Components of Adventure: Scotland with Vanderham and Hunter

Sep 16, 2016
by SHIMANO  
Views: 40,436    Faves: 346    Comments: 17

Photographs by Sterling Lorence
Watch it in 4K

Earlier this spring, we set out on an epic mission across the rugged Scottish Highlands with Thomas Vanderham and Matt Hunter. Our aim was to complete the 10-day mission on a single XT Di2 battery charge, all while putting the gear through some serious conditions. Nothing could have prepared us for what the vast backcountry of Scotland would throw at us, but what’s an adventure without a few hurdles?

Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
bigquotesThe established networks of historic trails that exist in Scotland is simply incredible. the highlands are full of epics, and the terrain was stunning. Being a fjordlike coastline, most of the ride days started and ended in quaint historic ocean-side villages where you easily see and understand how the culture of Scotch came to be and needed. But, yes, do remember your wool and gore-tex...that is the north atlantic sea...she has cold, damp, hard bite....that will make you believe in the Loch Ness Monster again. - Sterling Lorence, Photographer
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
bigquotesWe had heard that the weather in the Highlands could change on a dime. We stuffed our riding packs to the point of eruption - wind layers, warm layers, sun protection, and food. But nothing could have prepared us for the vastness and exposure of the Highlands. - Thomas Vanderham
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
bigquotesEarly on in the trip, we had certainly one of the hardest days of filming we had ever done. It had been 16 hours from start to finish; it was ambitious! Thinking about shot ideas, or even unzipping my camera bag was a lot, let alone chasing the crew of bikes with a heavy camera bag. It was one of those days out on a journey where your mind plays tricks on you. “Am I close to finished?” No, I was so far from being finished. Huge river crossings that soaked our gear, to hike-a-bikes that were endless. Looking back, it was such an amazing day that provided profound memories for all of us. We ended up getting the fewest shots that day, but they were the most spectacular ones. - Colin Jones, Cinematographer
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
bigquotesOver the ten days of our trip it handled anything and everything. Airline shipping, being submerged in water at countless river crossings, hundreds of kilometres of rough rocky trails, peat bogs, and probably even a few salty tears spilled on it. XT Di2 durability was proven in the ultimate proving ground. - Matt Hunter
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
bigquotesWe had XT Di2 on our bikes. They were the very first gruppos off of the production line and unproven in the environment we were about to enter. There were questions about its durability, water resistance and battery life. But XT Di2 met every challenge on our journey on one charge, not backing down from river crossings, all day rides and the many jagged rocks that tried to grab at it along the way. - Thomas Vanderham
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
bigquotesThe northern highlands of Scotland have a heavy reputation. Beautiful, surely. But rugged, rocky, rainy, windy, muddy and midgey are the words most often chosen. - Matt Hunter
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
bigquotesIt was incredible to have two of the best riders in the world on our Highland trails; seeing them get their teeth into the rugged Scottish terrain, and enjoying a few 'wee drams' with them round the fire in the evening. It was a truly epic adventure. - Euan Wilson, H+I Adventures
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland
bigquotesMass respect to our Scottish guide friends Euan Wilson and Mark Clark, when it comes to slogging out huge 10-13 hour epics, dragging us through the peat and rocks, and keeping it flowy the whole time, those guys are tough as nails with huge smiles and do Scotland proud. I have a new respect for what I always thought was an epic. -Sterling Lorence, Photographer
Matt Hunter and Thomas Vanderham in the northern highlands of Scotland

To learn more about XT Di2, head over to the Shimano website where you can find out more about Synchro Shift, Perfect Fit, and Instant Response.


Special thanks to Euan Wilson and Mark Clark at H+I Adventures in Scotland.

