Cotic Launches the New BFeMAX Hardcore 29" Hardtail

May 20, 2020
by cotic-bikes  


PRESS RELEASE: Cotic

Today we launch a brand new product for Cotic - the BFeMAX: It's our radical, rock smashing, fast-as-you-dare hardtail.

The BFeMAX, our new hardcore 29er hardtail. It's the result of gene-splicing our award-winning, super-fast SolarisMAX 29er trail hardtail, with our tough-as-old-boots, 27.5" wheeled BFe do-it-all fun machine.


The BFe (pronounced Beefy) has a long and storied history at Cotic, introduced in 2005 as the tearaway toughnut foil to the subtle charms of the iconic Cotic Soul. As long ago as 2007 our rider Robbie Rickman did the Megavalanche on his BFe26. Imagine what you could do with a BFeMAX!

The BFeMAX acts as the same kind of amplified partner to our quintessential hardtail all-rounder, the SolarisMAX. It's the rowdier younger brother. You know the one - loads of fun, but a bit on the wild side? That's the BFeMAX.


If you're looking for the fastest descending hardtail possible, then you're in the right place. Designed with 140mm forks in mind, but with the brawn to run up to a 160mm fork, the BFeMAX screams 'Come and have a go'. There isn't really anything this bike won't jump into with both feet: Jumps, drops, big mountains, hacking about in the woods and steamrollering down just about anything, this is the bike you need to embarrass your full suspension riding mates.

There's enough room for meaty 2.6” tyres and still space for mud. The big wheels carry momentum up and along, then let you grab it by the scruff of its neck on the way down, with speed and stability all day. We have brought over the legendary toughness of the BFe with it's Reynolds 853 down tube spine, and Cotic FM custom-butted heat treated cromoly tubeset throughout the rest of the frame for the classic Cotic ride feel.

BFeMAX turns the speed up to 11 with the big wheels; it doesn't really understand it's a hardtail!

In a nod to our history of producing hooligan hardtails, one of the launch colours is our Bright Blue. It's been a mainstay of every new style of BFe since the 2nd generation frame arrived in this classic Cotic colour, way back in 2009. It was also worn to stunning effect by the Gen5 BFe, the bike that pioneered our Longshot geometry in August 2017.

The other colour option is beautifully classy Gunmetal and Copper




Here's the all important numbers:




Frame pricing is £549 / approx EUR630 / approx US$623, and delivery is included within the UK, Europe, USA and Canada.
Bikes pricing is:

£1,849 / approx EUR 2,125 / approx US$1,925 for the SLX based Silver build

£2,699 / approx EUR 3,110 / approx US$2,810 for the Gold Eagle GX bike

£2,749 / approx EUR 3,160 / approx US$2,865 for the Gold XT bike

£5,299 / approx EUR 6,099 / approx US$5,520 for the dream build eeWings/X01 equipped Platinum bike

Full information is over on our website: www.cotic.co.uk/product/BFeMAX

As with the recently launched RocketMAX Gen3, Rock Shox Lyric Ultimate is now a fork option, and we now have a selection of Shimano XT and SRAM Guide RSC G2 4 Pot brakes for those wanting a bump in stopping power, but have particular lever feel preferences.

You can play with our configurator here: https://www.cotic.co.uk/order/framebuilder/BFeMAX/



Pricing and specs may still be a little variable for the moment due to parts availability. Hope is back making bike parts again, but current lead times are a couple of weeks for some items, for instance. The Platinum build bike is priced with HUNT TrailWide or EnduroWide aluminum wheels because the usual carbon option isn't due for another couple of months. We assemble to order in the UK, and you can change the spec of your bike to your heart's content, and if we need to make a substitution we will always contact you and let you know. We find that we have a great conversation with most of our customers about their builds, so it's just part of the Cotic process.

Frames are available right now in all sizes and colours. We're fully loaded. First ordered frames will be with customers end of next week, bikes are currently taking 3-4 weeks because we're so busy.

