Review: Park Tool DAG 2.2 vs Coherny Derailleur Hanger Gauge Tool

Dec 27, 2022
by Travis Engel  
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You are a bike mechanic. Whether or not you’ve ever thought of it that way, you possess skills that most people don’t. Maybe you think those skills start and end with changing a tire, but I disagree. You know the angle your brake levers should be at, and how to get them there. You know how your saddle clamps to your seat post and how to adjust it. You at least know your left pedal is reverse thread. From my years of being a professional bike mechanic I can tell you that this makes you more qualified to fix a bike than most of the human population. And if you’re reading this article, it means you probably know what a derailleur-hanger alignment gauge is, and that fact alone rockets you well into the top 1%.

But very few of us own one. The hanger gauge is the sort of thing most of us let bike shops worry about. They’re bulky, they’re rarely used, and most notably, they’re expensive. The benchmark is the Park Tools DAG-2.2, and it’s $80. For a tool that you might go a year or more without needing, that’s a lot of cash to have hanging on the pegboard, if you even have pegboard. But when you need a hanger gauge, you need it. So, what about a cheap one? How bad could they be? Well, that’s exactly what we’re going to find out.

Coherny Professional Bicycles Hanger Alignment Gauge Alignment Ranging Tool for MTB and Road Bikes: $39.99
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Yes, that’s literally what this thing is called on Amazon. But it’s not the only one. There are look-alikes out there from “SYCOOVEN” (yes, all caps) or one on AliExpress that’s just called “AG 2.0,” which is even a few bucks cheaper than my trusty Coherny.

The first thing I noticed about this tool is how well put together it feels. It’s entirely lathe-spun aluminum, and it’s oddly satisfying to slide the two telescoping elements in and out. It ‘s hard to tell scale in a photo, but it is not undersized or flimsy-feeling. It’s also significantly lighter than the Park DAG-2.2, and far more compact. Not that this is the sort of tool you’d pack on a trip to Whistler, but it wouldn’t be a bad luxury item to take on a road trip. It even can be quickly broken down to three narrow parts and would fit in a small toolbox.

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Having used the very differently configured Park DAG-2.2 during my near 20 years of shop life, I was surprised how familiar it was to use the Coherny. I had expected the telescoping motion to be a problem, in that it would be loose or sloppy, but there’s actually a bit of smooth resistance that steadies the outer end at a constant distance from the axis so you can follow the rim. In fact, it was a little smoother than sliding the probe of the Park DAG-2.2 up and down its arm. Similarly, sliding the probe in and out on the Coherney was also easier because it is held in place by a tight plastic bushing, whereas the DAG-2.2 relies on a thumb screw that is best tightened and loosened every time the probe is slid in and out.

But on the other end, the “axle” that threads into the hanger, there is a considerable amount of play. You can’t tell when it is off the bike, but magnified by the length of the tool, there is about 17 millimeters of wobble, and it makes getting an accurate reading a little more difficult. I needed to set the probe to hit the rim at one end of that wobble and go from there, putting some pressure on the tool as I did my rounds looking for the direction of the bend.

I didn’t sense any further inconsistency in the rate of wobble as I went around, and this method did get me a straight hanger after checking it against the more robust DAG-2.2. It is imperfect, clumsy, and requires the extra step of flexing it towards the rim to actually know the shape of the hanger, but I have to admit that it’s better than eyeballing it.

Park DAG-2.2 $83.95
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Your local bike shop probably has a couple of these above its workbench. We often forget that Park is not the only dedicated bike tool brand out there, but they are the biggest and most popular. While there are several fancier gauges on the market (the $185 Abbey Bike Tools gauge is an absolute treat to use, and Park has a new DAG-3 for $120), the DAG-2.2 offers the most bang for the buck.

Part of that is its simplicity, albeit simplicity that might make you question the $84. But like the vast majority of Park Tools, the DAG-2.2 is made at Park’s headquarters in St. Paul, Minnesota. And as I learned using the apparently not-so-dialed Coherney alignment gauge, it’s not easy to do this right.

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The axle assembly is what makes the DAG-2.2 stand out. It’s the heaviest part of this already heavy tool. The thick steel around the axle is meant to survive years of professional use, and the occasional professional fall to the shop floor. It also is designed not to stretch, flex or deflect under load. The Coherney tool seemed tight as a drum until the force was magnified by a 14-inch lever. The DAG-2-2 that I tested, which I’ve had for two years, had barely two millimeters of play compared to 15 on the Coherney.

