Check Out: Storage Solutions, a Comfortable Cockpit & Lightweight Yet Aggressive Tires

Sep 30, 2021
by Henry Quinney  



A lot of gear comes across our desks here at Pinkbike. Check Out is an occasional round-up of items our editors have gotten their hands on recently. Sometimes it's products we're doing long-term tests on, other times it's stuff we're stoked on but don't have time to fully review. And once in a while it's crazy shit someone sent us unsolicited and we're having a laugh.



100% Aircraft S3 Sunglasses


Features

• Multiple colour & lens options
• Interchangeable lenses with clear lens included
• $185 USD
• Slightly softened look
• Light, vented and grippy
100percent.com

bigquotes100% made quite a splash a couple of years ago with their angular and bold Speedcraft sunglasses. Well, now the S2 and S3 versions keep a lot of what made that sunglass so great, while also potentially toning it down slightly when it comes to aesthetics. Now they’re merely “loud”, without any capitalisation.

I like the look of them, and they do seem to be noticeably more ergonomic than the previous generation. They not only provide a slightly gentler fit around the ear but also feel a lot lighter on your face.

A few grams here or there won’t make you ride any faster, but to say it doesn’t impact comfort would be untrue. The light feel of the S3's is a huge factor in their comfort and is one reason why I like riding them so much.

The 11% light transmission blue mirrored lens is okay for patchy light but, to be honest, on anything other than burnout-summer days I’m happy with the clear and the predictability that comes with it. As you can imagine, pretty much any imaginable colour configuration is available, as well as a new photochromic lens. Each set of glasses comes with two lenses - the original mirrored one and a spare clear one. The case comes with a spare slot should you ever buy an extra lens.

The grippy legs not only mean they don’t have to fit so tightly to your face to stay on but also help in securing the glasses in your helmet. These seem noticeably more secure and rattle less than the previous iteration.



OneUp Carbon Handlebar & Stem




Features

• 800mm Wide / 35mm Dia Bars
• Sweep 8° Back 5° Up Bars
• $139.50 & $79.50 USD
• 35 and 50mm Stem options
• 0° rise Stem
• Cuting and control alignment marks
• 0° rise Stem
oneupcomponents.com

bigquotesHow we measure handlebars isn’t as simple as you might think. Not only does something like a high amount of bar rise mean that you can run the same bar height without eating into your frame reach, but there are also other factors that can muddy the water.

The way we measure sweep is in relation to where the taper ends. This means that two bars that on paper have the same dimensions can put your hands in a different position or your wrists at a different angle. Handlebars are one of the few areas of the bike that I’m more conservative about. When it comes to frames, I love the weird and sometimes whacky geometry dimensions people will come up with. However, with bars I’m very much a bread-and-butter kind of guy.

I like the shape I know and love and don’t have too much interest in exploring outside that. Going between bikes a lot, I needed a bar that had dimensions I liked that I could take from bike to bike, so I decided to go for these bars from OneUp.

Yes, it’s carbon and yes OneUp make assurances of fatigue reduction. These claims may well hold water, and I definitely didn’t find them to be uncomfortable, but without back-to-back testing and isolating some parameters it’s hard to say exactly. One thing, however, I really enjoyed was the shape. These bars put my hands exactly where they want to be. The considerable 35mm rise and 0° rise stem also give me set up options aplenty.

Something I also like that perhaps is a benefit OneUp didn’t intend is the flat part of the bar, which I believe is there to help balance the properties of stiffness and flex, is an excellent place to rest my thumbs when I climb with the palm of my hands on my levers. Having that flatter section almost feels like a nook to nestle my inner digit onto for a bit more purchase.

In regards to the stem, what can I say? It’s stiff enough and, at 173g, light enough also. It looks clean and I think it represents good value. Again, I’m a little old school and find super-short stems can often struggle to deliver the feeling I’m after, so I chose the 50mm version, but there is a 35mm option too.

These bars have already been between multiple bikes and brake setups are fairing well. There is some small scarring to the alignment marks but, to be honest, I would have experienced far worse by now with some other models. All in all, I’m very happy to use this setup as a control when testing.



Pinner Pro ATC



Features

• Aggressive tire developed for World Cup racing, but in lighter ATC casing
• DTC dual tread rubber compound with the softer compound on side knobs
• $79.95
• 997g
• Tubeless ready 29x2.4” / 120 TPI
kendatire.com

bigquotesAs anyone who knows me will attest, if you bumped into me in the last six months the chances are I’ve chewed your ear off about tire inserts. During my two part insert group test they made a complete believer out of me. I’ve since altered what I look for in a tire slightly to not only get the most performance but to do so in conjunction with an insert.

The insert I use, the Rimpact Pro, is lightweight at around 160g. So, instead of going for heavier casings I’ve started seeking out sub-kilo tires for the sole intention of having their blind spot covered by the insert. So far, I’ve been really enjoying this and feel that, for me and my riding, it’s the best compromise.

I’ve just come off a set of Vittoria Martello 2.4” Trail casing tires and was curious for my next tire to be something that also wasn’t made by Maxxis, which is a brand I’ve frequently used over the entirety of the time I’ve been riding. I chose the ATC Pinner for a couple of reasons.

