Devinci Django - First Ride

Mar 15, 2016
by Olly Forster  


Wading through the volume of new and bedazzling standards and bike classifications can be enough to confuse even the best of us. Casting any negativity about this situation to one side, what the bike industry has done - in all of its benevolence - is empower us with options, and lots of them. So in reflection, the only real challenge facing anyone looking for a brand new bike today is understanding and acknowledging their own individual needs and choosing the appropriate tool for the task at hand. This brings us nicely to the Django...


Devinci Django
The build seen here, with a full SRAM X01 drivetrain in a size large weighed in at 27.6lb's (12.42kg's), but won't be available with Devinci instead opting for an 11-speed Shimano XT build, while retaining the RockShox suspension seen here.


The Django, for all intents and purposes, looks a lot like another bike, the Troy - Devinci's 140mm travel trail smasher, which they released last summer. So why take a capable 140mm travel trail bike platform and shrink it into a 120mm... err, trail bike that's randomly named after a movie about slavery? Let's ask a more specific question. How gnarly are your local trails? Now we are always going to be drawn to the bikes that scream and shout at us the loudest, but acknowledging our 'real' needs can sometimes get left by the wayside and doing so at the detriment of our riding experience.


Devinci Django Geometry
Devinci Django Geometry

Details:
• Intended use: trail
• Travel: 130mm front and 120mm rear
• 27.5" wheels
• Adjustable geometry
• 67.5 - 68° adjustable head angle
• 425-427mm adjustable chainstays
• 12 x 148mm rear spacing
• Press-fit bottom bracket
• Split Pivot Suspension System
• 2.35" Tire clearance
• Internal cable routing
• Asymmetrical construction
• Sizes: S, M, L, XL

PRICES - USD / CAD / GBP:

• Carbon XT: $5689 / $6599 / £4999.99
• Carbon RS: $3789 / $4399 / £3099.99
• Carbon SX: $4999 / $5799 / £3999.99
• Carbon frame: $2239 / $2599 / £1999.99
• Alloy XT: $5089 / $5899
• Alloy RS: $3189 / $3699
• Alloy SX: $4399 / $5099
• Alloy S: $2589 / $2999
• Alloy frame: $1639 / $1899


Looking at the Django for the first time, it's hard not to make comparisons to its bigger brother, the 140mm travel Troy. With a near identical silhouette and 20mm less travel front and rear, the question begs to be asked, "why go for the Django and not the Troy?", especially with a minimal weight penalty and a significant descending advantage.

The deal here however, is quality over quantity and with a suitably progressive rear and modern geometry both backing up the Django's intentions along with a 50mm long stem and 760mm wide bars, it's a bike designed for a rider who knows what they want. At 5'9" (in my riding shoes), I opted for a size large, favouring bikes with a little more room and found the sizing about right as far as "modern" trail bike geometry goes, and while a 460mm reach might sound long for some, it is however far from progressive.


Devinci Django


The Django, much like the rest of Devinci's full-suspension stable, uses Dave Weagle's Split Pivot suspension design, where the dropout pivot concentrically rotates around the rear axle. The idea behind this design is to combine active braking with good pedalling performance in one. The Django delivers a progressive suspension curve to increase bottom-out resistance, which is pretty essential when you only have 120mm to play with. Devinci supplied our Django with three 'bottomless rings' in the RockShox Monarch Debonair shock, matched with two tokens in the 130mmm travel Pike forks up front, providing ample support over the short period we had on the bike.

Devinci Django
The ability to adjust the geometry by rotating the linkage bolt that connects the seatstays to the rocker is a nice touch, although we kept in the low setting throughout having no issues with clearance on roots and rocks.
Devinci Django
The internal cable routing is especially neat and tidy and is the same design found on the Troy, allowing a degree of flexibility with your set up and cockpit orientation - spare plastic covers are also supplied.

Unchaining Django

Heading out on my maiden voyage onboard the Django and hitting the first climb, I resisted the urge to make use of the RockShox Monarch shock's climb function and left it fully open for all but one particularly steep and surfaced climb. The pedalling efficiency and acceleration of the Django's Split Pivot system was pretty impressive, making light work on the climbs. But it's the descending where a bike really comes to life and shows its true colours, and that could certainly be said for the Django, but not before getting to grips with its on-trail demeanour...


Devinci Django
Railing berms and hitting the typical features associated with man-made 'trail centres' brought home just how over-gunned many riders are out on the trails, denying themselves a lot of fun by taking a gun to a knife fight.


