by ditching the plastic lock on grips with a thin rubber veneer and running push on grips. I’ve got ODI longnecks on all my bikes now ST compound. I just stick them on with spray paint, it fills the void between the grip and the bar so no water can get in and holds them in place. They last years and cost about £7.99 and never slip. When it comes to replacing them, I’ll need to cut them off with a Stanley knife. I can take my stem, shifter, levers off without having to take my grips off so there’s no downside to them. The difference in comfort and damping between them and lock on grips is night and day.
  • 1 0
 @93EXCivic: Agreed. Sorry didn’t see your post.
  • 5 0
 @thenotoriousmic: I tell everyone this! No one believes me that $10 Oury's or ODI's are so much more comfortable. Lock-on marketing is a scam
  • 2 0
 @SacAssassin: I love Oury's but my hands barely fit on them, they are so narrow
  • 2 1
 @DCF: I’ve been running the same longnecks on one of my bikes now for three years. Haven’t moved or slipped at all and the more your ride them the more comfortable they get as opposed to burning through £25-30 lock ons that west to the plastic in a few months and tear instantly after a single crash. I’m never going back, they’ll have to prise them out of my cold dead hands.
  • 2 0
 ODI LONGNECKS V2.1 LOCK-ON 800mm-20mm 780 mm and perfect combo..
  • 1 0
 @R-M-R: "use safety wire.."

What do you mean?
What is it?
  • 2 0
 @pakleni: The link provided by HCnoodle is sufficient (though I think glue is uncessary), or you can search for [safety wire grips] and get loads of results, as it's been standard practice among motorcycle riders for decades.
  • 1 0
 @1aTom: Still £25+ in most shops, you’re still riding a plastic grip with a rubber veneer and they still tear really easily and wear through to the plastic core pretty fast but as far as lock on grips go they’re still one of the better ones, deity are another that make decent lock ons.
  • 3 0
 @HCnoodle: Thanks for the link! I've had a set of Renthal slip-on grips I've been meaning to put on for a long time now, but kept meaning to look into which type of wire would be best to use to keep them in place. That's a big help.
  • 3 0
 @CleanZine: I had those grips and eventually the wire cut through the grip. I hated them anyway but eventually the wire cut through the grip. I’d try spray pain and see how you get on before wiring them.
  • 1 0
 @thenotoriousmic: Cheers dude. Do you know which compound you used? I've had them on other bikes before and got on with the actual grip feel OK, but expect that might change with how differently I ride this bike compared to them. I think I've got the softest compound they do (they're a really light grey colour) so that might not help with the wire issues...
  • 2 0
 @thenotoriousmic: I no longer use any hair spray or spray paint or glue to install. I hate waiting for it to dry. Try putting a long zip tie inside of the grip then it slides right on the bar. Once it's on, use a set of pliers to pull the zip tie out. Works every time
  • 3 0
 @CleanZine: I use clear spray pain and no wire, in 10min after installation they are good to go and no slipping at all.
  • 2 0
 @CleanZine: I used the creamy coloured ones. I couldn’t get them to stick. They came with renthal grip glue which didn’t work, spray paint didn’t work hence the wire. The grip still moved where it wasn’t wired and ripped where it was wired. I also had a set of the grey ones which I used temporarily on my BMX but they were so thin and hard it felt like I was holding raw handlebar. I’ll only use ODI longnecks in the ST compound now on my bikes. Most of the new BMX grips come in an ultra soft compound that’s too soft for my liking on the mountain bikes. The majority of BMX grips are made by ODI. S&M, Sensus, KTM and basically any grip that says made in the USA is made by ODI.

youtu.be/B799GQQyqM0
  • 2 0
 @thenotoriousmic: I've got fingers straight off a toddler so I'm all about the skinny grip life unfortunately. I'm currently using the ODI AG-1 grips as they were the thinnest lock-on grips I could find, so I'm used to thinner, harder grips at least.

There are a few I've liked from the BMX world that I've had on my 24" for a long time so they're my back-up plan, but I'll give these Renthals a shot seeing as I've had them getting in the way in my toolbox for upwards of a year now. I've got some satin black spray paint (matchy matchy for my bars at least) and some clear lacquer so I'll try those and some wire to see how I do, otherwise I'll try some of the WTP grips I've been using for a while on my other bike. Thanks again for the help!