Firstly, I don’t care about rolling speed, I just want something that offers a lot of grip. Secondly, I quite like to run the same model front and rear so I can just rotate them as needed. And, finally, there was something about the Pinner that I’ve always found very interesting and wondered further whether that would help it be an excellent playmate candidate for my inserts.

The tread pattern doesn’t feature centre and side knobs that are offset from one another. Offsetting them is a good way to protect the rim and is something that I often look for before taking the enlightened path of the insert illuminati. Having them in rows, such as with the Pinner or maybe even some Specialized tires can give you huge quantities of braking traction as well as a very predictable feeling when going between the centre and side knobs.

When riding the Pinner one thing is very obvious - this tire is brilliant at transferring between the centre and edge knobs and is wonderfully consistent. It's not a dissimilar feeling to riding a shaped GS ski that's narrow underfoot, where going from edge to edge feels both immediate and controlled. Rolling speed is perfectly adequate for a tire this aggressive and it’s been a great tire to have on the currently dry and blown out trails of Squamish over summer.

The ATC casing uses a more simple dual tread compound configuration, where the side knobs are softer than the centre, instead of the dual-layer that you might find on Kenda’s downhill tires. The difference being that on the AGC gravity casing, the knobs have a harder rubber at the base of the knob and softer towards the top. I would be very curious to try the ATC casing with the layered compound. All in all, it’s a good tire. Since autumnal conditions have started to roll through, I’ve actually really started to enjoy this tire on your downcountry bikes. It’s light enough and the added security of an insert helps lighten the reliance on your damper to handle compression spikes. There have been multiple times where I’ve bottomed out front and rear and been very happy to have that security and the added 160g per insert seems ever more reasonable.

All in all I’ve really enjoyed riding the Pinner Pro. I would love to try the ATC casing in a slightly softer compound, though. It feels very predictable, is confidence-inspiring, yet doesn’t feel as soft or quite as tacky as some other brands.



Race Face Stash Quick Rip 1.5L Bag


Features

• 1.5L bag with external storage
• Wide and supported belt
• $57.00 USD
• Generously sized phone pocket
• Watter bottle or stash storage
raceface.ca

bigquotesThe Race Face Stash hip pack aims to offer a genuine alternative to the bulky and cumbersome hip backs that you may have seen. It’s sleek, it’s light and it’s very comfortable. It almost feels like the pockets you would find on a road jersey. It might not be able to take a bladder but that’s actually one of the reasons I like it. It can carry a bottle, or not - the stretchy water bottle carrier also handles a waterproof jacket very well.

All in all, I like it for its versatility. It can take a bottle, enough tools and, on particularly hot days, your knee pads strapped to the lower part of the pack. I know this might look a little kooky but on 1000m+ climbs in sweltering heat it doesn’t seem like a bad option, and that’s not even factoring in a pad like the Roam where you don’t have to remove your shoes. All in all, it makes a lot of sense to me.

The bag seems to be able to house all I need when riding. One side is dedicated for tools, keys and my mask. The other side is for Oreos and raisin bread. Funnily enough, each slice is accepted with mere millimeters to spare by the zip. I don’t take this as a coincidence.

In these rainy weeks, I’ve found one bottle to be enough so have stuff a rain jacket in the back and my gloves in the external mesh. However, it did occur to me that on high-elevation backcountry rides next summer this will be a great place to store bear spray. All in all, it feels like a SWAT setup for those that have neither a Specialized or a dremel and an afternoon free. I’ve got to say, I’m a big fan.



Race Face Roam Knee Pads



Features

• Easy on-off pads
• Plenty of protection for rowdy riding
• $129.00 USD
• Skid plate and D3O
• Breatheable back-mesh
raceface.ca

bigquotesFor some reason that I can’t quite explain, as bikes have got more capable and the trails I ride have got steeper, rougher and more technical, I’ve gone through the motions of running lighter and thinner knee pads. I wouldn’t say I’m going slower and although modern bikes may add some elements of security and reduce the risk of crashing, the fact that I’m riding rougher and faster trails means that when it does go wrong it can do so disastrously.

To buck this trend I’ve started running some Roam knee pads. Not only are they suitably burly with a skid plate but they also feature D3O padding. The fit is secure and robust. I don’t worry that this pad will move or be agitated under heavy load.

There is mesh on the back of the pad to help breathability but the main feature that might have you interested is the way you can remove the pad without having to slide it off over your foot. This sounds small and rather inconsequential but it is pretty useful - especially when you want to take them off on particularly hot days.





