Dangerholm's Latest: A Mountain Biker's Gravel Bike

Jul 1, 2021
by Danger Holm  

Gravel bikes.

One of the biggest trends in cycling today and it's quite easy to understand why. They're versatile, fun, fast and essentially a bike for anyone. The spectrum is surprisingly wide, ranging from carbon aero speed machines to pretty much full on bikepacking rigs ready for adventures like riding across the globe.

Except for maybe too many tan wall tires, there's one thing most of them have in common - drop bars. Of course there are exceptions but the vast majority of these bikes clearly have a road bike pedigree. Which makes perfect sense, both looking at history and at more practical reasons like the benefit of multiple hand positions for long rides.

But what if you come from riding mountain bikes? What if your other rig is an enduro bike or if you're already used to doing hours of gravel riding on your cross country race bike? Surely it would be nice to have a flat bar and be able to easily pop manuals during those fire road descents?
There's a joke about how things are almost going full circle and that the 90's rigid mountain bikes essentially were gravel bikes. So let's go there, albeit with a very modern and integration oriented approach.

Before we start though, let's take a look at the first build based on this very frame set.


The DangerPubes Collaboration

Bicyclepubes is a man of mystery. His identity is unknown, but on Instagram he shared his very accurate and hilarious critique of the bicycle industry with priceless MS Paint drawings. He also used to do charity campaigns where you would donate for a good cause and in return get a unique Paint drawing of your bike. Unfortunately he has left the world wide web now, so you will have to take my word for it, but it was some truly amazing content and for being such a niche account (and even more niche type of humor) he had a huge amount of fans.

Either way, since I had been honored by/victim for his sharp digital pen in the past there was a connection. So we set out to do a collaboration. A bike in the spirit of his drawings, where we took all of our very worst, best and funniest ideas and actually built a bike from them. So before I started the Scale Gravel project I took the frame set and turned it into the DangerPubes build.

The result was the ultimate high speed backwoods bike-lo-pack race. It featured highlights such as carbonium frame with zittyzit fork, QRBBT (Quick Release Banana and Baguette Technology), direct-mount spare tubes, Crocs Power Strap System, dual handlebar system and a riser (yes, riser) seat post.

The more you look the better it gets! Or maybe worse, haha...


So much going on!
I expect this standard to really take off in 2022.

Time For A Makeover

With the DangerPubes build in the books it was time to strip the bike back down and take a very different approach.

I've spent a large amount of my training hours for years now on gravel roads riding various XC builds so I already knew quite well what I wanted. It would essentially be a hardtail going full-on gravel by running a rigid fork and super fast rolling tires. You'll be able to tackle a short trail section on it but it will be at home going full speed on long winding gravel roads.

Having already built the Scott Hyper Spark which took integration to new heights with fully internal brake hose routing and hidden shifters, I wanted to continue on that theme. Running a rigid fork would allow for an even cleaner looking setup so it was the perfect opportunity.

Aside from the technical aspects of clean looks I decided to play a bit with that 90's old school MTB vibe and go for a bright paint job. Something that escalated as I went and in the end even the full carbon wheels were custom painted to match.



Preparations and Modifications

Mountain bikes aren't yet at the same level of integration as many road and gravel bikes. And while that's both good and bad, I'm 100% sure that integration will be a big part of how our bikes evolve in the coming years. Definitely not all types of mountain bikes, but certainly for some. So in order to skip ahead a few years and run hidden brake hoses and shifters there's quite a bit of custom work to do.

For starters the handlebars obviously need to be modified. Unfortunately it's not as easy as just grabbing your Dremel and adding some holes. Snapped handlebars is the last thing you want, so even if it's Darwin Awards 101 I feel obliged to tell you - don't do it. So what did I do? Like with all my carbon work I went to the experts, in this case local carbon repair man Mattias Hellöre. The handlebars were reinforced and then I spent quite some time on finishing work to make everything look smooth and nice.

The steerer tube itself also needed a fair bit of work and the bike features a steering stop to keep the rear brake hose from being damaged.

Front derailleur mount removed and cable ports covered up.
While the wheels come in a true carbon finish without clear coat, they still needed to be prepared for the paint to stick.