We hope you're all well and staying safe. Cy will be around in the comments as usual for the next few days, so get your questions in. Ask away!





134 Comments

  • 28 0
 I thought every bike was fast-as-you-dare..
  • 15 0
 That is true. And for me, that's about 2 mph.
  • 16 0
 @JaiB1: So long as you're having fun dude!
  • 2 0
 especially when there's a red parts mounted on!
  • 12 0
 Please, its a rad new hardtail, dont ruin the comments !

Two buddies of mine have bought the last orbea laufey (pretty cool too but in alu :-/ ). You cant go wrong with these new 29ers. We were riding with a mate on a old kona honzo 2 days ago, were impressed by the progress of the the new geometry, specially going uphill. Even with 2,6 tires, its fast rolling. And in downhill, its pure fun.

The colors are great for the last models !
  • 9 0
 Glad you like the idea. It's a lot of fun.
  • 1 1
 Well said Wink
  • 4 0
 Just bought a on one big dog 1 month ago.

The numbers are pretty similar except the fork (cotic accept bigger forks).

I can say that this kind of bike is really faster than you think. And ready to almost anything !

Good work cotic ! Like usual ! :-)
  • 5 0
 My 26 inch bfe stick rockin cotic do build solid frames. If I ever fancy bringing my hardtale into the future (ie not 26) then this is definitely on the list

Saying that #26aintdead
  • 3 0
 I try not to get excited about the abundance of new bikes out there and having owned a few Cotics before, I quite like them. This though quite possibly for me just looks like the definition of "right" for me. Give me one of those and one of those Privateer 161s and in terms of bikes that just look like they'll be a huge barrel of fun, I'd be sorted.
  • 9 4
 Does it void the warranty if I use a coil fork or a fork that wasn't sold with the bike?
  • 7 0
 What? Seriously?
  • 3 4
 @Muckal: No not on this bike. It's a cheap dig at the shock on the rocket max.
  • 8 0
 @Muckal: Their full sus models have a void warranty if you use any shock other than the one that comes with the bike, and there are no coils avaiable
  • 5 1
 @Civicowner: well, that sucks
  • 4 0
 @Civicowner: what? Seriously? Lol
  • 3 0
 @Civicowner: Some FS frame designs put relatively high non axial loads on the shocks. The current Stumpjumper is an example of this.
It could be that the shocks Cotic offers are the only ones they feel confident to support those loads
  • 14 0
 @Civicowner: what kind of car do you drive?
  • 2 0
 @Arierep: I used to have a Gen 2 rocket max and it didn't really work with a coil. I completely understand a brand not making their bikes for air shocks. Not allowing me to use a different air shock than the stock without voiding the warranty is wack though.
  • 56 0
 @Solozime: Sorry you're upset with our decision, and i really appreciate you being keen on a RocketMAX. However, with the Gen2 bike we learnt the hard way that all these different shocks that have proliferated are not created equal, and without guidance from our experience they can get setup wrong too. If that then leads to a component or frame failure, or rider injury, that's all still on us regardless of what has happened outside of what we have tested and what we know.

We are a small company, and these things are a major concern. Especially when as the bike designer and company owner it would be me up in court with a judge asking if i had done everything i could to prevent [insert horrible rider injury here]. It's not something we have experienced before as a business, so we had to take steps to control the risk for us and for our customers. We will be introducing more (air) shock options as we get a chance to test them, get a base tune on them and sign them off with the bike. Pretty much everyone here prefers the tunability of air shocks and the big can shocks have such great performance that we want to offer that first because in our opinion that works best on our bikes. If that doesn't line up with your preferences, that's cool. We are all different, and although we're sorry to lose you as a potential customer, you would be better off on another brand that supports your shock preferences (hopefully with the same level of testing and insight we put into our bikes). Ultimately we want to build rad bikes we like, share them with like minded riders and keep everyone safe, healthy and having fun.

