CyclingTips Digest: Enve Gets Into the Frame Business, Rapha's Powerweave Shoes, Cycling Monopoly, & More

Mar 31, 2021
by Sarah Moore  


What's going on in the curly bar world? CyclingTips Digest showcases articles from our sister site, CyclingTips. In each installment, you might find endurance coverage, power-to-weight ratios, gravel bike tech and, of course, lycra.




BIKES OF THE BUNCH: A BRANDLESS 8.2 KG MTB BUILT FOR LESS THAN US$3,000
By: Francis Lim

We are all in awe of the bikes that Dangerholm can come up with, technically and aesthetically, but not everyone has the deep budget and technical know-how to work on their bikes at that level. This build bridges the void between stock bikes and those creations. It’s something any bike enthusiast can do; a reasonably priced bike that can hold its own in terms of aesthetics and weight against all the superbikes out there.

Hong Kong has a lot of MTB trails and a robust MTB scene. I wear my road biking heart on my sleeve but sometimes, especially on colder days, I wish there was an MTB in our cramped apartment that I could take for a two-hour ride in Lantau Island where we live. I’d love to sneak onto small village roads, climb the steep hill to the Big Buddha or ride the big, new bike park built on the south side. And as someone not technically proficient off-road, I’d need the bike to be light for an easier carry!

(Read more.)




ENVE GETS INTO THE FRAME BUSINESS WITH NEW ULTRA-PREMIUM CUSTOM ROAD
By: James Huang

Enve Composites — a brand best known for its carbon fiber wheels and cockpit components — has today announced that it’s getting into the carbon fiber frame business with the new Custom Road. It’s actually two closely related custom frames, both featuring a sleekly modern silhouette, an emphasis on blending ride comfort and aerodynamic performance, a low weight and custom paint, and fully custom geometry using a novel modular construction that’s made from start to finish at the company’s headquarters in Ogden, Utah.

(Read more.)




CT EXCLUSIVE: CANYON OPENS UP ABOUT AEROAD HANDLEBAR WOES, DETAILS PLAN MOVING FORWARD
By: James Huang

Canyon’s latest Aeroad aero road racing bike debuted to much fanfare when it was released to the world this past October, and for good reasons. It was considerably more aerodynamically efficient than the already-fast previous model, it was up to 160 grams lighter and 40% stiffer, it was just as comfortable, and incorporated a novel multi-piece handlebar system that allowed for easy disassembly for travel. Combined with Canyon’s usual pricing advantages over other major brands with more traditional distribution networks, the redesigned Aeroad should have been a home run.

But instead, it turned out to be a nightmare, with seatpost-related wear issues popping up shortly after launch, and — far more disastrous — an extremely public catastrophic handlebar failure suffered by a star rider.

(Read more.)





HERE’S THE LOWDOWN ON GARMIN’S NEW RANGE OF RALLY POWER METER PEDALS
By: Dave Rome

It was only a few days ago that we covered a leak from a Garmin retailer which showed a whole new range of inbound power meter pedals. What we didn’t know was that the release was just days away. The pedals are now official. Here are the details.

Wholly replacing the Vector range, the new Rally range of power meter pedals covers three distinct cleat systems: Shimano SPD-SL road, Look Keo road, and Shimano SPD mountain bike.

This means Garmin is the first to market with a pedal-based power meter solution built on Shimano’s SPD-SL cleat platform (although a leak suggests Favero may be close). Meanwhile, SRM/Look now has some much-needed competition in the off-road-friendly SPD space. The Look Keo version of the Rally remains mostly unchanged from the now-discontinued Vector 3.

(Read more.)





THE APP THAT ADDS ADVENTURE TO YOUR EVERYDAY CYCLING
By: Matt de Neef

Ridge Road started out fine. The hard-packed gravel was nothing I hadn’t ridden plenty of already that day. When gravel gave way to bark-covered 4WD track though, the going got considerably tougher. When that 4WD track turned into gnarly, root-covered single-track I started to think my GPS had led me astray. And then it got steep. Struggling-for-traction steep. Stepping-off-the-bike-and-pushing steep.