The frame did see a lot of finishing work as well. It's a Scott Scale 910 frame, meaning that it comes with a front derailleur mount and of course cable ports for a traditional setup. Mounts were removed and cable ports covered, followed by plenty of primer and sanding. It might seem like a lot of work for just a few small details but it really adds so much in keeping the overall looks clean and pleasing to the eye.

Speaking of sanding, there was a lot of it. Painting many components means that all of them need to be sanded in several steps. Old paint or clear coat needs to be removed, primer needs to be sanded and even the new clear coat gets a cut before being polished so you end up with a perfectly smooth finish.

Ready for paint.

There was however one detail I didn't manage to sort out. With a rigid fork it would look just perfect if the front brake hose ran internally through the left fork leg. So believe me when I say that I tried to find a reasonable way, but it just wasn't meant to be. But I guess I had to save something for next time!




Highlights

Frame Set
At the heart of the bike is the Scott Scale 910 frame, in size Medium. This is actually what you might call their entry level carbon hardtail frame, sitting below the RC and SL models. They share the same looks and geometry, but the higher end models feature even better carbon and layup resulting mainly in lower weight. What's nice about the 910 and their other HMF Carbon models is that you get most of the performance but at a significantly lower price.

It's matched to a Trek 1120 rigid fork up front. This fork has been developed for their adventure bike and it features the traditional fork leg bosses plus an optional integrated front rack. A super nice solution, and perfect if you want to go on truly stupid long rides or just need to bring some stuff to the after-bike BBQ.

The handlebars are Syncros Fraser iC SL which is a one-piece combo. Except for clean looks this style of design opens up for some good construction benefits too, like being able to run continuous carbon fibers all the way from the stem section to the handlebar ends. One of the things that gives integrated combos a good strength to weight ratio when done right.



Wheel Set

As some of the most iconic looking wheels on the market today, the Bike Ahead Composites Biturbo RS are hard to miss. They're a one-piece carbon construction hand made in Germany, and the concept has been around for quite a few years now.

Except for the unique looks they also offer a quite unique ride quality by being very responsive and quick accelerating. The latest version features a 27mm inner rim width and weights from around 1250 grams. Hub internals are DT Swiss so no surprises there, and in my case I also upgraded the bearings to ceramic ones.

The tires are Continental SpeedKing RS which are most likely the fastest 29" tires you'll find for gravel riding. The acceleration grip is actually very good but as you can imagine they keep things pretty exciting during hard cornering and braking. Part of what makes them so fast is the very thin and supple RaceSport casing, which also unfortunately makes them quite difficult to run tubeless. So to keep things reliable I'm running Tubolito tubes. Tubes definitely keep with the 90's theme of the bike, but these are not the heavy butyl tubes of old but extremely lightweight and actually more durable.

Painting the wheels felt like taking a big chance.
Luckily it worked out, adding to the looks of the bike and enhancing the beautiful shape of the spokes.



Brakes
Once again I'm running Trickstuff Piccola Carbon brakes and once again I have several good reasons to do so.

They're not just the lightest brakes at the market but despite this they're also some of the most powerful 2-piston brakes. With very smooth internals and the lever blades running on four bearings each the lever feel is second to none, and extremely light and nice feeling. Then there's the looks, or course!

But maybe most importantly for this project they're available with a special banjo coupling for internal or semi-internal routing. These angle the brake hose towards the handlebar, making for a perfectly clean look when going all in like with my custom solution or if you're running something similar but more user friendly like the all new Scott Spark.

The brake discs are Trickstuff Dächle UL, a model giving a great mix between performance and low weight. The edges are rounded for easier wheel installation, and they're fastened with super light Bike Ahead Composites centerlock adaptors.

Small in size but with a surprising amount of power.
Notice how the lever blade runs on four bearings.

Controllers
The bike is running SRAM AXS with a wireless rear derailleur and dropper seat post. No cables makes for a pretty clean looking cockpit and to make things even better I'm running Zirbel Twister WE01 controllers. These slide onto your handlebars and are plug and play when using a SRAM BlipBox, which you can for example place under your stem or even hide inside your frame or stem depending on what you're running.