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The probe on the DAG-2.2 is probably the only slightly frustrating bit. If it were held in place with constant friction like the Coherney or that Abbey tool I once had the pleasure of using, it would make one rather frequent action in the process of hanger alignment a lot easier. Hanger straightening needs to be done slowly, especially in the era of thru-axles, when hangers are far stronger and take far more force to straighten. It’s done in small steps, so the probe needs to be re-positioned a couple times during the process. But as we established already, this is a tool that most of us won’t use that often. A few seconds of fiddling is worth the accuracy if you want it done right.

The Verdict
As for which of these two tools is the right choice for a de facto bike mechanic like yourself, I really have to say it’s worth it to pony up for the Park. Although a cheap gauge eventually did get me good results, I had to put a lot of thought into it on the way. And that’s coming from someone who worked in bike shops for nearly two decades, using a hanger gauge several times a week. For the vast majority of us who will not be using it often, a tool that gives accurate, reliable results will make a crucial task (which is as crucial as ever in the era of 12 speeds and 52-tooth cogs) far easier and more repeatable. It’s worth it.

Author Info:
travisengel avatar

Member since Jun 23, 2010
21 articles

116 Comments
  • 148 0
 "For such an expensive bike you sure use a hammer a lot"...my GF.
  • 10 0
 I call them convincers, they're specialty tools. And if that one doesn't work get a bigger convincer. In before the dick jokes.
  • 2 0
 It's a mullet in my case. Same results just more gradual. My expertise is pressing Angleset cups with 2 hockey pucks and a mullet. Works great almost every time.
  • 44 0
 @kanasasa: I get that you're Canadian and you play hockey, but even so I think you probably mean "mallet".
  • 19 0
 @kanasasa: Do you just head bang them in?
  • 11 1
 @barp: im imagining someone headbutting a headset in, then looking at the camera smiling and 4-8 teeth are missing.
  • 4 0
 @RonSauce: That's Sam Pilgrim, isn't it?
  • 2 0
 @kanasasa: 60 % of the time, it works EVERY time!
  • 2 0
 Shimano tool number 1: hammer. Shimano took number 2....bigger hammer. At least that is what we said when I worked in a bike shop.
  • 80 2
 I can tell you I don't have money. But what I do have are a very particular set of skills, skills I have acquired over a very long career. Skills that make me a nightmare for bent derailleur hangers. If you let my DAG 2.2 go now, that'll be the end of it.
  • 11 28
flag peterguns (Dec 27, 2022 at 8:27) (Below Threshold)
 Comment GOLD right here!!
  • 35 3
 I have no tool, I just eyeball it. Does my method work? Not really. But where's the fun in just solving your issues first try?
  • 22 2
 username checks out
  • 5 6
 An accurate eye and a long and stiff enough 5mm allen key often solved this problem.
  • 2 15
flag housem8d (Dec 27, 2022 at 9:38) (Below Threshold)
 Lol this the way; these days hangers are quite stiff so i usually need to only bend the derailleur. These tools are rarely really useful
  • 6 3
 Yep. If you want to get really tech.... screw an old 10mm qr axle into the hanger and check the axis.
  • 2 2
 I have a tool, and I still eyeball it. If you've aligned enough hangers, you get pretty good at it.
  • 1 1
 I heard a Co2 canister has the same (or similar) thread to a derailleur hanger and you can use that to lever it back.
  • 20 0
 Of all the hanger tools I've used over the years, the best is by far the Shimano Dura Ace tool our shop has. The second best is the newer Park DAG-3 which has some nice features like being able to rotate the feeler out of the way of the chain/seatstay and a slightly deeper mount which allows you to touch the rim in more positions without interfering with any frame parts. The Abbey tool is nice but I don’t think they’re as good as Abbey’s marketing. The Wolftooth one is nice for its size and packability, but I prefer a traditional style hanger gauge for shop use.
If you’re a pro and working at a shop, the first thing you should do if there are shifting complaints is a hanger check, it’s probably top-ten for most used tools at my bench.
  • 3 0
 The old Shimano tools are money... and the campy frame prep tools. Been over a decade since my shop days and man I still miss using those things.
  • 7 0
 I haven't used the TL-RD10 (Dura Ace branded), but I have its successor, the TL-RD11, at home and it's magnificent. Agreed that the Abbey tool is overrated. The feeler gauge doesn't click back into position after pivoting it out of the way, the telescoping bit will fall on the floor if you leave it dangling from the frame, and the feeler gauge needs a tighter fit in its bore. Plus the RD11 has a nice ergonomic handle on the end for making adjustments, whereas Abbey has you just grabbing a plain cylinder.
  • 2 0
 The EVT ultra tru arc is the best I’ve used, especially for ti hangers, but the abbey is pretty good.
  • 1 0
 @heinous: we have the EVT Park Stand heads. They’re excellent.
  • 1 0
 @heinous: the EVT is an updated version of the Dura-Ace one, that’s who designed it in the first place. It’s perfect.
  • 1 0
 @5afety3rd: yep, it was exclusively licensed after Brett designed it, so you’re seeing more like it these days.
  • 2 0
 @5afety3rd: wow, $600 for a hanger gauge. Wow. The modern Shimano is only $250. I mean the EVT looks beautiful but wow.
  • 1 0
 @BikesBoatsNJeeps: it pays for itself with accuracy and time saved. It did jump from the 400 I paid a few years ago though
  • 4 0
 @barp: Thank you for posting this. You scratched a 20+ year itch for me. I worked in a shop back in the 90's and we had the TL-RD centering gauge that fit into the dropouts. We still used the Park DAG but never with a wheel.