Music:
Beauty is Fleeting by Tony Anderson
Chase the Sun (Instrumental) by Aaron and Andrew

MENTIONS: @shimano / @sterlinglorence / @anthill




126 Comments

  • + 175
 Welcome to Scotland, where you can ride anywhere you like as long as you're not being a dick about it.
  • + 19
 Gotta love that right to roam!
  • + 61
 And seems like you can ride anywhere as long as you're not a pussy about the weather?
  • + 9
 that is what the flask is for. water bottle funnel = brilliant
  • + 6
 epic!
  • + 8
 Fantastically filmed..... superbly shot ...... and Real Riding ! Massive congrats to all involved .... Sterling you shine again !! Thank you for sharing
  • + 49
 As adverts go, this was one of the best I've seen in the sport, and stunning photography to boot. I must say though, speaking as a Scot myself, I have absolutely NO idea where the narrator is from with that accent.. It sounds like a Scotsman, doing an impression of someone doing a Scottish accent. Someone above mentioned wryly 'Groundskeeper Willie' which would be funny if it wasn't so close to the truth in this case. Sorry, TROOOTH.
  • + 6
 Highland accent.
  • + 6
 I thought Gerard Butler was narrating this while watching the vid.
  • + 11
 To me it sounded like a dude from Vancouver whoo tra-yd too soond Skottysh. Him deed hys best too doo dy akcynt. Boot lad is proobably froom Skottland and gyts angreh at mey maekin bad jooks. A'em shur hee'd kik me in dee bollohks yf hee hahd ay chahns
  • + 2
 I'm glad I'm not the only one who thought it sounded a bit weird. The still photos are brilliant though.
  • + 1
 I was thinking"If this guy does books on cd...I'm gettin' 'em!"
  • + 0
 @WAKIdesigns: WTF Waki hahaha good one.
  • + 1
 @Endurahbrah: thought the same thing! Shimano would have the money for his voice talent,
  • + 2
 that was Zoltan from The Witcher series.
  • + 28
 Hunter and Vanderham are pretty big deals, yes. But i can't believe they actually got Groundskeeper Willy to do the voice-over!
  • + 1
 They could hook up with bearclaw along.
  • + 28
 Pinkbike doesn't get enough praise for letting us enjoy these photo epics... Free of charge.
  • - 1
 If we had to pay to view phot epics then I would stop visiting Pinkbike.
  • + 1
 I'd pay for a hardcopy. Or, if they'd release a longer edit of the video on dvd it would be nice to have these pictures in a slideshow over a mellow soundtrack like they did in the Collective and Roam videos. To be honest the layout on this page doesn't do these beautiful pictures justice.
  • + 27
 good job Shimano came up with Di, i couldn't imagine doing that trip on old fashioned cables !
  • + 1
 Yeah... old fashioned cables could newer handle this... Only electric.
  • + 4
 to be honest i cleaned my bike in a river once and it totally wrecked my shift cables..
  • - 1
 @PLMedia: If wires are made from stainless steel and wire housings has teflon "insiders" then you don't need any grease and nothing couldn't become rusty so nothing could be damaged. I have the set I described and a haven't maintain it for ages. Works perfect.
  • + 3
 or worse still..... SRAM Smile
  • + 18
 Awesome! So proud to call this place home......
  • + 14
 Now that's how you field test a product. Shimano if you're listening if you every want to test your product with an everyday, Joe-schlub weekend warrior who prefers to neglect maintaining his bike, hit me up.
  • + 17
 LAPHROAIG; the best thing from Scotland.
  • + 1
 Scotch in general is the best thing from Scotland. Laphroaig is just the beginning of awesome.
  • + 4
 @joose: you mean whisky, haha Wink ill let you off dude.
  • + 4
 Laphroaig Select by the looks of it. Not a bad dram..these boys have taste.
  • + 3
 @zorba73: nice catch on the select. Assumed it was the 10 year.
  • + 2
 @joose: 10 years old is the best, so smoky, so good....
  • + 9
 They were in Bonar Bridge...I used to live about a mile from there. I've also ridden those trails, and it really is something else. What an experience!
  • + 10
 Scotland can chew you up and spit you out many, many times but I love it and keep coming back for more.
  • + 8
 Even though it's basically an advert for Shimano and I ride that stuff singlespeed, it's a great read and really captures the feel of those mountains.
  • + 9
 I've never understood how you can carry your bike like that without having the chainring dig into your neck Smile
  • + 5
 Have you tried it?
  • + 3
 @martn: Yes, and the chainring digs into my neck. Easier to do it with the top tube on my Slayer.
  • + 7
 @Tarekith: the chainring is only on one side you know?
  • + 2
 @Tarekith: make sure to hold both the fork and pedal at the same time and have your chain in the large cog
  • + 7
 One of the best things I've ever seen on Pinkbike. Hats off to everyone involved, I would say epic but it is just too small a word!
  • + 2
 Fantasticly awesome, a little longer than epic.
  • + 7
 That gear change noise is pretty slick compared to my clatter - can't wait to get that setup........in 2027 when I can afford it. Sweet video!!!
  • + 3
 haha I was just thinking how much more annoying that noise was compared to a mechanical setup. To each their own I guess.
  • - 19
flag jaame (Sep 16, 2016 at 6:49) (Below Threshold)
 What a shitty video. I watched it hoping to learn something about XT Di2... and learnt nothing.
  • + 4
 In 2027.... I wonder, which wheel size standard the industry will be messing with....
  • + 2
 @robbienroll: 2027 mm, they add a mm a year until people forget where they started, before looking in the ancient scrolls and going back to the wheel size they started with
  • + 3
 Ok, good. I was starting to wonder how 2 guys and a photog managed 7 days with those piddly little packs, then I read about the guides.
Lovely video nonetheless. Definitely not going to buy the product (although I may now be more inclined to consider a new bike with Di2), but it might make me ride more.
  • + 4
 Looks absolutely incredible. Soooo....did they have a couple of sherpas or who was carrying all their gear? Since its surely not in those little packs and they have stoves and sleeping bags in some pictures.
  • + 4
 I was curious about that, so took a look at the site for the guiding company they went with: www.mountainbikeworldwide.com/bike-tours/coast-to-coast-scotland#faqe529-bfb2