The "shifter rings" rotate on an aluminum base and have a distinct tactile feel thanks to small but very strong magnets. The controllers come stock with nice machined rings but you can also get them with 3D printed rings, with the paddle in any size or shape that you prefer. You can even print them yourself and buy the magnets separately.

In my own opinion the ergonomics are amazing, almost surprisingly so since they're so small and sleek looking. The paddle is very easy to reach and for example to shift to a higher gear you just lightly push it backwards with the knuckle of your thumb. It struck me that what separates them, except for the design in general, from other electronic controllers like Di2 or AXS is that they actually have some "travel" when you push them. They're not just a button that moves a couple of millimeters and says click. This gives them a much more natural feel, sort of blending a traditional trigger with electronic controllers.


To keep things 100% clean looking I'm running a custom setup on this bike. Having the brake hoses internally routed means that the stem and steerer tube already is full, making it difficult to fit cables going to a BlipBox hidden inside the frame. Instead, I had help having the Zirbel controllers connected directly to the SRAM circuit boards. The cables go underneath the Syncros foam grips with the PCB's and batteries hidden inside the handlebars. Not as easy as it might sound, but it gives a perfectly clean look.

The controller battery life with this setup is expected to be 5-8 years and if you for some reason need to make any adjustments you just pull the PCB out of the handlebar to access the button.

I opted for 3D printed rings with a wider paddle.


Seat Combos
Low weight is nice but droppers and easily doing manuals is fun. So in an admittedly luxurious manner I opted for both.

The rigid and lightweight option is a Schmolke Carbon TLO seat post with a Tune Speedneedle 20Twenty. A seat post this light actually offers one other performance benefit - comfort. With the option to get them for specific rider weight intervals means that you get a seat post that truly suits you. If you're 60kg having a seat post with a 130kg rider weight limit sure will give you an unnecessarily harsh ride. But this way the seat post is strong enough not to break but compliant enough to flex when riding bumpy terrain. You can actually see and feel the post flex (in a safe manner) if you stand next to the bike and bounce it with your weight.

Tune Speedneedle is a true classic when it comes to carbon seats, and this version with a stripe in the middle was introduced for its twentieth anniversary a few years ago. They are handmade on a small scale in Germany, just like the seat post.

A lot heavier but offering a lot of fun is the RockShox Reverb AXS dropper seat post. Luckily it's slightly compensated by the 60 gram Berk Composites seat. It's controlled with a Zirbel Twister on the left side of the handlebar, and since the controller is so small it can conveniently be left on the bike permanently while you easily switch seat posts depending on what you want for the day.


Drivetrain
Gravel riding allows for some pretty fast average speeds, so a big chainring like this 40T Garbaruk can make sense for more people than just Nino Schurter. On the rear there is a matching 12-speed Garbaruk wide range cassette so that you still can manage any steep long climbs. The crankset is a SRAM XX1 DUB with a Kogel preload adjuster in machined aluminum. Pedals are Xpedo M-Force 8Ti at a reasonable 213g.

A lot of focus was put on making this bike quite fast. Not just with fast rolling tires, but by having a very efficient and fast drivetrain as well. So the bottom bracket comes from Kogel and features ceramic bearings. So does the Kogel Kolossos rear derailleur cage with its oversized pulley wheels. The reason for the big wheels is that they result in less chain friction, since the chain links don't have to rotate as much. It also allows you to choose between three different tension settings for the cage, with lower tension meaning lower friction but at slightly higher risk of dropping your chain.

In an unholy alliance I'm combining the Kogel bearings with CeramicSpeed UFO Drip chain lubricant.

All in all this results in a noticeably faster drivetrain, as in that it spins at the lightest touch and even just the freewheel friction is enough to propel the cranks forward in the higher gears.



Ceramic bearings often get a lot of criticism with people saying they're a waste of money. In my opinion it's important to see them for what they are - marginal gains. There are absolutely very good steel bearings out there at a much lower cost, but a setup like this will save you precious watts compared to a standard drivetrain. How many is difficult to say and varies a lot, but the savings are there. So in reality it could make more sense to spend on ceramic bearings and OSPW derailleur cages than on titanium screws or Kashima coating if you're chasing seconds.

But of course, the best is to have all of them for all of the marginal gains haha.

Lower chain friction since the chain links don't have to rotate as much.


