Colorado-Based Myth Cycles Releases the Zodiac: A US Made Steel, Single-Pivot, Full Suspension 29er

Jan 18, 2021
by Alicia Leggett  
Zodiac Myth

Eric Tomczak grew up in Durango, CO, surrounded by mountain bike culture. The one-man bike company describes himself as "detail-oriented to a fault," and said he feels both younger and older than his actual age of 32: "Like, I'm starting to lose my hair but I still send my friends dumb memes." Five years ago, when he wanted a mountain tandem to ride with his wife, he looked around and didn't see what he wanted. A professional TIG welder, he decided to make it himself. Once he started building, he didn't stop, and Myth Cycles was born with the goal of making high-quality, steel adventure bikes. Since his early frame-building days, Eric has dreamt of making a full suspension bike, and in 2020, he realized that dream with the Zodiac.

Zodiac Myth
The most recent Zodiac prototype. Until this week, the Zodiac was known only as Project Z.

The full suspension idea moved into action about a year and a half ago, when Eric's friend Anthony Diaz talked him into it. Diaz runs a suspension tuning company, and the pair spent countless hours discussing how Eric could focus on the right parameters to create exactly the bike he wanted. Part of the inspiration came from handmade, steel, full suspension bikes he saw released in the UK, examples of the type of workmanship he wanted to bring to the U.S. handmade bike market.

Zodiac Myth
Intended use: Trail, all-mountain. Long days in big mountains.
Wheel size: 29"
Travel: 140 mm rear/150 mm front
Seat angle: 76 degrees
Head angle: 65 degrees
Reach: 482 mm
Front center: 824 mm
Chainstays: 444 mm
BB drop: 20 mm
Note that swapping out the shock mount plates to the "low" position lowers the rear end by 12 mm, making the bike about half a degree slacker and effectively lowering the BB by 8 mm.

Eric chose to work with steel both because of its ride qualities and because it's his favorite material to work with. He explained that the way steel flexes is very controlled, resulting in a bike that rides "like a dream," and it's durable and repairable. He believes these characteristics are responsible for steel's continued presence in the bike industry, even as most major companies make bikes only out of aluminum and carbon. "On a personal note: Every metal is totally different to work with, and steel is my favorite," he said. "Knowing a material is like knowing a language, and steel is the language in which I can express my ideas the best."

The whole project was a series of puzzles to solve, like sourcing quality steel tubing as well as facing the inherent costs of making a small number of frames by hand and the vast amount of labor it would take to scale production up. Another challenge was fitting all the design features he wanted into one design package. "I have a very specific idea of how I want every piece of the design to work, and the challenge at the end is making all those criteria come together into one frame," Eric explained. "And all the little things, like dust caps for bearings. There's a million decisions to be made, and none can be left out."

The process starts in CAD. Eric likes to have the design essentially finished before he even steps into the shop, though sometimes it can be nice to work out small details in the physical world. After designing the bike, he gathers the materials -- tubing, dropouts, head badge, braze-ons, bearings, lathe stock, and laser cut parts -- cleans everything, and marks the tubes for mitering. He has three milling machines, and each has a specific set of tasks. Once all the prep is done, he sets up the welding jig, miters the tubes, applies the laser-cut parts, welds it together, and does all the finish work, with countless nuanced steps along the way. It's an involved process, Eric said, but it makes more sense as he continues to figure out his systems.

Zodiac Myth
The final Zodiac will only have slight differences from this second prototype.
Zodiac Myth
Clean welds and a nice powder coat.

bigquotesI think a lot of different riders would have a place in their quiver for this rig. The whole time I've been working on it, I think of my favorite place to ride; the Colorado Trail. Lots of technical, big downhills, steep climbing, and most importantly; long all day outings. A lot of us who live and breath bikes feel somewhat defined by the bikes we ride. If a bespoke American made frame born in the mountains of Colorado speaks to you, maybe it's designed for you.Eric Tomczak

Zodiac Myth
Zodiac Myth
The original Zodiac. Like any new product, the Zodiac has evolved and become more refined as it has approached its final design. Before eventually adding a powder coat, Eric left the steel raw while he test-rode the bike and added incremental amounts of bracing to the swingarm between each ride.

