Developing the DMR Sled - Interview

Jan 24, 2017
by AJ Barlas  


At Core Bike over the weekend, the folks at DMR pulled back the curtain on a product that they've been working on for roughly two years now. The brand, which has recently been diversifying their range considerably, have now added an alloy framed, dual suspension bike to the mix. The bike was launched to the typical "looks like a…" comments, but there are a number of differences, including a concentric bottom bracket pivot. Although the bike was only recently launched to the public, we first got to see it back in August when DMR's marketing guy, Olly Wilkins, stopped through Squamish en-route to Crankworx.

The introduction of the Sled is an interesting move for a brand that, despite the introduction of the Bolt full suspension bike a number of years back, is still more well known for their steel hardtail frames and pedal designs. To find out more about the development process of the DMR Sled we spoke with the team behind the bike.




DMR started out with pedals, then eventually built some of the most bombproof dirt jump frames, but what brought on the desire to build an alloy full suspension bike?

We did the DMR Bolt full suspension frame several years ago, but we wanted to develop a new trail bike for a wider audience. It also suits the riding we all do the most here at DMR. You’ve got to want to ride what you’re designing I think!


What were the goals with setting out to develop this new full suspension frame?

The key goals with this frame were to make a fun, fast bike. We also wanted this, as with all our products, to be at a sensible and honest price.


How did you arrive at the chosen suspension design? Did you look at the full gamut of options out there before arriving at this?

We looked at numerous options in the early stages, the pedaling efficiency of virtual pivot designs rose to the top of the list…

DMR Sled development - 1st alloy mule


The Sled has an interesting take on the virtual pivot design, with the addition of a concentric bottom bracket pivot. What were you looking to achieve from the suspension design?

Our DMR Bolt frame design is a single pivot with concentric BB (so you can build in single speed), it occurred to me the lower link of a Virtual pivot could be too. We worked on it with David Earle of Sotto design and the kinematics looked good with this configuration too. It allows a short rear end and huge bearing on the BB link.


Concentric designs have been around for a while but they’re not very prominent today. What does this element add to the design that you weren’t able to achieve with others?

It’s not so easy to do and adds cost, which are a couple of reasons. It provides a broad base to the link to make it stiff and there are kinematic benefits, anti-squat in particular.


What are the main characteristics of the frame design?

A stiff front and rear triangle with broad/stiff links to provide a solid platform for an easily tunable shock. Excellent pedalling efficiency provided by the virtual pivot design, and enough travel at 160mm.


DMR Sled development - 1st alloy mule
DMR Sled development - 1st alloy mule


Who developed the suspension kinematics?

David Earle of Sotto Design. We worked with David on developing the DMR AXE cranks previously; we didn’t know at the time his huge background in suspension, so it turned out we had one of the industry's experts on virtual pivot designs at hand—Nice!

He did a great job on this, we couldn’t be happier with how it's turned out, (it) rides really well and looks the part.

Here are David’s comments on the design:
• Anti-squat is rising from 70% below sag to 100% at sag and then falling off to 70% again. This gives great pedalling around the sag point and minimizes the chain-growth and pedal kickback.

• The shock rate is also really good, falling about 8% before sag for great small bump feel and then rising about 15% after sag for great playfulness and resistance to bottom out.

• Chain growth is a minimal 24mm, which is very small on a bike with that much travel. This will produce no pedal feedback.

• Anti-rise, which controls braking, is around 80–90% in the normal travel range that is used when riding, which will allow the bike to slightly sit in when under hard braking, keeping it level and stable.


DMR Sled development - 1st alloy mule


What considerations were taken into account with modern shocks?

We’ve stuck with ‘legacy’ sizing 215 x 63mm—it's even got a threaded BB! We wanted the broadest choice of shocks if people wanted to change; however, the Rock Shox Monarch RT3 Debonair fitted is tuned to suit and an excellent option that’s very tuneable at a good price.

It was actually a straight forward choice for us. Metric will be something we can easily adapt to in the future. That's the beauty of ‘metal', changes are quick and easy should the industry create even more ‘standards'.


How did the process work for you guys? This is a ground up design, so it must've taken a bit of time?

It’s taken a couple of years to get done from start to finish, but it’s always an interesting journey with a design project as big as this one. It took a while to boil things down to a clear direction, but once we’d decided on the travel we wanted and the overall suspension platform design we got a basic design layout together pretty quickly with David.

