33 Enduro World Series Bike Checks

Aug 15, 2014 at 9:14
Aug 15, 2014
by Richard Cunningham  
 
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PB photog Colin Meagher was on the ground at the Canadian round of the Enduro World Series here in Whistler, capturing photos of competitors and their bikes. We prepared a busload of bike checks to illustrate the wide range of components and bike brands that compete on the EWS - and in some cases, the remarkable similarities of the setups that the racers used.


Crankworx 2014 - Bikes of the EWS

Jared Graves stands with the Yeti SB 6c prototype that he used to win the Canadian EWS round. Graves uses a prototype Renthal chainring on a Shimano XTR crankset. Brakes are Saint calipers with XTR Race levers that don't feature Shimano's Servo Wave mechanism, and he runs a Thomson dropper post actuated by a modified front XTR shifter. Suspension is all Fox, headed by the new 36 and backed up by a Factory Float X shock.



Crankworx 2014 - Bikes of the EWS

Damian Oton's Devinci Spartan is covered in depth in Mike Levy's PB story on the front page. Suspension is a RockShox Pike fork, paired with a Monarch Plus Debonair shock - a last minute switch from the Vivid Air damper that he was practicing with. The drivetrain all SRAM XX1.

See more about Oton's Devinci here.

Crankworx 2014 - Bikes of the EWS

Remy Absalon's Scott Genius LT is suspended by the Fox Nude shock and a Suntour Auron fork. Absalon uses Scott's three-position remote shock control in the rear, but it is not connected to the fork with the Twinlock mech that the stock Genius uses. The one-by Shimano XTR drivetrain has a Race Face chainring and bash guard.



Crankworx 2014 - Bikes of the EWS

Justin Leov brought a 29-inch-wheel Trek Remedy to the battle, sporting a Fox Factory RAD Float X shock and 36 fork. The drivetrain and brakes are Shimano XTR, but Leov, like most EWS riders, runs an aftermarket chainring - Wolf Tooth in this case. The chain guide is an MRP. Wheels and tires are all Bontrager, while the dropper post is a Fox D.O.S.S.



Crankworx 2014 - Bikes of the EWS

Curtis Keene's story begins with 27.5-inch wheels. Keen's first EWS podium was earned on S-Works Enduro 650. Up until now, the American Dream has campaigned upon the 29-inch wheel version. Keene chose a RockShox BlackBox Vivid Air DH shock and a Pike fork for the brutal Whistler course. The SRAM XX1 drivetrain was fitted with a Quarq XX1 powermeter and an upper guide on the crankset. Wheels were the new Roval Traverse Fattie SL and Keen chose the DH-strength versions of Specialized's Slaughter and Butcher tires. The screwdriver looking device taped to the underside of the top tube is a plug system that can instantly fix a puncture from the outside of the tire.



Crankworx 2014 - Bikes of the EWS

Martin Maes' GT Sanction has a modified Shimano XTR left shift lever that operates his Fox dropper post. Suspension is also by Fox, with the new 36 fork and a Factory Float X shock. Maes uses an e-Thirteen chainguide and a Hope chainring for his Shimano XTR one-by drivetrain. The 27.5-inch wheels are also blacked out, but the rims appear to be Stan's Flow EX. Maes rode 2.3-inch Continental Mud King tires on the dry and dusty course, perhaps to take advantage of their grip on the many roots that are the dominating feature here on Whistler's back-country trails.



Crankworx 2014 - Bikes of the EWS

Joe Barnes' Canyon Strive CF 9.0 is close to the stock model, with a Fox Float X shock and 36 fork, Mavic Crossmax Enduro wheels and a SRAM XX1 drivetrain. Brakes are SRAM Guide and the tires are blacked out 27.5-inch Schwalbes - Hans Dampf (rear) and Magic Mary .



Crankworx 2014 - Bikes of the EWS

Richie Rude rides the new Yeti SB6c shod with Maxxis Minion tires (DHR/ DHF) on 27.5-inch DT Swiss EX 1501 Spline 1 wheels. Seatpost dropper is a Thomson and the drivetrain is Shimano XTR powered and protected by an e-thirteen chainring and chainguide. Rude runs Shimano Saint brakes, presumably for their extra power. Suspension is all Fox, with a Float X shock and the 2015 36 fork.



Crankworx 2014 - Bikes of the EWS

Nico Lau fought his way to a second place finish on his Cube Stereo. Lau broke tradition, using a Shimano two-by drivetrain, that was hacked out from a triple crankset with the teeth of the outer sprocket ground off to create a bash ring. Lau uses a remote controlled Fox Float X shock and a D.O.S.S. dropper post that, when combined with the addition of the front mech, creates a traffic jam of cables funnelling from the handlebar. The fork is the new 36 and wheels are DT Swiss EX 1501s controlled by Shimano Saint brakes. Lau's tire choice is the popular Schwalbe Hans Dampf/Magic Mary combination.



Crankworx 2014 - Bikes of the EWS

Cedric Gracia's Santa Cruz Nomad showcases DVO suspension, with the new Diamond fork and Jade Coil shock. Wheels are Mavic Crossmax Enduro, shod with a Specialized Slaughter rear tire and a blacked out Schwalbe Magic Mary up front. Cedric's Shimano XTR one-by drivetrain appears to be powered by a Hope chainring with an MRP guide. Brakes are Shimano XTR.