Eric's three guiding principles in designing the Zodiac:
Simple: The lowest ratio of “care and feeding” to hours shredding.
Durable: The Zodiac is meant to be ridden for years to come.
Works: We didn’t assume that a simple full suspension is simple to design. Every detail has been painstakingly worked over until there are no compromises.

Eric said the ride quality is what he's most proud of in the Zodiac, but that pride is rivaled by his satisfaction with how it looks. He doesn't consider himself an artistic person, he said, but he loves when he can find aesthetically-pleasing solutions to mechanical problems.

Zodiac Myth
Zodiac Myth
The second prototype features aluminum plates at the shock mount that can be swapped out to adjust geometry.
Zodiac Myth
Zodiac Myth
The first prototype looks nice and polished with its new powder coat.

Zodiac Myth
The bike begs to be ridden in Sedona, partly because of its suitability for the terrain and partly because of the whimsical, whirlpool-esque headbadge.

When asked how the bike had changed between the two prototypes, Eric said the geometry had remained more or less the same, but his execution of a few points, like how he tied the bike together at the pivot bearings and how he made the forward shock mount, had evolved countless times since the bike's initial design.

bigquotesIt's like, if you draw a bunch of pictures of a dinosaur, the last picture is still a dinosaur, it just looks better.Eric Tomczak

Zodiac Myth

The first small run of frames is scheduled to be ready at the end of May and will sell for $2,599 USD, with options for complete bike builds as well. It will initially be available in sizes S, M, and L, with XL and XXL frames on the horizon. Eric said that one of his favorite things to work on is streamlining the manufacturing process to make production increasingly efficient, accurate, and repeatable. He anticipates spending the next six months fine-tuning the details until he feels he's solved the puzzle.


202 Comments

  • 289 3
 I’m gonna need to learn some British language so I can praise this bike in the proper way.

Quite chuffed about buying one of these with my money pounds! Can’t wait to throw it in my lorry and get my trousers dirty on this before heading to the pub for a pint. Cheers!

Is that good?
  • 34 0
 Smashing!
  • 76 1
 Username really sets this comment apart.
  • 60 0
 Truck....your truck is our pick-up. A lorry is a big rig. Otherwise smashing old boy.
  • 37 0
 Gotta go with the cockney rhyming slang. I couldn't think if too many legit examples, i've made up most of my own:

That's a lovely looking Private to drop some sausage and mash on. I like that they've made it out if electric too. Seat looks like it would be easy on your Jacobs. I'll turn up the Ronan, pop the Sebastian on and make myself a Bruce while i have a butchers at the rest of the pictures. Doubt we'll see it on the Liza smashing the world cup, but it'd be fun to ride to the battle. Or the nuclear, as you say above.

Private - Private Pike = Bike
Sausage and mash - Cash
Electric - Electric eel = Steel
Jacobs - Jacobs Crackers = Knackers
Ronan - Ronan Keating = Heating
Sebastian - Sebastian Vetel = Kettle
Bruce - Bruce Lee = Tea
Butchers - Butcher's hook - Look
Liza - Liza Minelli = Telly
Battle - Battlecruiser = Boozer
Nuclear - Nuclear sub = Pub
  • 3 1
 Good show, 'ol chap!
  • 3 0
 And anyone who knows RickyBobby18 also knows he can ride.
  • 1 0
 Username checks out!
  • 1 0
 Cool
  • 3 5
 You use truck now? Thought it was ute
  • 3 0
 Did pick-up ever used to be Cabbie?
SA slang influenced by uk
  • 3 0
 @DidNotSendIt: what are you doing?
  • 1 0
 So close. "Down the pub" would be ultra-authentic.
  • 2 0
 Frame weight? Curious how close it is to the aluminum frames in this category, several of which weigh around 8 pounds with shock.
  • 3 0
 @makripper: Ute in Australia & NZ. Pick up in UK :-)
  • 1 0
 @notsofastoverfifty: yeah ute definitely in aus n nz. Cheers
  • 1 0
 @DidNotSendIt: don't be a berk (Berkeley Hunt - ...)
  • 3 0
 Couple of suggested edits:

Mate, I’m well chuffed getting one of these with my readies (haven’t told the trouble and strife yet)! Can’t wait to throw it in the van - it weighs a farkin tonne, I ain’t gonna pedal the bastard - and get my trousers dirty before a couple of pints down the pub. Cheers big ears!
  • 5 0
 @DidNotSendIt: You've given your self away there. No self respecting Brit would say sausage and mash. Always Bangers and Mash.
  • 18 1
 Thats english as in "england" english. it would be said differently in scottish, welsh and irish Smile

scottish (weegie slang) would be...

"well chuffed wae ma purchase, cost a couple of quid. Cannae wait to chuck in in the motor, get it up the wids and get pure manky. After that am heading up the park for a bottle ae bucky"
  • 4 0
 @christoginger: not sure why but my brain defaulted to spud from trainspotting.
  • 2 0
 @danp63: Well, for my locale, i'd probably just shorten the whole thing to "Tidy mun".
  • 2 0
 Oii bloody good impression bruv. Quite a blimey lookin bike innit?
  • 3 0
 @DidNotSendIt: "having a butchers" is an actual real British saying for having a look at something. I don't know if you knew that or it's just coincidence

idioms.thefreedictionary.com/have+a+butcher%27s#:~:text=have%2Ftake%20a%20%CB%88butcher's,hook%20stands%20for%20'look'.
  • 1 0
 @mattg95: Yeah i knew butchers. So.e of them were from the Rory Breaker bit in Lock Stock. I quite enjoy indulging in 'mockney' and making up random ones to throw into conversation. Asking the missues to turn on the Ronan (Keating) was particularly satisfying.

I wonder what the WC commentary would be like if they chucked Danny Dyer in with Warner and Claudio? Presumably Rob has to start every sentance with "This muppet..." instead of "This man..."
  • 1 1
 @makripper: That's Aussies not Brits.Sheesh.
  • 89 9
 You can tell who the true mountain bike wankers are in the comments. Wahhhhh it has spacers on the stem . Jesus.. not everything is a fashion show for you and your weiner mtb friends.
  • 29 6
 You must be a true mountain biker, right?
  • 10 3
 @m33pm33p I totally agree! And still couldn't look at it and not cringe. Damn you, fashion!!! :-D
  • 3 1
 This made me laugh like hell! So true!
  • 12 4
 I cringed but not about the looks. When things go wrong and I go OTB or have a massive head bobble, I don't want Captain Stabby up front turning my mild injury into a major injury.
  • 4 1
 ...and I realise this isn't the final set-up for this bike (as mentioned in the comments), but I'd never run mine like that.
  • 16 0
 Exactly... all that shit is purely personal preferences and it's a fucking prototype people!!! He probably has a shit ton of spacers so that he can easily adjust on the fly and get a feel for how his changes affect the ride at various stacks, etc, etc, etc...
  • 1 0
 This guy’s good!
  • 10 9
 You can tell who the wannabe gatekeepers are by who's making comments judging other people's commitment to mountain biking based on their pinkbike comments.
  • 14 0
 You should see the comments on the Yoann/GG article posted today. The complaints about GG branding and the bike model names is hilarious. Everyone knows the stickers and name of the bike is what really affects how well it rides. Wink