138 Comments

  • 57 0
 $5700 seems like a lot for a hip bag, but I’m still going to get one because I’ll drop dead if I don’t buy everything MTB related. I don’t have Outside+ next to my name.
  • 4 0
 It's now on sale for 99% off. ($57.00 - hurry before they're out of stock...oops, too late)
  • 40 0
 Are expensive riding glasses worth it or do they scratch the first time you wipe mud off them?
  • 20 29
flag saladdodger (Sep 30, 2021 at 8:07) (Below Threshold)
 I just don't know why they are so large... they cover most of the face... I preferred, when they looked like sunglasses
  • 4 0
 I just got the S3 this summer. I have worn them a lot, and I do take care of them try my best not to scratch them. But there are only micro scratches after months of adventures
  • 3 0
 If I lived somewhere with a lot of bush wacking and branches, I'd say maybe. I live in wide open desert and alpine forests, so I view them as being worth it. The Smith sunglasses I own really are a lot better optically and I don't have any distortion, so I feel like I get less eye fatigue.
  • 2 0
 @Grantma: I've been on mine for two seasons with the clear photochromic lenses and they've been the best glasses I've ever had. I try to take very good care of them, only wipe them with a special cloth, keep them in the case when not in use and be extra careful cleaning them when muddy. They've been worth the money.
  • 4 0
 I've had a few pairs of Julbos and now some Oakleys. Not really worth it to be honest, they tend to last about 2 years before they are quite scratched up even doing my best to keep them perfect. I did just discover that my Oakleys have a hydrophobic coating which is really impressive, I rode under a monsoon like shower the other week and could see perfectly clearly.

Mine are prescription, which is great, but I only got them as my health insurance covers them. Would be squinting through €10 plastic ones otherwise!
  • 2 1
 I use the Ryders Roam and after using various cheap options, nice glasses are so f*cking nice to use. The anti-fog is next level (can ride up without having to take them off), the anti-scratch is the real deal (used for two years now without any scratches), the photochromic properties are crazy... changes so fast and works so well and I find them to be so much clearer and useful than cheapies.

I end up not using glasses when I have cheap ones... because the scratch, fog like crazy, are uncomfortable and the vision through them is sometimes shit. My ryders stay on my face for the whole ride and I barely notice them so I get the protection I'm after.

So, in my experience, yes... worth every penny.

PS. Don't let your wife use them or you'll have to buy another set.
  • 1 0
 yes and no. Middle of the ground pricing makes sense to me because I scratch em over time. With the contacts I wear, I need good coverage or my eyes water like a MF. Much better performance with a quality pair, but no way I’m spending 200+ on bike glasses. buy cheaper Smiths but wait til you can find a discount.
  • 40 3
 In my opinion, expensive glasses are not worth it - and that's coming from someone who spends lavishly on my many expensive hobbies. Personally, I use $29 Rock Bros. photo chromatic sunglasses. They are durable, they don't really fog up, and the photo chromatic works well for bright sunny days or trails where you dip in and out of the woods. I have had a single pair for 3 seasons now, and have yet to think about them during a ride.

I've never understood how/why society tolerates such absurd pricing for eyewear. Oakley's and other glasses represent MAYBE $3-5 in materials and manufacturing costs, and are sold to us for $150-250. It's preposterous. A healthy portion of that margin is then used to create elaborate marketing presence to convince folks to spend that much on their products. These companies are essentially marketing organizations, that happen to transact sunglasses to keep the machine running.

Thank you for coming to my TedTalk.
  • 13 5
 $10 "Pit Vipers": bit.ly/3CYdq6y
$20 "POC Aspire": bit.ly/3F31QJb

I can't think of any reason to pay ~$200 for a pair of riding glasses. I'll get 10 pairs of a spot-on, functional knock-off for the same price. Thanks
  • 3 1
 They are worth it you have good quality scratch resistant lenses. I use Melon Alleycats with lenses by Zeiss and they are very scratch resistant since I haven't scratched them in a year of riding in the sun mud rain and crashing. Also really comfortable for extended periods of time.
  • 5 0
 @saladdodger: I'm probably 1 in a million, but I have AS and it affects my eyes. Couple that with iritis and any small breeze, bright flashes of light, or dust in my eye renders me with about 40% vision for days. Wearing goggles is tough because I'm not a total endurbro, so big ole glasses helps me a ton! They cut down on the wind hitting my eyes, different lenses help me to go from bright to tree cover (even yellow in low light), and provide more protection for dirt, rocks, or low hanging branches. I appreciate them, maybe sunglasses is a deep ball and they should change the name to sungaggles ...
  • 2 0
 You're thinking of Oakleys LOL
  • 3 0
 I've had my speedcraft for 2 seasons on the same lenses. Zero scratches. Just keep them in their bag and hard case when not in use and they do just fine.
  • 1 0
 It helps a lot for long descents in colder weather @saladdodger:
  • 1 0
 pit viper - not an issue
  • 14 0
 @KJP1230: You're close - but as someone who's done a bit of work in the industry, around $12/pair is the "delivered to the United States" price of most quality sunglasses.