It says: "you only need to carry a day pack with you whilst riding. We have a support vehicle and driver who will transfer your luggage to your next B&B each day, and have it ready and waiting in your room when you arrive."
  • + 3
 @delusional: aaaannnnddd there it is. I mean you can't really do it without a guide unless you know the area, but it tacks on another $1700 in costs unfortunately. This sport is expensive....unless sponsors pay Smile
  • + 7
 @ianswilson815: Actually you can. About a month ago we rode 12 days, crisscrossing the Highlands. Unsupported with no idea where to go, looking at maps and making it up as we went. Sure, we probably found more bog than singletrack but it was an incredible experience. I absolutely recommend it!
  • + 6
 @martn: 2nd that...

We have an amazing resource in the ordnance survey in the UK. With a bit of time looking at maps and some research online you can plan some amazing multi day rides in Scotland. Everything has been ridden before so you can find someone's trip report / GoPro footage online. Right to roam (responsibly) and the wild camping (responsibly) attached to it are a triumph of forward thinking access law.

With a conservative estimates on daily mileages you have time to play with if things go wrong and if you use bivvies / bothies (another amazing aspect of Scotland, Mountain Bothies Association is a charity that relies on donations) then you can change your plans to suit conditions.

Transport links are pretty damn good up there and bike friendly, sleeper trains / coaches mean if you live down South you can leave Friday night, be riding at 0600 in the hills, have your own mini epic and with a Sun night overnight train be back at work Mon morning (maybe a bit smelly). Oh and did I mention tickets for sleeper seats can be had for £35 each way. If you can borrow the kit you need an adventure can be had for less than £150 and that includes a dinner while you wait for your train home.