For better than 2 decades I wondered what it was and how could I get one.

It always bothered me that the wheel was used as the basis for adjusting a deraileur.

I googled TL-RD10 and low and behold, there it was. So thank you.

Someone somewhere should make a centering gauge to fit modern dropouts.

For those of you who have no idea what I am talking about... manualzz.com/doc/53871177/shimano-tl-rd10-service-instructions
  • 2 0
 @ridintrials: so y’all just like wasting shop time? No need fit the extra centering chain line gauge thing. Use a wheel and use the valve as a reference point do you don’t have to worry the wheel being out of true.
  • 2 0
 @5afety3rd: does not work if the axle is bent, which was very common back then. wasting time is have to go back and do it again.
  • 18 0
 The great thing about being part of Outside is that you can completely ignore the work other colleagues in the same company have done and write a much less complete piece on the same subject and still get it through your editor. cyclingtips.com/2021/12/the-best-derailleur-hanger-alignment-tool-9-tested
  • 10 1
 I'll take techy tool articles from Dave Rome all day long. I unfortunately (for Outside) Robin et Al laid him off. Idiotic. But no doubt he will go on to bigger and better things.
  • 6 0
 You can truncate that URL at the question mark.
  • 2 0
 This is a nice solution! Every time I use the DAG-2 I wonder why Park didn't refine it just a little bit; works great but it's definitely clunky.
  • 6 0
 Earlier this year I replaced a worn chain and struggled to get my shifting smooth. So I replaced my derailleur hanger (which for a '19 Sight wasn't easy to find). No improvement. After the whack-a-mole approach to problem solving I ended up replacing each element of my XT/XTR drivetrain. Still not solved. After bringing my second time bringing my bike into the shop to get my derailleur straightened it turns out the OEM hangers are not straight enough for a 12spd drivetrain. I almost bought a cheap HAG, but ended up getting a derailleur hanger from North Shore Billet. Problem solved.
  • 2 1
 Did you replace the parts, or did your LBS recommend replacement without checking the hanger?
  • 2 0
 @cmrn: The first was an LBS straightening my hanger after me aligning everything in the stand. Then a few rides in shifting was not good at extreme tension. Then I got the new hanger as recommended. I assumed it was good because it was new. Nope. That's when I went ahead and replaced everything. Fortunately I had a drivetrain on hand. Also thankful I kept the old drivetrain that was still totally good. It wasn't until I was out of town and a veteran bike mechanic (shoutout to the mechanic in Grand Forks, BC) let me know I should get a billeted hanger. It's been perfect ever since.
  • 4 0
 any time shifting is problematic the derailleur hanger should be investigated. Any time a derailleur hanger is installed it should be aligned.
  • 4 0
 @rrolly: They probably said 'billet', but that's not the important bit - 'machined' is what they were getting at. Wheels MFG and NSB hangers are machined (from billet, which is just a word for the stock - the hunk of metal). It means the axle hole and derailleur hole are going to be co-planar due to how they're manufactured, and should be nice and perpendicular to the outer and inner face of the hanger, which means a machined hanger has a better chance of being straight once installed, but that's also dependent on the frame. Cast hangers (like what you often get from the bike brand) are cheaper to manufacture, but less likely to be straight, and often quite a bit softer than the third-party brands.