So, you know, just like a 10-15x markup, not a 30x markup. Entirely reasonable.
  • 2 0
 @atourgates: Please tell me you're kidding
  • 1 0
 @saladdodger: They still make those.
  • 4 0
 @honda50r: He's not, a brand called luxottica has a monopoly on basically all high end glasses brands and can charge essentially whatever they want
  • 3 0
 @JDUBKC: looks like a salad bowl
  • 1 0
 I’m using eBay replicas at $25 (well that’s what I paid) with interchangeable lenses and I’m really impressed with them and the ventilation they offer, couldn’t be happier

www.ebay.co.uk/itm/100-Cycling-Glasses-Sports-Goggles-Dazzling-Windproof-Outdoor-Goggles-3-lenses-/353639886618?mkcid=16&mkevt=1&_trksid=p2349624.m46890.l49286&mkrid=710-127635-2958-0
  • 1 0
 Maybe someone can help me out. I've been wearing glass lens sunglasses for a few years now and when I try to wear plastic lenses I can see distortion at the edges that I never used to be able to pick up on. Am i stuck with this on all plastic lens glasses or am I just not spending enough? wouldn't dare wear glass lenses while riding. seems like thats asking for trouble.
  • 4 0
 @mca896: spend as much as your wife allows. Or just don’t tell her. This is the way.
  • 1 0
 They'll definitely scratch if you just wipe mud off. Wash the mud off first, then wipe.
  • 2 0
 @JDUBKC: Those are pretty awesome in a Cobra Commander kind of way!
  • 1 0
 @warmerdamj: Kind of gross, but I lick my clean if they get dirty mid ride. The tongue is a very efficient cleaner and, you know, vitamins and minerals
  • 1 0
 Zenni for prescriptions. Get the calipers out and measure a pair that you already own that you like.
Look for the frames that match those dimensions. Purchase a pair WITH prescription for $50.00-$60.00 Any tint you want....
  • 3 0
 @warmerdamj: "Wash the mud off first, then wipe." I use the same approach with my anus.
  • 1 0
 @MrkTrussell: Have you bought those exact ones? How is the quality?
  • 1 0
 @Mugen: All the Oakleys i have had, had the inside of the lense blister and flake after 2-3 years and thats been with their riding and "fashion" glasses.
  • 2 0
 @mca896: I've tried a few cheap sets of different designs. They aren't all created equal. Some are much more wrap-around style and I found they had much more distortion, but the models I got (knock offs of some "MTB" design I'm assuming) with a larger, flatter lens seemed to be pretty much fine. Not as clear/undistorted as my goggles, but not off-putting at all.

I'm another one who wears contacts so basically have to wear some form of eye protection. If I don't my eyes dry out super easily at speed. That said, my glasses and goggles have all saved me from no end of mud splatter, branch hits and flies so I can't imagine riding without them. I've had rides cut short by people who steadfastly refused to wear eye protection getting mud in their eyes that meant they had to stop and rinse their eyes out - just doesn't seem worth the risk and discomfort to me.
  • 1 0
 @minesatusker: Smith glasses don't seem to do that and if they do they are really good with warranty.
  • 1 0
 @stainerdome: What dressing would you like with that? Vinegar and oil slick, please.
  • 1 0
 @shltler: we are a modern couple, there is no allowing or disallowing of spending, only trying to anticipate what the reaction will be! You spent how much on a bicycle??
  • 11 0
 If you're going to review a waist pack you should show the main buckle and what measures are taken to prevent it from pinching.
  • 11 0
 I just strap my Roam knee pads over my handlebar for the climbs. No fanny pack needed.
  • 12 0
 I have RF ambush and do the same, I never knew I needed non slip-on knee pads until I got them.
  • 3 0
 Yep, been strapping my RF Ambush pads on my bar for the climb for the last 3-4 years as well. Works well, doesn't get in the way much at all and *much* cooler than having knee pads on the knees or "off" on the ankles.
  • 8 1
 I've also spent the last couple years testing various insert, rim and tire combinations and I've settled on Tannus Tubeless Armour, EXO+ casings and lighter alloy rims (I might actually go EXO up front). Have found with the light Tannus inserts I get all the benefits of a cushcore pro at a far lighter weight (maybe not quite as much support, but it's very close). The Tannus inserts also don't seem to be a wear item like cushcore that gets cut up and needs replacing after a season or season and a half. I've been on the Tannus inserts for a couple seasons now and after pulling them and cleaning them up a couple weeks ago, they look freaking brand new?!

I've found running an insert has allowed me to create a wheel set-up that is actually lighter than when I didn't use inserts. Prior to inserts I used heavier duty rims and a doubledown casing up front and DH in the rear. I am also enjoying the supple grip and feel from the EXO+ casing that you don't get out of a stiff and muted burly casing like DD or DH.

The one downside is that you still have to watch out for sidewall cuts... my local has a ton of steep gnarly chunky rock, but it's not very sharp, I've never really had to deal with very many sidewall cuts... so depending on your local terrain, your needs will vary.
  • 5 3
 Tannus is great for straight on hits, but absolute hot garbage for lower pressure sidewall support in corners compared to Cushcore. I went from cush to Tannus and within two weeks back to cush core. You can ride out on a flat with cushcore and the tire wont come off the rim in a corner but with tannus there is nothing adding proper sidewall support so if it's too low you will blast the tire right off like there was no insert at all.
  • 1 2
 @pandafoo: agreed. Rolled two tires off with tannus in high 20s psi
  • 2 0
 @pandafoo: agree and on having to replace them, just sold an e-bike with 5500km on it this season and cush cores were as new as the day i put them in, and i will also say the side wall support and low tire pressure i can run with cush core is why i run them, along with not having a flat in the three years i have been using them and 20,000km plus on my e-bikes
  • 1 0
 do you whip or do rotation on your bike? just curios how lighter rims hold that with insert's?