@Plancktonne - Cheers for the info! Where I live rain is fairly common so I might try some wire just to minimise the amount of water that gets under them.
  • 2 0
 @CleanZine: I’ll add that it was only the creamy coloured grips that wouldn’t stick. The grey coloured ones stuck solid.
  • 1 0
 @DCF: Does it only take a couple hours to dry?
I personally spray the bars with cheap hair spray and put an air blower on my air compressor shove the nozzle under the grip and push it on while blowing air.
  • 1 0
 @93EXCivic: the zip tie trick takes zero time to dry and no air compressor. Also works 100% of them time every time
  • 2 1
 @CleanZine: with the spray paint the water shouldn’t get there. It’s a trick used on water jet ski.
I use it for about a year and zero issues. I have a safety wire too but haven’t used it yet as there was no need.
  • 2 0
 @R-M-R: im not sure if everyone else is on something, but as far as my xc minded butt is concerned, ESI extra chunky are by far the best grips for both comfort and weight.
They may be difficult to install (if you dont have access to the internet) and they may wear out quickly (i still have the same esi extra chunky grips on my rig that ive had for the last year and a half and i put nearly 80 miles a week on it) but they're by far my favorite grips and no one's gonna change my mind

oh and did i mention you can snag a pair for $20
  • 1 0
 @NateO14: I'm running ESI (non extra) Chunky and like them. I'm always hesitant to recommend them because they are a little slick when wet, and do tear easily with ground contact.
I always wear gloves anyway and resolved the latter issue with a pair of Loam Lab Counterpunch.
  • 2 0
 @NateO14: I've used them and they were decent, but not great, for me. My impressions:

+ Didn't slip on the bar
+ Excellent radial compliance
+ Lighter than a typical rubber grip
- Less friction than a typical rubber grip
- Poor durability due to cuts and tears
- Less shear compliance than Oury
  • 1 0
 @AndrewHornor: oh i totally agree, but i ride in areas of utah with an inch or two of precipitation so everything is bone dry, and not crashing and not setting your bike down does a mighty fine job of not tearing them. i have yet to try loam grips, maybe ill give those a shot.
  • 21 4
 If anyone who hasn't had an ankle injury yet is reading this - for god's sake get ankle braces as a preventative measure.
  • 4 0
 Yeah, talus head fractures take forever to heal.
  • 5 1
 I dont know if this is true, but back when we were riding bmx, we were convinced our ankles get weaker if we were braces and thus didnt wear them unless we had torn ligaments before.

Can anyone shine a light on whether this is true?
  • 7 1
 @waldo-jpg: Not sure if it is scientific or not but the same thought is true here in the USA. The thought is the more you wear ankle braces the more your ankles and riding style rely on them to support that weight and distribute any shock forces so your ankles don't have to adapt to them.

But once you injure your ankle you almost have to wear them to be able to recover and ride and then your ankles have become weaker for wearing them and the cycle goes on.
  • 10 1
 @waldo-jpg: Yes, it is pretty commonly accepted that wearing a brace just for the sake of wearing one will make your ankle dependent on it. If some one wants to wear one preventatively, it should be supplemented with appropriate strength training and PT.
  • 4 3
 @waldo-jpg: It is not very good idea in general to brace any articulation. It could be used to treat some injuries,but not some thing long term.
1 year ago I had ACL surgery and I wear a full leg compression thing for a month when my leg was like a potato,but never ever wear a knee braze of any kind and the doctor said to not wear any braze even doing Enduro/DH again,only the knee pad.
I played basketball for long time in my childhood,never ever used basketball shoes,just regular tennis or running shoes. Never had a torn ankle. It was forbidden for us to play with basketball shoes for not getting a weak ankle over the time,our team manager inspected close any shoe we bring to play. It was weird for some other teams see a butch of kids playing basketball with tennis shoes,but it worked really really well for us. Our rate of injuries was minimal. Even now I can twist my ankle badly and walk away just fine.
When I broke my ACL the doctor was surprised I did not break my ankle too.
  • 9 10
 It's good to see all the orthopedist chiming in on a medical treatment, thanks also to the physical therapists for their input, gawd forbid I'd undertake a treatment without your input..
  • 9 3
 Today I learned that occasionally wearing a device to prevent ankle sprains actually makes my ankles weaker. LOL
  • 5 1
 @waldo-jpg: Actually that is true...to a degree. Just like people who do heavy lifting wear back braces. Only wear them when you need them, not for every little thing. You need to work your muscles to keep them strong. If the brace supports everything for too long, it just gets weaker.
  • 2 2
 @brokespokes37: never thought of that. Makes sense. i have some that I only wear on the one or two times a year that I ride the bike park. Just a preventative measure
  • 2 0
 @FranzMuhr: As I sit here recovering from ankle surgery, I agree.
  • 1 0
 I've got an old ankle injury that flared up recently after a weekend of uplifts. Bought an aircast a60, so I could wear it just walking around at the start without looking too goofy. Once I'd recovered a bit, wore it on the bike and it seemed to work pretty well. Not as robust as these, but not too expensive, pretty light, not too sweaty, and actually fitted inside my office shoes too!
  • 4 0
 Had a tib-fib ankle break a few years ago and wear a brace whenever I’m racing/riding bike parks/etc. I personally think that the trail riding, running, and other daily activities keeps the ankle plenty strong, but am super glad to have the extra support when things start getting gnarly. Call me crazy but I’d rather ride without knee pads than without an ankle brace
  • 1 1
 double
  • 2 1
 @waldo-jpg: the brace doesn’t weaken the joint, it’s cartilage & bone primarily. I’ve currently had 5 surgeries from 1 ankle break, 2 of those being a total ankle replacement then a partial revision of the replacement due to complications. If I can offer any advice to anyone who hasn’t had an injury yet, wear the brace because I wouldn’t wish the alternative on my worst enemy.
  • 2 0
 If you’ve got problem ankles, or even just a sprain, there is simply no better option for protecting your ankles than a brace like this.