Hope that gives a small insight into where we are coming from, and that you are willing to see our point of view at least.

Cheers

Cy Turner
Founder and Director
Cotic Bikes
  • 3 3
 @Solozime: my old cotic rocket max (2016 or so)had super poor bearingalignment, rearend was barely moving even without shock. It killed a couple of coilshocks too. not the best bike i ve ever had.
  • 5 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: Sorry to hear that.
  • 6 0
 @cotic-bikes: Thanks for the reply.
Yeah for sure you guys can really dial in the feel you want if you focus on fewer shocks. You've by no means lost me as a potential customer and I still love your bikes Smile Really looking forward to Tweedlove and hopefully it'l still be happening so I can demo!

PS: I'm just a PinkBike engineer but In the future if you are looking at more shock options a Megneg Super deluxe option on it it would be awesome. I'ts my favourite shock and If i knew anything, (which i don't), I think it would really suit the Cotic.

Cheers Guys
  • 5 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: So did you contact Cotic about the problem, and what was the response? Or is this the first they're hearing about it? I'm a recent (happy) Cotic owner and they seem like a good and responsive small company.
  • 4 0
 @Solozime: That's great, and I'm glad. I hope we get to see you soon too. I am jonesing for a visit to Golfie. We've never had the Super Deluxe come up on our radar from customer suggestions to be honest, but I'll talk to SRAM about it. We're focusing on the Fox Float X2 right now as that's what most people seem to be asking for if they don't want to go for the Cane Creek.
  • 2 0
 @cotic-bikes: I don’t like the regular super deluxe much at all. On the other hand with the megneg it’s absolutely amazing imo.
  • 4 0
 @Solozime: Good to know. Sounds like I need to get one in to have a go on.
  • 2 1
 @number44: i did not because i was not aware of the problem, i just thougt a bearing was soso and shocks fail sometimes, as the second shock started leaking i took it out and realized. Seeing the marks and not beeing able to fit the lower shockmount without flexing one strut sligthly. Thats when i sold it. No point waranting it at that time. I liked the looks and silent ride, it was produced at a different manufacturer so this may be solved by now.
  • 3 0
 @optimumnotmaximum: Ah, understood. As a (former) small business owner I know that we'd always rather hear about issues, even if it's beyond warranties. Can't make improvements or do anything about issues if they're not raised, etc.
  • 1 0
 @Arierep: except for the fact that cane creek actually void the warranty on some of their shocks when used on certain specialized models, and the only shocks cotic offer are cane creek

@nmilot92 not a civic LOL
  • 3 1
 What is the application for this bike that is “the result of gene-splicing...27.5 wheeled BFe do-it-all” and the “quintessential hardtail all-arounder” 29er Solaris? If both bikes are advertised as capable of anything, then why add the gradient between them? Were they not doing something? I miss the Soul already.
  • 4 0
 I hear ya, but ignoring any overlap with other models I must say as a bit of a hardtail nerd I like the geo on this bike. Super long reach and super steep head angle works awesome on full suspension bikes but it feel it makes hardtails feel super wierd. 15-20mm less reach and a few degrees slacker seat tube is wat more functional so good on cotic for that. With the 140 fork you could ride this thing pretty much anywhere without it being too ungainly on more mellow stuff.
  • 3 0
 Sorry that should read super steep seat tube angle, not head angle. Lol
  • 2 0
 This bike is stronger and lobger fork optimised compared to the SolarisMAX. The overlap is no more marked than Soul vs BFe. Its that kind of idea.
  • 2 0
 @cotic-bikes : curious looking through the geo, which you’ve given already sagged, the seatube angle looks so slack in era where forward thinking companies like yourselves are pushing 77-80 degrees , any reason? Am I missing something?
  • 3 0
 Yes .hardtails don't have rear suspension to sag down when you are climbing. I have a full suspension bike with a 76 degree STA and a hardtail with a 73 degree STA and in practice they feel about the same. I previously had a hardtail with a 76 degree STA and it felt pretty awkward in all but the steepest of climbs.
  • 3 0
 Kenny got it right, but FS bikes sag more at the back than the front (typically 30% sag rear, 20-25% front), so our droplink bikes have 75.5-76 deg seat angles, which is actually more like 74-74.5 when you're on board (and actual measurement at saddle height), which is the same as what you have here. We're also not fans of the crazy steep seat angles. They work for short rides and on steep tech climbs, but here in the UK where we have a fair amount of access, but almost no lifts, most peoples' riding involves fairly long steady spins to the top of the hill, where a slightly slacker seat angle lets you "sit off" your wrists and not feel like you're in a half push up position for 30 minutes climbing.
  • 3 0
 @cotic-bikes: thanks for the response, interesting!
  • 2 0
 @cotic-bikes: I also think there are differences in riding style at play. Modern full suspension bikes with big cassettes and lots of traction encourage a "sit and spin" approach in almost all situations, and the steep seat angle helps as the bike is tipped upwards from horizontal.