Crankworx 2014 - Bikes of the EWS

Ben Cruz was reported to be testing some prototype damping internals that were recently developed for the 160mm-travel Lefty Supermax in the front of his carbon fiber Cannondale Jekyll. Cruz runs a SRAM XX1 drivetrain backed up with an MRP chain guide. Wheels are WTB Frequency Team with WTB 27.5 by 2.5-inch Breakout tires. Brakes are SRAM Guides and the dropper post is a RockShox Stealth.



Crankworx 2014 - Bikes of the EWS

Fabien Cousine stands with his Polygon Collossus N9, with a Shimano XT transmission, powered by an e-Thirteen crankset and chain guide. Suspension is BOS, with a Kirk shock and Deville fork. The Shimano ten-speed cassette is enhanced with a 42-tooth cog. Its 27.5-inch wheels are by e-Thirteen, and are shod with a Hutchinson Toro rear and a Squale front tire. The dropper post is a KS LEV.

Read more about the Collossus N9.


Crankworx 2014 - Bikes of the EWS

Mitch Ropelato chose a Specialized S-Works Enduro 29er driven by a SRAM XX1/X0 transmission and rolling on carbon Roval Traverse wheels. Tires are a 2.3-inch Specialized Slaughter in the rear, with a 2.3 inch Butcher up front. Suspension is a RockShox Pike fork and an Ohlins twin tube shock. The Specialized Command Post dropper is hooked to Specialized's new under-bar paddle-type remote.



Crankworx 2014 - Bikes of the EWS

Thomas Lapeyrie rides a Scott Genius LT 700 with a Shimano XTR one-by drivetrain powered by a Saint chainring with a Shimano guide. Brakes are Shimano XTR and suspension is split between the Fox-made Nude shock and a Suntour Auron fork. Thomas runs Michelin Wildgrip'r tires on both ends of his bike. Ergon fills out the cockpit and the dropper is a RockShox Reverb Stealth.



Crankworx 2014 - Bikes of the EWS

Alex Lupato, riding a Spicy Team, was the only Lapierre rider at the Canadian EWS. His SRAM X0 drivetrain is updated with an FRM 42-tooth cassette cog and crankset FRM also made the carbon chainguide. Suspension is all Marzocchi, with a factory-tuned 350 CR fork and a Roco LO shock. Wheels are by FRM and brakes are Formula. Alex chose a Maxxis High Roller II front tire and a Minion DHF in the rear. The cockpit is all FRM except for the RockShox Reverb dropper.



Crankworx 2014 - Bikes of the EWS

Yoann Barelli's Giant Reign 275 Carbon is the completely redesigned 2015 model, powered by a SRAM XX1 transmission and sporting a RockShox Reverb seatpost. Yoann runs an MRP chain guide and the 27.5-inch wheels are DT Swiss 1501 EX models, spinning a Schwalbe Hans Dampf rear and a Magic Mary front tire. Brakes are SRAM Guides and suspension is by RockShox, with a Monarch Plus Debonair shock, paired with a Pike fork.



Crankworx 2014 - Bikes of the EWS

Ludo May's Canyon Strive CF 9.0 is almost a carbon copy of the bike team mate Joe Barnes rides. Ludo ran a blacked out Schwalbe Hans Dampf rear tire, with a Mavic front tire on 27.5-inch Mavic Crossmax Enduro wheels. Both men are co-sponsored by Ergon, which explains the colorful and comfortable cockpit accessories.



Crankworx 2014 - Bikes of the EWS

Bryan Regnier's sharp looking YT Capra Pro features a carbon frame, with an aluminum swingarm. The four-bar suspension drives a RockShox Monarch Plus shock, paired with a Pike fork. The drivetrain is SRAM XX1 boosted by a Blackspire chainguide, and Bryan's wheels are Mavic Crossmax Enduros with a Maxxis High Roller II rear tire and a Schwalbe Magic Mary up front.



Crankworx 2014 - Bikes of the EWS

Mark Scott's Nukeproof Mega AM 275 Pro has a SRAM X01 transmission, driven by a Descendant crankset with a Hope chainring and an MRP chain guide. Suspension is handled by a RockShox Monarch Plus shock and a Pike fork. Brakes are Hope and the wheels are built up with Hope hubs and Stan's ZTR Flow EX rims. The rear tire is a Continental Der Kaiser and the front is a Conti Mud King. Scott's dropper is a RockShox Reverb Stealth.



Crankworx 2014 - Bikes of the EWS

Anne Caroline Chausson's Ibis carbon HDR prototype sports a BOS Kirk shock and a Deville fork. The drivetrain is all SRAM XX1, with a Truvativ chainguide. ACC runs Magura brakes and Mavic wheels, shod with a Maxxis High Roller II front and a Minion DHF rear tire. Her dropper post is the neo-classic Reverb Stealth.