If you’ve had even a slight sprain, a brace like this is ESSENTIAL to protecting the injured ankle from further trauma until it can heal. My ankle is so F’d that I need to wear mine every single time I ride, or risk worsening an already bad situation.

That being said, DonJoy has been making a brace like this for well over 15 years. Check Amazon.

Don’t bother with anything else. I’ve tried them all. Nothing else offers the stability, protection, flexibility, general comfort, and affordability.

I’ve been using one ever since a fancy sports doc told me there was nothing he could do for my ankle after multiple fractures, serious sprains, etc etc., short of an ankle replacement, which he said I’d best put off for as long as I possibly can.

That was when I was 30 yrs old. 43 yrs old now and the brace has saved my ankle more times than I could possibly count.

I’ve gone through probably 4 or 5 of them in over the last 13 years. Worth every single penny.
  • 4 2
 If you're wearing a brace but aren't doing ankle strength and stability exercises you're missing out on a hell of a lot of your body's own protective ability.
  • 3 1
 Both ankles twice plus knee. Always told to get it healed, rehab it and not wear a brace. The best brace is bracing from sport until its recovered. Thats hard but better in the long run. Thats 5 injuries with 5 different docs and 5 different physios. Ill work on that.
  • 4 0
 Just buy Space Brace, as the ones in this ad are knockoffs of the original. And do ankle strengthening as braces alone don’t do enough.
  • 3 0
 @waldo-jpg: as someone who dislocated their ankle, then started using braces, this is true, I spent a year in the braces, they allowed me to ride. But only PT and a lot of work made my ankles strong again. I know don’t where the braces unless I’m going very big.
  • 1 0
 @rp86: Too true!

I kept up with that stuff for a long while, then got lazy.