Bike looks nice and made here in CO. Love it!
  • 5 1
 Looks like they borrowed the fork for the photoshoot and had to return it as is.
  • 4 0
 @JackStephen: I was thinking the same. No shame in that. Bike looks sick, and perhaps the frame is unsold inventory in which case the fork might not be married to that bike.
  • 1 0
 @iamamodel: captain stabby, lmaoooooo i love it
  • 50 3
 The bike looks great! The flat bar bothered me tho.
  • 11 3
 Agree, wondering about seat tube insertion and the mad stack of spacers on top of that stem.
  • 17 5
 I thought the same thing. Bike looks rad, and I'm all for supporting CO based small businesses, but the decision to photograph it with a flat bar and a shitload of spacers above the stem is very strange.
  • 8 6
 Flat bars are great for 29". I found cockpit heaven with the flat bar + 30mm stem recipe. It's really got something special about it, and gives a better attack angle and control of the front than anything else. The one I currently have on my enduro bike actually has less rise than the one here, and forces me to run it with a few spacers so the shifter doesn't touch the frame.
  • 12 18
flag shralping-the-cube (Jan 18, 2021 at 12:04) (Below Threshold)
 @DavidGuerra: disagree, and don't see what a flatbar has to do with wheel size. Not that my experience is universal, but I run a high rise bar. feels way better, and IMO looks way better.
  • 10 2
 @shralping-the-cube: No? That's pretty obvious. Bigger wheel means a higher cockpit position, a lower rise bar brings it back down. My liking for flat bars is pretty niche, yes, and it was good to see a cockpit in the same fashion here. They're not easy to find, I probably own 2/3 of all 800+ mm flat bar models ever released. An 810mm Answer Pro Taper and an 810mm Funn Fatboy. I think I saw another one on ebay once, from some obscure brand.
  • 33 1
 @Rigidjunkie: I think the article says its a prototype frame. I'm sure keeping the fork uncut with a flat bar allows them to experiment with some different stack heights or allow different test riders to adjust how they like.
  • 17 1
 Btw I think bars, stems, spacers is all just about finding a good position on the bike. Noone said there has to be flat bars on XC bikes only nor 40mm on DH only. Get what feels good for you! Dont talk shit about others just because they have different taste or fit.
  • 3 1
 @shralping-the-cube: I run 29” and a near on flat bar. Keeps the weight over the front more with the higher head tube height and makes for better grip and cornering.
  • 1 1
 The flat bars and running rear Shimano and front sram brakes. Huh?
  • 1 0
 Don’t let it
  • 2 0
 @Jaydenc: well spotted. That must be weird ,.. different bite points, different feel.

I mean it may work for someone, on cars (performance cars) the bias front/rear on brakes is super important. So playing with some of this may be super interesting.
Does anyone here actually run some strange brakes combo?
  • 6 1
 @shralping-the-cube: It has everything to do with bike fit, and nothing to do with how a bike looks. A guy who designed and build his own bike clearly has put more thought into this that you did when you picked your last bike/handlebar combo.

29" wheels are tall, long travel forks are tall, big tires are tall. That all adds up (and then bike geo has an effect too!), and the best bike fit doesn't mean 'oh I've always run 1.5" rise bars, that's what I'll run here'.

Bike fit > bike looks.
  • 3 7
flag shralping-the-cube (Jan 18, 2021 at 16:08) (Below Threshold)
 @nouseforaname: I bought my cockpit based on how it fit me. it happened to also look rad. Also, the point here is that the dude is posting a bike for publicity for his new company, so it's a weird choice to photograph it looking unfinished with the huge stack of spacers, etc. Thanks for mansplaining at me, though.
  • 1 0
 @Spiral23: I use a magura MT5 front and a Shagura XT lever, MT5 caliper rear, I use Kool Stop pads and XT Ice Tech rotors. The bite point is pretty similar front and rear the rear has a little more modulation with a little more power front. I initially ran it that way to compare the feel and then set the bike up full Shagura and then went back to the MT5 master up front.
  • 1 0
 @shralping-the-cube: usually, @steeper terrain =higher rise. Usually bikes with taller stack heights =flat bars sla older wrecker for ex
  • 1 0
 @Spiral23: I'm a cheap f*ck and have broken some brakes, so I ran:
a: Hope Mono6 front, Shimano SLX (2015) rear
b: Avid Juicy7 (2009) front, Shimano SLX (2015) rear
c: Shimano SLX (2015) front, Shimano 2XXX series hydraulic rear

Still alive. I get used to it very quickly. It's like riding around with a rear brake that needs a bleed, but not urgently enough that you really do it. I feel like the whole 'brake feel' thing gets blown out of proportions.
YMMV
  • 3 0
 @Naero: classic Swiss cheap f*ck,.. only having three bikes , LOL...