Hardtails reward standing up more when climbing gets steep and/or technical so the utility of the steep seat tube angle is not really the same.
  • 4 0
 The fastest thing on the hill...I love my 26 BFe for street and DJ and 650B for DH racing. Solid, reliable and rapid!
  • 4 0
 Love a steel hardrail bike. Cotic have always been one of the leaders in this. Looks great too.
  • 5 0
 Someday I want a Cotic. That is all.
  • 4 1
 All y'other companies making a hardtail with "custom in house butted 4130" better wise up. Cotic be making one with 853. And for a similar price. Love it!
  • 2 1
 The whole Cotic portfolio (bit of a posh word) seems to be going 29 inch wheel. Soul gone (not a pun), how long before the Flare follows? Other brands too. I’m just over 5’8”, and just can’t relate to the big wheels, I’m looking at a new bike later this year but I reckon I’ll be pushed 29’r by the industry. Progress I guess. Sick brand though.
  • 3 0
 You should try a 29er. When 27.5 took over, hard to believe it was only 4 or so years ago, I was looking for a new bike. Read the science and data between 27.5 and 29, looked at tire/wheel weights and went with a 29er. I'm just under 5'8" and I can find a frame that fits. When I ride my 26er, I can feel the roll over that gets muted on the same trails with the 29. It's as fast or faster, just way more stable. I've done everything with my older Cotic Salaris 29er, even Ray's bike park and really I'm not missing the little bike.
  • 2 0
 We do have more 29ers than 27.5 these days, but it's all consumer/sales volume driven. We kept the BFe26 in production until last year, which was the point at which the sales dropped below where we could sustain it. Same with the Soul: It's an awesome bike and I love it, but if we can't sell more than one production batch per year, we can't afford to keep it in the range. We're a small company which was running 11 model lines a year ago. That's a lot to deal with!
  • 3 0
 What’s the deal with the new head badge? I like the old one crazy face style.
  • 9 0
 New badge introduced a couple of months ago. There was a lot of love for the old one, we appreciate that, but it wasn't very 'us' anymore. The new one is.
  • 1 0
 @cotic-bikes: what size is the gunmetal one in the photo?
  • 3 0
 I like the new head badge much better. I was planning on covering up or removing the old one if I got a Cotic.
  • 2 0
 @tobiusmaximum: That is the large size
  • 3 0
 @vikb: That's kind of harsh....it's not like it's a bear grabbing it's crotch or anything.
  • 1 0
 @rideonjon: the chromag branding is probably the best in the business. (Just my opinion though)
  • 3 0
 They now add a real badge to the steerer-tube, it seems! Looks so much better than (cheapish looking)stickers before.
  • 1 0
 Nice looking bike buy why oh why would you not line the seat stay up with the top tube. Looks like they fucked up and just left it. Best looking bike are a straight line head tube to rear axle.
  • 5 0
 As a rule I agree, but the blue bike is the medium, and this size and the small are tight on packaging around the tyres at this point so a small compromise on the lines had to be made.
  • 2 0
 @cotic-bikes: wow didn't expect a direct reply. Makes sense tho cheers
  • 3 0
 Those Conti tyres are a blast from the past. #rubberqueensnotdead
  • 1 0
 They never stopped making it... Yeah, they dropped the (much better!) Rubber Queen name, but the design, whether called RQ or TK, has always been produced...
  • 1 0
 @just6979: I know, but nobody over here has ridden them since about 2012. I used to really like them.
  • 1 0
 @chakaping: Yeah, I guess Conti kinda of let them fall by the wayside, pushing the Der Whatever Projekt stuff that the Atherton's were racing on. I had to move off them when the 26 inch models got hard to find _and_ the quality seemed to fall off (just could not get them to seat tubeless as well as previously). I'm on 27.5 now, and might grab a TrailKing 2.4 for a rear tire when I wear out this Specialized (which are becoming really damn good tires! Gripton is giving Black Chili a run for their money!)
  • 3 0
 Not sure if I wanna ride Max Hardcore.
  • 1 0
 My thoughts too.
  • 1 0
 Then you definitely don't wanna ride BFe Max Hardcore.
  • 6 0
 Once you have had Max Hardcore you never go back
  • 1 1
 You`re right; having a Max Hardcore between one`s legs must be a bit intimidating at the beginning Wink
  • 1 0
 Just one question : is this a uk build frame or a taiwanese build ?
There is no problem for me with asia. ;-) Im just curious.
  • 1 0
 Taiwan.
  • 4 0
 @Spittingcat: thanks !
And your pictures are awesome !
  • 1 0
 A much heavier Solaris for a bit less money.