As the gradient lurched savagely to beyond 20% I had to stop pushing and take a rest. It wasn’t just that my calves were on fire, getting purchase in my Shimano SPD-SL cleats was proving more than difficult.

This was no road. This was a hiking track that no bike could get up; certainly not a road bike with slick 25 mm tyres.

(Read more.)
capturing this race live for TV is a scetchy undertaking at times... dusty too 3rd Dwars Door Het hageland 2018 BEL 1 day race Aarschot Diest 198km





CYCLING MONOPOLY REVIEW: PASS GO, COLLECT $200, BUY THE ROUBAIX VELODROME
By: Dave Everett

Don’t you love it when you grab that winter coat you haven’t had to use in months, put it on, slip your hands into the pockets and find a nice crumpled five quid, ten dollars, five euro note? Sure, it doesn’t happen too often, but it’s a nice surprise, one you weren’t expecting.

Well, that’s how I felt last week when I had a delivery. For the life of me, I couldn’t work out what was inside. I hadn’t ordered anything (that I was aware of) and didn’t have any test items due for delivery, so it was a mini-mystery. Or at least until I opened it up.

(Read more.)





HOW TO CLEAN YOUR CYCLING WATER BOTTLES
By: Ronan Mc Laughlin

The water bottle, or bidon as it’s known in cycling circles, is an essential accessory but something that’s seldom the focus of our attention. While I like to have matching bidons, colour co-ordinated to my bike, that’s about as much thought as I put into it. That is, until I find one that has sat a little too long without being washed out. One sniff of a few-day-old protein shake is enough to make anyone sit up and take notice of a simple bidon.

I am consciously trying to make bidons last longer. Caring for bidons and keeping them clean is the most significant factor in helping them last longer. So what is the best way to clean a water bottle?

(Read more.)





SPOTLIGHT: DYNAPLUG RACER PRO REVIEW
By: Dave Rome

It was back in 2017 that I first got my hands on Dynaplug’s tubeless repair tools. At the time I wanted to know whether they would plug a road tubeless tyre puncture as well as they do lower-pressure off-road rubber. Long story short, ever since then I’ve carried a Dynaplug tool with me on any ride where I’m rolling with tubeless tyres, and the original EpiPen-style Racer tool remains a product I recommend to this day.

Since that review, Dynaplug has refined and evolved its product range that centres around the patented jab-and-go plug concept. You can now get “road-specific” versions with shorter insertion tubes, there’s the Carbon Ultralight which is a lower-cost and lighter version of the original Racer, and most recently, there’s the Racer Pro. At just over 10 cm in length the new Racer Pro may be marginally larger, but it’s also twice as useful. Let me explain.

(Read more.)





PARK TOOL RELEASES NEW DERAILLEUR HANGER GAUGE, BIT TOOL AND MORE
By: Dave Rome

The world’s largest bicycle tool company, Park Tool, has been busy expanding its enormous catalogue of tools. Today the company has announced four new additions to the workshop range which arrive hot on the heels of a recent expansion in bearing-related tools.

(Read more.)





TEAM BIKES OF THE 2021 WOMEN’S WORLDTOUR
By: Ronan Mc Laughlin

Two weeks ago, we published our 2021 Team Bikes of the Men’s World Tour feature ahead of the UAE Tour. With Strade Bianche raising the curtain on the Women’s World Tour this weekend we are taking a look at the World Tour machines of the women’s bunch.

After a largely interrupted first-year post-restructuring, the Women’s World Tour has grown from eight teams last season to nine for 2021. This year’s calendar is also affected by COVID-enforced race postponements and cancellations, but riders and fans alike will be eager to see the racing underway on the white (sometimes brown) roads of Tuscany.

(Read more.)





OPINION: WHY PROGRESS IS SO SLOW FOR ROAD BIKE TECH
By: Dave Rome

As a tech editor I get to test some seriously nice bikes and cycling products while calling it work. Equally, I get to test some seriously nice bikes and cycling products that I simply can’t afford to hold onto once my testing is done. And in what’s unquestionably a first-world problem, once that testing is done, I return to my nice-but-comparatively-not-so-state-of-the-art bikes.