Sorry, but I have to make that joke.
Yeah seems like putting the worst brake to the rear is way to go. If I have to choose then ill go SRAM in front as it has better modulation. And Shimano in rear as they lock up easier, thats what I like in rear, just solid quick tap.
  • 1 0
 @Spiral23: Classic Canadian, saying sorry for making a joke Smile
Not even mad, I have three bikes. two of them from the noughties, but yeah.
  • 23 1
 Wheel size? Are we really in time when we assume its 29” if not otherwise specified ?
  • 10 1
 You're right, I should have included it and have updated the article. But yes, it's 29"
  • 14 1
 What is the deal with steel? I'd love to see an all steel review, pinkbike, pretty please!

Starling, Myth, Pipedream, Cotic, Stanton, Ferrum... Surely there are more FS bikes that fit the bill. Maybe throw in a titanium framed one for comparison.
  • 6 17
flag Spiral23 (Jan 18, 2021 at 12:39) (Below Threshold)
 Hmm it does not brake as easy as carbon BS?
  • 21 0
 Are we at the "pick a material and be a d*ck about it" stage now?
  • 1 0
 Yep looks that way@aribr:
  • 1 0
 Swarf Cycles also do a steel fully.
  • 3 1
 it lasts so much longer than snappy carbon and plastic
  • 3 0
 Steel has better sharp impact and abrasion resistance (minus the paint scuffs and you having to patch those up to avoid rust). Other then that, its a little bit more compliant than aluminum, but that really depends on the bike. You can feel the compliance somewhat in hardtails with longer chainstays, but for full suspension bikes, its not something you would notice.
  • 3 1
 @Spiral23: down voted for the truth
  • 4 0
 @aribr: Yes. Yes it is ;-)
  • 1 0
 This ^^^ 100%!
  • 1 2
 You forgot "sick bikes"
  • 17 1
 Good work Eric. Looks great!
  • 2 0
 It looks very much like a Terraplane 6 gun.
  • 12 0
 Shop rag zip tied as a chain stay protector... I'm in.
  • 7 0
 “Like, I'm starting to lose my hair but I still send my friends dumb memes."

Don’t worry, Eric. Speaking from experience, it turns out hair loss is a total myth. You don’t lose it at all; it just migrates to your ears. Nothing to worry about.
  • 4 0
 .....ear and nose hair needs trimming weekly. Waking up with a stiff lower back. Hearing loss. The need to hang cheater glasses around your neck. Oh, and the balls hang lower. He has no idea yet.
  • 1 0
 @jason475: and getting up 2-3 times at night to take a piss
  • 7 0
 I love everything handmade steel....and I’ve owned plenty (SWD, Bicycle Fabrications) but I need to say this:

WHY is is continually considered acceptable to paint the rear triangle a different color than the frame when it’s steel?! I’m sorry, but it looks like it broke and you replaced it with a generic or spray painted it in your garage. Pick one color and stick with it.... it’s more professional and clean.

I’m so glad I go that off my chest.
  • 4 0
 Agreed. Makes any bike look cheap.
  • 10 0
 The headtube badge isn't a "whimsical whirlpool". It's Celtic
  • 6 0
 Yeah, it's called a triskelion, in case anybody wants to learn more.
  • 18 12
 It looks pretty, but I don't know if heavy, flexy, and single-pivot are what I'm going for in a modern trail bike, with a modern trail bike price tag. Sorry to be the one to say it.
  • 14 0
 You'd be missing out if you never tried one. They are uniquely excellent and capable bikes. It's amazing what words like "heavy, flexy and single-pivot" can do on paper to mislead people from the reality of the ride quality.
  • 19 13
 I know I'm splitting hairs here, but why would you show your bike with 3" of spacers above your stem?
  • 2 4
 Exactly what I thought
  • 8 0
 Maybe it is a loaner fork for the photo shoot... cool bike tho
  • 6 1
 It is still technically a prototype, even if a pretty polished looking one. He might want to avoid cutting the fork until everything is totally finalized.
  • 36 0
 Build up only for photos, and that fork goes back into inventory after. Probably normally has an older fork that we'd all complain about being scratched up Wink
He's not running a multinational mail-order company, he can't expense off a new fork just for this promo.
  • 3 0
 Prototype and he probably wants to sell that fork to someone... he built it for the photo's and he's running a tiny business.
  • 4 0
 Is that main pivot a repurposed 51mm BMX bottom bracket? It looks like the bearings in there must be huge.
  • 1 0
 My first thought was to throw one of these in there:

yeticycles.com/gear/detail/sb95-c-eccentric-kit-2013-2014

That patent has to have expired by now.
  • 1 0
 VW axle bearing? I bet it’s automotive based.
  • 3 2
 The bearing area looks huge, while the pinch-bolt pivot interface is a major turn-off....
  • 3 2
 since the topic has been hot lately, it seems like a lot of these boutique, single-pivot brands place the shock right in the middle of the down tube, basically ruining any chance for a bottle below or above the shock. seeing as how so many people are demanding bottle mounts inside the triangle, i am interested to see if they'll adjust their approach when future frames start to come out. i imagine there are a lot of considerations to make in this case which means it isn't as simple as 'flip the shock upside down and stick it to the top tube'
  • 2 0
 This layout was choosen to maximise the progressivity of the kinematic. Here the "shock extension" makes the frame sighty progressive.
If you change the position of the shock (e.g. to allow usaeg of a water bottle), the drawbacks of such a construction will be indirectly amplified when riding (pedal kickback, anti-squat, etc.)
  • 2 0
 @labourde: Well any other layout would require a linkage and much more complexity. The shock being driven straight into the downtube is just the simplest way. If you want to change the direction of the shock, it would require an extra pivot for the linkage to rotate about to redirect the force.
  • 1 0
 I'm sure they could mount a bottle under the top tube like Cotic do. In my mind Colorado is dry (frankly the middle of the ocean is dry compared to the UK right now), so I'd expect as many water bottle bosses as possible on a Colorado bike...
  • 1 0
 @mountainsofsussex: take a look- its there already under the down tube...
  • 1 0
 @billroth: that's a terrible place to mount a bottle though. Depending where you live, the bottle gets covered in mud, dust, cow s****, or just gets smashed by rocks.
  • 2 1
 Innovation is a Myth, retro is the future. I guess if this was made in my area by some buddies of mine I would buy one, Same quirky home built feel/look as the no longer Xprezo bikes in Bromont Quebec. Plus no room for a water bottle so Levy will roast it.
  • 2 0
 Oh you right, no water bottle. I’m out!
  • 7 1
 USA made Cotic. Neat.
  • 1 2
 Cotic is faux bar. This is a true single pivot and looks better than the Cotic. The Cotic has chaotic graphics.
  • 1 0
 Simple execution while ironing out the smallest detail. You get a sensible yet attractive frame like this one. Head tube badge is dope!
Made in North America. I wonder if the American steel company True Temper still makes bike frame tubing?
  • 1 0
 True Temper exited the bicycle tubing business a few years ago. But Vari-Wall is doing high-end made-in-USA bicycle tubing that gets the thumbs up from several big-name frame builders.
  • 2 0
 the main shock pivot looks a lot like an EBB shell. Scope for tweeking the geometry/suspension characteristics by putting the swingarm pivot off centre in that aluminium piece, and rotating it to where you want it?
  • 1 0
 Loving the frame and that massive pivot bearing. It's actually good to see a bike in 'test' mode. Myth do some really good HTs too. I do wonder why many US steel mtb frames are mainly 4130 though (unless custom made to order); granted I do see some use Columbus. I don't see many using Reynolds though. I'm assuming it's an import thing.
  • 4 1
 There it is again. "No compromises" Is it really true? Have we found the Holy Grail?
  • 5 0
 "No compromises" except having your bottle under the downtube where it gets covered in crap
  • 3 0
 These welds, these colors, this headbadge...how come the new breed of steel bikes look so slick? I am running out of saliva
  • 1 0
 I’m running out of sativa, also.
  • 7 4
 the Celtic Triple Spiral is a religious symbol... bit whack to use it as a logo.
  • 6 0
 Lol ever seen a cross as a brand logo? (Independent, victorinox ... thousands more) it’s not a big deal
  • 1 0
 @mariomtblt: I think most crosses used as brand logos avoid using the Christian cross, which is straight bars with the bottom further extended than the top or sides. The Victorinox cross is more of a plus sign on a shield, and the Independent logo is a very different shape.