Paint and Extras
As mentioned before the paint job sure is a bright one, and while it won't be to everyone's taste I kind of hope that it's so over the top that you'll end up liking it. Even in real life the bike almost looks like a rendering, and strangers keep stopping me just to ask what kind of bike I'm on.

Either way, it's easy to spot at a distance. The yellow color is called Mellow Yellow Metallic and truly comes alive in sunshine, while the thin stripes in the fading was just as difficult to mask as you can imagine. But equally satisfying to peel off.

To make a whole concept out of it I didn't just paint the front rack to match but a Scott Cadence helmet and Scott Sport Shield sunglasses too.



Scott Scale Gravel - Weight from 7.50 kg / 16.53 lb incl. pedals






Summary

So does this bike make sense in the end?
I would say hell yes to that. It falls perfectly right in between a "real" gravel bike and a traditional XC hardtail. It's fast, comfortable, fun and you'll feel right at home as soon as you get used to not having any suspension. With this type of bike, and especially so with this very build, it's easy to get that high speed feeling like you're flying down the gravel road ahead of you.

What's nice is that a build in the same spirit as this one doesn't have to cost a fortune. Any decent hardtail with a lightweight rigid fork and some fast tires will get you there. A perfect work horse for training year round and a great tool for when you want to go and ride something different than your regular trails. You can cover great distances when riding gravel, and to me that's one of the best parts - you can go and see so many nice places you normally wouldn't.

So what's next? Well, this gave me an even bigger appetite for gravel riding so I will actually build a "real" one too. My very first drop bar build!
And on the topic of integration, I would say that the new Spark would be a good canvas to take things to the next level. Feel free to follow along via my Instagram until you get to see the next full feature article here on Pinkbike!

I know you've missed the Lemmy shorts in the last couple of Dangerholm articles so here we go!

Warning and disclaimer:
Please keep in mind that any modifications such as paint stripping, repainting, sanding or in any way modify frames, components or safety equipment is potentially dangerous and can lead to crashes and injuries. It will always void any and all warranties, and is strongly advised against by SCOTT Sports and all other manufacturers, who take no responsibility. It is not recommended to put any travel fork on any frame, if unsure of the fork travel limit for your frame always consult a dealer or the brand directly first. If you choose to modify your bike anyway, always make sure to do so with safety in mind and remember the points above.


157 Comments

  • 302 2
 Even the balls must have internal routing with those shorts.
  • 73 0
 DangleHolm's
  • 47 0
 @likeittacky: More like StrangleHolm's.
  • 6 0
 Ergo dangerpubes
  • 4 1
 Chicken legs
  • 23 0
 If your balls have external routing, you need to see a doctor.
  • 22 0
 Aren't internally routed Testes called Ovaries?
  • 1 0
 Tucked into his quads.
  • 2 1
 @likeittacky: I wanted to upvote you for that but you're on plus 69 right now and I'm not ruining it.
  • 151 0
 Warning and disclaimer:
Please keep in mind that any modifications such as cutting, tearing, ripping or in any way modifying jeans is potentially dangerous and can lead to crashes and injuries. It will always void any and all warranties, and is strongly advised against by Levi's, Wrangler, and all other denim clothing manufacturers, who take no responsibility. It is not recommended to put any long travel quadriceps into any short short denim clothing, if unsure always consult a dealer or the brand directly first. If you choose to modify your jeans in anyway, always make sure to do so with safety in mind and remember the points above.
  • 88 0
 @reverb Do I have your permission to use that masterpiece of a disclaimer next time around? Not even kidding haha.
  • 23 0
 @dangerholm: absolutely! I truly would be honored. Keep up the amazing work on the bikes and quads! Smile
  • 4 0
 @dangerholm: Dude you should evacuate the frame with helium........think of the small gains!
  • 145 2
 Came for the quads, not disappointed.
  • 39 0
 WTF is he feeding those things? It looks like two Pitbulls live inside his legs!
  • 5 0
 @gossman: Bags of angry snakes
  • 7 0
 Also here for Quadzilla.
  • 1 7
flag entrecerros (Jul 1, 2021 at 14:03) (Below Threshold)
 @Waldon83: he does not even do squats wit proper technique
  • 1 0
 Still waiting on official names for these bad boys...
  • 7 0
 @kungfupanda: Walker and Texas Ranger
  • 2 0
 @thejames: Too obvious; has to be more like Shotgun and The Candy Man
  • 4 0
 Or Des and Troy because when you put them together they destroy @thejames:
  • 1 0
 @rpr175: Genius
  • 66 5
 I'll be the first to admit when I initially saw this bike I thought it was a dumb gimmick............. and now I desperately want one.
  • 3 0
 do it
  • 1 0
 It’s a hybrid. Hybrids are sick, bikes and cars.