Either way, as socratease said, and as you've learned from experience (the best way!), it's good practice to check any hanger after installation, regardless of whether it's new or not.
  • 1 1
 @cmrn: I knew what billet was, I just thought there was a new meaning attached to the word, ha.
  • 8 0
 Salvaged 10mm rear axle (not QR if available) + phone + app that uses the accelerometers (like phyphox): virtually free and good enough.
  • 1 0
 hmm, can you explain a bit more?
  • 7 1
 @iiman: 10mm axles are the same thread as a rear derailleur. Screw it in the backside of your bent hanger and align it parallel to your thru axle or QR. Usually you can get it close enough. No app or phone needed.
  • 3 0
 @MisterChow: that's like the Wolf Tooth tool, get it, but how do you introduce phone and app there?
  • 1 0
 @iiman: We'll have to ask @faul. I just eyeball it until I can get a proper DAG on there.
  • 2 0
 @iiman: your phone can measure angles from horizontal/ vertical. So you can use it to measure the difference between a reference (seat tube, rim if the wheel is true, thru axle...) and the 10mm axle.
  • 6 0
 if you buy the park tool, it'll pay for itself in the first two or three uses. that's the biggest advantage in my eyes. mine has paid for itself multiple times over in the last 4 years. if a hanger is THAT bad, i put a new one on, but usually just a few mm to move it back in place after a crash or being dumb in a rock garden is all it needs. wouldn't want to pay $30 to replace the hanger every time.
  • 5 0
 17mm of play is unacceptable. Park Tool all the way. I once bought a $18 Amazon special spoke tension gauge… now I get all my wheels built and tensioned by a shop.
  • 1 0
 I have that tool (or probably a different branded version of the same thing). I find the whole thing is a bit wobbly, and as the article says, you need to preload it to get consistent readings from it. I probably wouldn't buy again. Would suggest clubbing together with a couple of mates to share the Park tool instead
  • 1 0
 the spoke tension app that uses the microphone is pretty good--to a point. I make sure to get a couple good readings and then tension the remainder by ear.
  • 5 1
 Pinkbike comments section denizens change a tire -check Adjust seat post -check Know that the left pedal is reverse thread - not so sure
  • 4 0
 This isn't r/bikewrench
  • 2 0
 IMO, great tools are accurate, reliable and durable. Truly great tools are all those things and beautiful. It looks to me like Park hired a philosophy major to do the welding on that tool. They did a much better job with the DAG-3.
  • 2 0
 Great tool to have in the box and on races. Road or mountains , I use it when needed but always recommend to gaffer tape a spare hanger under the seat for any races. That did help on few exotics bikes far away from home or shop.
  • 2 0
 If you want a tool that works like a charm: the VAR Derailleur Hanger Alignment Gauge. Around €100 - comes with a mm/cm measurement and anyone with basic maths in the pocket can work out what needs to be corrected.

