Crankbrothers Highline Dropper Seatpost - Review

Feb 14, 2017
by Richard Cunningham  
Crankbrothers Hiline seatpost


Pinkbike debuted Crankbrothers' Highline dropper seatpost last April and it was their most significant development since the brand was reorganized under the Selle Royal Group. The Highline represented more than a new product from the Laguna Beach innovators. It was a mission statement—a demonstration of its redoubled engineering, testing, and quality control processes—and it was impressive in every respect.

In the Crankbrothers style, every part is beautifully machined and finished. Inside, its cable-operated mechanism can be disassembled and serviced by average home mechanics with a few simple tools. The primary element of the Highline is an easily replaced cartridge (backed by a three-year warranty) which ensures that in a worst-case scenario, customers won't be waiting for their dropper post to be serviced by the factory. I posted a favorable first-ride piece shortly after the Crankbrothers launch and promised a long-term follow-up report, so here it is:


Crankbrothers Highline dropper seatpost 2016
The cable actuates a spiral driver (left) that turns the Highline cartridge's rotary valve.
Highline Details:
• Weight: 580g (includes remote and cables)
• Infinite travel adjustment - 5” / 125mm
• Diameter: 30.9, 31.6mm
• Length: 400mm
• 50mm clamp-head height
• Internal routing
• Quick-connect mechanism
• Quick-release, two-bolt clamp head.
• Jagwire Elite Ultra-Slick cable and housing
• Self-contained hydraulic cartridge
• Igus LL-glide bearing and keys
• Trelleborg seal
• Three-year warranty
• MSRP: $350.00, €350.00
• Contact: Crankbrothers


Installation

Someone put some thought into the Highline's installation process. To begin with, it's cable operated, and Crankbrother's decision to use Jagwire's best cable and housing means you may never need to service it, but if you do, a gear cable and some housing can be purchased at bike stores worldwide. I found that the lack of end fittings made it much easier to internally route the cable housing than a hydraulic Reverb hose, with its threaded metal ends. The fixed end of the cable slides into the actuator mechanism at the base of the post, which can be unscrewed by hand. The free end of the cable is fixed to the remote lever with a set-screw, which makes it simpler to fine-tune the housing length between the lever and the frame.

Crankbrothers Hiline seatpost

bigquotesPositioning the Highline's remote is facilitated by its ball-and-socket clamping arrangement, which allows the lever to be rotated about its axis and angled to accommodate just about any rider's preference.

Positioning the Highline's remote is facilitated by its ball-and-socket clamping arrangement, which allows the lever to be rotated about its axis and angled to accommodate just about any rider's preference. The low-profile handlebar clamp is only ten millimeters wide, so it can be nestled inboard or outboard of most any brake lever perch. The shift lever itself is quite comfortable, and its smooth, low-friction action made micro-adjusting the seatpost height a very intuitive process. Nuances, perhaps, but they add up. Extensions and retractions became seamless events—and returning to a competitor's dropper post was not always a pleasant transition.

Two-bolt seat-rail clamps have proven to be the easiest to micro-adjust, and the most secure method to retain a saddle. The downside, however, comes when it's time to replace or remove the seat, which often becomes a wrestling match unless one or both of the clamping bolts are completely removed. Crankbrothers eliminated the need to remove bolts (and the resulting shower of specialty hardware) by slotting the back of the seatpost head. Loosen the bolt, swing it free, and the saddle slides off and on in a more civilized manner.

bigquotesCrankbrothers eliminated the need to remove bolts (and the resulting shower of specialty hardware) by slotting the back of the seatpost head.

Crankbrothers Hiline seatpost

Trail Report

I ran the Highline dropper post on two different bikes in mostly dry weather for nearly a year. I did manage to find a few mucky and rainy days to ride, but nothing like a serious rider would encounter in British Columbia's temperate rain forests. The post scores top marks for durability. It survived some impressive crashes in the boulders without any indications that harm was done. The sliding bushings are still intact and the post does not rock. The two-key indexing system also held well. To date, the side play is negligible—pretty much what I experience with reputable brand's posts when they are fresh in their boxes.