The first prototypes were done in steel back in August 2015 to check out the basics. But it was clear from the outset that this bike would need to be in aluminum to meet the price and weight we were aiming for. So following the initial steel prototypes we moved onto the aluminum production design with David at the helm on that.

DMR Sled Steel Prototype - image courtesy of DMR
DMR Sled Steel Prototype - image courtesy of DMR


The first mule that Olly (Wilkins) had here in Whistler was littered with small asterisks over the frame, highlighting points that need to be worked on. Is this a normal process for DMR?

Yes, this is the normal sort of thing as there’s only so much you can do in CAD, getting a physical bike together and getting it ridden is an essential part of the process. Cable routing is one of the trickier things to get right! Along with problems we got great suspension feedback from every rider we have so far had on board. The kinematic predictions by David were echoed by Olly after two weeks of testing in Whistler.

We were also an early supporter of the ShockWiz on Kickstarter. This helped us evaluate the suspension and decide on the stock shock tune. It proved to be super helpful and very useable technology for us to have access to.


How many different iterations did the frame go through from this first alloy mule?

Apart from the initial design prototypes in steel, we did just one aluminum prototype round, then pre-production samples, then a pilot production run, before an actual production run. But from start to finish there were dozens of CAD drawing iterations and refinements, etc...

The best design gets the best performance at the best price, that’s where you need to be a bit clever... getting the best solutions with the least compromise. It was great to be working with David and his team at Sotto design to refine the design as far as possible.

DMR Sled development - 1st alloy mule
DMR Sled development - 1st alloy mule

DMR Sled development - 1st alloy mule
DMR Sled development - 1st alloy mule


Were there any unexpected elements that needed to change? What was the most surprising?

Nothing that comes to mind, to be honest. The project has flowed nicely. How time slips by is always surprising!


What was the toughest part of the process to overcome? The hardest piece of the frame to get right?

Getting it into production is always difficult, it may all look wonderful on CAD but getting it actually made in volume with high quality is a difficult process for a product like a suspension frame, there are so many elements to get right. Again having David on this project with his experience was a massive help!


Were there any elements that you had to let go of that you really wanted to include? What was it?

Getting a water bottle in the front triangle was one, and the concealed V8 motor…


DMR has a history of building long lasting products. How did this affect the development of the Sled?

Yes, it's built to last, it's early days but we’ve tried to make it as robust as possible without adding too much weight. Durability and serviceability are definitely important to us. We definitely wanted the Sled to be UK-weather-proof. If it can survive our testing grounds then it’s done well. In winter testing it hasn’t just survived, it’s thrived!

DMR Sled development - 1st alloy mule



MENTIONS: @dmrbikes



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112 Comments

  • + 101
 Like it raw.
  • + 65
 Shimmy shimmy ya.
  • + 5
 @Patrick9-32: ODB Alive and uncut!
  • + 8
 Looks so much better than the glossy colours they've gone with.
  • + 16
 i actually liked that salmon color it turned out not to be.
  • - 16
flag enrico650 (Jan 24, 2017 at 4:59) (Below Threshold)
 I checked the geometry and a size small has a 440mm reach and a wheelbase close to 1200mm. No way a short rider can ride this thing or even manage a switchback.
  • + 3
 Looks better than the final colours!
  • + 9
 Oh baby I like it rawwww!!
  • + 4
 I actually like the steel prototype way more than the finished product tbh
  • + 3
 that's what she said
  • + 4
 @enrico650: I'm 163cm and manage just fine in a bike with 432mm reach with a 40mm stem. Numbers can't give you the whole picture, you have to actually ride a bike to feel how it fits. Hence demoing is a must before buying.
  • - 7
flag enrico650 (Jan 24, 2017 at 13:04) (Below Threshold)
 @justwan-naride: Read the comment : 440mm reach
  • + 7
 @enrico650: I can read, that's 8mm of difference, not a big deal, esp. now that 30-35mm stems are widely available. Seat tube angle and seat height also practically determine how a bike fits (seating and standing), so don't jump to conclusions before actually putting your @ss on the saddle.
  • - 9
flag enrico650 (Jan 24, 2017 at 13:59) (Below Threshold)
 @justwan-naride: You are the one that came to the conclusion .
But, we will forgive you.
  • + 3
 @enrico650: much agreed. I actually hate the trend of bikes getting longer and longer. I know its all about longer bike/shorter stem but a few years back my medium SC had a reach of 390 with a 50 mm stem, felt perfect I didnt want it any longer and the shop agreed. Now mediums are starting to be 50-60 mm longer and stems can only be 20 mm shorter than 50 so i think everyones overshooting. What works for the racers may not always work for teh average rider. I'm 5' 7.5" currently Im still riding my 2011 medium transition blindside (converted to 27.5!)w/ a 40 mm stem and a SMALL 2014 RM Altitude (same reach in slackest setting; with a 45 mm stem) Ive test rode modern medium longer reach bikes and any longer and my back hurts and I feel sketchy and too far forward on the techy DH. and the small seattubes are sometimes just too short. So i hope my current bikes last me forever!.
  • + 6
 @enrico650: Very kind of you. I've had both short and long bikes, and for me a longer wheelbase works better.Enjoy what suits your body/style/terrain.
  • + 1
 @bonkywonky: I agree!
  • + 42
 Nice "Proto No Photo" decal.
  • + 24
 Should make a t-shirt with it.
  • + 29
 Must be a thankless task pouring this much effort into designing a bike for the mighty internet mafia to simply yell "Looks like a SC"