Crankworx 2014 - Bikes of the EWS

Kelli Emmett races Giant's women's specific, 140-millimeter-travel Intrigue -1. The aluminum framed AM/enduro racer has a SRAM XX1 drivetrain and a trio of RockShox necessities: a Monarch Plus shock, a Pike fork and a Reverb Stealth dropper seatpost. Brakes are SRAM guides and the Giant rolls on DT Swiss EX 1501 Spline wheels and Schwalbe tires - Hans Dampf rear/Magic Mary front.



Crankworx 2014 - Bikes of the EWS

Women's winner Cecile Ravonel and her GT Force, with a beat up SRAM XX1 transmission, powered by an e-Thirteen crankset. The 27.5-inch wheels are American Classic AM hoops that sport Hutchinson Toro tires, front and rear. Brakes are by Formula and suspension is by Marzocchi, with a prototype, remote-controlled Roco air shock and a 350 CR fork.



Crankworx 2014 - Bikes of the EWS

Anneke Beerten's S-Works Enduro 650 runs a RockShox Monarch Plus Debonair shock and Pike fork. Wheels are carbon Roval Traverse Fattie SLs, with the Specialized Slaughter/Butcher tire combination found on the standard models. SRAM fills out the drivetrain, dropper post and brakes with XX1, RockShox Reverb Stealth, and Guide. Beerton's stash of spares fixed to the top tube includes a tubeless plug kit and a cycling computer.



Crankworx 2014 - Bikes of the EWS

Tracy Mosely's Trek Remedy Nine Eight 29 was one of the few big wheel race bikes at the race. Her drivetrain was a Shimano XTR two-by-ten, with a lower roller guide. The shock was a Fox RAD Float X, while the fork was the new 36. Wheels were aluminum Bontrager Elite models with prototype Bontrager tires. Brakes were Shimano XTR and her dropper post was a Fox D.O.S.S.



Crankworx 2014 - Bikes of the EWS

Ines Thoma rides a Canyon Strive CF with Mavic Crossmax Enduro wheels, a blacked out Schwalbe rear tire and a Crossmax front tire. The dropper is a RockShox Reverb Stealth, and the drivetrain is all SRAM XX1 and the Strive is anchored by Guide brakes. Suspension is Fox, with a Float X shock and a 36 fork.



Crankworx 2014 - Bikes of the EWS

Rosara Joseph's 26-inch-wheel Yeti SB66c is powered by a Shimano XTR one-by drivetrain using an e-Thirteen chainring and guide. Wheels are the very popular DT Swiss EX 1501 Spline, with a Maxxis Minion DH rear tire and a Minion DHF up front. Brakes are XTR and the dropper post is a Fox D.O.S.S. Suspension is also by Fox, with a Float X shock and a 36 fork.



Crankworx 2014 - Bikes of the EWS

Lars Sternberg's aluminum-framed 2015 Transition was running a Shimano XTR drivetrain with a handmade prototype chainring. The 27.5-inch wheels were a mix, with a WTB i23 rear and a KOM up front, while both tires were WTV Vigilantes. The four-bar rear end was suspended by a Fox Float X and the fork was a Fox 36. The dropper was a blacked out RockShox Reverb Stealth.



Crankworx 2014 - Bikes of the EWS

Dan Atherton's GT Sanction is a Shimano XTR-powered beast, set up with an aftermarket 40-tooth cassette cog and a Hope narrow-wide chainring, with an e-Thirteen guide. Brakes are Shimano Saint, and the wheels appear to be blacked out 27.5-inch Stan's ZTR Flow EX, mounted to Continental Mud King tires with hot patch numbers that indicate that they are prototypes. Suspension is all Fox, with a Kashima Float X shock and 36 fork.



Crankworx 2014 - Bikes of the EWS

Jason Moeschler's Cannondale Jekyll was sporting secret Shimano parts - a prototype Deore XT drivetrain and brakes that duplicate the new XTR in many ways, including the wide-range 11-speed cassette. Jason was also running proto carbon WTB wheels. More on this later today, but while PB prepares the story, look closely at the photo. Reportedly, Jason's 160mm Supermax Lefty also has some secret internals.



Crankworx 2014 - Bikes of the EWS

Matt Slaven was rocking the new Kona Process and Bell's two-piece enduro helmet. Suspension is all RockShox with a Monarch Plus Debonair shock, paired with a Pike fork. The Kona's transmission was SRAM XX1 and the brakes were Guides. Matt's wheels appear to be blacked-out carbon Enve AM models, with a Maxxis Minion DHF tire on the rear and a High Roller II up front.



Crankworx 2014 - Bikes of the EWS

SRAM's Duncan Riffle walks the walk - racing the toughest EWS race to date on a Giant Trance Advanced, sporting a SRAM X01 drivetrain with a proto chainring and bash guard. Check out the rear derailleur too. Wheels are SRAM Roam 50s with a Schwalbe Hans Dampf rear tire and a Magic Mary front. Suspension was handled by a RockShox Monarch Plus Debonair shock and a Pike fork.



Crankworx 2014 - Bikes of the EWS

Charlie Sponsel's Felt Compulsion is suspended by Fox, with a Kashima Float X shock and a 34 Float fork. Wheels are a mix of WTB's Frequency i23 in the rear and a KOM up front, mounted to Maxxis High Roller II tires all 'round. The one-by drivetrain is powered by an FSA Gravity crankset and guide, with a Shimano Saint rear mech and ten-speed cassette.



racing for the win in the 2014 Crankworx Enduro held in Whistler.