Crankbrothers say that the seal-head should be unscrewed, and the post lubricated each year. I didn't bother, as the protected area inside the post looked nearly new and was still moist with lubricant when I checked it for this report. The seal-head can be unscrewed by hand should you be curious about the health of your post.

As mentioned, the action of the remote lever, in combination with the post's smooth-operating rotary valve makes for one of (if not the best) modulating posts I've used. part of that control is due to the fact that the Highline extends at a metered rate—fast enough to satisfy most riders, but not so fast that it can't be stopped with a degree of accuracy mid-way through its stroke. Riders who demand an instant extension may find the Crankbrother's post to be too slow, but the Highline is what it is. Its cartridge system is not adjustable for speed like a RockShox Reverb with its manually charged air-spring. I prefer a faster post, but I grew to like the ability to precisely adjust the Highline's extension for technical trails that demanded a lot of pedaling.
Crankbrothers Hiline seatpost
The free end of the cable tucks into a slot beneath the remote lever.

Crankbrothers began the Highline project two years before the trend for longer-stroke dropper posts became the norm and there is no hiding that a 125-millimeter-stroke dropper post is the absolute minimum requirement today. The push for ultra-steep seat tube angles has upped the ante and the 150-millimeter post has eclipsed the 125 as the baseline standard for all-mountain and enduro style mountain bikes. If there was any complaint that I could level at the Highline, it would be that it desperately needs a big brother. Crankbrothers suggested that a longer-stroke version was in the testing stages at the launch, so I hope to see it sometime this year.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesCrankbrothers did well to make the Highline an exemplary dropper. If its only reason to exist was to assure loyal fans that the brand has returned stronger and more committed than it has ever been, the Highline would be a win. That said, if I didn't know anything about Crankbrothers, I'd still recommend it to anyone in search of a pro-quality 125-millimeter-stroke dropper post. Now, where's that 150-millimeter version? - RC



MENTIONS: @crankbrothers



165 Comments

  • + 121
 I took a gamble and bought this post last season. Rode it through the summer and the fall and it worked flawlessly. Despite what people say about CB, it's a very nice post.
  • + 130
 Really nice post what you wrote.
  • + 58
 Thanks for coming by and dropping a quick review.
  • + 44
 I'm going to take the high line and not continue these puns.
  • + 26
 You should extend it a little more.
  • + 39
 @mrgonzo: is that what you were told this valentines day?
  • + 32
 @adrennan: Frown yeah your mom has high standards
  • + 3
 they say that shorter and longer options should be popping up soon.
  • + 5
 These puns are starting to top out
  • + 0
 You really cranked me up with this review!
  • + 0
 Nice is such a wimpy word. This post is drop dead gorgeous!
  • + 0
 Can't you pink bikers just drop all this nonsense
  • + 84
 "Now, where's that 150-millimeter version?"

Shorter and longer travel options are in final stages of development and will be coming soon Smile
  • + 12
 make a pivotal dropper post for banter please
  • - 2
 YES, so surprised pivotal hasn't been picked up by mtb. THE strongest to wieght ratio post/saddle there is
  • + 10
 @nojzilla: pivotal doesn't allow you to move your seat fore and aft.
Pretty crucial for trail bikes.
  • + 0
 @jflb: i have seen one with a few different mounts underneath. wouldnt be too hard to design
  • + 1
 I used pivotal on my slopestyle and dh bikes, its by far and away the best setup money can buy, not to mention by odyssey seat was the most comfortable seat I've had despite it being so small, it meant it got in the way less too. The whole set up weighed less than a top of the range mtb seat and post and cost a fraction of the price. Bring on dropper pivotal!!
  • + 2
 yeah £50-£70 for some wacko saddle because its got "carbon" rails or something