I'm not sure if they do that for legal reasons, or just to avoid public anger.
  • 2 0
 This is exactly the bike I was looking for to stand out from all the Acto5 p-trains at the trailhead. In all seriousness, it's gorgeous.
  • 1 1
 This bike looks like it was built in a high school metal shop class by the kids who program video games on TI-84 calculators. Sure ill give you name-brand pricing for this unproven steel frame with no shock! BTW how much does it weigh?
  • 3 0
 Impressive Eric! Looks like you've been busy!
  • 5 1
 Looks like a Starling!
  • 1 0
 Ha! Steel is real.... real similar. Don’t fret it mate, you guys can fight it out in some kind of Battle of the Steel Bikes, Shed Wars.... put me down for a ticket.
  • 1 0
 I kind of like the massive main pivot - it looks like it could hold suitably oversize bearings and the cover plates could keep trail crud out.
  • 1 2
 After reading the article and checking out their website and zooming in and out on all the photos of the orange finished product....... that flat bar combination just seems so absurd. I really dig the color options and they look awesome on the frame but the company logo isn’t very noticeable and to me the font seems odd. I’m sure it helps a lot being in Colorado growing this brand and all but I could never pay $2,599 for the frame alone especially during this uncertain economic time. Would selling it sub $2,000 not be profitable enough?
  • 3 0
 If we look for example at Chromag steel hardtail, they offer same frame,.. one made in Canada, other-one made in Taiwan.
The one made in Taiwan is $900 CAD. The one made in Canada is $1900 CAD. Add shocks, bearings and mounting hardware... its probably right there as far as its few bikes made in US.
  • 3 0
 It's like $1000 less than a Santa Cruz and the engineer makes it himself in the USA. Basically every bike is sold out for months. If anything he should be charging more.
  • 3 0
 Congrats on the launch Eric! Stoked for you!
  • 1 0
 Brilliant Bike. Could you please provide me the name of the colour. I would like to powder coat my bike and this is a nice colour!
  • 1 0
 My first day of CAD, I could only draw straight lines too! Of course, on the second day I could add curves where it helped the design.
  • 1 0
 Random...but with that Geo...I wonder if a Cane Creek set up wouldn't work better?
  • 2 0
 I like everything but the price. :/
  • 11 0
 $2,600 USD for a US-made full suspension frame is pretty good.
  • 1 1
 @AndrewFleming: Really? Using 40yr old materials & build techniques, coupled with 25yr old suspension design. Let's be real here.
  • 2 0
 @m1dg3t: It’s still 2021 labor and overhead costs.
  • 1 0
 @AndrewFleming: Your point? Guarantee these frames could sell @ 50% less and he'd still be making profit.
  • 1 0
 @m1dg3t: Ok, I’ll disagree. The raw material is a small part of the costs to build a frame. High American labor cost due to higher cost of living (food, housing, health insurance, taxes) and high overhead costs (shop/factory space, liability insurance, taxes) are bigger contributors to frame costs. Why do you think most frames are made overseas and then shipped here at an additional cost? Look at the prices of quality American-made steel road and hardtail mountain bike frames. Most are $2,000+ and those are simpler, fewer welds and don’t have any suspension pivots and hardware. If someone could make a decent American-made full suspension frame for $1,300 while still being profitable, it would already be happening. If you guarantee it, go for it!
  • 2 0
 @AndrewFleming: I bet you think you "win" because you illicit no further response from me other than this?

Ha.