This in particular is a really f*cking sick hybrid.
  • 55 0
 When I am old and on vacation in Sweden, I hope, I am passing through some small town and suddenly see a sign which says "Danger Holm Bike Museum" and that the museum has all his crazy projects bikes on display! Pieces of niche
pop-cultural art, worthy to be conserved.
  • 2 0
 I think this will be difficult because he is rebuilding His Bikes all the time. The old Bikes are gone
  • 2 0
 I will buy a ticket to your Museum!
  • 1 0
 @HundredPerCent: and occasionally selling them… pick up only though… I think he sold his copper Genius for some €7500-ish through happyride.se
  • 4 0
 @BikingBender Haha you're too kind. I do hope to be able to keep a few bikes forever though, so if I keep on building there surely will be enough for a little museum one day!
  • 2 0
 @dothecrux: Only 5k, I felt slightly robbed haha but it had to go.
  • 5 0
 @taurausmountain: Surely there will have to be a free ticket deal for the Pinkbike comment section! Should make for some fun discussions haha.
  • 33 0
 look how they massacred my boy.... jk. this is top notch, danger doug. miss you xoxo.
  • 16 0
 I'll be damned, my one and only master pubes. Keep on being awesome out there in the real world. MISS YOU TOO
  • 22 0
 The real question is why did Bicyclepubes leave the internetz. Did Specialized hitmen take him out? Did QBP drill a million bike zits into him? My internetz sux without Bicyclepubes.
  • 1 0
 @jeredbogli with the tough questions we all need the answer to.
  • 22 0
 I heard surly/salsa kidnapped him and he's the head of design now
  • 2 0
 Yeah this article made me aware of it. I know he hasn’t posted in a while but didn’t know he deleted the account.

I will continue wearing my Outside Is Bullshit tshirt in his honor.
  • 14 1
 Where to start with the DangerPubes build? I can't decide what my favourite feature is. The baguette holder or the unique way of storing a tube on your bike? Tough call.
  • 6 0
 those plastic rotors?
  • 18 0
 It's got to be the tube storage. Any attachment method that automatically punctures the tube in 8 places is some mad genius shit!
  • 5 0
 The tube storage is amazing. I can't wait to try this using my bottle cage bolts!
  • 7 0
 Just like leaving condoms in a dorm by thumbtacking them to the bulletin board.
  • 1 0
 @Notmeatall: carbon
  • 3 0
 @commental Initially those were my favorites as well but later on I was leaning more towards the drillium mug or Crocs Power Straps.
  • 3 0
 @MuddyBrit: less rubber, less weight!
  • 10 0
 This article made me realize that BicyclePubes is gone and now my day is ruined.
  • 13 3
 That's a gravel bike riders gravel bike.
  • 10 0
 Damm dude Conan the Barbarian wants his legs back.
  • 6 0
 Conan the Bikebarian.
  • 9 0
 Soooo... A rigid mountain bike.
  • 6 0
 I actually really like that Trek fork/rack combo. Really slick. I love these Dangerholm articles, but this is the first time I've ever though about buying something featured in one of them.
  • 1 0
 It's super neat! I really like the whole 1120 concept as a whole, including the equally cool rear rack. I've actually owned two Stache (pre-1120) bikes, super fun bikes.
  • 8 0
 Its ridiculous and dumb and I love it.
  • 9 1
 Id say thats not a gravel bike, its a fully rigid mtb
  • 7 0
 Scrolled straight to the bottom for the quad-shot. Was not disappointed!
  • 7 0
 I dunno, I still think it's just a regular mountain bike with fat slicks.
  • 2 0
 Can't really argue with that, but considering modern standards and trends for mountain bikes I'm guessing that a lot of people except for myself would enjoy it more on gravel roads that out bouncing and sliding around on trails haha.
It's a fun bike though, and even though I'm looking forward to my "real" gravel bike I'm building up I sure will keep taking this one out for spins as well.
  • 3 0
 Very sick build! But....as a mountain biker who also rides quite a bit of gravel, a "mountain biker's gravel bike" to me is a drop-bar build with suspension and meaty tires, maybe even a dropper. This is just a rigid mountain bike. Drop-bars are the ticket for gravel because they provide multiple hand positions, very handy (no pun intended) for long rides.
  • 2 0
 I thought a mountain biker's gravel bike was a road bike? Wink
  • 3 0
 Thanks! You definitely have a point, which is why I mentioned pretty much that at the start of the article haha. While I'm looking forward to getting my "real" gravel bike up and running, drop bars and all, this one has its good sides as well.
As far as comfort goes, I've found that "long rides" really seem to mean different things to different people. But for reference I'm simply used to flat bars and have no problem spending 5 hours or so on such a bike. Will be interesting to compare with the drop bars later on though, gonna be my first ones!
  • 1 0
 I've raced gravel on my Scale HT many many times including 50 milers...always super comfy. I've also raced my drop bar gravel bike too. For some odd reason I just love riding gravel on my HT with RaceKings lol.
  • 5 0
 "will save you precious watts"