And that got me thinking. Why is it that new bikes made for off-road riding leave my older, personal bikes feeling like relics of the past, while I’m perfectly happy to jump back on my old alloy rim brake road bike after riding the latest and greatest race machine?

(Read more.)





NEW OAKLEY ENCODER SUNGLASSES INTRODUCE CLEVER NEW INTEGRATED FRAME DESIGN
By: James Huang

Sunglass giant Oakley has long had a reputation for pushing boundaries when it comes to style. But while the company’s new Encoder model does sport a somewhat avant garde look, the most interesting thing about it has nothing to do with optics or aesthetics.

At first glance, the Encoder uses a fairly straightforward frameless shield layout and an oversized lens that offers generous coverage. But while frameless sunglasses often offer field-of-view and weight advantages over full-frame designs, they also tend to be flexier, offer a less-secure fit, and generally just don’t feel as substantial.


(Read more.)
Oakley s new Encoder looks slick but what s far more interesting is the technology incorporated into the new lens design.





RAPHA EXPLORE POWERWEAVE REVIEW: THREADING THEIR WAY TOWARD PERFECTION
By: Iain Treloar

Two years ago, Rapha took its first unaided steps into the cycling shoe category. In the past, the British company had a long history of footwear collaborations with Giro, but the launch of the lace-up Explore gravel shoe and Classic road shoe represented a clean slate.

There were some wobbles on the way, and the Explore, while promising, wasn’t an unmitigated success – as I found through an extensive long-term review published early last year. But the Pro Team road shoe, which followed soon after, showed impressive signs of evolution, along with some fancy woven uppers that all but eliminated the fit quirks of the Explore – despite the two sharing the same fit.

(Read more.)





REMCO EVENEPOEL IS THE NEW FACE OF PIZZA HUT
By: Iain Treloar

Remco Evenepoel – speedy bicycle cyclist, pelvis smasher, alcohol-free beer abstainer – has inked a multi-year deal with Pizza Hut Belgium as the chain’s new ambassador.

In a tweet linked to a press release, Evenepoel showcased a couple of shots of the moment that the two icons forged their “tasty collaboration”. While the deal is presumably lucrative, the Belgian star has not disclosed exactly how much dough he made.

(Read more.)






111 Comments

  • 136 8
 7 fucking grand for the enve frame. That thing better poop rainbows and unicorns.
  • 111 0
 Even better, it looks expensive parked in front of the cafe half way through the 12km Sunday group ride.
  • 12 0
 Well that’s the next evolutionary step... since off the shelf bikes costing already 12k€ (Road bikes!!!)
  • 23 1
 How else would you build that $25000 bike to impress your peasants?
  • 39 13
 It's actually not that pricey... $12,500 for a complete top spec build. That's on par with anything SLR from Trek or S Works from Specialized. That's basically the going rate for top spec road bikes and cheaper than some off the shelf top spec bikes.
  • 14 3
 what would Paul Aston say and do about it?
  • 5 0
 @ferenooo: Yet Dave Rome is "perfectly happy to jump back on my old alloy rim brake road bike after riding the latest and greatest race machine". Like in "we pay by the nose for... nothing. At all"
  • 18 1
 @badbadleroybrown: worryingly, I kind of agree. I normally consider enve stuff a bit "try-hard", but I can see the point of this. Compared to mass produced top-spec big brands road bikes, the price is more than fair for a semi custom frame with quality components. I actually quite like the understated looks. Argh, I'm turning into a roadie!!!
  • 7 10
 @badbadleroybrown: putting the bar of affordable at SLR and S-Works automatically qualifies you at dentist level Wink
  • 22 1
 @Mac1987: I didn't suggest it was affordable... and a product that's only going to see 200-500 units produced per year isn't meant to be an affordable, mass market item.