The Django isn't the kind of bike to hammer head first into a steep, root, rut and rock infested descent with little abandonment while simply covering your brakes - the Django can certainly handle it, but it does, however, demand a different approach and will reward you for picking your lines carefully. But then I think this is what the Django is all about. With less travel comes a heightened connection with the trail, which can - in the right hands - allow for a greater degree of creativity with what you find. Linking up roots and undulations in the trail can reinvigorate a once dulled experience on a larger travel AM machine, yet while I did feel more connected to what's happening under the wheels, I did struggle to easily generate raw speed across rough trails, requiring a lot more input than similar short travel bikes.


Devinci Django
Going 'off-piste' and into the rough stuff, the Django became twitchy requiring pin-point accuracy - perhaps a longer travel fork with an offset shorter than 42mm would have helped with weight distribution, but doing so would perhaps diminish what the Django is all about and after all, if this is photo looks like your local trails, Devinci have a bike or two designed to excel in these environments.


From one extreme to the other, the Django was a different machine on trails of a more groomed and man-made nature where the light and superbly stiff carbon chassis, sub 28lb weight, progressive suspension and aggressive ride position, all came to life as you let off the brakes and put the power down. Pumping and jumping your way through modern trail features brought home that a short travel machine with some decent numbers in the geometry department, could be a lot of fun. That said, I do wonder if Devinci missed an opportunity with the Django, especially within the growing short travel trail bike sector. Embracing 650b wheels over 29" wheels - a rising trend right now - and considering the Django has a stiff 'Boosted' rear and the right numbers geometry wise, well, they could have had a real "rocket ship" on their hands.


Devinci Django
For those more familiar with the ride height of a longer travel platform and a penchant for getting some air, the Django's ground hugging persona will take some time to get used to, favouring precision over wilfully hucking and hoping.


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesComing to the realisation that the latest EWS proven 160mm travel machine would be pure overkill for most of us and the terrain we encounter at our local trails, and choosing a more appropriate option for our immediate needs is a wake-up call that more and more of us are coming around to. This was the precise reason that the team at Devinci designed the Django. While fast and aggressive riders might feel that a bit under gunned on rough-and-ready trails, those looking for a bike to hammer out the miles at their local trail centre and have some fun along the way, will like what they find. - Olly Forster


Visit the feature gallery for high resolution and additional images




MENTIONS: @devinci





184 Comments

  • + 132
 If trails keep getting more flat and boring, pretty soon we'll be riding cyclocross bikes, and saying xc race bikes are overkill. This bike looks fun though.
  • + 64
 If the trails get super smooth, there is also less of a need for wagon wheels to monster truck over rocks.