mans running a leopard print Vibrator for a seat, according to Bone Deth.
  • + 2
 @crankbrothers: Really happy to see such an exemplary review, and looking forward to more of the same in the future! Between this and the Q&A a few months back, thank you, and congrats on beginning to turn the company around! Another couple years of this and the bad jokes will be a thing of the past. Beer
  • + 52
 Props to CB for a finished well designed prodcut. Disclosure - I say this as a self-confessed CB doubter having been burned by their products before. Credit where credit's due
  • + 8
 I saw CBs creation of the Highline as test for them as a "new blood company". I went out of my way to get my hands on one as early as possible to see how well it works. After a few weeks I sold my Reverb not for a fault of the Reverb but rather the Highline never itself never became an issue, even in the muddiest summer on my side of BC. It's also the plushest post I've ever used or setup in my shop.
  • + 4
 They must have recognized that their brand (as well as the product) had absolutely no room for funny business, and did their utmost to create a completely on-the-money product at a competitive price point. Most obvious and visible improvement is to the seat post clamp, where they included a user-friendly feature to a scheme that has been proven to work. Props also for the mechanical actuation as being simpler over time. Sounds like the engineering and product teams had a very clear goal and worked hard to realize that, so - good for them. Interested in trying this new post.
  • + 4
 @twozerosix: True that Lee. Unfortunately it took them being bought out by a different company to finally change their culture.
  • + 33
 I've been running a Highline for 6 months and 1,000 miles now and I agree with this review in pretty much every regard.

I can add that I've been riding the post in subfreezing (and sometimes sub-zero) temps for the last two months, with lots of road slop and salt thrown into the mix. The post only slows down slightly at sub-zero temps, and it operates as well as it did when new, despite the salt and road grime thrown at it.
  • + 6
 Thanks for the cold weather report, I was curious about that. My freshly serviced gen1 reverb just. barely. goes. up. when it's 25-35° out, about the coldest it gets here. Doubt it would even work below 20.
  • + 2
 @JustinVP: This is what I hate most about the reverb. mine slows at around 45 degrees and fails to move below freezing
  • + 13
 I was thoroughly impressed with Crankbrothers' Q&A here on Pinkbike. Taking full responsibility for past mistakes was admirable, and I'm very happy to see that the new products are living up to what was spoken. Crankbrothers will be back on my shortlist when I'm looking for new products.
  • + 11
 I have had one of these since the release and it has been flawless. For me, the 125mm is the perfect length. I like the slower return speed and audible but light top out. The post locks into place and feels solid wherever you stop it, zero up and down free play. The Kronolog was terrible, but the highline is awesome!
  • + 1
 Is the return speed on par with a KS LEV (stock setup) or slower?
  • + 2
 @cool3: This seems to be slower. Not annoyingly slow, just not the sharp fast rebound of say the Specialized Command Post. It seems to be about the same speed as a reverb set to the slowest speed. It comes up and has a light but audible thud. I actually really dislike a super fast rebounding seatpost.
  • + 4
 @randyridesbikes: You don't like getting your nuts smashed by the command post as it rockets up at mach speeds? lol seriously caught me off guard the first time i used it
  • + 3
 @nismo325: for those of u without a brass set, the Command Post return speed is adjustable.
  • + 10
 Crank has very much redeemed itself for the Kronolog with the release of the Highline. I have been using my Highline for 3 months now in very wet and very dry conditions. The only maintenance I have done is a quick wipe down of the post and dust seal after every ride. The post has worked flawlessly the whole time and there is no side-to-side play. The remote is the most user-friendly remote of any post. I've already seen the 160mm version in person, I presume it will be available soon. I very much recommend this post.
  • + 9
 What was the box like?