Scotland ... the best thing about living in the UK.
  • + 3
 The Applecross and Torridon area, which features heavily in this video is fairly straightforward to explore as long as you're well prepared and don't take too many risks with the weather. It's well covered in guide books, so no need for a guide, unless you want one. Go if you get chance, it's bloody marvelous
  • + 2
 @ianswilson815: As said below, just because they chose to use a guide doesn't mean you have to. All you need is a decent size pack, a sleeping bag, a map, a lot of food, and a willingness to suffer. Everything else is optional (and you can even compromise on the sleeping bag if you're willing to turn up the suffering).
  • + 2
 @OllieBuck: OS maps are great but it took us a while to get used to so many dead end valleys and mountain ranges without any trails on the map to cross them. Or trails on the map that weren't quite as evident in reality. But the right to roam and just carry on linking trails just added to the experience in the end.

I really liked the British Mountain Map of Cairngorms as well.
  • + 7
 I usually hate adverts but that was pretty good.
  • + 2
 First of all the video is awesome!

But let's talk about something that is behind it.... Let's talk about XT DI2.
There are too much questions... First of all I tried to find XT's manual for DI2 version and I couldn't. So I easily found XTR's manual for DI2 version and here is what I found out....

1. Cables. Cables go from derailleurs to battery, from battery to junction box mounted on a stem and from that box to shifters. Aren't there too many cables, really? Besides they could have placed the junction box in the battery's enclosure and get rid of unnecessary junction box on stem. BUT. As I have heared there is an wireless version of XT (manual of which I haven't found). IMHO the idea is great but in the case of wireless system do we need to charge not only the main battery but the batteries on shifters too? Isn't there too much maintaining, really? In case of my cheap Shimano Alivio transmission I adjusted it only once at the beginnig of bicycle season (4 months ago), and it still works perfectly well without any maintain at all after riding at least 4 times every week and a lot of jumping with my chain and rear derailleur bounced with a huge aplitude. I even switched it while going up the hills under load which is not allowed on this low level of derailleurs... And the result is no maintain - it works perfectly well.

2. Battery. I'll consider it on the examle of XTR's version because as I mentioned I haven't found manual for XT DI2. So I suppose as far as Shimano's engineers haven't found out how to produce energy from air they still have batteries even in XT version Smile . So according to manual there are three places where we can put a battery. The first- bottle mounting, the second- seat post, the third- fork's steerer. Not all the frames got a bottle mounting, Some people has got a dropposts and some lead their brake cables througth the fork's steerer. So in my case I don't have a bottle mount, the brake cable already in fork's steerer and soon I am planning to buy a drop post... I can't say that the first thing I wanted to do when I heard about XT DI2 was to buy it but still I feel a bit shared unfairly.

So just to have electrons running through cables on my bike I need to handle all this? Or maybe I missed something?
  • + 2
 How do you get alivio to keep working? I have to adjust it after every single ride.
  • + 2
 @Mtbkid21: Yes there is a little feature... No matter how low the level of your transmission parts the wires and the wire housings should be the highest. And if we go from another side - no matter how high level of your transmission parts they won't work good without good wire and good wires housings. So yes I have got cheap alivio but I also have got Jungwire "Reinforced with Kevlar (TM)" (www.pinkbike.com/photo/13948469) wire housing and shimano's stainless steel covered with PTFE wire. With this wire you don't need to use any grease at all -> means to maintaining in the future, no fear of getting it to the water.
But that is not all...
Also you need to cut wire housings with a special tool or if you haven't got one (as I haven't) then you need to work up the ending in such a way that all the little wires inside the "corset" of wire housing will be the same length like this: www.pinkbike.com/photo/13948470
Sorry but that is not all againSmile Dead Horse
The last but not the least is cup ending on the wire housings. They also should be the best : www.pinkbike.com/photo/13948468

There are some frames in which wire goes without wire housing placed on special mountings, I don't have a one. So all my wire housing is of one piece. Don't know if it is important...