25 inch wheels anyone?
  • + 10
 I agree it's overkill. I don't think you need almost 150mm DH hub spacing for a 120mm bike.
  • + 36
 Maybe its the rise of a new genre where you slopestyle your way down the mountain and do gnarly climbs up the other side instead of giving up when things are more than fire road, like enduro? Who wants to go for an all-slope ride?
  • - 4
flag inked-up-metalhead (Mar 15, 2016 at 1:33) (Below Threshold)
 Good job it's 9mm less then...
  • + 46
 The local trail crew keeps ironing out fun sections of my local forest, most trail centres and bike parks are all imba certified 1m wide concrete flat luges nowadays and I hate it. A lot of the local Strava Kom holders are guys on rigid carbon single speed 29rs and such, not that I use Strava myself, but... If you can go fast on those bikes then ita not an mtb trail IMO
  • + 97
 Yep, we don't need smaller bikes. We need bigger trails
  • + 18
 if the trail is boring, push harder ....go faster... dont get a smaller bike
  • + 4
 Ugh.
  • - 40
flag burnadette (Mar 15, 2016 at 6:04) (Below Threshold)
 The word "realization" is misspelled in the end quote... sorry.
  • + 45
 it hasn't been misspelt. 'Realisation' is the common spelling in much of the world. 'realization' tends to only be used in North America.
  • + 28
 Yes that's English not American lol
  • + 7
 Drops mic....
  • + 16
 I hear ya. Happening here too in Kelowna BC too. Leave my damn single track alone and go ride the bmx track if that's the terrain you want.
  • + 1
 Or buy a road bike. Hell no. You got it all wrong lagr1980.
  • + 19
 That's it! I've had it with this dump! We got roadies on our trails! We got 1m wide trails! Our pets heads are falling off!!
  • - 21
flag theedon (Mar 15, 2016 at 8:33) (Below Threshold)
 2001 called. They want their bike back
  • + 11
 I dunno, I see lots of fast mofos on 120mm bikes, even on burly terrain.
  • + 25
 I think the point is, if most of the people buying big Enduro bikes actually had the opportunity to ride an Enduro track, the way the bike was designed to driven, they would either wreck their bike or scare themselves out of ever riding again... this bike is a reality check for the general public, who understand what kind of riding they will ACTUALLY be doing.
  • + 10
 Thing is, I'd rather have a bike slightly over built than under. Then I know it'll hold up to abuse. This rig for example, I'm looking at it thinking hmmmm slam the seat 4X gearset an DH cockpit an would it be a short travel play/ thrasher?
  • + 7
 My 170 Capra was so much overkill i ended up only using it for uplifts , i use my Scout for everything up to DH, i'm going to BPW next weekend and will probably take that over my new DH bike, and i'll do the blacks on it, just slower lol
edit .. it hast Fox 34 140/150Talas, DH wheels, 203 front disc so it is beefed up quite a bit from stock
  • + 5
 @ctd07 That sucks dude, I really feel for ya! There's defo a place for groomed, built trails - but I've just got back from a local hub of twisty, root infested, steep, root infested, narrow, root infested trails , my hands, forearms and shoulders are screaming at me and my shock's still cooling down... and life is awesome! Big Grin
  • + 3
 Will 26+ tires fit ?
  • + 1
 @SiSandro Thank god someone on here is talking sense! We need to seize this important opportunity to introduce more standards!!!
  • + 15
 For all the people complaining about your trails becoming to smooth get out there and dig then! people would rather complain than do anything about it.
  • + 7
 Given the choice between a 27lb 160mm bike that pedals well and a 130mm bike that pedals well, why the hell would you get a 130mm bike? This overkill argument is bullshit. Plus size tires can also be considered overkill using the same logic, everyone (bike industry) is talking out of both sides of their mouths. If you ride gnarly trails, there is no reason to not go with more travel given how good today's bikes pedal.
  • + 7
 There are more people that do not need a big travel bike..so why tell someone to buy a bike with more travel if they cannot use it? Why not set someone up for success? I'm not gonna sell someone a Devinci Spartan (which climbs well for what it is) but when there are bikes like this available that can do all and maintain less travel meaning less weight and better control, why not put the people on a bike they can progress on?
  • + 1
 Because less travel does not necessarily mean less weight and more control. So who here would get this bike over a Tracer, Bronson, or HD-3? If your in a market for a $4-6k bike, I'm guessing that you know what your doing, in which case none of this is even a question. If you have to "sell" someone a bike, then what you say could apply.
  • + 3
 Press-fit… Need I say more?
  • + 5
 Personally for the trails within a reasonable distance from me, this bike would be rad . The Bronson/hd3 etc are awesome bikes but they Would be major overkill and make the trail boring.
  • + 0
 Slowdownu is absolutely correct, bang on, no possibility to argue his point. My theory is: you can always use more travel, especially if the bike is still rideable uphill.
  • + 1
 80mm forks will be "long travel" forks.
  • + 6
 Eh? Okay!!

Its called get a 130mm bike, set the sag and tune the suspension and rip!!! More travel is not needed unless you want to be part of the "look at me club" while guys on their 120-130 bikes are leaving you in the dust....
  • + 3
 #onetwennyisplenny
  • - 1
 I agree with the having the right amount of travel for the type of riding point. My problem with this bike is that for what you are paying its at least 2lbs overweight and that is enough to rule it out. Whilst people will disagree about the right amount of travel I dont think Ive ever met anyone that would choose a heavier bike.
  • + 5
 All these GOONS talking about how you can buy a downhill bike for this kinda money, half these guys sit on the couch watching how to videos on tailwhipping a bike....clowns!!! YOU DONT NEED 200MM OF TRAVEL TO RIP!!!!! This bike is considered a great deal by industry standards, so not too sure why so many of you have issues with pricing.
  • + 4
 Are you guys really arguing over 20-30mm? lol I don't think that extra 1inch of travel is going to turn a bike into a slug
  • - 6
flag burnadette (Mar 16, 2016 at 10:35) (Below Threshold)
 I'm just trying to get a mofo to spellcheck an article... "Realisation..." Go home "Oxford New-Lexicon," you're drunk.
  • + 11
 Realisation is the correct spelling most places that aren't the usa. So get your head out of your American arse and realise theres more to the world than your country.
  • - 9
flag burnadette (Mar 16, 2016 at 11:16) (Below Threshold)
 Thank you for the life advice inked-up-meth-head, but I think you are using the wrong form of "there is," in your anti American remark. PS. Take a Midol bro, it helps with the British Nationalism...
  • + 3
 People who point out grammar corrections in comment are the lamest.
  • + 3
 dude there's nothing British nationalism about his comment not was it particularly anti American. either admit you made a mistake or quit the lame personal attacks, you'll just make us look even more clueless.
  • + 6
 @nismo325 *in 'a' comment :-P
  • + 1
 Perfect...targeting XC guys that might actually go over a couple roots. Sorry just wouldn't feel comfortable on a bike like that. I also ride with my seat to low and all the travel available on my suspension even on a "flow" trail. Love how my bike feels even though I may not ACTUALLY need it.
  • + 1
 @wolf-amongst-lambs...Just a joke...anything under 140 is for the XC guys, haha. Seriously though, my bike is prob overkill for most of the stuff I ride but I don't mind.
  • + 2
  @rcrdrvr ... no, I get it now, but I was tipsy the 1st time I read it and COULD NOT make sense of what you said lmao
  • + 2
 @rcybak: I would rather ride a shorter travel bike if the trail did not demand longer travel. More fun.
  • + 61
 This bike should be a gearbox belt drive with that name. They missed the boat
  • - 1
 This bike should get a lot of things. After watching the video posted earlier I wondered what this bike needed to make it more fun. Those guys looked like they were almost fighting the bike.
  • + 2
 DJANGO UNCHAINED
  • + 0
 ^^^ I was going to say...
  • + 28
 ....or alternatively, pick up a 26 Banshee Spitfire V2 frame and enjoy the wonderful world of a 140mm trail bike that is backwards compatible (threaded BB, 135mm rear end, 26/27.5 dropouts available) and that puts equally big smiles on faces for much less cash.
  • - 20
flag fatenduro (Mar 15, 2016 at 4:29) (Below Threshold)
 Or spend $5000 and get a dirtbike with a motor.
  • + 8
 or not...
really.... if you are looking at getting something like a Troy or this Django and you have a shed full of 26 inch bits and pieces, you really should consider a Spit.