- nice looking seatpost
  • + 9
 Better than the absolute garbage that Easton/Raceface has been.
  • + 0
 so i started to have problems with my turbine, turned out i just needed to add air to it. Has been running perfect for about 6 months now, cant beat the action of my fox transfer though.
  • + 2
 More info please.
  • + 0
 9.8 fall line ftw
  • + 2
 I've been using 2 Raceface for over 6 month with zero issues. I think that a lot of people don't know that they can adjust the air pressure. I must admit that Raceface is not clear on the air pressure feature though.
  • + 4
 For me, all of my CB products have a story of looking good, feeling good, working good until you forget to maintain properly your stuff. That's when the things snap. But it is not CB's fault, it is us, users, for not taking care properly.

This one looks awesome and certainly would consider it for my next bike.

Cheers,
Beer
  • + 8
 While I understand your logic, the fact is other companies' products continue to work relatively flawlessly with minimal maintenance (if any) ...e.g hope hubs

CB products do not offer any advantage...well except some additional freedoms that come with CB clipping vs spd...and typically have a weak lifespan.
  • + 8
 @nvranka:

I maintain my Hope hubs annually. That's what keeps them going. Except for your grips and seat, there's not much else that is 'set and forget'.
  • + 5
 @CaptainSnappy: I guess it's a socal thing given the lack of consistent rain, but I never maintain my hope pro 2's on both DH and AM bikes, and they've lasted years of consistent hard rides without skipping a beat
  • + 6
 What's the maintenance that prevents egg beater axles from snapping? Cos being shanked in the calve by my own crank is what keeps me away CB.
  • + 7
 Down vote me all you want, but my reverb hasn't required so much as a bleed in over a year, have never blown up wheels as easily as I did CB Iodines, and have run spd pedals for years without maintenance vs blowing up/needing to maintain mallet dh pedals...
  • + 4
 @KiwiXC: not buying them? I think that counts as "preventative maintenance" doesn't it?
  • + 4
 @CaptainSnappy: SPD pedals are set and forget - I still have shimano pedals from the 90's that work flawlessly and have never had any maintenance done to them - and that includes living and riding in the PNW
  • + 0
 @Kiwiplague: Never will. I think dumping friends who ride them is important too. Had 2 rides ruined by "mates" who snuck CB pedals on the ride and then had to roll out slowly with only one pedal!
  • + 1
 @KiwiXC: I'm about as big of a shimano fanboi as you can get, but I would like to point out the XTR pedals that assploded with a disturbing frequency.