The brace has saved me from myself!
  • 1 0
 @nyhc00: curious, did you go to orthopedic dr or a podiatrist for these surgeries?
  • 3 0
 @5afety3rd: I figured that would be the case. I had torn ligaments and just decided to recover completely rather than wear any braces. Never had issues with weak ankles since then
  • 1 0
 @paski76: ortho, but I have seen a podiatrist. After having my ankle scoped for the 3rd time the post traumatic arthritis never settled down so was left with the choice to fuse it or the joint replacement.
  • 14 2
 Big foot ankle brace is so obviously a stolen design from Space Brace thespacebrace.com/shop/space-brace-2-0-ankle-brace - buy the original and best.
  • 1 0
 I found space brace to be bulky. Bought a few different ones off Amazon with the same design and found one that worked just as well but fit in the shoe better.
  • 1 0
 i agree. I have the space braces and these look identical.
  • 3 0
 and space brace is copied from tsg and tsg is copied from someone else. Nothing is new in this space, but every few years someone with a good marketing department brings these things up again
  • 4 0
 Any ankle brace you get at a medical supply place looks like this. Space Brace just marketed it to sports. Pretty sure mine was like $25 and looks exactly the same. Plus insurance covers it because it has removable plastic inserts that nobody uses, but are necessary to get it covered by insurance.
  • 3 0
 I have a pair of 661 ankle braces from around 2003 that look nearly identical to the space brace, with the laces and straps that wrap over, under, and then up the sides, and then one more around the top. Only difference I can see is the tongue on the space brace looks breathable. The 661 brace was certainly not the first to make this either. The new 661 braces are different and don't have straps for some reason.
  • 1 0
 I have a space brace and the lace at the bottom by your arch doesn't often go over top of the padding, it usually hits your arch bone directly and leads to discomfort. I'm sure many of the other options do the same thing but at a glance you can see that the space brace photos do exactly what I describe, while the bigfoot one looks like the laces are a hair higher up where they will go over the padding underneath. I like my space braces but that is one problem I've identified.
  • 8 0
 Because on ebikes grit sticking to your chain is less harmful... I understand, you need to have something ebike specific to sell to all those naive new customers but whe advertise it on an mtb site?
  • 5 0
 It reminds me of when I was in NZ a few years ago, went into a bike shop to buy some chain lube and the guy behind the counter asked me if it was for a hardtail or full suspension....
  • 1 1
 I actually did switch lubes for my ebike (though I agree ebike specific is marketing BS). Some of my ebike rides are much longer than my regular rides, the wax based lube would start to fail on me when I started to get around the 30 mile mark. Switched to a oil based lube for the ebike as my range was exceeding this on some rides.
  • 8 0
 Man, I don't mind ebikes. But there's no way that people, you know, want to use lube on them!?! Right?
  • 6 0
 Had me at elube..wtf..and as for drinking in the wilderness I always bring plenty of whiskey when than runs out litty iodine tabs work just fine
  • 2 0
 if you like iodine taste you nee help Big Grin
  • 6 0
 LifeStraw playing catch-up to the Katadyn BeFree. Good to see some options on the market now.
  • 2 0
 I wondered about kits like this for MTB packs. I have life-straws in my backcountry fishing pack. Some of the enduro races this year had no, few, or limited water stations. With it being so hot and humid this year, It’s always tough to gauge water needs for the backcountry enduro races. You don’t want to add yet another thing to your race kit essentials and up the carry weight during 22 mi. Of liaisons and gates.
  • 1 0
 @10DollarHelmet10DollarHead: My fiancé and I have two of the BeFree filters, 1liter and 3liter. We carry the 1 liter in our Osprey Savu 5 packs for long rides (over 30 miles) in Pisgah. We unscrew the filter just enough from the pouch to let the air out, roll it up tight to the filter, and screw it tight keeping the air out. I also carry it on two long races that I do each year (70+ miles) and feel that it doesn't take up that much space nor does it add any noticeable weight. It's fast to use!
  • 2 0
 @ZSchnei: great advice, I’ll look into it. Right I carry water and I know that does but scale in places like Slatyfork WV and Rothrock SF PA
  • 1 0
 @10DollarHelmet10DollarHead: My one piece of advice if you go with a Katadyn BeFree: If it's been sitting for a little bit you need to fill the filter and let it sit for an entire day and night before you use it. This will get the filter wet again and allow it to flow smoothly.
  • 4 0
 People will bash rev grips for their price as usual, but if you suffer from hand/wrist pain and have tried a few different grip thicknesses / etc no to avail, highly recommend rev.
  • 4 1
 E BIKE LUBE! @#£& off you’re just taking the piss now.

How about not falling into the marketing trap and if your really worried that your normal lube isn’t good enough go buy some motorcycle chain lube, you’ll probably save some money as well.
  • 1 0
 EBike lube = wet weather lube
  • 7 3
 Coincidentally, only 0.000001% of bacteria and 0.001% of parasites are lethal.
  • 26 1
 There's a spectrum between lethal and shitting through the eye of a needle...
  • 3 0
 But I get your point :-)
  • 1 0
 Tried lots of chain lubes. I just use Maxima chain wax. minimal greasy gunk build up, doesn't attract dirt, lasts a while, doesn't seem to drip off in the wet causing the dreaded micro drops of pollution and its $15 bucks for a 13oz can at Cycle gear. Pretty sure it has enough viscosity for my watt output or an ebike.
  • 1 0
 Broke my left hand from a nasty fall in a rock garden last year. Purchased the Rev Pro grips once I was healed up and have been very happy with them. Paired with a One Up bar, they have helped reduce most of the pain as a result of having two rods placed in the broken hand. Highly recommend!
  • 1 0
 Regarding the ankle brace product spotlighted above, as mentioned, this type of ankle stabilizer has been around already for years and for a lot less $$ than the "Bigfoot".

see: www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00TZTO0VM/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o05_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1
  • 1 0
 Me trying to yell over all the people talking about which shock absorbing grips they like:

(In the tune of those baseball team chants "Lets-Go-___-___)