Rene Wildhaber's Trek Slash 9.8 runs a SRAM XX1 drivetrain boosted by an e-Thirteen upper chain guide. Brakes are SRAM guides, while the wheels are Easton Havens mounted with prototype Bontrager tires. The wild man with the Red Bull helmet runs a stock looking RockShox Monarch Plus shock and a Pike fork, and his dropper is a Reverb Stealth.

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146 Comments

  • + 81
 Look at all those chainguides....

"Pre narrow-wide, single-chainring drivetrains required a chainguide to prevent the recurring disaster of derailment. When XX1 began showing up on bikes in early 2013, there was industry wide speculation that narrow-wide would not live up to expectations. By the end of the year, chainguides had all but disappeared on trail and all-mountain bikes" - RC, December 2013.
  • + 62
 well played NoahColorado!^^^
  • + 16
 I'll buy you a beer at Eurobike for busting your balls! We'll have a pretty cool new ring on display, BTW..... Smile
  • + 3
 shimano are about to tell us that its not how narrow or wide the teeth are but its the shape of the teeth. true or false, you decide.
  • + 1
 haaa. from my counts, only 2 of the 33 bikes featured ran no quide system at all. thats kind of surprising to me...
  • + 8
 I ran X01 with no guide on Sunday...I dropped a chain on Top of the World stage 5 just before it the Kyhbers pass intersection. Had to stop in my race run to put the chain back on. A top guide would have kept it on.
  • + 3
 Upper guide and a bash is always needed for maximum reliability and protection!!

What has changed the game allot and biggest effect for anything below DH level, is with clutch RDs with narrow wide chainrings the "lower roller" chain tension support and guide, which was the key aspect of a guide as much as anything and also the biggest "weakness" to any chain guide with standard chain rings and non clutch rear Ds crud mud, wear of bearings chain etc and drag.
Is no longer required and all setups with NW clutch don't use this, only dual ring aficionados hanging onto the past and non narrow wide running std e13 or Shitmano rings require them!

End, lower rollers for DH only!

Btw 2years using XX1 no guide, will add an AMG though, Ive still not dropped a chain, and only one front ring replacement.
Still on same chain and rear cassette, allot of miles and extreme terrain.
  • + 2
 Also front derailleurs are disappearing only 3 from 33 bikes. Even most of the Shimano riders are going with 1x drivetrains. The upper guide makes sense while racing, weighs next to nothing and adds a bit of security. I am not sure if they are required and there would be lots chain drops without them or if the riders just want more peace of mind.
  • + 12
 It only takes a freak dropped chain to loose a race. Why would you not sacrifice 150 or so grams to ensure your chain is kept on and have that piece of mind.
  • + 4
 Noah your delivery was flawless!
  • - 1
 That trek remedy hasa 26or 27.5 with a 36 and a 29 in the back??
  • + 1
 You're right, gonna order me a sweet E13 top guide.
  • + 8
 I have no idea what Maverick said.
  • + 15
 I WOULD LITERALLY (as in not figuratively) GLADLY ACCEPT ANY ONE OF THESE BIKES AND BE PERFECTLY HAPPY WITH IT.
  • + 8
 Hmmm...it seems to me that Joe Barnes's bike has got 26 in the front and 27.5 wheels in the back? Or perhaps it is it just an optical effect...
  • + 9
 Optical effect. However 27.5 in the front and 26 in the back would make a lot of sense.
  • + 1
 I'm interested to see if anyone runs a mixed size wheel set up for racing
  • + 3
 i know one of the engineers at Norco was riding a 29/27.5 bike set-up for a while
  • - 1
 i don't think uci allows different sizes
  • + 1
 I run 29 27.5 on my specialzed camber and it's sorted the handling right out no were near as twitchy and feels a hell of a lot more planted on the descents
  • + 2
 Impressive optical effect since I cant notice it on any other 27.5" bike, but stands out like dog bollocks on JBs bike, it looks like a 29" in the rear its that big? Does my arse look big in this never seems more pertinent! Haha.
Interestingly Innes Tomas bike does not do that?
  • + 3
 The really funny thing is this: In the high resolution pic, the front wheel internal diameter measures 6.1 cm, and the rear wheel measures 6.6 cm in my IPad. That would pretty much be the real difference within 26/27.5/29 wheel sizes (no math, just proportions). Yet, he seems to be holding his bike pretty much in parallel fashion to the camera lens. That is one weird optical effect indeed!
  • + 3
 I hope different wheel sized bikes don't reappear... I had a Specialized Big Hit with the 24"/26" and the rear wheel felt like it hooked up on everything, and then years later I had use of a Trek Top Fuel 69er and a 69er hardtail (the one with the Maverick fork) and they had the same problem.. 29", 26", or 27.5", I have no particular allegiance, but please industry, don't mix and match Frown
  • + 1
 Could it be that for maximum endurobility that the rear wheel has a smaller rim width therefore pinching the rear tire more to make it bigger? Especially with schwalbe tires, those things are huge.
  • + 6
 It's Mark Scott with the Nukeproof Mega not Scott Mark! There are a lot of Magic Mary tyres (tires for you Americans) fitted to the front of rival sponsored bikes, I wonder if it was the tread or maybe going for the tougher super gravity casing that was the reason for the change. The rear Mavic wts tyre was absent from all of the Mavic sponsored riders bikes, not the most versatile tyre in the world, they could do with something a bit grippier to go on what seems like a pretty durable casing.
  • + 3
 My Mavics have proven to be prone to lots of pinch flats. Especially the rear. Where I had no issues last season with flats using Shwalbe & Maxxis I am constantly pinching this year. So it seems they have the same issues.
  • + 6
 Magic Mary is a great tyre if you get them for free, but they last a fraction of the time of a Maxxis. The side knobs tear off crazy easy & way too soon.