It certainly will, but even pluralizing "watts" is pushing it for actual gains, ha!
  • 2 0
 I know you got better connections to Scott, but if you're not into tuned model, mortals cannot access 910 frame only as far as I know and if you get whole bike, you simply overpay on what you get
  • 1 0
 Really? I've completely missed that then, I'm pretty sure it was available last year at least?
  • 1 0
 @dangerholm: maybe I'm wrong, I just remember Scott had for sale as frame only just these top level ones with more expensive carbon arrangement. Which is really a pain for customers who wants the frame, but aren't fans of twinloc and Fox performance suspension. Or maybe it's just laziness of local distributors.

Anyway going for mtb'ers gravel bike, I'd surely pick the same frame! And again, those Zirbel twisters...I wish I had never seen them, but now I know I need them.
  • 1 0
 Cool build, plenty of people don't like drop bars. I do have a nit to pick with this comment:

"Any decent hardtail with a lightweight rigid fork and some fast tires will get you there."

Very few hardtails allow a big enough chainring (40T in this case); from what I've seen 34 or 36T is the max, which really isn't enough for gravel.
  • 2 0
 Maybe I should've specified it as XC hardtails. Most of those doesn't come with much tire clearance, allowing for 36-38T definitely. It doesn't have to be that expensive to go the route I went here though, with custom offset. I could probably fit a 44T with the clearance I have here. Either way, it's a good point!
  • 1 0
 I’m no scientist, but I’m fairly certain if you mash that banana, baguette, cliff bar, baked beans and water and stuff it in the inner tube… you just might have a cushcore that doubles as a rim saver and snack maker… thoughts @dangerholm?
  • 1 0
 @dangerholm - any chance of a geo chart for this build? Would be interesting to see how it compares to current market offerings. I have a rigid 2016 Stache 5 with a spare set of wheels that are non-plus, and that's all I need for this 'type' of bike (maybe I'm just slow!), though wouldn't mind the 1120 forks at some juncture and a Slack-R headset to get a touch more front centre and lower the BB a fraction. Thanks!
  • 1 0
 @Danger Holm. I absolutely get it and applaud you for this fella!

I did something similar to a Holdsworth Mystique last year. Flat bars and a 70mm stem. XTR drive train, with Hope RX4 brakes mated with Tech 3 levers. Hope Pro 4 on 27.5 rims. Fat slick (tan wall of course!) tyres for the road that will take light gravel work.
Coming from BMX / Dirt Enduro and DH, I wanted something to commute to work on. Something as quick and light as a road / gravel bike but without the drop bars, but not a hard tail MTB due to the geometry. And finally, Burgtec flat pedals cause I don't fraternise with that clipped in stuff! Smile