I'm just making the point that they're pricing it on par with other brands' top spec bikes while also offering a ton of customization options. Compare this to a Project One Emonda SLR9 and it has a similar or better spec, similar or better paint customization, and geometry customization that's not available on Project One (or from any big brand) for the same price or less.
  • 6 10
flag Mac1987 (Mar 31, 2021 at 4:51) (Below Threshold)
 @badbadleroybrown: not saying they're more expensive than competitors, just saying S-Works price level equals expensive for most people. Saying a Ferrari isn't pricey because a Rolls Royce is more expensive seems a bit out of touch with the real world in my personal opinion. Doesn't mean a Ferrari isn't worth the price they command, but they're firmly in the expensive category nonetheless.
The same goes for a 7k frame or 12.5k bike. Not a jab at Enve, but just not agreeing with calling these products 'not that pricey'.
  • 3 10
flag Geoman (Mar 31, 2021 at 7:09) (Below Threshold)
 @badbadleroybrown: That’s close to the price of a brand new Kia Rio. Sorry, but a bike should not cost the price of a car.
  • 24 0
 @Geoman: The people who are buying the bike have no idea what the price of a Kia Rio is, so they don't care.
  • 7 0
 Road biking costs can be insane. I'd say $3,000 US will get you a solid bike but you can build a $40,000 US bike if you wanted to. Most frame-only high end options are $5,000 US+ and if you're lucky you'll get a seat post with with that. One that stands out for me is the Cervelo RCA... I think the original retail for the frame was $10,000 US. Check out some "climbing bike" builds where some people get their bikes down to sub 5kg. I'd LOVE to see Gustav build a no expense spared road rig... although, he'd have to find a hedge fund to sponsor him.
  • 7 0
 Custom geo carbon is a pretty neat competitive advantage though
  • 6 0
 It's actually a bit of a deal. If you max out the options on Enve's website, at the $10k level you can have paint matched carbon bottle cages and an *included* travel case, plus enve wheels of choice. Add $1k for the same spec from Trek, $2k for Specialized. Neither give you a travel case or paint your cages. The custom King Headset is also not an option anywhere else.
  • 2 0
 @me2menow: Calfee has been doing this for years. I think the lugged carbon frames they offer have a beautiful aesthetic.
  • 3 0
 I just built up a bike with their foundation wheels and the Force AXS groupset on the website. Looks like that would be $7,500. Not chump change, but for a custom bike with carbon wheels and electronic shifting, its not that bad TBH.
  • 1 5
flag rexluthor (Mar 31, 2021 at 9:51) (Below Threshold)
 @Vindiu: it's so true. There is not a heckuva a lot you can do to a road bike. Joe avg and even Joe above-average cannot tell a 3lb dif in bike weight. Electronic shifting seems to be a thing just because it was made a thing. If you've used anything 105 mechanical and up since it went 11sp you'll know what I mean: the shifting is insanely good on the mech stuff. And plastic everything. It makes so little difference out on the road and one could argue the simplicity and elegance of what once was the classic road bike (I am not talking DT shifters but more like a CAAD12) are no longer available.

I still think discs on a road bike is laughable and just plain stupid. I'm not talking about commuting in the rain, but an actual road machine.
  • 1 0
 @gaberoc: If you like the Calfee aesthetic, you should be appreciate that Enve helped them develop their carbon frame making process and makes their carbon tubes, along with tubes for dozens of other custom frame builders.
  • 3 0
 I take my comment back. It would be $10k with that spec.
  • 1 0
 @rexluthor: you clearly haven't spent any time on a modern road bike... electronic shifting may not be a substantial improvement in shift performance overall but it is better in a number of ways and routing wires is far superior to routing cables, which also makes things much more aero overall in frame design and integration. Literally any rider can tell a 3lb difference immediately... and disc brakes have every advantage on the road that they have in the dirt and then some. Rim brakes on carbon wheels in the rain or on a long descent are a flat out safety hazard for average riders.

Just like on mountain bikes, none of these things are the difference between a bike being rideable or unrideable but they absolutely make modern bikes ride better
  • 1 0
 Not happy until they have a full susser frame in the lineup for $10k.