But don't just take my word for it, here are some juicy bits from the Vital review in this link: www.vitalmtb.com/product/guide/Frames,7/Banshee-Bikes/Spitfire-v2,12133#product-reviews/1766/expand

"Yes bike industry pawns, it is still possible to not spend a fortune and get an absolute ripper of a bike. The Banshee Spitfire is one of these bikes."

"The Affordable, Downhiller's Trail Bike"

"It has adjustable geometry, 12x142 rear dropouts, adjustable dropouts for 26” or 27.5” rims, a tapered head tube, a paint job that actually stays on the frame, a full-length seat tube, and 140mm of travel."

"I have to remind myself that the Spitfire is a trail bike. I’ve been mind f*cked- it’s that good."

"Leaving the fork in 130mm mode while descending turns the bike into a slalom machine. It’s ridiculous how well it corners"

and finally...

"If you are a downhiller on a budget, you should absolutely consider it as your next trail bike."
  • + 2
 Much less cash ? Which other company can get you a carbon trail bike for 4000$ CAD ? thats cheaper than direct sale model.
  • + 3
 @Mathhhh

Much less cash?
Um, I have no idea "what other company can get you a carbon trail bike for 4000$CAD"

but then again, why would I, considering I am suggesting getting hold of a 26 inch Banshee Spitfire V2...
.....which would be ..... aluminium and used, which would be... umm...

Much less cash!!!
  • + 2
 I have a Spitfire and rode it for the last few seasons on 26" wheels.

Swapped over to 27.5 and will give that a go. Switching is not a cheap process though... We're talking either complete new wheelset, new drop outs and axle or lacing new rims to your current hubs and switching axles in the hub.
  • + 2
 With you there @Canadmos,

Picked up a set of Stans Flow Ex 27.5 Rims at a steal last month and now saving up for the dropouts and spokes!!!
  • + 1
 "If I was in world war II they'd call me SPITFIRE!"
  • + 1
 Mathhh - it doesnt matter. You could get a lighter aluminium trail bike that weighs less that this does for alot less money.
  • + 2
 Really? What bike?
  • + 27
 So much troubles around how much mm of suspension you should actually ride, while there never is a perfect number since every trail is different and every part of one trail is different too.

Can't believe how much fuss there is about this, while my 2004 Gemini (custom built trail machine) can easily be set between 140-150-170mm of rear travel and a u-turn fork. Did we forget that u-turn excists as well as adjustable rear suspension settings?