Not as exotic as the creature you have birthed, but a lot of fun racing through the city!
  • 2 0
 With shorts that tiny, his cock and balls must resemble a curly haired special forces sniper team hiding behind a denim wall, ready to leap out when you least expect it for maximum shock and awe.
  • 6 2
 ok, another form of exhibitionism

[ready to get downvoted into oblivion]
  • 2 1
 Nah, it's pretty clear that, while Gustav does ride his bikes, his builds are a lot about showing off. Which is fine, but we can call it what it is.
  • 5 2
 As sick as these are, his theme is starting to become repetitive. Probably get hate for that but oh well.
  • 10 0
 I've actually thought about this a bit myself, so no worries at all. I do however want to say that there's kind of a difference to repetitive and to what is simply style/taste. Take music for example, some bands find their sound and keep on going for 20 records while others are on this quest to always make something totally different compared to the previous record. Motörhead did the first and well, I love Motörhead haha.
Either way, while my bikes for sure will continue to all carry a certain style and elements of repetition I hope to be able to mix things up a bit in the future! Both with the builds and the presentations.
  • 4 1
 @dangerholm: you are finding originality within your style, bike to bike. You will mix it up as time goes on but let there be no doubt in your mind that what you are doing is fresh and original. World class. I’ll even forgive your svenska grabba’s propensity to terrible metal of yore, and use another musical metaphor: Bob Marley’s songs—on the surface—sound all the same, but when you explore them, they’re all unique and original. Heja DH.
  • 2 0
 When I was a kid I thought Spinergy wheels were the coolest, now that i'm old and boring I can't stand those Bike Ahead Composite wheels.
  • 2 0
 The Maniac from Mora keeps figuring out ways to add lightness. My favorites to date: cross-drilled inner tubes and legless pants. #innovation.
  • 3 0
 *Shammy Hagar has entered the chat*
  • 3 0
 That would be one sick fixed gear!
  • 3 0
 Those quads. Like double the size of a mortal's legs...Octods?
  • 4 0
 Seriously.. With all the builds he does, how does he find time to build his legs!!
  • 8 0
 @SeanOg: When sanding, he holds his arm rigid and just does a lot of squats to move the sandpaper. While wearing a weighted backpack
  • 3 0
 @showmethemountains: My secret is out.
  • 1 0
 I just realized i have that gold bottle holder from the pubes bike somewhere in my parts bin. I seem to remember it coming on a stand to make it look like a trophy.
  • 1 0
 Correct! It came with like a plastic stand and some note about it being 24K gold plating etc.
  • 1 1
 Saw the short version of the build video for this on instagram and the best thing was the fact that a Reverb AXS was the spare post he used to hold the bike in the stand... gotta be the only time that's ever happened
  • 3 0
 Time for a DH build with as many suspension parts as possible
  • 1 0
 This reminds me of defunct Eastern European water parks that would be part of a Buzzfeed photo slideshow titled "Twenty Places That Were Once Full of Life"
  • 4 0
 Gotta love this guy
  • 3 1
 I like the tennis ball color
  • 2 0
 I want to know what the build cost is, but I also don't want to know.
  • 2 0
 i love it, danger your nuts. awesome
  • 1 0
 Haha cheers man.
  • 2 0
 I love the bananas bolted to the front of the fork
  • 2 0
 end up staring at the man more than the bike......
  • 2 0
 Just scrolled through looking for a thigh shot, was not disappointed
  • 1 0
 The real question is does he just keep re-using the same set of TrickStuff brakes? Or does have a backstock?!
  • 3 0
 I've re-used them on occasion but I do have a little collection by now (and yes it does feel extremely luxurious).
  • 1 0
 @dangerholm: every month or so I break down and go to the website to finally place an order....then I see the lead time (again) and chicken out (again)!
  • 1 0
 Would look good sanded down for the rat bike look. Keep the wheels raw carbon and everything else polished aluminum.
  • 2 0
 Dangerholm only creates his signature bikes to show off his legs
  • 1 0
 DOPE build. I did something similar with a scale 710 last year, but dude took this it a whole other level!!
  • 2 0
 Absolutely love the thought and build
  • 1 0
 Thanks, appreciate it!
  • 2 1
 A mountain bikers what??? Miss me with any and all of that gravel bike stuff.
  • 2 0
 With those quads on this light bike, he must accelerate like a rocket ship
  • 1 0
 Here you’ll see the plumsmuggler setup; which comes in denim or redneck options
  • 2 1
 awesome - I'm not a gravel bike guy but Dangerholm's creations are fantastic. Keep on doing what you do!
  • 2 0
 That's fucking beautiful, you crazy tinkerer
  • 2 0
 Anyone else think that the derailleur should be painted white as well?
  • 1 0
 Yes.
  • 2 0
 Master of building, sanding, and in shorts standing. Obey your master.
  • 2 0
 rip bicyclepubes peepee-poopoo
  • 2 0
 Don't know but looks ugly
  • 1 0
 for some reason it took me 10 minutes to get over the fact that he doesn't use a top of the line carbon frame
  • 3 1
 Would
  • 1 0
 Does Dangerholm have a team of Scandinavian elves doing all this work?
  • 1 5
flag wyorider (Jul 1, 2021 at 11:45) (Below Threshold)
 More like a trust fund to do nothing but ride and tweak bikes.
  • 7 0
 @gtill9000 That would be the dream. I actually live nearby a Santa amusement park, might be worth looking into haha.