The Spanish-made Unno hardtail frame, which I guess is somewhat comparable in 'simplicity', is about $4700 usd.
  • 3 0
 @badbadleroybrown: road bikes are unfortunately remarkably sensitive to reduced weight or drag. I just put a fancy semi-aero rear wheel on my Giant TCR and it's measurably faster, and I can feel it's easier to cover distance - Strava reckons I suddenly gained 20W. Routing road bike cables is a total pain, especially when they're aero integrated, so I can totally see why axs is popular for roadies. Perfectly happy with 105 personally. Oh, and discs? Game changer, especially as I love a challenging descent. Road rim brakes are rubbish...
  • 4 0
 Just to be that guy; if those Enve frames are anywhere near the quality of the rims I've seen from them, be prepared for a splinter up your arse. I'd put my money into a brand that cares about cycling more than posturing.
  • 2 1
 Local shop in my small town has a $6000 trek frame on the floor. They keep a $10,000 sworks road bike around most of the time as well.
  • 1 3
 @Geoman: Seeing all the downvotes we're getting, it seems criticism on calling car-priced bikes 'not-expensive' is not acceptable anymore. I'm happy for all the people making 6-figure salaries here.
  • 2 0
 @Mac1987: don't think anyone is saying it's not expensive. It's just not expensive for what it is. The frame costs more than all the bikes in my garage, so I'm not the target market, but I think the whole bike seems a fair price. More fair than an s-works for example
  • 2 0
 @Mac1987: see your problem is that you think people are saying it's affordable by saying it's not that expensive... that's not the case. Yes, it's obviously expensive, but to use your example of the Ferrari, it's like if Ferrari came out with a new car that they were only gonna make a few hundred of and rather than it being $400k it was only $100k. No one would say "hey, that's a cheap car" but pretty much everyone would say "that's actually not that expensive considering it's a Ferrari and it's basically the same price as a corvette"

So no, it's not an affordable bike but, for an extremely limited production bike with custom geometry, it's really not that pricey... the BMC Masterpiece, for example, is a limited run BMC without custom geometry that sells for $11,750 for just the frame, fork, seatmast, and cockpit.
  • 1 3
 @badbadleroybrown: if you read my comment, you see I agree with you. It's relatively acceptably priced, but absolutely expensive. Funny that the highest rated comment has the same criticism on bike pricing, but in a less nuanced way, and gets 124 upvotes. At the same time, saying the same thing but with more explanation gets downvoted into oblivion.
My fault for expecting logical and fair assessment though. It's PB and we go by emotion.
  • 1 0
 @Niko182 - yes it will better poop rainbows and unicorns, but have you ever taken lots of acid and look at someone using the toilet?
  • 39 3
 Too much bitching about Enve, not enough praise for a sub-20-pound mountain bike under $3k around here.
  • 6 1
 Sub 20lb hardtail under $3k, using China sourced parts is honestly not very noteworthy. In terms of mountain bikes, we're truly living in a golden age.
  • 4 0
 @ryan77777: Yeah, but the point is, people here are always crying about Pinbike never featuring “bikes people can afford.” Well here’s one. Not a peep about it. Instead, all focus on Enve.

And you bring up a good point about the light, cheap bike being sourced in China. The Enve is custom made for each buyer, right here in the States. So it looks like your choice is light and cheap from China, or light and expensive from the US. I’m not saying either is right or wrong, good or bad, but there it is.

Maybe We Are One will get in the frame making business and we can have “light and light reasonable.”
  • 1 3
 @TheR: I am pretty sure your choice isn't a $7k frame from ENVE or a cheap, Chinese frame. But nice false dilemma there.
  • 1 0
 @HB208: Ok, so tell me about all the cheap, light American-made frames available to me out there. All the sub-20-pound bikes under $3k not made in China.
  • 2 0
 @TheR: Most bikes are made in Taiwan, which is not "cheap Chinese made" crap. They are literally the epicenter of bike manufacturing.
  • 1 0
 @HB208: Ok, but you didn’t answer the questions, though — can you point to all the cheap, light, American-made bikes out there? And all the sub-20 pound bikes not made in China? Yes, I will concede there are many reasonable, acceptable options in between made around the globe.

Also, Not one person in this thread mentioned anything about “cheap Chinese made crap,” until you. Not making judgments on any of it. Just stating what is. In fact, my initial comment made no reference to China.