Props DMR for this and also for staying the course as a long establish UK brand. Not rushing into things is a hallmark of quality design hopefully this will end up in similar acclaim to the Trailstar and V8 pedals!

Seat tower looks like a process btw (sorry I couldnt resist!)
  • + 7
 I prefer this over the looks of a SC (now that they dropped their single pivot designs). And yeah, that low top tube is what makes cornering so much fun. To cater for those who want a dropper post, they had to extend that seattube a little, like Kona does indeed.
  • + 5
 Is nice bike. Well done. Pivot around BB is interesting.
  • - 26
flag deadmeat25 (Jan 24, 2017 at 6:21) (Below Threshold)
 What thanks do they deserve for ploughing this much effort into putting yet another pointless and drearily average bike onto the market.
  • - 27
flag deadmeat25 (Jan 24, 2017 at 6:22) (Below Threshold)
 @CantClimb: Pivot around the BB is f*cking stupid.
  • + 6
 @deadmeat25: It is only pointless if no one is going to ride it, at all. Let's wait and see.

What do you think is wrong with that pivot? They explained in the article what it was for and I see no harm.
  • + 11
 @deadmeat25: ha ha,

Ladies and Gentlemen, can we all be upstanding for todays troll.

Lets see the color of your bike design fabric, or are you just like one of those who likes to run their mouth
  • + 0
 @usmbc-co-uk: "or are you just like one of those who likes to run their mouth"

Not much doubt about that...
  • + 0
 @deadmeat25: I'll back you up, brotha. The trail bike market is saturated, and bikes are becoming more and more similar. New brands are still jumping in, planning to make money without having to be innovative. Another indicator that prices are too high.

This is actually good for the consumer though, cuz it "should" start driving prices down, and driving the sub-par brands out of business. I think we can all agree that this needs to happen.
  • + 3
 @vinay: Looks aside, and regardless of who makes what to look like what other brand - the low top tube is an instant boost to any bike's capability in the turns. I was very seriously considering both a Transition Smuggler and a Kona 111. Ended up with the Kona, despite the Transition pedaling better (as a heavy rider, I sure could have used the help going uphill), because it made it so much easier and more fun to rail the bike into turns. Those two bikes have almost the same geometry - but the lower top tube gives me a lot more room to lean that thing. An inch or two can make a huge difference.
  • + 1
 @g-42: Oh yeah, that's the main thing I look at for bikes. The yet unnamed difference between standover and bb height. The Kona Process is doing great there. Unlike most other brands, there is hardly any penalty when going for a longer bike. What's shying me away is the press fit bb, but that's mostly because of bad experiences I read here on PB about press fit bb. I don't have experience with those. And I won't be after a complete bike, I want a frame. Another interesting frame is the Alutech ICB2.0 (and the steel version of Portus Cycles). Then again if you get a Starling Swoop you can also choose to have a short seat tube so the top tube should lower accordingly, I suppose. But the thing that caught my eye here on PB recently and what I just can't get out of my mind is that Kingdom Vendetta 2, raw.