*sidenote, I abhor CB pedals
  • + 2
 @SlackBoy: I thought that XTRs had a bearing and unscrewing issue rather than a spindle snapping issue, but then again I don't have a shop.
  • + 4
 @KiwiXC: weird, never had an issue with any of my CB pedals in cyclocross or mountain in over 5 seasons!
  • + 0
 @KiwiXC: Shimano have since corrected the problem, but early Shimano XTR pedals with the copper nut (Shimano M985) failed at an alarming rate. My pedals sheared a the base of the threaded section of the axle on the outboard side. Avoid the M985 at all costs. I think Shimano should have replaced all M985 pedals no questions asked. I took apart a new PD-M9020 XTR and it had a much larger diameter axle shaft. That being said, I still have some PD-M747's running strong and I still think Shimano makes the best pedals period.
  • + 3
 Wow! Good job CB. You've gotten the approval of the PB crowd. Way to turn it around. I use a Thomson elite dropper that I've had for two years now zero issues except for the chincy plastic cable guide they use on the side of the post. Zip ties ftw. But I'll check out the CB next.
  • + 4
 I met some of your reps at the beer fest at Big Bear/Snow Summit this year. Almost bought the flats but just didn’t have enough confidence yet. I think I might now. Great comeback! Keep it up @crankbrothers !
  • + 2
 Been running one for 4 months now. Was really nervous but initial reviews were good and the price was right. I have to admit it has been a pleasant surprise. Only flaw is when it is really cold it, it needs to be cycled several times to warm up the internals or it will not stay down.
  • + 2
 ive had the post for about a year now, and I have to say it has performed fuken great. No issues, have not had the need to rebuild, or adjust anything since I installed it. I sure would like for it to have 150mm drop, but for reliability, so far the best post ive had.
  • + 4
 Only $475 here in Canada too, that beats Race Face, RS, and Fox for a premium level post... and it includes a 1x lever (cough RF/Fox, cough)
  • + 0
 Yet it's easily 100$ more than the Giant and TranzX options which are built on the exact same principles and they come in 150mm drop...
  • + 2
 @m47h13u: however unlike the tranzX, the CB version actually works. My buddy had a tranzX last literally 3 rides before it was kaput. No idea of the giant, but the transX is absolute garbage.
  • + 0
 @ratedgg13: the Giant one is the first dropper to use a gas strut, so it was basically the first reliable infinite adjust dropper on the market. That reliability is why crank bros, shimano, and several others are now using gas struts. I'm all for more competition in the market, but let's not pretend CB is doing something unique or new here
  • + 2
 Big fan of the Giant version. First generation was so so, but any version with a black stanchion has been great (and I've put thousands of miles on all of them). Keep the dust wiper clean and lubed.
  • + 2
 @iamamodel: Another fan of the Giant. Unfortunately not done in 31.6 so I had to move on.
  • + 3
 What is the need for a dropper that goes 150-200mm? Just curious. I believe my Thomson is 125 and it seems plenty. Geez I can still remember having to hump the rear of the seat.
  • + 3
 How tall are you? I'm 6'4" and can use every mm of my 150mm post. 200mm would be even better, but not worth trading out a functioning unit.
  • + 2
 I'm 6'1 and with a 125mm reverb, I still have to adjust the seatpost at the bottom/top of every hill. Kinda defeats the purpose really.
  • + 1
 @sdm74 I'm only 5'11" and on my large Stumpy I have at least 40mm of extra post out of the frame. Hunting for a 150mm as why not? Why would I not want the post to be as low as possible? Remember when you had the hump the rear of the seat? Remember when you grabbed your canti brakes in the wet and nothing happened? Remembering is the problem. Look forward.
  • + 1
 Umm being tall and lanky for me..My 150 doesn't cut it ..Still to much post protruding for my taste and still gets in the way when sending it sideways..I want that thing dumped! Going to check out fall line 9.8 175mm ..I'm a tall basterd tho!
  • + 6
 Best lever in the dropper game. Works great with ks too.
  • + 1
 How are you holding the cable at the post end with ks?
  • + 2
 @allenfstar: u gotta flatten the end dealeo.
Most shops can do it...takes 2 sec
  • + 1