And again, my main point is everyone is outraged about Enve, but little mention out there of the light, inexpensive bike, wherever it’s made.
  • 1 0
 @TheR: Ok, yes, I agree with you. To my knowledge, any bike that is made here in the US is much more expensive.
  • 3 0
 Its hard to praise something that is made of cheap, untested carbon with wheels alike. It has no dropper and is just built as xc/gravel bike using tyres with a hard compound chosen for colour alone.
Its as relevant as the pretentious article further down about how to clean your matching bottles or ‘bidons’.
I like riding road but it needs to get over itself sometimes.
  • 1 0
 @ilovedust: Well there you go, then. You can bitch about that and Enve. That’s the Pinkbike spirit!
  • 1 0
 @ilovedust: I will say this, though. Calling a water bottle a bidon does come across as pretentious.
  • 26 5
 every time i read or see something from them i think of that crazy rim fail. their image for me now is overpriced rubbish, even if thats not entirely true
  • 4 1
 Pole needed some competition!
  • 1 0
 @mi-bike: but i like pole, dont know why them and enve not
  • 12 2
 WHY PROGRESS IS SO SLOW FOR ROAD BIKE TECH...
Which progress? Every year a new hub standart? 1x14 drivetrain... no thanks!
  • 2 1
 Welcome to the MTB world where Trek and SRAM f*cked everything up by doing this sort of shit to stay ahead of competition (at least they think they are).
  • 13 3
 I wonder if ENVE will be sent the frame to Paul Aston's review Wink
  • 7 0
 They should have a mtb monopoly frame. community chance - get caught damaging a Marilyn Monroe statue with Peaty and Warrer. Go directly to jail, do not collect £200
  • 9 1
 I am just here to both criticize the enve frame and read others' criticizms of it.
  • 6 2
 I’m just here for the orange tan wall trump jokes
  • 3 1
 @DizzyNinja: All I know is that this dude name Trump, his middle initial stands for jaundice. Guess his son who's name after him is J.J.
  • 1 0
 I think its cool that they're making a frame. it looks good and I'm sure plenty of people will buy them for the bling factor. But i just don't understand why anyone would pay that much for one when you could get a custom frame from a small frame builder and probably end up paying quite a bit less for something that is way cooler. Horse, Sklar, Prova, Inglis/Retrotec are all quite a lot cheaper and way better looking in terms of custom road bike, imo.
  • 1 0
 Wait until the 5-year old Hambini get a hand on Enve's frame from someone who bought it and has a problem installing a high end bottom bracket!
  • 4 0
 Why are so many restrictions placed on road bike design by the UCI when it surely must be a tiny percentage of riders who actually race? Surely just making the best bike possible and selling it to the general public would work out? I'm amazed no one has made a bigger/smaller wheeled road bikes yet for the bigger/smaller size frames (unless I missed it).
  • 5 0
 Probably for all the weekend roadies that think they're on the verge of getting a UCI ranking, and will be head-down with icy stares on the local group ride Big Grin

You're bang on though, there's huge potential in the same way that MTB builds have evolved massively in the last 10 years.
  • 4 0
 Yeah, makes no sense. Its why you see triathlon bikes pushing the innovation boundaries (including being ugly as sin) and TT bikes have kinda been the same forever.
  • 6 0
 @HankHank: Not so sure myself, I think for pure road bikes the answer is mainly "because they started a century earlier", which the writer does acknowledge.
I really like the slow, careful pace of change in road tech - it means I don't have to change my road bike as often as I do my MTBs.
Just moved to disc brakes and 28mm tubeless tyres last year and it's a big improvement - but arguably the only really significant change(s) for the last two decades - for normal riders.
  • 2 0
 @chakaping: that's a cool perspective, I'd not considered the lack of change being a good thing.
I'm just curious as to what could be done if the restrictions were lifted... The Aussies were riding sub-7kg track bikes in the 30s, and as mentioned above, TT designs are always interesting.
  • 1 0
 @wilsonians: I have never understood the expression 'ugly as sin'. I've done a little consensual sinning over the years and it was always beautiful.
  • 6 0
 And don't care about the custom geometry and I don't care about disc brakes on road bikes, but those bikes look really good.
  • 4 0
 I like to read CyclingTips from time to time, but so often their headlines just read like clickbait.
  • 2 1
 Welcome to the internet
  • 6 1
 Wait, y'all really wash your bottles?
  • 3 0
 The 5 day rule: if you ride more often than every 5 days you don't have to clean it!
Or the Catholic rule: Only clean your water bottle on Christmas, Easter, and when mom's in town.
  • 4 0
 Custom geometry? I'll have a Gravel Donut please.
  • 3 0
 “The Belgian star has not disclosed exactly how much dough he made.” Bravo sir, bravo!
  • 4 2
 Cycling industry: How do we be more inclusive and welcoming to new riders?