Mmmmyeah, Kingdom Vendetta 2, rawrrrr...

yeah...
  • + 2
 @vinay: I had a Giant before the Kona, and damn, that PF BB was a creaky mess pretty much from the get-go (and only getting worse over time). Haven't had that issue on the Kona yet in about a year. I'm a big guy (about 230#), so I'm pleasantly surprised by that. Might be an outlier (perhaps I got a frame with tighter tolerances), but it seems to echo what I hear from other Kona riders. But yes, I would vastly prefer a proper threaded BB fitting.

I get the urge to build up a bike yourself. It's hard to do that at a competitive price though. My Kona ended up needing a new hub (they warrantied two of the cheapo hubs it came with, and then they made such a stink about it with the supplier that I scored a high-end one that's been holding up well), and I upgraded rear wheel in the process (since it seemed like a good opportunity to do so). Other than that, the stock build has held up well. But at my size, it's hard to find reasonably priced bikes that are built up to last because the manufacturers all seem to want to go light. Kona seems to spec things a little stouter, which works for me (but might put off a lighter rider).
  • + 2
 @g-42: I once bought a complete hardtail and later a complete fully and that was it. I only upgraded components and hardtail frames. But there was never an urge to go for a new complete. At some point everything on your current bike suits your taste and on a new complete, you'll soon enough find yourself upgrading stuff again. Sure that Kingdom uses a boost rearhub so I'd need to lace up a new rear wheel. But I'm fine with lacing something to a Deore XT hub which is much cheaper than a quality hub with cartridge bearings. I could transfer my 1x9 drivetrain, pedals, cockpit, brakes, forks and front wheels. That adds up quite quick. I've seen used (ex demo or little used) Process 134 and 154 bikes in my area for about 2500 euros. That's a really fair price but I now I'd be paying for stuff I already have and for stuff I'd probably replace eventually. And I'd already be paying more than I'd do for the separate components I really need. Sure I'll be left with outdated parts that no one wants and as an incomplete bike, have little to no resale value. But resale wouldn't give me what I'd save on not buying everything new. So I'm fine with that. Both frames are about ten years old now. It's ok. I'm 37 now. I love to ride loads but I've come to dislike replacing stuff that's still serves me fine. And what I buy now I want to keep using for another fair while. I always stuck to frames that were maybe a bit small for me because I wanted them to be low. But as reach got longer without the top tube getting too high, upgrading the frame became interesting. But that doesn't mean I suddenly need more gears, new brakes etc.

Indeed I hear and read good stuff about the Kona Process, no issues with that bottom bracket. But I live in The Netherlands. I mostly ride my steel hardtail (DMR Switchback) and even though a fully does make sense in places, I've got to cherish my challenges. I can take a low slack hardtail in fairly rough terrain abroad, I just need something that allows me to move around. For a while Stanton seemed the ticket, it was just that for some reason they made fullies lower than hardtails. Until I saw that Kingdom. They got it right for me.
  • + 15
 I'm mighty impressed with something like this coming out of a fairly small UK brand. I was thinking before lauch it might just be a longer slacker Bolt in steel. Awesome thats aluminium. The DMR range may not be massive but every product I have bought so far just works. Good luck to Deaks on this #OiOi :-)
  • + 1
 The only DMR products I've bought didn't work, the exalt frame came with the rear end not aligned right so I had to re dish my rear wheel then it broke on a weld and they offered me a 10% off on a crash replacement frame. The tires I had got big bubbles in the sidewall all over the place and the pedals lasted less then a year could never recommend this company to anyone
  • + 11
 Love the sensible seat tube lengths vs reach measurements, other manufs' please take note. Making room for 170/200mm droppers for tall people nice.
  • + 7
 they could still fuck it up by not reaming it deep enough to size.
  • + 6
 The guy behind the suspension on this is the same who designed the Yeti Switch suspension system which seems to be pretty well liked - www.sottogroup.com/switch

Makes sense to outsource kinematics to a specialist unless you are going for a simple single pivot I suppose.
  • + 7
 Make every article like this! Giving the actual numbers for anti-squat & shock rate? So good.