And now a little bonusWink The wire housing showed previously is intended for transmission and brakes both. When I installed it on my AVIB BB7 they started to work so good like "they were electric". And the ending cup showed previously reduces the thickness of housing for brakes to transmission level... So the only thing you need to do is to buy housing and some amount of different cups and your alivio transmission will work perfect.

PS Sorry my English is not perfect hope you'll understand everything...
  • + 1
 @ivankvkharkiv: thanks for the tips
  • + 1
 @Mtbkid21: You welcome! And I just have forgotten the last thing... Check pulleys on rear derailleur. If they have play (backlash, lost motion) then change them. The best option to change is aluminium pulley with bearings.
  • + 2
 I live up in the north west corner of the Highlands near Assynt. Slowly ticking off all the areas that are ridable / not so ridable ... I've been meaning to create a page to document and roughly list some places. Day rides and over nighters, ability levels etc etc. They tend to be hillwalking paths, deer paths, 4x4 roads etc.

For scouting out trails .... Ordnance Survey maps are extremely detailed, there are programs you can buy online and search out areas on your laptop. But probably the most useful tool I've used is Google Earth. Zoom into the hills and you start to find loads of paths. It's brilliant. And free... (Although, don't rely on having signal out in the hills for your phone mapping, and if its an iPhone - it'll probably of run out of battery between the time of parking up and doing your first pedal stroke ... which isn't very desirable)

Hats off to the cinematographer for capturing the landscape!! It is harsh and weather beaten environment ... its reminded me that what i have on my doorstep is actually awesome.
  • + 5
 That was awesome, and seeing all the shots of Torridon, I can't wait to go back!
  • + 2
 Loved this video, but would love loved it more if it were a much longer (even a series) and more of a raw documentary style video...think Casey Neistat's work...that would have really been awesome.
  • + 5
 this is one of the best things ive ever seen on pinkbike.
  • + 2
 Wow. Beautiful photos! Brought back pleasant memories of riding there 20+ years ago. A bit different then without all the new fangled gear like suspension but just as wet and cold (and stunning) as I remember.
  • + 3
 Great riding, photography, filming and of course the scenery. Thanks!
(But I still don't want any electronics on my bike except for light, sorry.)
  • + 3
 SO good! I went here in May and had a blast. Awesome to see you guys get such banger shots from this trip. Scotland is awesome!
  • + 4
 Wow. What a way to start my Friday by reading this. Inspired for the weekend now!
  • + 4
 Scottish Highlands = one of the best bike holidays I have ever done. Pure biking and adventure.
  • + 3
 Just got back from Sutherland, about 100km north in Oldshoremore, wish I had been able to take my bike, so much potential for all day epics
  • + 4
 Bet that Laphroaig tasted pretty damn good!
  • + 0
 I always find it a bit of a challenging Whiskey. A little too Peaty for me. Always fun trying to order it in the scottish highlands if you don't know how to pronounce it. Best I understood it was pronounced Lafroy. Similarly I was told Aberlour was pronounced Arberlaray but then the locals may have been messing with me
  • + 6
 @tufty: try some whisky next time then ;-)
  • - 3
 @km79: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whisky colloquialisms aside
  • + 2
 @tufty: If you think the standard Laphroaig is a bit too much of a punch in the face I recommend trying out the Quarter Cask. Same Laphroaig dna, but slightly less peaty, smoother and more complex. Wonderful stuff!
  • + 1
 @eric-w: Agreed. Quarter Cask is fantastic!
  • + 3
 @mdg3d:

I used to work at a bar and they were almost always mispronounced.

Lagavulin was my favourite. 'Can I have a laglooovin please'
*sigh*
'Of course sir'
  • + 1
 @eric-w: I will take a look. I need something to take with me for the evening after BPW next Saturday
  • + 2
 @yerbikesux: I like the unpeated Tobermory and am partial to a drop of Oban when I get the chance
  • + 2
 Wish my 10L pack would fit t hat much kit for 3 nights biking......... EEERRRRRMMMMM thanks crew for carring all that stuff.....
  • + 4
 i love both those guys. id pay anything to ride with them
  • + 1
 Why not use a small hub dynamo with a rectifier and capacitor for the power supply?