also Cycling Industry: Look at this $7k frame and $300 shoes lol peasants
  • 1 0
 That was a damn fine looking ~$3k hardtail, even if it could use a dropper post and a beefier fork. But, I'm guessing as a road rider's "off day" bike, it's meant more for distance than bashing through the rocks.
  • 2 0
 I find it a bit ironic that Envy, a CF company, painted every square mm of their first CF bike metalic silver.
  • 3 0
 Road Biking: More expensive than Mountain Biking for reasons.
  • 1 0
 I literally just bought a DAG-2 last week. Oosh. Although, the DAG-3 is $35 more so I probably would have bought the 2 anyways.
  • 1 0
 CRACKING looking bike that ENVE! Let’s hope it performs as well as their e-bike specific rims


I’ll get my coat.

Don’t call me Shirley
  • 3 4
 I didn’t realize ENVE was still around after everyone broke their all mt wheels & was told they didn’t qualify for warranty. Maybe hence the play to a high end road market?
  • 3 1
 Have a link for this? Sounds like hearsay.
  • 5 3
 @eteyber You should ask Brendan Fairclough, Amaury Pierron, or Connor Fearon about Enve durability. They might ride a little harder and know a little more than most. Connor came straight from running WAO's and hasn't looked back.
  • 3 0
 @grizzlyatom: For sure; I imagine as a sponsored rider they probably don't have to deal with the terrible customer service or warranty process. I'll ask them next time I see them tho.
  • 1 0
 @eteyber: Good info. I just don't see where they aren't honoring their warranty. In fact, I thought they beefed up their warranty a year or so ago?

But, yea, clearly some poor QC on their end, and after receiving a review like that, let's hope they step up their game.

I have a pair of M40s that came on my Lynskey hardtail, and I am super happy with the rim, but the Chris King hubs are do come with premium care costs, like their fancy lube, and needing a bearing press.

I think I enjoy my Hunt H_Impact wheels just as much, and actually notice their performance more often than these though, plus they both come with a warranty, and Hunt even paid for me to retrue my wheel when it fell out quickly.

I do think that they're being given a run for their money right now, so they should either step up their game, or get more competitive with their prices for sure.

Cheers.
  • 2 1
 @eteyber: I wasn't talking about customer service or warranty (both of which are above standard in the industry) specifically, I was talking about the sheer durability of the product. Paul Aston was a disgruntled media schill who rode a wheel that wasn't up to the intentional thrashing he gave it on his E-DH bike, big surprise.

I've been around several world cup DH teams for years, and in the real world, the Syndicate had incredible success with Enve for many years as carbon was just entering the DH scene, Brendan Fairclough cased a 60ft canyon gap on live feed and rode the same, undamaged wheel to a podium at Rampage, the Kona DH team and others requested Enve wheels after speaking to other teams and having repeated failures with previous wheels, and Commencal has not had a single wheel failure of note under some of the fastest riders in the world for multiple seasons now. The abuse DH wheels take is almost unimaginable for the average rider. It is the ultimate proving ground. I don't think everyone has to ride Enve products to enjoy riding a bike, but if you don't have first-hand knowledge from riding their wheels or dealing with them as a company there's really nothing to be gained by endlessly berating them, even if their pricing offends you.
  • 2 0
 @grizzlyatom: Agreed. In the end, I do like their products.