First thing I did was look up my bike on Linkage - very interesting reference point. I see you, @dmrbikes
  • + 9
 The steel proto looks the shiz :-D
  • + 2
 Definitely! More aesthetically pleasing than the aluminum, at least to my eyes.
  • + 6
 This bike brings all the great memories from the times I've had on my 2008 Nomad. If I wasn't on another similar bike I'd consider it. Cool stuff! Especially in Raw. All the best of luck with it DMR!
  • - 11
flag deadmeat25 (Jan 24, 2017 at 6:23) (Below Threshold)
 Zzzzzz yeah whatever, no paint does not a good bike make.
  • + 4
 @deadmeat25: let me know when you buy a pink La Ferrari with cyan dots on it.
  • + 7
 @deadmeat25: Did Olly Wilkins turn you down for the tea-boy job?
  • + 5
 that test mule is very nice, wonder who built it... BTR? They made mules for Pole, similar BB centric pivot design. Dave Earle is a smart dude, good for DMR to have him involved. Looks like a fun bike.
  • + 13
 Thanks looked good in steel didn't it! The frame maker that does our production steel frames made it for us they did a very nice job. But it would be too pricey and heavy unfortunately.. David is indeed a smart dude and was a pleasure to work with.
  • + 6
 @dmrbikes: tis a stunner in both al and st. very nice indeed.
  • + 6
 Forget the trying to mount a water bottle just make sure you can fit a coil in there if your that way inclined it'll be golden. Great looking bike
  • + 1
 @dmrbikes it seems that you designed this bike with user serviceability and durability in mind. And you're coming in at a reasonable price. As a bike mech, and a consumer that favours bullshit-free products, well done guys, seriously! For this reason alone, I'm very interested.

Could you tell me the shock length this runs, and possibly your thoughts on running a coil shock?

I'm thinking coil shock, Lyrik, burly wheelset - bike park SAVAGE
  • + 2
 Wonder what the steel version weighed (too bad they couldn't afford the proper tubing to have it makes its weight go down. . Steel almost always looks way better than aluminum
  • + 1
 I read elsewhere it'll be about £3500 complete. I'm probably going to be looking for a bike like this shortly and would love to buy British, but I can pick up a YT Capra for £2400 can't I? Are these bikes totally dissimilar or am I missing something?
  • + 2
 with this and the Identiti mettle its exciting times if you're after a 160er. Definitely going to take an interest in the long term reviews of these bikes
  • + 5
 Schweet. Looks great.
  • + 4
 They'd make a bunch of people happy if they offered raw.
  • + 4
 any idea on the frame weight?
  • + 1
 this.
  • + 1
 Any pics of it set up single speed? would it still need a tensioner or is there zero growth? I'm guessing tensioner looking at a single dropout spec.
  • + 1
 Hmm, it's got a Boost rear, thinking it would be cool to put a 2.5 on the back and boost the front to get a 2.8. Nice job, DMR!
  • + 1
 I thought the two counter rotating links was part of the vpp patent? It's clearly different being concentric but does that not infringe?
  • + 15
 Hi The patent has now lasped , we were always a fan of the design concept opposing the riders weight against the pedal input forces , we looked at several other designs early on but when we learned that patent was to expire we decided to work with David on that developing this bike.
  • + 2
 @dmrbikes: Sweet looking rig. I want ask about the water bottle mount absence. What downsides/compromises outside of cost and maybe weight occur? It seems to me that the addition of a bottle mount with the front triangle means that the downtube will need to emerge straight out from the bottom bracket before turning up to the head tube (Santa Cruz, Giant). Does adding this element to the design cause issues?
  • + 1
 @hellbelly: At a guess I'd say that putting a water bottle in would mean that the top tube couldn't be as low slung and the internal cable routing would either need to be changed or removed completely.
Surely at the end of the day you'd list everything you'd want and see what you could have and the water bottle was probably low priority.
  • + 2
 @samfr1000: Rightly with this bikes intentions, unfortunately, wrongly for pacifying reviewers & internet experts.

Bottle cage compatibility seems to have a outsized effect on peoples opinions, especially professional reviewers.
  • + 1
 @dmrbikes: It looks like you folks went with x fusion, what brought you to that decision?
  • + 1
 @groghunter: Always wondered why no side-mounted bottle mounts: a custom cage and a flattened bottle design, and EVERY bike could have one.

Or two.