HaHa.
  • 1 0
 @m1dg3t: There's no winning on the internet! Just filling time on long work calls... I figured you were busy designing and manufacturing that $1,300 profitable American-made full suspension frame!
  • 2 0
 Sure this is a cool bike but... "You'd be faster on a Rocket"
  • 3 1
 if they made in in 27.5 I'd buy one right now
  • 1 2
 Wasn't a Sinister Gruitr like $1350, with an aluminum frame? So a cheaper material costs twice as much, with similar design details, 10 years later? How much inflation is there?
  • 2 0
 Actually 1350 adjusted for inflation is $2029, so it’s pretty close.
  • 1 0
 Awesome to see more steel options out there, my Ferrum is absolutely top notch ????
  • 2 0
 Looks like the ugly nephew of so many pretty British bikes.
  • 1 0
 Hahaha when you can’t choose between Sram and Shimano brakes... just run both
  • 1 0
 its not something i would buy but at least its not yet another e-bike so thats good at least.
  • 4 3
 Nice bike and good price!
  • 1 0
 Why is so much of US based frame manufacturing in Colorado?
  • 1 0
 Could be because a ton of riders live in the state.
  • 2 1
 @extratalldirtrider: I mean there are a ton of riders in California, Utah, Washington, Oregon among other places as well.
  • 1 0
 Bike building is an essential business here.
  • 2 0
 It’s just a myth....
  • 2 0
 Ok it's a bike, and? What's the point ?
  • 2 0
 My thoughts exactly
  • 2 2
 @fracasnoxteam: Steel. Single pivot. One man in a shed.
  • 2 0
 @BreakLikeTheWind: is a man in shed a selling point somehow? Legit curious
  • 1 0
 That raw frame gets me hard! BikeBonner!!!
  • 4 3
 Why are we going backwards?
  • 1 0
 I'd be on board if it wasn't a single pivot.
  • 4 5
 $2700 seems steep for the oldest simplest method of building a bicycle frame. I like it but paying a premium for....nostalgia??? Eh.
  • 3 2
 Yeah my revel rascal was 2500 with the shock included lol
  • 1 0
 They had me until the boring seat tube brace.
  • 1 0
 They had me BECAUSE of the cool seat tube brace .
  • 1 0
 @Sirios: To each their own my friend!
  • 1 0
 Love it. Simple beautiful. But I’m a cheap bastage
  • 1 0
 Anyone know which rims those are? Thanks.
  • 1 0
 Gonna be really hard to tell with the decals removed.
  • 2 1
 1st thought was Pole then I looked deeper and saw a better bike
  • 1 0
 Congrats Eric! Durango proud
  • 1 0
 "He explained that the way steel flexes is very controlled".... whaaat?
  • 1 0
 Is the head tube badge a ground down weld bead? Love it
  • 1 0
 The DMR Bolt nods its approval
  • 1 0
 Steel is real. Real heavy.
  • 1 0
 Finally a bike that I would buy!!
  • 8 7
 Whats the weight tho
  • 5 6
 Doubt it's being raced uphill, so who cares.
  • 14 0
 @CamShreds: people who ride uphill a lot?
  • 3 0
 @thisspock: thoughts and prayers for them lol
  • 5 0
 @CamShreds: For an all-day mission on the CT (as he mentions in the write-up), I'd care
  • 2 0
 @dirrrtbag: I’d care more about dampness than weight, and often times a heavier bike is damper, gotta find the happy medium though
  • 1 0
 US made Balfa
  • 1 1
 They should have called it the Cruz
  • 1 0
 Huck. To. Flat.
  • 1 0
 Love it ! very cool .
  • 2 2
 Over 2 grand for a steel frame no shock? That's absurd.
  • 1 1
 Why not chromly
  • 1 0
 What makes you think it's not chromoly?
  • 1 0
 It's 4130 which is chromoly.
  • 4 7
 man that spacer stack above stem is crazy. Everytime i see this i feel like it will impale my head when i crash.
  • 5 0
 One time I bruised my head on such a stack, bruised a little of the shaft too. I'm just lucky it wasn't the berries.
  • 7 0
 I'm sure he just didn't want to cut the fork just for pictures.
  • 2 0
 @kcy4130: The mushroom head or your skull? Can’t tell with all the shaft & berry talk here
  • 1 0
 Berries... Mushrooms. I should have eaten more breakfast because y'all making me hungry.
  • 1 0
 @Barmelito : how do you knock your head into the stem? I've knocked my knees and balls,never my head..bike not long enough?
  • 1 2
 Sick; Who cares?
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