 All these tests should be done with a minimum of 10 posts. I ride with several guys...KS, 9point8, Fox....etc. One guy has had a KS for 2.5 years no problems, another guy with the same KS has had it warrantied 4 times. Need a larger sample size folks.
  • + 1
 Can anyone who has this post talk about lifting the saddle when the post is lowered? I'd like to know if it stays put or does it lift a little? (Ideally, I'd prefer that it wouldn't raise - or if it does, the motion doesn't mess up the cartridge like what happens on most other cartridge posts)
  • + 4
 Zero up and down free play at any height. It feels solid when lifted by the seat. It has been perfect.
  • + 3
 @randyridesbikes: excellent, thank you for the info! Glad to hear it's not like my KS or my old Reverb when you lift up the saddle it raises... and the more you do it, they seem to get air in the cartridges which then results in the sagging at full extension.
  • + 3
 @peterdaam: Yes, I have been reprimanded by many a friend for doing this to their bikes loading up on the bike rack to go for a ride. This one does not seem to be bothered. I have had it for about a year now as well. Same operation as when new.
  • + 3
 @randyridesbikes: that's great! does it go up at all when you lift the saddle when all the way down?
  • + 2
 @peterdaam: no, literally no movement whatsoever at any height.
  • + 2
 @randyridesbikes: awesome! I might have to wait for their 160mm version :-)
thanks for the info!
  • + 1
 Sorry Pinkbike - that's not a real world test for any UK rider. You need to test it in the conditions we ride in. Muddy and mucky for half the year. If it stands up to that then perhaps CB is on the long road to repairing its appalling reputation.
  • + 2
 Also true for here. The mud in this bit of Switzerland is actually worse than I experienced in my native UK.
  • + 2
 I have this dropper and it's been perfect. The leaver really makes it the best dropper I have used. The only negative was mine was around 610 grams not 580 as claimed - bit cheeky Crank Brothers!
  • + 1
 ......
  • + 5
 That ball-socket lever is a great idea!
  • + 1
 Fox doss the best,zero maintenance,zero problems ,yes a little side to side play and forward to back play ,and yes maybe the not the best (not the worst after some hard pacient adjusting of the remote),but it is flawless,the others ummmmm..........
  • - 5
flag owlie (Feb 14, 2017 at 17:18) (Below Threshold)
 engrish a secund languige?
  • + 5
 @owlie: i was meant to downvote you... such as asinine comment. How's your portugese dipshit?
  • - 4
flag owlie (Feb 14, 2017 at 17:48) (Below Threshold)
 @dwojo: better than your sarcasm detection ingrate
  • - 2
 @dwojo: What do they feed you down there, bowls of stupid?
  • + 1
 @owlie: your comment is not sarcasm which is why dwojo didn't detect it.
  • - 2
 @iamamodel: Pretty sure owl is pointing out the awful spelling. Do they spell bad in potageeze ?
  • - 1
 @owlie: Let's pretend the five of us were having a chat in a pub. Oneheckler mispronounces or misuses a few words. You respond with "Engrish a secund lenguige?" Dwojo would call you a dipshit. And I would agree. And I bet oneheckler would agree once dwojo and I explained the meaning to him if need be.
  • + 3
 @iamamodel: And I bet @owlie would call you out for just as big a dipshit for even commenting on this thread. do you see the irony? calling someone for the same shit youre doing? bowls of shit must be the only thing to make it over on boats for you guys.
Lets pretend youre a special little snowflake defending your countrymen with some misguided omerta
  • + 0
 @iamamodel: dipshit. go ride your bike
  • + 2
 @owlie: no it's not, thank you very nice or merci tres bien :-)))
  • + 4
 Big fan of Crank Bros. They make some cool parts.
  • + 3
 125 and 150 are not enough for those who like to pump.
  • + 6
 I pump so hard that my balls hit my pedals. Need a 1 meter dropper post.
  • + 2
 Damn and I just bought a Thomson. Looks like there is finally a reliable dropper post available.
  • + 2
 The flume trail made pinkbike! Some fun exploring to do back there @richardcunningham
  • + 2
 I really like the design of that level how you can choose the angle due to the ball joint, seems nice.
  • + 3
 I'm interested, but lets see a 150mm!
  • - 1
 Amazing that companies, even after all these years of dropper post development, still think 125mm is sufficient for everyone. I note the 150mm remark, but that's still WAY too small a drop for many. I run a 170mm reverb and would happily run a 200mm + if the option was available.