I bet it could be done for less weight than the battery and then you would never have to worry about recharging, EVER.
  • + 1
 I bet Shimano considered this option, but from a design standpoint it's seems much more appealing to retain the ability for a rider to run any hub rather than have to release a new (non)-standard hub to accommodate the added space taken up by a dynamo. I agree, never having to charge would be awesome, but having to plug your bike in overnight every few months isn't terribly inconvenient(honestly, it sounds cool charging your bike haha! Welcome to the future). Regardless, 56g for the battery is pretty minimal when you consider XTR cable and housing can weigh approx. 140g for a 1x setup!
  • + 4
 My two favourite riders, way to top off a Friday
  • + 4
 Amazing. Would love to go one day!
  • + 2
 It's well worth it, I was there a few months back and loved it. A great ride in Torridon is starting at Annat, riding over the mountain to Achnashellach, along the road to Coulags then back over the mountain to where you started. I met a few other cyclists and plenty of walkers and everyone looked pleased to see me and was very friendly, it was a pleasure to ride there and I'll definitely be going back!
  • + 1
 fantastic video. was wondering the whole time what this annoying electric sound was. thought it could be a damn loud focus of a camera or some servos of a drone...until it all became clear at the end of the vid
  • + 1
 **Actual Question Here** Did the battery last the entire 10 day trip? What happens if the battery dies while out in the backcountry?
  • + 4
 It only used 5% of the battery the entire trip according to the little bit of info at end of the film.
  • + 6
 I think you just bin the bike and walk back home, buy a new bike the next day?
  • + 4
 The battery life is phenomenal. I'm 10 long days of riding into a charge and it's so far only dropped 1 of 5 bars!
  • + 3
 @km79: Thanks, I guess I would have seen that had I watched the last 5 seconds. That's phenomenal.
  • + 4
 TAKE ME, I'M READY
  • + 4
 Phrasing
  • + 2
 Wow awesome, love the photos some amazing shots as always! Thanks for this.
  • + 1
 Honest question: If there are still electric cables with this system, how is it better than existing cable actuated derailleurs we use now?
  • + 2
 Just wisited Scotland this summer. I also went to Fort William. No riding though. All I did is enjoyed the whiskey.
  • + 3
 Scotland: where even Scotland is Scottish.
  • + 2
 Who wrote the quote on the beginning of the video. It's amazing. That man deserves a beer.
  • + 1
 They made that section at 4:14 look like a piece of cake! In reality it's actually a lose, sandy, gravely shoot where you can't really touch the brakes at all.
  • + 1
 Thanks or the 30 screensaver/backgrounds! (Click and drag, click and drag...)
  • + 2
 Video of the year right here.
  • + 2
 this arcticle is the perfect definition of mountain bike! Congrats!
  • + 2
 Scotland is on my list for sure. It seems like such an adventure.
  • + 0
 How does that even sound like Groundskeeper Willy? That's just not even funny unless your experience of anyone north of the border is solely related to cartoons.
  • + 2
 I think it was tongue in cheek, wee laddie.
  • + 3
 Sooooo many PODs!!
  • + 2
 Sh*t, I now must visit Scotland.
  • + 2
 Magic darts.
  • + 1
 very much enjoyed this, thankyou
  • + 2
 Where's Duncan McLeod?
  • + 1
 Of the clan McLeod? There can be only one
  • + 2
 great photos!!
  • + 2
 Sign me up
  • + 1
 the scenery is amazing but I don't miss horizontal rain!
  • - 1
 MTB industry trends... electronic shifting... e-bikes... apps for this, apps for that.... what's next? e-rider? What will be left for me to do?
  • + 1
 Anything Hunter is as good as it gets! Stunning!
  • + 1
 E.P.I.C.
  • + 1
 Looks wet.
  • + 1
 Beautiful pics!
  • + 1
 awesome
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