Someone said something about the golden age of MTBs right now, and the possibilities are really endless right now aside from bottlenecks in distribution atm.
  • 1 0
 @Delapp15: Ya Hunt is a great example of the kind of carbon product and lifetime warranty that I had assumed was inevitably running Enve out of business.
  • 1 0
 @grizzlyatom: Your right Enve increased their warranty to lifetime a year+ ago because everyone else had a lifetime warranty and I guess they didn't feel like throwing in the towel. Unfortunately in practice everything I've seen ends up being a very expensive crash replacement, compared to Hunt or Santa Cruz or Revel that get a new wheel to your door for free within the week. My personal experience with Enve is spending way too much money on their tubulars for race wheels and both rims cracked within 2-years; for the record I've never broken a carbon road rim before or after that.

While I think your history of DH teams never breaking an Enve rim is slightly hyperbolic, people are always going to have varying degrees of luck riding carbon rims hard. Confidence in the warranty process and a quick turnaround is what you're paying for, otherwise just get a china-carbon rim (or get the Zipp Motos if your a physics nerd and don't ride DH)
  • 1 1
 That piece about washing bidons was genuinely useful, cheers.
But I mainly came to ask why-oh-why can't Enve make a bike which isn't minging for that kind of money?
  • 1 0
 I could actually see ENVE doing well in MTB...probably the right market for it too
  • 2 1
 Wait, road cyclists actually call water bottles bidons?
  • 1 0
 I might buy one. My hands.. hammered..
  • 1 0
 Well, slightly hesitant to look like the douche in the supercar around town (Woodside). I'll stick with what I've got.
  • 1 0
 DANG thats a hot DAG
  • 4 3
 Pizza Hut is disgusting
  • 1 0
 "pelvis smasher"?
  • 1 0
 Pretty odd way to say he has success with the ladies, but good on him I guess.
  • 5 8
 I’ve been riding mountain bikes since 1989 and never heard anyone call a water bottle a bidon. What an inclusive world we have now.
  • 9 1
 Must be tough these days, trying to find stuff to complain about, eh?
  • 7 0
 Bidon 2021
  • 4 0
 been doing sports since the late 90s and i have heard the word Bidon in Track&Field, Road biking and MTB.

Roadies use this word mainly, to be fair the article is from PB sister website Cycling typs, which focuses mainly on road biking. But i've heard that word in MTB context regularly, in 2 different languages.

Need to ride more my friend, and different trails with different people Wink
  • 1 8
flag unrooted (Mar 31, 2021 at 9:15) (Below Threshold)
 @Narro2: my personality doesn’t go well with riding with other people. . . Especially roadies.

And don’t call me friend, buddy.
  • 4 0
 @unrooted: “don’t call me buddy, pal!” Lol
  • 2 0
 @DizzyNinja: don’t call me pal, guy!
  • 2 1
 @chrod: Sellwood Cycle Repair was making Biden Bidons a few years ago. There are rumors that there might be another run.
  • 1 0
 @unrooted: hahha, ok then, there is the root cause amigo.
  • 1 0
 I heard that word years ago... at an auction.
  • 1 0
 @unrooted Im with you on this. I have been ridding since the early nineties (including racing) and ride road as well. Its only in the last year I have heard that term for a bottle. Call it what it is. Im off to ride my velo touts terrain now.
  • 7 10
 Enve frame = overprice and too stiff.
  • 5 7
 Enve = something others will *envy*. Simple as that. No other selling point.
  • 5 1
 I think the main selling point (other than the fact it says ENVE on it) is that it's a carbon frame with custom geometry. Pretty uncommon and certainly goes some way to explain the enormous price.
  • 2 0
 @codfather1234: Do you think you could do cheaper with S-works or Dogma?
  • 5 0
 @pakleni: I have no idea, I have no info on the road side of things. My point is that taking the custom geometry into account, the price isn't perhaps as shocking as it may look.
  • 2 0
 @codfather1234: Agree. It is not. Especially because the price is in the ballpark of mass production hi end bikes and cheaper than boutique brands like Heroin bikes

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