Only downside would be the chubby head on rare occasions doesn't have enough space to move / bend the hanger into shape. I've adjusted a couple 1000's hangers with this tool and it's like new..
  • 1 0
 I do agree, this VAR DAG is a treat to use .
  • 2 0
 Park Tool DAG fantastic mistake purchase by my wife 15 years ago (it was in a cart and came along with a bunch of other bike bits) super useful to this day. My last new bike had a misaligned hanger from the shop, DAG sorted it out and shifting so much better. Lend mine to mates to sort them out. Zero regret purchase.
  • 9 8
 Straightening the hanger can get you back on the trail in a pinch, but bent hangers are often also fatigued or cracked. It's probably a better decision to spend $35 on a couple spares and keep them in your toolkit than to bother buying an alignment tool.
  • 41 0
 What if I told you that even brand new hangers need checked and sometimes adjusted? Because they do.
  • 8 0
 I've straightened my hangars many times. Depends on the design, but they can normally be straightened at least 3-5 times without breaking.
  • 6 1
 For many years hangers were part of the forged dropout, and not replaceable. It wasn’t until aluminum frames that hangers became commonly replaceable. Even then you still had a lot of early aluminum road frames without replaceable hangers. Fatigue is a real problem with older aluminum frames and adjusting those hangers is a crapshoot. If they’re really bent you can’t guarantee that the frame won’t get ruined by straightening.
Also, it true a lot of new hangers can require a little tweak to get them right out of the box, but usually what you find is the dropout is slightly misaligned and the hanger is attached to a frame that isn’t completely straight. Unless it’s a steel frame, you’re not aligning dropouts. However if a new hanger isn’t straight it’s worth your time to put dropout gauges in the frame and visually check the frame.
  • 2 0
 @swan3609: I am pretty sure (having run the verniers over the four that I own - UDH and Norco's very special UDH 2 - got to use up that back log of 1.5 pitch maxles!!) that a North Shore Billet derailleur hanger is precise in every area that matters. If the hanger alignment tool is indicating a lack of straight when one of these is properly installed then the issue is with the frame.
  • 6 0
 @andrewbikeguide: that's fine and well but you are absolutely correct that frames may not be perfectly machined, or any of the other hundred hangers out there that are stamped instead of machined are not perfect out of the box.. The original point was that someone would rather just buy a new hanger than straighten one.. And my counterpoint was that after installing hundreds of new hangers on bikes, many of those new hanger still needed adjustment to be perfect.
  • 11 0
 @andrewbikeguide: Doesn't matter whether the new hanger or the old frame is to blame--either way you're gonna need to use a hanger alignment tool.
  • 4 0
 @swan3609:
The three bikes I’ve bought in the past two years all needing hanger alignment from the get go. So yes.
  • 2 0
 Last month I built a brand new giant gravel bike, it wasn’t shifting consistently. Put my park dag 2 on it. It was way off. Shifts great now

I use the dag 3 or more times a year. I think it is necessary tool
  • 4 0
 How huge is this bike?
  • 4 0
 @vonb: The bike's regular size, but it's for riding on giant gravel (small boulders).
  • 2 1
 I just put straight rod with M10x1 thread instead of rear mech, and see if rod is perpendicular to wheel in two axis by eye. Accuracy is similar to setting bars to front wheel, good enough. Well used park tool dag i found in the shop was wobbling so much that straightening was close to lottery.
  • 1 0
 >Well used park tool dag i found in the shop was wobbling so much
What?
  • 1 0
 @mtb-jon: I worked for a while in the shop, dag tool was there, but so much loose after years of using, that it was practically unusable. This is not saying, tool itself in good shape is wrong, but for me there are better ways how to check rear hanger.
  • 1 0
 @stpan: sounds like the threads where worn out? Sure, there are other ways to check it but noone of them are precise. Especially in the world of 12speed and big cassettes
  • 2 0
 Ace Hardware
Drilled out square tube
11 mm bolt
Few 11mm nuts
Some washers
Ruler
Under $20 and have a nice ghetto derailleur hanger gauge tool that works as good as these
www.youtube.com/watch?v=sWdO4dnu18g
  • 1 0
 I've unbent steel hangers with adjustable wrenchs, aluminium hangers with a long bolt and hammer. It took a little bit of finesse and testing if shifting improved with the derailleur itself, and didn't took me much time. that cheaper tool will be my buy.
  • 1 0
 You can do even better, there is an identical knock off of the park tool shown on Amazon for even cheaper. I've used both the Amazon and park version and see no difference.
  • 1 0
 I have a DAG. Got it right after bike-school in 2011. Haven't used it a lot. But when I need it - I need it. Use it when shifting just ain't right. There's always an alignment problem.

Not surprising given year-round PNW riding. Bikes get tossed. Fact if life. And ha gers get bent. Not often - but often enough.

The cool thing is - it bolts right on, adjustment is really straight-forward (fiddly, but clear & easy), and it's more than beefy enough to make the bend, when a bend is necessary - over & over & over again. Like all my Park branded tools. Great value, and works.

Frankly I might be pressed to purchase a less expensive tool, if I was absolutely sold that it woud work as easily, have my back, and go the distance. And I din't already have my trusty dusty DAG. I mean..., all you really need from a.practical standpoint, is massively improved. Right?