Love the grip, hate the wear. Back to Maxxis for me.
  • + 1
 Yeah, but Maxxis tires are harder compound and that's why they last longer. I live in AZ so Maxxis is very popular among riders out here due to our dry and dusty trails that make the harder compound worth while. I'm the only rider that I know that uses Schwalbe Magic Mary tires out here and I personally love them! Best tire I've ever had!!
  • + 1
 I'm waiting on the Maxxis Shorty exo to be released as an intermediate winter mud tyre due to the Schwalbe cost to wear ratio, I quite fancied the Magic Mary until I started reading and hearing from mates about the knobs ripping off. I have the Wtb Warden as a full on mud tyre put as good as it is, it's a very specific tyre.
  • + 6
 How about CG ditching the Panaracer tires for the Magic Mary and Specialized Slaughter?
I was pretty surprised by how many people ditched their sponsor for the Schwalbe. I know I love my Schwalbe's!
  • + 3
 @rewob, I'm not sure which compound you were running but don't dismiss the Magic Mary or Schwalbe just yet. I had a set of SG Magic Marys in the Trailstar compound that had knobs tearing off after only four DH runs...I put in a warranty claim with Schwalbe USA and sure enough, there is a batch of defective rubber out there. Btw, since it will be awhile until the new batch is ready, they set me a free set of Vertstar Magic Marys in the dh casing to use for now... Top notch CS!
  • + 1
 Crap, sorry, @Trinket... Edit button won't work for me.
  • + 1
 Deffo a bad batch on the Magic Mary's, I've just had a full refund on my Snakeskin 26" Trailstar Magic Mary. Crack started appearing after the first ride, now it looks like all the tread is about to rip it's self off. Schwalbe have always been a good company to deal with when it comes to warranty on tyres, I will deffo be buying another Magic Mary
  • + 0
 The edit button has been faulty all day today :-{(>
  • + 1
 The edit button has never worked for me on my iPad
  • + 4
 I believe Graves is running Saint calipers with XTR levers, CG is sporting a Nomad and Sternberg is running a new Transition Patrol.
Dont get me wrong, it is great to have lots of bike checks on EWS bikes, but it would be even better to have them a little bit more in depth than "Atherton is running cranks with chainring" or "ACC has a wide bar and short stem on her Trek Bronson bicycle" type of checks.
  • + 9
 We got our photos at the start of the event as the racers were rolling up to the start ramp. Some of the info was first-hand, some was garnished from looking at the high res image. Thus the abbreviated information. PB detectives are among the world's best - we rely on them often.
  • + 2
 Ok, that explains it.
  • + 2
 I noticed that most of the riders who run Saint calipers are using XTR levers. Good call.
  • + 1
 Dont know why Graves dont like the servo wave feels, so he ditch it and change it with a saint caliper. Does anyone know the reason behind this?
  • + 3
 Servo wave is in the brake lever not the caliper.
  • + 1
 Props to you immacaroni, never know that before
  • + 4
 It is funny how many blacked out tires there are. I wonder if people trashed more tires in practice than expected and were scrambling to find any replacement without upsetting sponsors.
  • - 3
 Which ones are blacked out? They all look pretty visible to me.
  • + 20
 DH and Enduro racers often use tires and equipment that are not "available" from their sponsors, because they offer a sizeable advantage, like narrow-wide chainrings on Shimano one-by drivetrains, or tires that better suit the track conditions. (It is a common joke that Schwalbe DH tires should be sold with a black marker pen at WC DH races )Thus, the blacked out equipment. Also, some pros black out equipment that the team has to purchase because the supplier does not sponsor the team and thus, they do not provide their advertising services for free.
  • - 1
 Just a quick question here,
I heard that Matt Slaven was riding a carbon Process 153 in Colorado and I see that he's switched out for the alloy model. Would you know why he's doing that? I also saw in the results at CO that he didn't finish! Broken frame perhaps?
  • + 1
 That's why i destickered my frame, fork and wheels ^_^
  • + 4
 barnsey ! what happened to you? you should work on new "dudes of hazzzzard" episodes instead of growing a mustache or doing well in the ews. take that camera and do something funny, will ya!?!!?!!
  • + 20
 Don't worry chief! @bOObdesign We have it under control! Have been filming all year and will release a movie at the end of the year! It is coming along nicely!