(You read it here first).
  • + 1
 @goytay: I believe it was the prototype that used x-fusion, the sales model will have a Rock Shox Monarch RT3 Debonair.
  • + 1
 @KeithReeder: I carry this backbottle.com for my sub 2 hour local rides. It stays put, is cheap and is easy to access in a standard rear pocket or storage vest ala: www.specialized.com/us/en/men/clothing/mountain-vest-with-swat/116182 That said, having a accessible bottle for such rides is a nice feature that has made a resurgence over the past few years.
  • + 3
 shut up and take my money
  • + 3
 Sweet bike guys. I'd love to see you make 130-140mm travel trail bike.
  • + 3
 Actually looks like quite the machine
  • + 4
 Like that bike!
  • + 2
 What sort of life does that lower pivot have? Bolted together pivots haven't had the best history.
  • + 2
 From the looks of it, the bolted pieces are just stiffeners for the links. In theory, the larger bearing around the bb should be stiffer than smaller ones positioned inboard and behind the bb like on a santa cruz. Whether they'll last longer is down to the bearing quality and the lateral loads which again should be reduced because of the wider spacing. Personally id rather have the bolted links than the bonded carbon bridge on my process or even a welded link.
  • + 4
 The end plates are also keyed to have the centre brace fit like a puzzle piece.
  • + 12
 Hi The lower link is assembled 'side to side' with the centre spacer keyed into the side plates to make it as stiff as possible. This part of the bike is in the firing line with mud and water so it will need maintenance, but the bearings are good quality and the concentric BB pivot we use on the Bolt frame has proven to have been durable. We will carry all the bearings in stock and they are widely available metric sizes so its easy to look after.
  • + 4
 I fucking love it
  • + 2
 Intense has some competition.
  • + 1
 Can We buy the steel prototype ? How about a Reynolds 853 or Columbus option?
  • + 1
 I would love to have a steel version available like one of the prototype !!!!
  • + 1
 Dave's CV

www.sottogroup.com/david-earle

might be a real budget Santa Cruz...
  • + 4
 I'd rather have a decent alu bike than cheap carbon from SC c-models. Also SC bikes don't look good to me any more. May be good bikes but color schemes are down right terrible. CMYK for fks sake...
  • + 2
 @WAKIdesigns: Im not into plastic at all. Raw would be a thing, but at least they corrected the salmon to red...
  • + 0
 @WAKIdesigns: Santa Cruz makes all their VPP bike in aluminum too, FYI
  • + 2
 @parallaxid: ummm no... not Hightower, not Nomad, not V10 and the rest is irrelevant.
  • + 0
 @WAKIdesigns: try using your brain before your keyboard. Santa Cruz makes an alloy Bronson, which is much more of a competitor to this DRM than the Nomad. Also the alloy Bronson comes in black. Would you consider that to be a "terrible color scheme" too?
  • + 1
 @WAKIdesigns: Matter of taste of course, but I agree. SC bikes have gone off the boil looks wise.
  • + 2
 @parallaxid: by what standard does this DMR fit Bronson more than Nomad? One suiting your argument? Yes Black yes sorry, that suits you argument too. Unlike almost every other color scheme they did since 3 or more years... sorry for bothering your high intelligence with my stupidity
  • + 1
 @parallaxid: Every bike SC does now with the exception of the V10, Highball, & Jackal uses some combo of either yellow or blue mixed with black or as the main color. I happen not to like either of those colors. If I were to spend the dough on any of those bikes I would be buying decals to block out those accents. I do happen to like their older esthetics though with the open Santa Cruz lettering and S-man headbadges.
  • + 2
 ill buy that steel frame guys
  • + 1
 Looks great, but, please can I have one of the steel prototypes? No photos, promise
  • + 1
 same features as my 2010 commencal, apart from lighter, curvier slightly better looking Smile
  • + 1
 Is it possible to look both raw and refined at the same time? This bike seems to do it.
  • + 2
 I like honesty in his bike.
  • + 1
 looks like early intenses
  • + 1
 which makes it look waaaay better than current ones...
  • + 1
 why is olly on a focus sam?
  • + 1
 Well it looks good indeed.
  • + 1
 That steel version looks pretty sweet.
  • - 1
 It looks goppin, no thought or passion at all from @dmrbikes it feels, just looks like a frame that's been thrown together and not finished Frown Shame
  • + 1
 No considerations to 2.6 or 2.8 tires?
  • + 1
 WHT was the price on this s4xy machine?
  • + 1
 reminds me of Intens´ Slopestyle 2
  • + 1
 Really nice bike just almost exactly like my Intense Tracer 275!
  • + 0
 yet another bike, too many bikes, stop making bikes
  • + 1
 DMR Intense Tracer T275
  • + 1
 ok... price?
  • + 1
 Raw for sure x
  • + 0
 intense wants its old 5.5 back
  • - 3
 Well, it looks alright.
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