Another 40 bucks? I spend that on beer, in one evening out with my friends on an evening. So there's that, eh? $40 ain't breaking my bank, as meager as it is. And t's a WAY better investment on a sure thing.
  • 3 0
 More articles like this please. How about the best value chain checker? Tire levers, chain whip, chain breaker etc.
  • 2 1
 As explained in the article, best value is the tool that does its job correctly. Might be the more expensive one, but it'll pay for itself in doing the job right for a long time. Pedro's levers are great, and cheap.
  • 1 1
 ruler (basically free, slower), or rohloff (faster). Anything else is a waste of time and money
  • 2 0
 Best tool ever. People that say you can get them close enough with an app or eyeball are out to lunch! Every new bike needs to be checked and most can take a tweak!
  • 2 2
 What I don't get is why you have to use the rim as a baseline for hanger alignment. I know it's the way to go, but sometimes in the life of my bikes, rear rims are not dead straight and/or may have a flat spot. You would have to first make sure those wheels are trued and then the hanger alignment tool can make its magic
  • 5 0
 Pick the same rim reference point for adjustment in the vertical (12 & 6) and horizontal (9 & 3) axis.
It has nothing to do with a perfectly true wheel. Flat spots welcome too.
  • 6 0
 You rotate the wheel as well. Always measure on the rim beneath the valve
  • 1 0
 If you own multiple bikes, this is a tool that gets used far more often than you realise. Got mine second hand for about £45, and it's paid for itself by the sheer number of times I've used it
  • 3 0
 Don't buy Amazon crap. Put your money to a company that actually does good things for the bike community.
  • 2 0
 I've long since figured out that there's no point buying cheap tools, cause while someone with skill can use cheap tools well I need all the help I can get
  • 11 8
 Pony up for the Abbey HAG, it’s worth it.
  • 2 1
 1000% agree.
  • 2 0
 What the heck am I doing wrong that I use my Park Tool DAG 2.2 way more frequently than maybe once a year?
  • 3 0
 Sounds like...crashing. Ever since I went to 12 speed I need to do a derailleur adjustment whenever I crash.
  • 1 3
 Quit buying department store bikes with pot metal steel.
  • 2 0
 @RonSauce: Or just using your bike. How/where it's stored when not riding, shuttling, falling over at lunch on a park day...all can tweak a derailleur and/or hanger. No big deal, but a necessary check on 11 (a bit forgiving) and 12 speed (not forgiving).
  • 3 3
 With sram UDH being a thing now, I’ve found the best derailleur tool is having multiple bikes with UDH so if my shifting is off i can just pull another bike apart and try another hanger. This is a very inexpensive fix.
  • 1 0
 All you need is a piece of 25mm SHS, a fine thread bolt and a couple of nuts and washers to make one. I use a ruler to measure to the rim.
  • 1 0
 What are you measuring?
  • 2 0
 @RonSauce: Instead of using a tool with a built in feeler gauge, you would just measure from the end of the tool to the rim to determine which way it's out of whack. This is actually how the Campagnolo hanger tool is designed to be used, believe it or not.
  • 1 0
 Or you can just tweak it with an allen key in the derailleur itself while pedalling the bike in the stand so you can check shifting on the go.
  • 1 0
 What's odd about the satisfaction of sliding the telescoping elements in and out, Travis?
  • 3 0
 are we not doing phrasing anymore?
  • 1 0
 @muumuu: A: your Mum

@noapathy: where you going with this
  • 3 2
 Shoulda named it the Ball GAG 2.0. Total missed opportunity.
  • 1 0
 I am just proud to be the one percent of something as I have used both.
  • 2 1
 Can we use ductape on these Travis?
  • 1 0
 Good dags. D'ya like dags?
  • 1 0
 DAG nabit...
  • 3 4
 Wouldn't buying a new hanger be cheaper
  • 2 0
 I've found that it's sometimes hard to tell which bit of the drivetrain is slightly off with 12spd. And a knock that mightn't really register with the brain while concentrating on the riding might be enough. Or it might be all the worn bushes in a tired GX mech, as it was for me. It's a fairly painless way to diagnose dodgy shifting
  • 3 0
 Even if that were a guaranteed fix (it's not--a new hanger should still have its alignment checked because often they're a bit off either due to a bad hanger or a bad frame), this would be penny wise and pound foolish. After buying a certain number of new hangers, you've spent more than you would have on the tool. It's also wasteful.
  • 2 0
 My alignment gauge was cheaper than my hanger. Its good to have both.
  • 2 0
 New hanger on hand is a smart thing, so is having an alignment gauge.

Most new hangers I’ve installed were crooked out of the packaging, most brand new frames also show up with bent hangers.
  • 1 2
 A review of a tool I havent needed in the last 10 years. Cool.
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