Surely the overlap is massive here. What can this handle that a 140mm Solaris can't?
  • 1 0
 I’m not certain but maybe it’s a geometry thing?
  • 1 0
 @tobiusmaximum: Barely, have you seen the geo charts? Wack an angleset on a solaris and it's splitting hairs stuff. the weight however is always heavier.
  • 3 0
 It's much stronger than the SolarisMAX, and can take up to 160mm forks which the SolarisMAX can't. This bike is designed around a 140 fork, with capability for up to 160mm. The SolarisMAX is designed around 120mm forks with up to 140 capability. There is some overlap, but the SolarisMAX is lighter and can be setup more XC. Also, if you prefer 140 forks, this has a lower BB and steeper seat angle than the SolarisMAX with 140mm forks. Or if like the idea of a Cotic 29er hardtail but can't quite stretch to a SolarisMAX then this is an option. Lots of reasons for people to buy this instead of a SolarisMAX
  • 3 0
 I just built one of these up. Can't wait to hit the trails.
  • 2 0
 Frame shipping to north America differs from whats on the Cotic web site. Please confirm.
  • 1 0
 Hi there. Sorry, the wording isn't great on that bit. The frame price of around US$623 is correct with shipping including. It's £507.50 GBP exactly. But it does have to add shipping to the headline UK/Europe frame price. What IS shipping included is if you purchase a complete bike. Sorry for the misunderstanding.
  • 3 0
 A thing of beauty.
  • 1 0
 I’ve just built up a 27.5 BFE , I think the resale value has just gone up ( not that I’ll sell it)
  • 2 0
 Will it take a true 2.8 tire?
  • 2 0
 It won't fit a 29x2.8, but it would easily fit anything up to 27.5x3.0 in the back.
  • 4 0
 @cotic-bikes: I can confirm smoke clearance with a 27.5x3.0 on a 45i rim. Tons of clearance.
  • 2 0
 Smoke = ample. Stupid autocorrect.
  • 2 4
 The chainstays seem short for a "fast-as-you-dare" bike, unless you only like going in straight lines downhill. Size L has an _800mm_ front center! Sure, it's got 485mm reach to pull you forward a bit, but still, how the f*ck do you really weight the front wheel in less-than-stupidly-steep corners?