Dudes
  • + 3
 Hell... I loooove To hear that! You guys got the style, the coolness and a lot of fun. If you need a support actor... I can drink beer and eat... And some other stuff which i forgot ... Im at your service
  • + 4
 Amazing how the Specialized riders both moved to 650b bike, despite the company marketing saying they still endorse 29ers as being superior and only did 650b bikes due to consumer demand...
  • + 8
 www.mtb-mag.com/en/interview-curtis-keene-speaks-on-racing-his-career-and-more. In this interview Curtis talks about how it was a sponsor obligation to ride the 29er.
  • + 2
 good interview, thanks for the link
  • + 2
 Thanks to all at Pinkbike for this. I found this a really enjoyable read/pic fest to browse through. I was at crankworx whistler 2 years ago and its hard to explain the event. If you are a bike geek it is the best thing in the world. I hope to go back one day.
  • + 3
 I have to imagine that the Nude shock on the Scott bikes have to be a disadvantage. With the smaller diameter shaft and no reservoir I would imagine there could be flex or more heat build-up.
  • + 1
 As the owner of a Fox Float CTD shock (no reservoir) i'm interested to know how much of an improvement a Fox Float X CTD shock would make.. Anyone tried both?
  • + 2
 I've not tried the Float X but the main benefit should be heat management. If you find your CTD losing its damping through a long stage, the piggy back reservoir should help dissipate and share the hear across more oil. If not then you're lugging extra weight to look enduro
  • + 1
 On the topic of shocks....

What are all you guy's opinions on coil vs air vs air w/ reservoir? What about for a heavier rider?

I've heard coils are better in almost every regard... with the exception of the few hundred gram weight penalty. Is this true?
  • + 0
 not true.
they do the same thing but they do it differently. and whether which is right for you depends on your application and intended use.

all else equal (suspension design), there is more adjustability and modulation on an air shock just due to the design. A coils curve is predetermined based on the rate (again suspension design held constant).

The newer design on reservoir's for air has fixed a lot of the problems with frothing that occured previously under high heat and speed. But a heavier rider banging on a big track may still push an air shock to a point where coil is better.
weight is generally lower on air vs coil.
  • + 2
 That's the reason I wrote the comment. I am a 235lb rider geared up. My average ride is 14miles but sometimes I do 20-30 mile rides. A lot of pedaling. My downhills are steep, long, loose, rutted. All inline shocks are never tuned correctly for me. I have found the reservoir shocks handle my weight better and the heat management. Also the shafts of the nude shock are so much smaller. I know it is proprietary to their bikes but I would think at the pro level they would be a disadvantage. I;ve ridden the DHX air, Float X, Monarch Plus, CCDBA, and am changing to a CCDB Inline shock. I am curious if cane creek will have successfully tackled the problems that plague other companies inline shock offerings
  • + 1
 have you thought about sending your shock in to a custom shock tuner and having them put in a custom shim stack? best of both worlds.
  • + 4
 I'm one of the riders in the photos, Charlie Sponsel on the Blue Felt near the bottom. I like my Float X, but I never had any problems with the damper on a standard Float CTD or RP23 heating up to the point where I perceived a significant loss in damping. Those little turd shocks can put up with an amazing beating. I can't speak for air shocks from other brands because I've only ever ridden Fox, but in my experience a Fox air shock is a pretty bombproof thing. As for the EWS, I know a lot of guys switched to coils for the last round due to the damper fade you mention. I didn't, and I didn't have any noticeable problems. As for air vs. coil, the spring rate tuning you do on a modern air shock with volume reducing spacers is invaluable. You can turn a crummy bike into a great bike with a 50 cent piece of plastic. You cannot tune a bike's wheel rate the same way with a coil. The real golden age will come when we can get air shocks for trail riding with volume adjust, some sort of lockout-y thing, and REAL compression adjust knobs. And I mean from Fox or Rockshox, I wouldn't touch a Cane Creek DoubleBlowout Air with a 10 ft. pole.
  • + 2
 And Spunk, you might just be dealing with bad tunes on those inline shocks you've ridden. I'm 185 pounds but I ride like a bag of bricks, and I need a mandatory compression tune on every shock I ever get. Most stock bikes come with a compression tune that's five or six times too light for me. If you purchased an aftermarket Float X it probably has a medium/medium compression and rebound tune, whereas a lot of complete bikes come with a light/light.
  • + 1
 Every shock I send to Push. The Float X was ordered direct from Fox for the bike it was put on. For where I ride, how I ride, and what I weigh, reservoir shocks are better. The CCDBA is amazing. I am hoping the CCDB Inline will be just as amazing at a weight savings.
  • + 5
 Donno what happened but no pics of the yellow Altitude Rally the Rocky team was riding. Ops
  • + 1
 could be trippin', but isn't the s-works enduro frame supposed to be full carbon? looks like the rear triangle is aluminum. no confidence in the carbon rear triangle? can see it better here: www.mtb-mag.com/en/interview-curtis-keene-speaks-on-racing-his-career-and-more
  • + 1
 All Enduro spesh rear triangles are aluminium and have been for years!
  • + 1
 just looked closer on the specialized website and you are absolutely correct! i may have been thinking of the stumpy fsr which i believe at one point had a carbon rear triangle for the s-works model only. the main reason i was curious was because i was comparing the s-works enduro to the expert carbon model. looks pretty much like the same frame between the two. the expert carbon seems to be the better value in my book.
  • + 4
 What I want to know: What's the average height of these racers? They all look like little people ...
  • + 1
 Except for Absalon, who makes his bike look like a toy.
  • + 1
 Atherton is 6' 2"
  • + 1
 it all in the wheels
  • + 2
 Running a FD shifter for the drop post has my intrigued. I'm running XO Trails and X01. I've got a spare X0 FD lying around. I wonder if it will work for a KS LEV.
  • + 4
 CG is on a Nomad, not a Bronson. Or am I trippin'?
  • + 3
 Nope, I forgot to add that corrrection last night. Thanks mate.
  • + 1
 You are correct. Also Duncan's chainrings are XO not XX1
  • + 1
 Nomad
  • + 2
 Just going to have to say it while I'm taking a huge dump--or at least trying to--Trek is going back to Fox for proprietary rear suspension in 2016.
  • + 5
 no rocky mountains?
  • + 4
 Yeah need to see some Altitudes in there!
  • + 1
 no Norco
  • + 1
 are my eyes playing tricks on me or does it look like a few of these bikes are running 29" wheels in the back and 27.5 in the front?
  • + 3
 yeah you might wanna get that checked out, man.
  • + 1
 Anyone else think all the 'blacked out' parts on sponsored riders is just a bit of a con?? they are basically admitting they dont think their sponsors stuff is up to it??
  • + 1
 I quite like that a lot of these bikes are bits and pieces the riders think are best, not to mention the prototype frames. Maybe they don't have the coverage that DH or XC has so their bikes are purely functional and not about selling bikes but going fast. So Enduro.
  • + 1
 What's up with the waterbottles on the outside of the front triangle? How the hell are you suppose to grab it not to mention is gets sprayed by crap literally!?
  • + 1
 The susp. lay out does not allow a water bottle inside the triangle, they don't need to grab it during the SS cause they are pretty short and during the transports they probably make time to get off the bike and have a sip of water.
  • + 1
 They're often used to refill a hydration pack.
  • - 2
 The main reason bike companies put the bottle cage on the down tube is because some frame designs wont allow it to fit on the inside of the front triangle. Mainly because of the shock placement. Its not too hard to reach down an extra 6 or so inches... And it makes for a great down tube protector.
  • + 1
 how about putting it on the top tube in front of the seat instead of the down tube? The dirt sprayed bottle on Yetis ar such a pain in the a... mouth...