Lately it has all been going like: you need 160mm. 160mm is too much, get 150mm. 140mm sucks so buy 120mm. Oh shit that 120mm is not enough for every trail, get 160mm again. Just get adjustable suspension.
  • + 9
 Adjustable suspension would be an excellent solution.........for the buyer. Bike manufacturers, not so good, selling fewer bikes/models!!
  • + 9
 At the same time, if you'd be the only one selling trail bikes with adjustable travel, your sales should go up as people would rather buy from you than from another company.
  • + 4
 I'm really tempted by the aggressive 120-130mm trend since most local trails could be ridden on a hardtail but then you're pretty much confined to the trail riding domain. I find 140-150mm are the most versatile bikes if you're a DHer at heart looking for a quiver killer. If you're not too adventurous on the downhill sections, bikes like the django are perfect for you though.
  • + 0
 Imagine a downhill bike that can reduce your travel from 200mm to 140mm.
  • + 3
 @PLC07 my realization has been that yes, you can go into a 150-165mm bike as a quiver killer(I only up it from your number because the Spartan pedals truly well.) However, I've found I have a lot more fun having a short travel trail ripper (currently a 29er hardtail with aggressive geo for me) & a no compromises AM bike.

That said, I live nowhere near a bike park or real DH trails. But what I'm really trying to say is: quiver killer still doesn't exist. You can compromise a bit & get real close, but I'm truly glad to have a ripping hardtail so that I don't have to. weekday rides are a lot more fun when you don't, as the author put it, bring a gun to a knife fight.
  • + 2
 Couldn't agree more @Mattin.

Each time I look at a new bike I consider that my current bike adjusts by flick of a switch from 170mm of travel to 130mm and finally 30mm. Before I begin down the road of thinking "maybe I should buy this bike" I realize I already have a mid-travel and hardtail-esque bike. My geometry does not change at flick of a switch but the aggressive head angles of these new trail bikes makes that less of a distinction.
  • + 5
 Most of us already have massively adjustable suspension in the form of air Springs. If you ride a 160mm bike, and you know you are going to go on smoother trails, pump it up to reduce the sag, and speed up the rebound and compression. Now you have suspension that feels similar to 120mm. Obviously its not perfect but in this way you can take advantage of what you have instead of getting down on yourself for buying too much bike.
  • + 1
 The downside I see in adjustable rear suspension like that is that if you set it to longer travel, the shock ratio will be different. You can compensate with higher air pressure or decrease air can volume (if you have an air spring) but getting more damping as well can be more difficult to get right. I don't think travel doesn't matter that much at all really, it is about geometry. This Devinci and also my Cannondale Prophet allow you adjust the geometry without changing the amount of rear wheel travel hence without changing the shock stroke.
  • + 2
 @groghunter my 145/160 does fine on most dh trails except the gnarliest, pedals alright and it jumps good too. Its not doing anything perfectly but at least I know I'll be more than fine wherever I go.

The ideal situation would be to have a bike for every purpose but I've been down that road and I find maintaining multiple full sus bikes more expensive than I'm willing to spend on a mtb season so I've settled for a good all around bike + DJ. I like having my bikes dialed and with multiple bikes you have to compromise. Also, you never really know which bike you'll need on new trails and the all-rounder solves that headache when travelling.
  • + 2
 @vinay Agreed that adjustable suspension it is not the perfect solution. my bike is also a single pivot which many people are not fond of either. There are many limitations to the bike and that was some solid insight on the stroke. If I were a great rider, I would certainly have multiple steeds. In my current case, I'm simply trying to enjoy each ride as much as possible and hedge against buying more than one bike!

@PLC07 Well said
  • + 1
 @DatBikeDo Actually my point wasn't necessarily that adjustable suspension is bad, I just think that the actual amount of travel doesn't matter much. A little maybe especially if you require the progression even in the events you use little travel. But if it implies complex (internal) adjustments to your shock it is not worth bothering. Adjustable geometry is what allows you stay right on the edge of your abilities. So if stuff gets to tricky, you want to slacken the head angle. If it gets too easy, maybe setting it a bit steeper makes it challenging again. I know, the current trend is to build a Geometron (or play catch up with that design), straight line through the obstacles and moan that the terrain is too tame. I'd rather find out that I can't yet properly ride something nearby on my simple bike so that I have something to work on rather than spend loads on an amazing bike to then have to travel loads to find terrain that actually challenges me. No strava, no camera, nothing to show off. Just making sure I'm grinning.