Big wheels, huge wheelbase, short-ish chainstays: takes flat turns like an oil tanker.
  • 5 0
 Interesting you think the chainstay are short. We were berrated 3 years ago for "going up" to 442mm for the tyre clearance and a better weight balance on 29" wheels. It works because you use a 35mm stem to keep the handling sharp and the weight centred. They'll take way more load on the front than a shorter bike, because the short stem means they have almost no tendency to tuck the front wheel, so you can really get involved. They're ace on corners.
  • 1 4
 @cotic-bikes: You got berated because people don't know what they're talking about. "short chainstays" was a stupid buzzword that the media made everyone think they wanted on every bike for every discipline. Fricking Pinkbike _still_ has chainstays as the _only_ length they list in the initial specs sidebar on every bike review. _You guys had it right back then_. But now head angles are slacker and reaches are longer, making for longer wheelbases, and chainstays should go up (at least on the larger sizes with their much bigger wheelbases) to match.

Stem length doesn't effect wheel tuck, pretty sure that's determined by head angle and trail... XC bikes tend more towards tucking the front on steep twisty descents because it's got steep angles and short trail, not because it's got a 90mm stem...
  • 5 0
 @just6979: I think that's possible a little harsh, but thanks for the support on the point. You're right about chainstay length, it does need to be in proportion to the bike length overall. Wheelbase is not something I ever consider when designing. It's the thing that drops out the end when all the other important things are decided.

As for stem length, that's not my experience. Even going up to a 50mm stem on our current bikes shows a significantly increased tendency for the wheel to tuck when you loose front end grip. Once your hands get in front of the axle on the steering axis, as soon as you loose grip your bars tend to accelerate the situation (tuck, then crash) rather than just transmit the information. I've lost the front end on my bike a few times, and with the short stem, you just kind of realise, then pick the bike back up. It's like everything happens in slow motion compared to the 'front wheel side tuck SMASH' of the old days.
  • 1 1
 A short offset fork would help, but it's already got a lot of trail.

Short chainstays compared to what? Rootdown is 42cm.

The longish chainstays allow for a straight seat tube, which might mean one could use a longer (40mm) stem, which helps with weighting, which is easier with slacker htas anyway. Based on the longer-than-average toptube, I wouldn't take a chance on in, but it's consistent with their other offerings and its stated intention.
  • 1 0
 @ceecee: short compared to the overall wheelbase
  • 2 1
 @cotic-bikes: "Wheelbase is not something I ever consider when designing. It's the thing that drops out the end when all the other important things are decided."

Well, that's odd, because front-center to rear-center ratio (or wheelbase to chainstays depending on how you look at it) can have a pretty big effect on handling. One would think that wheelbase should definitely be considered as part of the process. It has a large impact on turning (not steering!) feel.
  • 8 0
 This is not directly related to you @just6979 but seems a relevant place to vent.
Everyone’s a geo expert now and everyone’s (understandably) looking for gains in areas that they have personally found to be advantageous. It’s gotten to the stage where we’re quite comfortable telling a guy who started his own very successful bike company where he’s got it wrong.
Mtb is not like road where the rider is always in one position on one type of terrain, it’s vastly more dynamic in both respects. Add to that there is a wide variety of technique - even within those that are proven to work - I think we would all do well to remember there is not one geometry that will suit all riders. This is the job of a good bike designer, to come up with a balanced bike for as many possible riders on the terrain the bike is designed to encounter as possible. But as above, the very nature of mtb makes it impossible to truly suit everyone’s taste and/ or needs.
My point is that the way one rider interacts with their bike may be completely different to that of their peer. They may even compete at the same elite level, be of similar height and weight and yet ride two quite different geometry bikes and at that level they’ll have tried everything available to them that they thought would give them the gains.
We should applaud variety, if this bike ain’t the one for you, look elsewhere. Be a real shame if all bikes weren’t the one for you. And if you still can’t find it there are a number of custom options out there.
  • 1 0
 @just6979: yes, let's take speculation to the hundredth decimal point
  • 2 4
 @ProperPushIrons: Of course different people need different bikes, but...