I ride EXO or analog from other brands, with no inserts on heavy duty rims - so far so good, no inserts, however would like to go lighter road
  • 3 1
 My current thinking is that sidewall inserts like Schwalbe's Super Gravity are the way to go, not inner inserts. It gives extraordinary stability to the tire, even at very low pressures, and the protection is exactly in the right place. Foam inserts don't really work, they give in, are not hard enough, and end up not doing what they're supposed to. Their only advantage in comparison with a sidewall insert might be their ability to ride with zero pressure.
  • 1 0
 @DavidGuerra: Every Schwalbe Super Gravity tire that I have used has been retired due to the sidewall tearing in line with and just above the rim. Stopped running them before inserts were very common, so I don't know if that would have saved them. Never thought that style construction added much of anything to impact protection though, which is the main function of inserts, with sidewall support being the secondary, and ride dampening being the third function.
  • 2 0
 @insertfunusername: weird. The super gravity casings before their current iteration where and are the real deal for me. I can ride them with low pressure and they protect the rim. No cuts or flats, burping whatsoever. Easy tubeless setup. And I don't really get were the weight advantage should be when an exo tire weighs in at 1000 to 1100g and the insert ist 150g? Old SG was 1200g and super trail which is essentially as heavy and burly as old SG is around 1200g too. So I.dont get the hassle with complicated setup and flimsy sidewalls. Why make things complicated?
  • 1 0
 @KalkhoffKiller: Add to that at least 50 extra grams of sealant per tire that are needed, with all that extra surface on the inside of the tire for it to adhere to, or even be absorbed into in many cases. No such problem with a sidewall insert, and it also gives you protection against side cuts. Tire manufacturers could make even stronger side inserts, with the weight that is saved from not running an inner insert, and the function would be better. That's my current thinking anyway, after moving from more lightweight tires with an inner insert to a SG tire with no inner insert. Really nice support, even with little pressure.
  • 1 0
 @KalkhoffKiller: I got bit a bunch of times with Schwalbe's failing and moved on. Maybe they are different now. I loved them when they would stay inflated, but had 2 SG casing Rock Razors cut open along the rim, then a snake skin Hans Dampf get a 2 inch side wall slash while riding on a paved road and another Snake skin NobbyNic get a huge slash through the tread and I was done. Oh yeah and I tried the weird fat Albert front that had zero traction when on the brakes, that thing was sketchy AF.
  • 1 0
 @insertfunusername: swalbe like condoms, good for 1 run.
  • 1 0
 @nickmalysh: In all fairness the second one I had was a RockRazor that lasted nearly a whole season on the back of my trail bike. It was great, and that was how I gave them a bunch more tries, when the nobby nic slashed through the tread, on the front of my short travel XCish bike was the last straw.
  • 1 0
 @insertfunusername: SG is probably the most pinch flat resistant apart from dh casings out there. Better than DD or Exo plus. I had some cuts with an Apex Hans Damps but that's a way lighter casing and I don't have that much experience with the evolution casings. But the ones I ride on my trailbike are still going strong. But they don't get abused as much as the tires on my Enduro.
  • 1 0
 @KalkhoffKiller: I haven't tried the more recent casings after having the 2 SG casings tear at the rim and then the 2 slices on Snakeskin casings, 1 on a paved road and 1 on a blue trail as a front tire.