Looking at the pictures in the article (which admittedly implies I can't really judge the speed he's going at) I don't see why I couldn't do that (including the roots section) on my 26" DMR hardtail (Switchback) with a 130mm fork in front (which is short and steep by modern standards). I'd probably be slower, still be flying and eventually be spending more time on the descends. What's not to like?
  • + 3
 It wasn't all that long ago I was riding DH on a cromo hardtail with a rigid fork. Loved it then, love hitting it now on my old-ass freeride with 8" travel and big brakes. If I had the $$ I would absolutely grab some sick slack machine, but I am not positive that running the terrain faster equals more fun. If the bike does all the work for you, how is it a challenge? I respect the guy smoking by me on a 4X more than the dude I have to get around who's on a full carbon S-works hanging on the brakes.
  • + 23
 Comon guys - list the frame weight.. without shock. No idea why manufactures find it so hard to include that info.
  • + 8
 +1 on that! and for a medium, not the small...
  • + 9
 I always assume that if they dont list it, it will be heavy.
  • + 9
 Yeah, it should be a 29er with 27.5 plus clearance. There's too much duplication in the bike industry. It's like having to use 3 different spoons at a very expensive dinner. It makes more sense (to me at least) have a mix of bikes that have different capabilities rather than having 2 or 3 trail bikes that have just 20mm of travel in between them and on the same wheels size.
  • + 3
 But on the up side, this means a potential sales disaster due to confused segments and possibly crazy cheap discount pricing next year, buying a bike at 50% off is something we can all agree on.
  • + 7
 "... it's a bike designed for a rider who knows what they want."

These rhetorics continue to surprise me. If you're going to spend this kind of money on a bike, you better know you want it. Not to take anything away from the bike, but you'll probably also be just fine with one of these if you don't exactly know what you want. Seems like you can ride technical stuff with it and it won't be too sluggish on the easier stuff, nice and versatile. And then you have people who know what they want and it just happens to be very different from this bike. So what's left of that statement? It is a bit like these commercials going "you know what you want so don't look any further and have our stuff".
  • + 9
 BOOOOst. and Push fit? WTF is that? pressfit you can do with your hands instead of a press?
  • + 2
 HAHA! You already corrected the typo. lolz
  • + 6
 I'm the happy and proud owner of a Troy, but I've got to be honest: I'm a bit disappointed. The Django should've been a slacker 120mm travel 29er (like the Transition and Evil offerings). Spartan, Troy & Django? Why not slacker 120mm travel 29er?
  • + 5
 If somebody gave me one, and maintained it for me, and switched tyres for me - I'd happily take it as a 'quiver killer'. As nobody's going to do that, l'll keep the Enduro (style) bike for the weekend and the 29 hardtail for the sloppy midweek local stuff.
  • + 3
 Those are my two exact bikes as well! I think it's the perfect combo. I have a 27.5 160mm 67-degree head angle carbon all mtn bike, and a 29er 70-degree head angle (!!) aluminum xc bike. The funny thing is that, as my skills improve, I'm finding that I can ride a lot of the same technical stuff on my hardtail that I can on the 6" bike. It was easier to learn it on the big bike, but now that I have the skills, I can do it on the xc hardtail. Just makes me realize how small of a difference all those numbers really make. These are two hugely different bikes, but they're both extremely capable. Sure, I descend faster on the big bike, but the xc bike is just as much fun, no question about it.
  • + 1
 I agree @skelldify! People get way too hung up on bike "genres" and suspension travel. I HIGHLY doubt most of the people saying you have to have 160mm don't begin to make proper usage of that bike.

The fact is most of us can get our butts handed to us by the skilled dude on the Specialized epic, even on some gnarly stuff.

I've been riding a rigid single speed lately (instead of my yeti sb5), and for those of us who don't ride an EWS racecourse everyday I think you'd be amazed at what a less capable bike is capable of. I've gotten faster and learned many new tricks and skills!
  • + 8
 Django was a guitar virtuoso, like Hendrix...I see an alternative to the Classical Greek theme that devinci were going with.
  • + 6
 Django Reinhardt was off the chain www.youtube.com/watch?v=szNJ6DqrqoA
  • + 6
 Pretty sure they thought they'd sign Gwin... Django, unchained... I'll fetch my coat!
  • + 1
 He (Django) also did a lot with little since the last two fingers on his left (fretting) hand were burned and nearly useless. He was the master of picking his lines (no pun intended). So, I think when you consider the push to minimize travel and do more with less, the name works pretty well.
  • + 1
 or the 1966 Sergio Corbucci film. plot is literally about a one man army.
  • + 1
 "err, trail bike that's randomly named after a movie about slavery?" c'mon PB, show a little culture, Django has nothing to do with slavery. Obviously Devinci is trying to cash in on the understated coolness and glamour of the python web framework www.djangoproject.com .
  • + 9
 Nooooooo I was expecting for a 29'' trail bike Frown
  • + 1
 Next one....
  • + 1
 There's just too much crossover between the Hendrix & a dedicated 29er, & they're just too small a company to have a dedicated frame for every segment. Hell, if they DO release a 29er, it's likely to just be a Hendrix frame with new decals.