It's a damn fact that a longer wheelbase makes for a slower _turning_ bike. And a steep head angle and/or short trail makes a quick _steering_ bike. These are both aspects of _handling_. A bike with a 1400mm wheel base and an 80 degree head angle (asumming 46mm middle-ground offset) is going to _steer_ very quickly. But it's not going to _turn_ super fast. On the flip side, a bike with an 1100mm wheel base and a 60 degree head angle (same 46mm offset) is going to _steer_ fairly slow, but _turn_ damn quick. And they're both going to _handle_ differently.

By "steer" quickly or slowly I mean the front wheel is going to start trying to change the direction of the bike with less input (quick) or more input (slow). By "turn" quickly or slowly I mean the bike is actually going to change direction more or less for a given steering input. Both are aspects of _handling_.

Everyone likes to say "Oh it's got a steep head angle, it's going to steer so fast and be twitchy", or "It's so slack it's going to be hard to turn", without taking the wheelbase (and front & rear centers) into account.

And now to hear a bike designer doesn't even look at the wheelbase until the design is done and it just comes out that way... that's disappointing. Makes me wonder how they even chose the reach numbers for the other sizes (since they obviously just extrapolated off the first size they created, obviously to fit themselves), since with the same chainstays everywhere the front-rear balance is different for every size. Reach and stack are down to the millimeter, but chainstays are "make them all the same, who cares" and then wheelbase is just "f*ck it, it is what is". In fact, what size is "the size" that they based the handling goals on? I'd assume medium with a full XS-S-M-L-XL range, but maybe it's L in this M-L-XL range... Because the XL is going to handle a bit differently than the M with their quite different wheelbases and front-center to rear-center ratios.

I know lots of people love their Cotics, and I've heard the guys on quite a few podcasts, so I figured they were a little better than the big manufacturers with design and sizing. Instead it turns out they also just say "f*ck all the sizes that aren't the one I ride, they are what they are."
  • 2 0
 @just6979: I am very, very aware of front/rear centre ratio. That's extremely important. However, if those dictate a large wheelbase, I'm not going to shorten a bike just because some people get scared of a long wheelbase because a magazine 20 years ago said that was bad. I went down that road during Longshot geometry development as the bikes were getting very long. Got worried people would be scared off by it. Built a RocketMAX prototype with 'less scary' numbers. It was awful. Went for 1300+ wheelbase and 63.5 deg head angle like I originally got to, and it's awesome. Wheelbase is about the least important number on the whole bike.
  • 1 0
 @just6979: that's a tasty chunk of original analysis that I'm still trying to digest. Thanks for typing it up. I presume you've seen the highly regular sizing schemes on new Optic and Sight. Torrent didn't quite get the same treatment.
  • 1 0
 @ceecee: oh yes. Norco did an awesome thing with that. Someone else is doing it too, maybe a couple companies, can't recall right now... Make as much sense as changing layups or suspension curves or shock tunes for different size bikes/riders. Maybe more, because although using identical layups might cause unneeded harshness on a small frame, having only one geo measurement remain identical means each size will literally handle differently per size.