The only other tire failure I have had, in the last 10 years, was internally tearing a Conti Protection Apex casing or maybe project... can't remember, it was the toughest casing they sold in the mountain king 2. It was torn enough that the wobble in the tire would rub the chainstay hard. I've seen maxxis tires do the same, but never experienced it myself. Never had a problem with my Maxxis, Vittoria, Kenda or Mitas tires that I have run during that same period, other than the very rare flat.
  • 1 0
 @KalkhoffKiller: Never ran anything but EXO from Maxxis, I prefer the suppleness of that casing, though I would give an EXO+ a try. Here in the PNW I think we can get away with less sidewall strength sense there aren't the same sort of slashy rocks that are in other regions. If I moved back to the southwest I would run DD casings.
  • 6 0
 Love my race face ambush pads that i had the last 5 years. The roam looks like an interesting alternative. Are there other good open back designs?
  • 2 0
 Oh, I meant: are there other good removable designs?
  • 3 0
 @btwo: I have a pair of Ion k pact zip and they are pretty good
  • 1 0
 @NoriDori: thanks! No durability issues with the zip?
  • 2 0
 @btwo: No (been using them for about 1 1/2 years) the zip is fine. But of course reckless treatment will show.
  • 1 0
 @btwo: ion K-Pact Zip are the best. G-Form E-Line pads also good. Both fit better than the RF Roams which have constrictive non-elastic piping at the top.
  • 1 0
 @btwo: I have the flanks, which are more full leg coverage but similarly soft-shelled D3O, and they are also removable, and strap onto my lumbar pack easily for long forest road climbs. Love them - no thigh gap either.
  • 1 0
 @erikkellison: I have the e lines and like them a lot. These are interesting though
  • 6 0
 Is it just me or does the Fanny pack trying to be a backpack look straight up awful. All you missing is a bunch of rope over your shoulder to complete the look.
  • 3 0
 Been having hand problems. ( Carpal tunnel , trigger finger) . One up is the best fatigue reduction bar I’ve had so far. They make everything about my ride better. Some day we’ll have active electronic resonance reduction bars. Until then , these are it.
  • 1 0
 I also had some hand issues, some of my finger joints were staying inflamed all the time, that were solved by using OneUp bars as well as Rev Grips.
  • 1 0
 Same here, though I’m trying a titanium bar. Definitely less numbness
  • 1 0
 good to know!
  • 1 0
 They are Sweet! I just wish they would make an even taller rise bar!!! As they point out it allows higher grips without eating into your reach and since I like to mess with Mullet set ups taller bars are nice to have... And yes I have gone back to 31.8 Aluminum to get taller bars and found them much stiffer then One Up carbon 35.0... Currently using new Renthal 40mm rise on one bike and they are better then they used to be. But still wish I had taller One Up's... 45mm or 50mm would be amazing!!
  • 1 0
 @stiingya: just curious... how tall are you? and whats the center of your front axle to to the outside of your handlebar measure?
  • 1 0
 @whitebullit: 6'2" but no idea the measurement your asking for. I look at stack, reach, effective, cockpit, bar drop, and seat top to BB. Might be interesting to measure what your asking just to check. and compare between bikes...
  • 1 0
 @stiingya: thats what i use it for, 85 centimeters axle to outside grips my sweet spot, easy to set up future bikes
  • 1 0
 @whitebullit: Don't you end up with the issue that your bars could be low and have a short stem OR could be higher with a longer stem and you would still have the same 85cm measurement but the bike would handle and fit totally different?
  • 2 0
 The Race Face Stash is a good hip pack for small to medium length rides.

Pros
- Compact and light
- Slim profile keeps stuff close to the body
- Water bottle in center for good weight distribution (don't notice it much when riding)
- Enough room for a cell phone, tools, keys, tube/CO2, even a small mini-pump
- Hanging gear straps can be stowed out of the way when not carrying pads
- Comfy, wide stretchy waist band
- Cool RF logos keep mom from borrowing it for mall walks

Cons
- Water bottle in center makes it slightly difficult to reach, impossible to put back unless a contortionist
- Tall water bottles wag a bit when full on large hits
- Waist band elastic will probably stretch out in 4-5 years?
  • 1 0
 I'm all for the bulkier knee pad that is removable w.o pulling shoes. Drop um around your ankles, hook um to bars or pack too and go. The protection factor is way better than something like a g-form with minimal difference in discomfort.
  • 1 1
 www.bicyclevillage.com/product/fox-racing-launch-knee-shin-pads-53066-1.htm
www.revzilla.com/dirt-bike/fox-racing-titan-race-kneeshin-guards?sku_id=904261

It's hilarious how expensive MTB stuff is when MX stuff offers better prices for technology that's been out for a long time.
  • 1 0
 "Not only does something like a high amount of bar rise mean that you can run the same bar height without eating into your frame reach"

Does it not eat into frame reach though? There's been a few interesting discussions elsewhere about this that have raised the point that running higher rise bars reduces frame reach just as much as running more stem stackers to put your grips at the same height. From what I understand, that means running higher rise bars does preserve the total horizontal distance between bottom bracket and grips, but it does so by shifting some of that distance from frame reach to effective stem length: the grips are further in front of the steering axis. That is, in terms of handling, higher rise bars will do the same thing as adding stem stackers and a longer stem. What's important is the relationship in space between your grips, the steering axis, and the bb. How that relationship is constructed---what combination of bars, stem, and stackers---doesn't matter in terms of handling.
  • 1 0
 Yes.... but no one is willing to run a longer than fashionable stem length. So the original statement is valid.
  • 1 0
 Stacking spacers beneath the stem reduces reach because of the angle of the steerer tube. As the stem gets higher it's moving backwards and so your grips are higher, but moved back. A taller rise bar is moving the grips purely vertical and doesn't reduce your reach.
  • 1 0
 @stiingya: Isn't frame reach the horizontal measurement from the centre of steering axis to the centre of the BB though? i.e. not including the distance the stem adds from the steerer to the grips. I'm not sure I've seen a common name used in MTB for the total horizontal distance from grips to the BB.

So a taller riser bar does (largely) move the bars vertically, but the horizontal distance from grips to BB is then comprised of less frame reach and more effective stem length, right?
  • 1 0
 @danprisk: reach is bb to center of steerer tube, effective reach is bb to grips and admitidy ive said "reach" in our back and forth without typing out the word effective behind it sometimes, but considering our discussion was on taller bars, spacers and longer stems I thought we were on the same page with that. My bad if that wasn't so...
  • 1 0
 I have always wanted that DH rubber compound with a lighter casing, especially in the winter on the front of my bike. Am I the only one?