"SENSUS- MEATY-PAWS, (clap, clap, Clap-Clap-Clap) SENSUS-MEATY- PAWS (clap, clap, Clap-Clap-Clap)

Anyway, Sensus Meaty Paws are THICC. Dual layers of rubber do a great job of killing the vibrations. Definitely not going to work for those with small hands though.
  • 1 0
 I've been using the Katadyn be free water filter. Just learned a good tip after the last ride when it took 5 minutes to squeeze half a bottle of water through it. It filters much better if you pre~hydrate the membrane before you need more water. When I got home it was flowing much easier.
  • 7 3
 They aren't charging enough for the #Ebike lube.
  • 2 0
 Rev grips are awesome. They actually make me think I have more traction because the ride is a touch smoother and I go faster.
  • 2 0
 ASO ankle brace is exactly the same as the bigfoot. Has been available in North America for 20 years for those that don't want to ship from Brexit
  • 2 1
 i wonder if having a helmet mounted right next to the spine in a hip pack is actually a BIGTIME health hazzard if case of a faall. I looks like it would tip the spine in half.
  • 1 0
 "The E-Bike lube sounds silly, but it has been specifically formulated for high chain torque" wonder if Van Der Poel uses this on his road bike seeing as normal lube isnt up to the job?
  • 1 0
 The RMU 5L Fanny pack looks durable and functional. Only problem is they want $19.00 just to ship it…24% additional funds is outrageous for a product that weighs nothing imo. Looks sweeet tho
  • 1 0
 Where are you shipping to? Sometimes the automatic rates can get funky.
  • 1 0
 Don't drop the $ on the "REV Pro Series Suspension Grips" did that and no bueno, stick with the "Oury lock-on" better grip od and damping.
  • 1 0
 Looking for comments on the RMU Hip-pack. Does it sit comfortably on you (especially for riders that have a little extra jiggle in their bellies on the DH)?
  • 3 0
 Kids these days are Viscous
  • 3 0
 “The enduro Fanny”
  • 1 0
 Is this like Festival Fanny?
  • 3 0
 @Tuna-Flapjack: It's like a normal fanny but with more squish.
  • 3 1
 @MrBaldwig: well played sir!
  • 1 0
 They should call the 5l endro fanny "The sweaty Betty', because as the song goes, "Sweaty Betty, she's got a huge .......
Sweaty Betty, you'd fit a bus inside her"
  • 1 0
 Maybe I need to try this brace… but the times I’ve warm these after a sprain, pedaling really sucked.
  • 1 0
 *worn something similar
  • 1 0
 So, instead of just buying an off-the-shelf brace, you can buy an overpriced one that does the same? Lol
  • 2 0
 RMU makes a solid ski - happy to ski them in biking
  • 2 0
 @J26z Thanks!
  • 3 1
 Helmet should be on placed on your cranium, not on your waist
  • 2 0
 Ankle braces changed my life.
  • 2 0
 $90 USD for a set of grips. YIKES.
  • 1 0
 Broped lube-for that bare minimum of pedal ratcheting you’re doing for the motor to put out 500 watts.
  • 2 1
 Can I use the ebike lube for my regular bike or is it a fashion faux pas? I'm looking for a little more viscosity.
  • 1 0
 I really wanted to like the Godfather's Garage dry lube but I just couldn't get it to work. Gonna stick with TriFlow.
  • 1 0
 I have read that LifeStraw can make toilet water drinkable. Has anyone here tested that claim?
  • 1 0
 Why would I need shock absorbing grips for my bike that has a shock up front and rear?
  • 3 1
 *Grabs the popcorn…
  • 2 1
 Ebike lube, ooooh matron
  • 2 0
 Its time for ews lube
  • 2 1
 Waiting for the hip pack that can hold a full face helmet
  • 1 0
 It is actually possible with the helmet sling, you can loop the clips through the full face and attach to the clips like a normal helmet. Not the best solution but it does work.
  • 1 0
 Or if you're willing to hide from the MTB fashion police then a convertible helmet's chin bar is much easier to handle
  • 4 6
 Makes sense to have ebike specific chain lube. When riding ebikes you are spending 100% of the ride time pedalling the bike.
Analogue riders seem to spend most of their ride time pushing their retro bikes uphill.
  • 1 0
 More like be ause ebikers grind their shifts under load be ause they forget the motors doing all the work
  • 1 0
 Frig off Bigfoot, it's SpaceBrace 2.0 of nothin'
  • 1 0
 ESI Super Chunky or nothin'!
  • 1 0
 I already have a water filtering pouch





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