With chainstays staying the same, XL riders are proportionally shifted towards the back of the bike relative to the wheels, and XS riders are shifted to the front. So shorter riders are missing out on some of the benefits of new long front-ends and still have to fight long chainstays, and taller riders are dealing with the extremes of huge reaches with (relatively) tiny chainstays. There is a reason many DH bikes have adjustable chainstay lengths and/or adjustable reach/wheelbase through swappable headset cups. Minnaar has _custom_ chainstay extenders!
  • 1 0
 @ceecee: an example, from Cathro's bike check today: "So a 7mm reach adjust and the rear end is in it’s the longest setting to try and balance things up."

Chainstay length _is important_!
  • 2 0
 @just6979: lengths! please, since they've been tied to balance via ratio and even single riders are divided by them. Santa has made them without having to make a different swingarm--which is probably half the cost of a frame--so there's no significant financial disincentive to have them. Also sliding dropouts--they could be labeled Tall/Not tall or Race/Rip. Scott Voltage had a 41cm setting for 26" only. That gets me going, but I'm in the rip camp. That and fit theory which is probably consistent with Physics, in plain speech. DH pros adjust head and tail track by track to get the fastest balance of turning and steering. Courses for horses!
  • 3 1
 THANK YOU GOD. LITERALLY FELT THIS WAS MISSING FROM THE BRAND. SIGN ME UP.
  • 1 0
 Nice to see some quality hardtails back on the market. Like the look of these and the On One Hello Dave
  • 1 0
 Reminds me of the Kona Unit X
  • 2 1
 I came here to say this bike is not for me.
  • 1 0
 For me the most hardcore thing is "29er only"
  • 2 0
 That thing is lowwwwww
  • 1 1
 Hi, I have a 2020 Trek Roscoe 7 and I was wondering if it would be possible to run a 140 or 150 mm fork on it.?
  • 2 0
 Mmmmmm. Beefy
  • 1 0
 anyone suggested a TiFeMax?
  • 1 0
 Was it Cotic who got a thrill put of advertising 26" ain't dead?
  • 1 0
 Max hardcore, ha ha.
  • 2 1
 Ritchey still exist???
  • 1 3
 looks ridiculous in those pictures. Wheels look massive compared to the frame.
  • 3 0
 We do a nice 27.5" wheel version too. www.cotic.co.uk/product/BFe
  • 2 0
 @cotic-bikes: That sounded harsher than I ment. I'm actually looking at a BFe, soul or an Identiti AKA at the moment. no stock anywhere though.
  • 1 0
 @mtb-scotland: Actually, I've just checked and we are out of stock of mediums aren't we? We have all the other sizes though. It's been a crazy month. I can barely keep up.
  • 1 0
 @cotic-bikes: no small souls and no small in the gray colour scheme BFe
  • 3 0
 @mtb-scotland: Ah, well, like I say, it's been a crazy month, and unfortunately due to production 'bumps' with the current situation, we're a few months away from a BFe restock too.
  • 4 0
 @cotic-bikes: Don't worry about it - more time more savings more bling
  • 1 3
 A Ritchey bar! Eeek!
  • 5 0
 It's one of those component substitution we mentioned. It's a really nice bar, but usually these come with our own Cotic Calver bar.
  • 3 0
 @cotic-bikes: Please don't take me serious, I was just kidding. I love your brand, I constantly drool over your products and very likely I'll be a customer one day in the future. I'm very keen on a steel bike, especially as a retro bike collector that has ridden quite a few bikes and has a huge appreciation for the feel of steel. But for now I'm saving money for a 29” DH bike, as I'm pretty pleased with my Foxy 29. Thank you for replying to my dipshit comment, though. It proves that you have way more class than me, honestly. But I send you genuine love from green Transylvania. Actually, a few hours ago I finished my evening ride and met my buddy who owns a Cotic and talked about his bike and this one over here, as we both read the article. Chapeau, guys! Smile
  • 1 0
 @cotic-bikes: Thx for commenting. To me it really shows you connect with your (potential) customers. I am still enjoying my Bfe 26 and my son his Bfe 27! Great bikes and love to try the 29'er!!!
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