EXO, or EXO+ strength casing with some DH rubber would be a perfect winter wet weather tire on the front and maybe even the back, if you are okay with some quicker wear.
  • 2 0
 Maxxis makes a EXO casing DHF with MaxxGrip 3C
  • 1 0
 @Kiowa008: that is a pretty good one, but not the best winter tread pattern. I run that as a summer tire, just wish they made the Assegai and Shorty in the EXO MaxxGrip combo. They do the Assegai in EXO+ and MaxxGrip, and that is a good option.
  • 1 0
 I have the roam knee pads. They chafe the back of my knees. While the protection seems good the comfort prevents me from using them. A pad with neoprene like material would be a lot better IMO. Definitely a regretted purchase.
  • 1 0
 Are the 100% polarized? seems like a lot to pay if they are not. Although I have not tried out non polarized glasses to see if it really makes a difference, or am I just sucked by the marketing. I get fairly good use out of glasses and ride quite a bit. Now I just need to find a clear goggle that won't fog like crazy in the PNW colder wet part of year
  • 1 0
 „ Not only does something like a high amount of bar rise mean that you can run the same bar height without eating into your frame reach“ - and here we go with the same myth again. If you high rise bars does not eat into reach then this simply means you are virtually riding a long stem.
  • 1 0
 ?? Got a way to show/demonstrate that?

A longer stem with no other change raises your bars/grips while increasing effective reach. Just using taller bars raises your bar/grip height and is not changing your reach or effective reach.
  • 1 0
 @stiingya: It depends how you roll those high rise bars. If the rise is parallel to the fork, then your virtual stem length stays the same, but it reduces reach to the grip. If the the rise is vertical then your reach stays the same, but virtual stem length increases. You can get to exactly the same place for your hands by adding spacers and using a longer stem with a low rise bar.
  • 1 0
 @cru-jones: Bar roll is independent; switch from 20mm rise bar to 40m rise bar at the same roll and you've moved your grips up 20mm with no effect on reach. No myth there?

Now I agree that you can combine spacers with a longer stem and "may" be able to get taller grips without any effect on reach. But it depends on HTA, stem lengths, spacers used and the amount of extra steerer tube you have to adjust with.

But the first change is no more a "virtual stem" then the second method is a "virtual high rise bar"? Smile
  • 1 0
 @stiingya: depends what no roll means. Actually with a lot of riser bars, if you check the center marking, neutral roll means the rise is parallel to the fork.
  • 1 0
 @cru-jones: My understanding is that no roll means the grips are parallel to the ground. As far as the markings, the bar doesn't know if it's going to be mounted on a 70* HTA or a 62* HTA so I don't know how it could be set up to be parallel to the fork? And what are the markings being lined up with to create that consistancy?

I do concede that most mountain bikers probably do have a slight roll even when they are trying to set them up level which does effect reach slightly. So if your bar roll has a slight increase in reach with your bars at 20mm and you retain that same roll at 40mm you would slightly increase your slightly increased reach! Smile BUT roll is still independent and so the bar rise in itself is not causing any change in reach.
  • 1 0
 @stiingya: If you roll the bars so the grips are parallel to the ground then on almost any bar the rise of the bar is not vertical but going backwards, reducing reach. If you do the same with a handlebar with less rise then this amount of rise that goes backwards is less, essentially having more reach. But most riders will roll the bars forward a bit more, so reach to the grips stays the same or is increased. Reach to your grips is not independent from roll or rise, both have influence.
  • 1 0
 @cru-jones: Disagree, I do not know of any bars that change sweep when they change rise? It's vertical rise and the back sweep and up sweep are normally the same for a particular bar. The taller bar does not come back further, it's just taller.

I already conceded that most of us do have a little roll. And I said that roll angle if retained on a taller bar would SLIGHTLY increase whatever reach change you already started with. But it's very small AND...

yet again... the roll is independent of the rise. So the taller bar is not changing the reach, it's how they are installed. They don't jump on your bike and install themselves... They don't know what HTA or stem they are going to be installed with, so by themselves they are not adding anything but RISE... Smile
  • 1 0
 @stiingya: I am close to giving up, but one last try to explain it. If you go up without decreasing reach then you go further away from the steering axis, hence having the same effect as a longer stem with spacers. If you go up without increasing the distance to the steering axis you are reducing reach. A riser bar cannot magically get around this simple geometrical fact.
  • 1 0
 @cru-jones: Not claiming there isn't a change in steering axis, I'm saying reach doesn't automatically change with a higher bar. Reach is a horizontal measurement, the bar and stem create an effective reach change in the first place. But because the bar roll is independent you can install a taller bar without changing reach if that is your intent.

You may also be able to create that same change with spacers and a longer stem. But that requires that you have enough steerer tube to play with and you may or may not be able to replicate exactly the same change as you can with a higher bar. You can't magically get around those geometrical facts either? (OK admittedly you could get a custom stem and put your 20mm bars exactly where 40mm riser bars would be! But why would you do that? Smile )

But the end result would be the same change in steering axis. So I don't get what your arguing about. Spacers and a longer stem don't do something better then a taller bar? A taller bar may not do anything better then spacers and a longer stem but save a little weight?