I 3D printed mounts that attach with zip-ties and it works really good on my sb66c but still looks very improvised if not to say ugly..
  • + 2
 Keeping the bottle down low helps keep the center of gravity low, which helps with balance and maneuverability. A bike is basically manipulated along 2 axes: One running through the center of gravity of the bike/rider, from left to right, and one running front-back through the lowest point of the tires.

A typical water bottle you would carry weighs about 1.5 lbs. If the bottle is low down and near the center of gravity of the bike, manipulating the bike doesn't change the position of the bottle much, so it requires less energy compared to having the bottle high up, where it would be moved much further for the same amount of manipulation and require more energy.

They also would probably rather not rack their balls unnecessarily.
  • + 1
 Legend... Center of gravity for maximum agility on two wheeled vehicle is supposed to be on a line connecting rear wheels axle to the lower end of the head-tube.
At least that's what was featured in vehicle dynamics 101 books when i studied transportation engineering back in the day and even if the big wheel fans insist, physics did not change in the last few years. You can see actually see that very clearly on motorcycles (how all the masses are concentrated around that line) or if you prefer i can look up the old ISBN number of my schoolbooks if you are interested in more details.
So considering this the bottle is not further away from the ideal position on the down tube than it is on the top tube. On most contemporary frame designs it would actually be closer to an ideal position in terms of not influencing the handling.

A typical water bottle I would carry on my down tube collects 0.5 lbs of dirt which i would rather not have in my mouth and if i ever end up down there, underneath my seat where top tube and seat tube connect, i would be happy to have some extra cushion of a soft water bottle because something must have gone terribly terribly wrong....
  • + 1
 Actually would you get me the names at least of those books? Sounds interesting. For the record, I haven't stated anywhere where the center of gravity should be, other than saying low.

I won't disagree with you on the center of gravity line idea, that sounds reasonable. For motorcycles (which are less effected by the rider's body shifting around, and still have the center of gravity low and in the middle of the bike), but does it take into account forward and backward rocking motion, jumping, hard braking, and the incredibly steep angles the riders will sometimes face? Having the center of gravity too near either of the extremes (either the headtube or rear axle) will make the bike difficult to maneuver in other ways that road use vehicles don't typically experience. You would be over the bars constantly if the COG was at the headtube, and it would be wheelie city if it was at the rear axle.
  • + 0
 the books are in German though... i should dig them up anyways. haven't looked at any of them in 15 years...