Edit - I'm aware of 200mm drop posts available, but it should be a norm by now
  • + 1
 I agree. With the amount of new droppers that have come out in the last year or so it's surprising that 99% offer no advancement on 150mm of travel.
  • + 1
 Agreed! having to lower your post a bit more when doing long, gnarly descents is very frustrating with a dropper post and seems to defeat the purpose of the product.
  • + 0
 To accommodate both you, & us people on the other side of the height bell curve, they need to let us change the amount of drop with some kind of replaceable shaft or spacer system. Ideally, it would let you adjust drop & extended length independently. I don't wanna have to sell a post off a brand new bike because it's still too high slammed to the collar, just as much as a tall person doesn't want to sell a brand new post because it's laughably short for their size. If you only sell aftermarket, that's one thing, but any brand trying to get OEM business should be catering to every rider that buys a particular bike.

Racers who only want a smaller amount of seat drop, so that the seat stays at their knees when dropped, could tune for that. with small enough adjustments, I could get more drop than my current 125(still some seatpost visible) but less than 150(which would be too long for my current bike.)

eightpins has the right idea, but either needs to get better market penetration for their custom mouting system, or build droppers that will work with a standard seat tube as well.
  • + 5
 125 is sufficient for alot of people, myself included. Now that said, i think alot of people, maybe even the majority, need a 150, and theyre silly to not offer it. They should offer both 125 and 150, no doubt about it.
  • + 6
 @Torbo24: Already in the works. Shorter and longer travel versions are coming soon.
  • + 4
 I recently switched from a 150mm post down to a 125. The seat tube on my bike is a bit long and I always had to fully extend my post and then lower it to the right height so I could pedal comfortably. So it was never a smooth transition to seated climbing mode for me. Switching to the 125mm dropper allowed me to fully extend the post.
  • + 4
 some bike frames can only fit a 125 dropper unfortunately
  • + 1
 @supatramp: Yeah, I think with dropper posts is a lot of times more about that than how much drop you like.
  • + 4
 Don't get too upset that not every post manufacturer makes a dropper for the Jack Skellingtons of this world as a high priority. I've got short legs and don't freak out because they didn't come out with a 100mm version right off the bat.
  • + 1
 @Torbo24: I'm eyeing up the 9.8 falline 175mm..My 150 still has to much post out the seat tube...Sucks for jumping and manualling ...
  • + 1
 @Olimac: not freaking out about anything myself, just responding to folks who dont understand why anything shorter than 150 exists. More choices=more better
  • + 1
 @Torbo24: exactly..People just like to bitch for the sake bitching! No doubt!
  • + 3
 No
  • + 2
 Good to see Crankbros made a good post! I'm sure a 150mm is in the works
  • + 10
 160 in testing...meaning theyre out there. Guessing sea otter release.
  • + 3
 Top????????????????
  • + 1
 Ok I'm game, bring out a 170mm and I'll buy one. I've been on the fence for 6 months and now the decision is made.
  • + 2
 Start doing video reviews plz!
  • + 6
 Reading is good for you!
  • + 1
 150? Wheres the 175-200? Getting back in the game and coming in at the bottom isnt going to win fans over
  • + 1
 I ordered one, over here in Scotland. 7 weeks later still no post. Gave up. Brand X fitted and happy.
  • + 1
 Reverse cable means you can't use something like a Southpaw, a converted Front Shifter or the RF Lever.
  • + 1
 You're right, it's unfortunate. I use a front deraileur shifter for my KS LEV to match the ergonomics. There might be a way to install a bolt on cable end like what the KS posts have, though that might have to be stuffed into the shifter.
  • + 1
 wolf tooth and doss remotes would work
  • + 1
 @adrennan: that's true, but nothing beats the ergonomics of a matching shifter!
  • + 2
 @peterdaam: i just paired the wolf tooth with my doss dropper (broke the doss remote) i prefer the feel of the wolf tooth lever.
  • + 3
 I have this crank bros lever matched to my ks. Its awesome!
  • + 1
 The bikeyoke triggy would work as well im pretty sure, as they have both configurations available. Compatible with sram matchmaker as well.
  • + 2
 $350.00, €350.00 - yeah, right.
  • + 1
 trust us guys, this one's more durable than the last one!
  • + 1
 were are the post that have the leaver under the seat? why just why
  • + 2
 Moist.
  • + 1
 Is it stealth routing only ? Or is there an in stealth option
  • + 1
 Getting it right after only...what,15 years?
  • - 1
 Lever looks kinda ugly imo
  • + 7
 i really like the ball and socket design. that part is freaking clever.
  • - 3
 Looks like a session
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