But no "myth" to bust here that I'm seeing??
  • 1 0
 @stiingya: the "myth" I see implied so often (often more implicit than here) is that with a high rise bar you get the golden combination of high stack, short stem and uncompromised reach.
  • 1 0
 @cru-jones: you repeating that its a myth doesn't make it one...???

Measure your effective reach, install a taller rise bar and adjust the roll so you have the same effective reach you started with... BAM! Myth busted...
  • 5 1
 The final review is just padding out the article.
  • 2 0
 Being able to remove my RF Ambush pads without taking my shoes off has been a game changer. But they’re a bit chunky for what I ride nowadays. These Roams look like great.
  • 1 0
 The roams are identical to the ambush, just with a hard plastic cap over it all
  • 1 0
 You mean like the $35 Fox knee and pads?
  • 1 2
 Unless you hard lacing clipless shoue, it is not and issue to take flat pedal five ten, never ever unlace them
  • 1 0
 @nickmalysh: not so much fun to do in the pissing rain we tend to have here in the UK. And I tend to lace my 5Tens up so they don’t fall off (have to size up due to wide feet and no one making foot shaped shoes)
  • 1 0
 I like the concept of light tyre and light rim insert, however majority of tires within 1 kg still, unless we are talking about 27,5 maxxis

Kenda/Vitoria/Michelin/WTB all others weight over 1 kg within non DH casing
  • 1 0
 I've been experimenting with a 29x2.4 Maxxis Rekon Exo for a fast rolling rear. The tire is 840g alone, and with a tannus insert is still 200g lighter than the Minon SS DH it replaced. So far I'm really impressed. Without an insert, no way.
  • 4 0
 $130 for knee pads. Fuuuuuck off.
  • 2 0
 Oakleys are great as long as you take decent care of them. Iv had mine for two years and they only have a tiny scratch.
  • 3 0
 I'm more into xc tyres but with DD casing
  • 1 0
 Is it just me or does the pinner tire look like a tire from a 90's rigid mtb that someone just pulled out of the shed for the first time in 20+ years?
  • 2 0
 time for a glasses roundup. just not from henry
  • 1 0
 Transition make no glasses, or ?
And Henry has a interesting pair already, everything looks like a Spire through them Smile
  • 2 0
 But where are the tires for my 26"???? :/
  • 3 0
 they are in transit from 2002, so expect some delays.
  • 1 0
 I've been using the Race Face Roam knee pads for about a year now and I love them. Just ordered my second pair in Tan :-D
  • 8 9
 Why why why why why are we still making knee pads that don’t have coverage up to your pants. The look of a knee pad gap is so kooky I hate it. Just make the damn thigh sleeve higher!!
  • 7 0
 the extra length, for some, means extra warmth, which I wouldn't mind in winter, but in sumemr i want my pads to take up as small a footprint as possible on my leg. If you dont like the gap wear 3/4 length undershorts or get 3/4 shorts
  • 6 0
 Longer shorts if you dont like it?
  • 1 0
 I use raceface ambushes, which are pretty much identical but just d30, no skid plate, and the top of them sits on the bottom of my liner. So maybe it's just the liner that's the issue, not the pads. For reference I use an endura liner.
  • 1 0
 Troy Lee Speed Knee pads have just enough length above the knee that with good-fitting knee-length shorts you don't see a gap. But you could be in danger of showing a little skin if they slip
  • 4 0
 Stop wearing such short shorts. It’s weird to think that knee pads need to grow to prevent a gap caused by weirdly short shorts.
  • 1 0
 The IXS daggers for instance, have protection that extends above the knee, which has helped me a lot in impacts against the handlebar for instance. 7idp Sam Hill and others have a sleeve that extends upwards. But usually, if there is leg showing above the knee, I blame the shorts, not the pads.
  • 1 0
 those knee pads are a pretty good idea.i hate putting mine on. total PITA must be why i hardly ever wear them.
  • 2 0
 I've been running raceface ambushes for nearly 10 years, the original pair are still going strong. And yes, the open back design is amazing, you can throw them on in literally 30 seconds and drop them off in half of that. If it's warm ill take them off between runs.
  • 3 1
 Do people really hold their sunglasses on their helmet?
  • 3 0
 Yes. A ton of people. My riding buddy primarily holds his glasses with his helmet. I don't know why he brings them.
  • 1 0
 Yep. Always have. On a long climb I'll take them off and stick the arms in the helmet vents.
Where else am I going to put them?
  • 2 1
 I’m out of the loop, where is the “top 10 shaped GS skis that are narrow underfoot” article
  • 1 0
 Nice to see RaceFace have worked out the correct way around to mount velcro!
  • 1 0
 the one storage pack that has it all
  • 2 0
 Looks like a Sutro
  • 1 0
 Is tragus piercing a requirement?
  • 1 0
 100% ..hands down..best glasses I've owned...best pricepoint!Smile
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