@wyorider I wish! Working 100% at a bike/sports shop and doing all this on my spare time.
  • 2 0
 Thunder Thighs!
  • 1 0
 Different strokes for different folks.
  • 2 0
 Shreds not dead!
  • 1 0
 Sheesh, what's left to hide... the chain?
  • 2 3
 Cool, but just a light rigid hardtail. Doesn't have drop bars or the gearing which make a "gravel" bike fun and fast on multi-surface rides.
  • 1 1
 It has the gearing, just not drop bars. A 10-52 cassette is plenty for gravel riding, especially for someone riding this specific build, who will likely not be another MAMIL but an elite, fast rider who can manage a limited low gear.
  • 2 1
 @dockboy: Any MAMIL will be spinning out a 4 to 1 gear ratio on any smooth slightly downhill gradient and riding in the 10t cog that much will suck as well. Beauty of "gravel" bikes is versatility and comfortable position going fast as well as slow.
  • 1 0
 I have a bike that's pretty much like this one (carbon frame, fork, handlebar, seatpost, seat), except that it has a 10-speed 11-36 cassette and a 48-36-26 touring crankset. The Kenda Kozmik tires roll very fast and offer a surprising amount of side grip on dirt. This bike does very near the pace of my road bike on asphalt, and I can ride anywhere with it.
  • 1 0
 @dockboy: lol, he didn't mean not enough low gearing, he meant not enough top end. This bike will be too slow on actual gravel roads even for MAMILs, let alone "elite, fast riders".

Great quality and beautiful build but I agree with people saying it's still a rigid MTB on semi slicks, not a gravel bike. I bet when he builds an actual gravel bike, as he said he would, he'll find it much better for the purpose.

I also don't get why "a mountain biker's gravel bike" should be close to an mtb. I think the opposite. As a mountain biker I already have an mtb, so I want my gravel bike to be different, not more of the same. My gravel bike plays the role of a better, comfier, more versatile road bike that won't limit me when I see an interesting path veering off the road into the woods. Drop bars seem like a small detail but they're so key to long distance/fast riding on smooth ground. It's the one thing that could have turned this into a real gravel bike.
  • 1 0
 Bet he wears shorts during the winter?
  • 1 0
 The hail wrong with tan walls?!
  • 2 3
 A real mountain biker riding real mtb courses would destroy each of his bikes in less than 5 minutes... just take your own conclussions
  • 9 0
 If I got a dollar every time someone said something like that, I could have at least one more bike that people would say will break.
  • 1 0
 Any videos of that riser seatpost ?
  • 2 0
 So so good!
  • 2 1
 All this weightweenie ceramic bearing crap is roadie af
  • 1 0
 An expensive version of my rigid Scale. Which was quite expensive!
  • 1 0
 He´s hiding something behind his right Hand,im 100% on that:-)
  • 1 0
 this dude needs to be stopped
  • 1 1
 The emperor's new clothes. You bunch of kooks...
  • 1 0
 I love it
  • 1 0
 Slow clap
  • 1 1
 Roids?
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