Also, you could see if you can still get an Atlas frame.
  • + 2
 Just run the Hendrix with 29 inch wheels! Its an aggressive short travel 29er at heart with room for plus wheels if that's your preference.
  • + 2
 speaking as someone who has a 29er with a set of 27.5+ wheels: having both wheelsets is the best of both worlds. sometimes I wanna feel like a monster truck, sometimes I wanna feel like a Ferrari. either option is a wheel swap away. & having run it this way for a while: I'm on the lookout to upgrade to a frame designed for for 27.5+. Going skinny on a fat frame is easier than going fat on a skinny frame.
  • + 2
 I've done the same thing with my atlas. Its a great way to make one bike very versatile. I'm now running the 27.5 rear and 29er front.... fun again!
  • + 2
 Some brilliant chaps are designing 27.5plus bikes now that are 2.8 specific, so they wouldn't accept 29er tires, beware.
  • + 2
 name names!
  • + 1
 Who is doing that? I thought the whole idea was versatility. Or is it profit margins....
  • + 2
 Ibis Mojo 3. It could be a (very wasteful) trend. If they just mention 27.5plus, the odds are it may not have enough mud clearance for blurly 29er tires like 2.35 Hans Dampf or 2.5 Minions.
  • + 1
 Ah. So I believe that's actually a different situation, in that the bike was designed around normal 27.5, but they engineered it with enough clearance that you can run a 2.8 in the back, so they're selling it with a + build kit. So yea, you can't run 29er wheels, but the bike will ride as designed with a 27.5 x 2.4.
  • + 1
 Yeah its one of those half cup full or empty situation here I guess. I just felt that its a shame if they decided not to go a little bit further and make it 29er compatible.
  • + 5
 Having 'downsized' my bike travel recently to 130 (but with aggressive geo) I get what this guy is talking about. Depends on what you ride tho.
  • + 1
 Agreed.........
  • + 1
 riding 160 26er atm and yes, I agree that it depends on what you ride. will the only thing about the 160mm bike i have that i love THE MOST, is the geo but i never get to use all of the travel it offers. I'm just wasting energy going up too because of the suspension and travel, not to mention weight. So bikes like these are awesome! low travel, light and slack. do want!
  • + 3
 @Positivebicyclist Ha Ha, what utter nonsense. I'd say it takes more skill to ride a shorter travel bike fast. 160mm sure does let you away with bad line choices. I know what I'm talking about, I have an enduro 29er and race it quite successfully, but for shear fun (and to sharpen my skills), the 130mm bike rocks, far more feedback, poppyness and playfulness (not a fan of these phrases but the fit well). And BTW, a local rider who used to race worldcup DH has just acquired a 5010 but hey, it might not match his skill level.
  • + 7
 should have gone for 29er weheels
  • + 1
 my guess is that they prioritized short chain stays...hence the 2.35 rear tire
  • + 2
 Agreed. Welp, I guess I'm still getting an Evil!
  • + 3
 All these GOONS talking about how you can buy a downhill bike for this kinda money, half these guys sit on the couch watching how to videos on tailwhipping a bike....clowns!!! YOU DONT NEED 200MM OF TRAVEL TO RIP!!!!! This bike is considered a great deal by industry standards, so not too sure why so many of you have issues with pricing.
  • + 2
 I have recently moved from 130 to 160 bike and I realized, that for trails I ride the most the biggest difference between those two bike is stiffness (AM rig is stiffer, but that is just a coincidence). Other than this, if you tune your suspension properly (tokens) and use proper tire pressure, a 130mm rig can hadle a lot, in fact, riding it can be much more fun. AM/enduro bike really start to shine when you are pushing it very hard.
  • + 5
 www.youtube.com/watch?v=OP2VV5kDOHk Evan Voss x Brandon Blakely, Django, Fast Draw
  • + 1
 Read the review after watching the video. Everything the reviewer says about the bike staying on the ground and being difficult to get air made no sense after watching those two hop about the woods.
  • + 2
 And here we go again. The numbers, all about the numbers. This is how the bike industry makes money off most of us overpaying a few grand for a bike that is simply useless to the average consumer and trails available. Like some mentioned above highend bikes with high travel actually hurt ones riding as they baby you on the hard stuff. It's the rider not the bike, try doing down hill or enduro trail on a 130 to 140mm travel hardtail without soiling your big boy paints or crashing then talk about numbers. I have over 20 years of mtb experimence all on hard tails till my recent fs. The hardtails have made me a far better rider, I have a grin on my face when I outride other riders on my hardtail or mid level fs while guys on 6 grand plus huge travel carbons don't know what to do with the bike or themselves on the trails. I never in my life fell for the bikes industries numbers game and handle myself just fine on all kinds of trails. So I actually praise Devinchi for making a bike for 85% of the consumers out there. We are not all seminuks or reeders, or magazzys. Not even close, so let's not kid ourselves here that we need top end bikes to Huck and thrash. We don't. My $2500 fs and 10 year old 26er hardtail sure keep up with the big boys riding there expensive toys. I always buy mid range aluminum frames and do just fine. I don't believe in the benefits of carbon, high travel and I have riden a few to know the great benefits argument are marginal at best.