Sure the effects are multiplied in motorcycles and are easier to feel as a part being not where it is supposed to be is usually heavier so the influence on handling is bigger.
Of course you would not want to have COG at the end point of this imaginary line.
btw, Husaberg did actually introduce an Engine on endure-motorcycles which had the piston in line with that line in order to minimize the influence of those moving masses on the handling of the bike a while ago. They switched back to use the regular KTM based engines though after a few years. It was really interesting from an engineering point of few (geek-alarm)

Anyway point is water tastes better without dirt on the mouthpiece of the bottle + plus i can grab it while pedaling up the hill. On the way down the bottle is empty anyway...
  • + 2
 What's any different with Duncan's SRAM rear derailleur? Looks like a standard X01.
  • + 1
 Is it a shorter cage?
  • + 1
 Dunno if it's my screen or the business of the backgrounds but it seems a lot harder to see the bikes clearly than compared to the normal bike check pics.
  • + 3
 Where are all the guys riding steels hardtails?
  • + 1
 Gotta say it, for me YT Capra Pro (no.1) and Canyon Strive CF 9.0 rules!! IN YOUR FACE big players... That S-Works Enduro 650 is sick too...
  • + 2
 I run RF narrow/wide on my NomadC never dropped a chain. DH at mont sent anne, etc..
  • + 2
 Looks like everyone has a flat/clip pedal combo....but, which pedals are the best/most used in the field???
  • + 2
 Looks like the Mallets and XT/XTR trail pedals are the most used (least in these photos).
  • + 5
 Count them, but It looks like Shimano XT and XTR trail pedals outnumber Crankbrothers Mallets by a large margin - just the opposite of DH. My guess its that Shimano pedals are phenominally reliable.... Mallets, not so much.
  • + 2
 I like the bikes and their setups. I wish they would post what protective gear they wear too.
  • + 1
 anyone else notice cedric and Anne Caro have crossmax but with 24 spokes at the rear, possibly wider?
  • + 1
 What fenders are these guys running under their forks? Looking for a good fender setup.. recommendations?
  • + 1
 Marsh Guard is the most popular
  • + 1
 How come there aren't more enve carbon wheels? Is it price or sponsorship? Anybody no why
  • + 1
 ...and the two bikes I'd actually like to own out of that set... Mich Ropellato's Enduro 29 or Cedric's Nomad
  • + 2
 Okay, then I'll have Regniers Capra and Barellis Reign.
  • + 0
 Mitch's is sick. But I have never seen race photos with the ohlins. Seems he always swaps it for an air shock.
  • + 1
 Alex Lupato = Into the wild
29 wheels = monstrosity
Cedric Gracia = no more Panaracer tires?

My head is shaken...
  • + 1
 I'm surprised more people aren't modifying their front shifters and selling them on ebay/pb as remote levers.
  • - 2
 Canyon in race geo is so sick...too bad they're stingy in industry bro deals.
That giant reign for the win(too bad u have to buy too build for blu/blk), followed by slash, sanction,..
The way those konas sit (and ride) still enthrall me.

Looks like maes bypassed the stock derailuer cable maze on his force? (Eliminates friction)
  • + 1
 Maes is on a Sanction
  • + 2
 No one talks pedals? looks like about half Mallet DH.
  • + 2
 Anyone know why they black out the tires? Sponsor conflicts?
  • + 1
 i am single, need money, can you send some $ for next year's trip to whistler?
  • + 2
 I cant possibly pick a favourite one
  • + 1
 Anyone know whats up with the Covert rear shock position? Totally different.
  • + 3
 They are changing their suspension platform. Plus, I don't think they are going to call that bike a Covert. Click on the clink below.

fotos.mtb-news.de/s/70200
  • + 2
 It's a 2015 Transition Patrol. Transition has moved a Horst Link suspension design now. The covert is no more. www.endurotribe.com/2014/08/transition-2015-une-gamme-amenduro-completement-renouvelee/#toparticle
  • + 1
 Thanks
  • + 1
 Good eyes there catching the Horst Link arnoldtm2. Looks like PB will have to nab one for a review,
  • - 1
 So CG is no longer with Panaracer???
"Thomas runs Hutchinson Wildgrip'r tires on both ends of his bike" I think you meant Michelin...
I'm still waiting for a 180mm Lefty to come out...
  • + 5
 Defending French tire makers, are we?
  • + 1
 Hehe, nah I'm a Schwalbe fan myself, though I have used Michelin and Hutchinson tires in the past with no complaints.
  • + 1
 not sure whats up with the new WTB rims?
  • + 4
 Carbon rims from WTB, they look good.

www.pinkbike.com/photo/11299381
  • + 1
 they almost look like aero rims haha
  • + 1
 Xamien Co must be very busy with manufacturing for all of these new designs.
  • + 1
 Atherton is doing the English proud. he looks well ard in his picture.
  • + 1
 Anyone know what bike Lars 'n' Bars is riding? It's clearly not a Covert, unless the 2015 model has a completely different suspension design
  • + 1
 Dan is well 'ard
  • + 1
 Having my yt capra in a coupla weeks but I love that Canyon.
  • + 1
 11 Speed XT!? Already? Oh hell yes!! Thanks Shimano!
  • + 1
 Why doesn't Niner have a presence here? I'd think the WFO would rip.
  • + 1
 Lars is almost riding a Covert.. More of a Patron
  • + 1
 *too build=team build
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