  • + 6
 2,35 tire clearance? Meh.
  • + 1
 Ibis Mojo 3. That's all I say.
  • + 2
 Looks like the replacement for the Atlas, disappointing! They should have just redone the Atlas with a bit slacker head angle. I completely love my beefy built out Atlas (Pike 130 with wide rims) for XC, rough XC and light trail riding, the short wheel base and CS makes it ride so nimble for a 29er.
  • + 4
 every week new bikes, new standards are coming...27 +, 160 mm, 120 +, 134 +...
I would still keep my Mega TR and YT Tues 2.0 both 26" Thank You!
  • + 1
 26 is still the standard, being that they are the base upon which all are judged by. I can except new hub spacing. Not all rear ends are created equal, nor would I want them to be. The real fun starts, for me, when having to break traction in order to regain control.
  • + 3
 this bike would prob be sweet for my trails, but not for when I head to the bike parks. Not rich enough to keep a stable at home either, so I like my 160mm quiver killer
  • + 1
 Very nice bike,but is anyone else keen to see devince come out with a carbon wilson. It's been a decent chunk time since the 27.5 alu version came out so im hoping that the carbon is coming down the pipeline. Their Alu is pretty darn heavy, (hell even their previous carbon wilson was a bit chubby ). But the Django's weight would seem to suggest that their becoming more aware of the weight thing.So It would be cool to see steve smith make his comeback this year on a fresh new rig
  • + 1
 Wait a couple of weeks...
  • + 1
 You won't have to wait long...
  • + 5
 Comon Divinci. Hook up the threaded BB.
  • + 1
 Nice looking bike, but I sure would prefer 27.5+/29 option. For me it fits right in the middle of my 29er hardtail and 150mm AM machine, and with the 2, for me there is not enough room between this bike and a hardtail. For someone with a single bike, depending on what they are riding, it could be a great option!
  • + 5
 That looks like alot of money for a heavy bike.
  • + 2
 Burly short travel trail bikes are great.
Moved to Ontario, and ended up downsizing from my 160mm Range, to. 130/120 fuel ex (W/ pike), and I couldn't be happier for the trails here.
  • + 1
 I like it, would be a great compliment to my DH bike. DH for the bike park/shuttling/hike a biking and this unit for trail riding and pissing around town on. 120mm is plenty enough travel to have fun with, 150mm is getting too close to my DH bikes squishy-ness.
  • + 2
 Funny how companies create a XC bike, update it to a trail bike, then to an all mountain bike, etc. Then they need to create a new XC or Trail bike to fill the gap they made! Smile
  • + 5
 12x148mm rear spacing for 2.35" tire clearance? What is the point?
  • + 1
 The point is the Hendrix if you want extra meat on your stick!
  • + 2
 A trail bike is just a big travel XC bike right. So 120/130mm is considered 'small' travel?! I remember the days of 50-80 being small....... Just a numbers game it seems.
  • + 3
 I'm in the market for something a little closer to 135mm front, 125mm rear.
  • + 1
 Not bad, get a frame, scrape off 1mm on each side in the back and use an old 26" DH wheel in there. Put a 120mm fork on the front with a 27.5 and you are ready for business. Smile
  • + 1
 my problem with this bike is that the frame tubes are a mess! when you make a carbon frame you have the possibility to make it flowy and elegant. no a pretty bike that s for sure.And yes it should be a 29er.
  • + 0
 why buy a short travel trail bike when they make cheaper trail hardtails?

you have already admitted to yourself you don't need a lot or any travel. save money for beer and trips to places with real mountains and get the hardtail.
  • + 2
 That's the dumbest thing I've ever read on Pinkbike.
  • + 1
 highly doubt that @PhillipJ
  • + 0
 "The Django, for all intents and purposes, looks a lot like another bike, the Troy - Devinci's 140mm travel trail smasher, which they released last summer"

Wasn't the troy released in 2013 or so? You're thinking of the spartan.
  • + 0
 No the Troy is brand new for 2016
  • + 2
 Nope, if you google, you'll find 2014 troy reviews posted in 2013 so definitely not a 2015/2016 platform.
  • + 1
 it was redesigned for 2016
  • + 1
 120mm, 68deg, pressfit bb, boost.... this makes my 2010 yeti asr5c seem super modern, but at least i have threaded bb and 12x142.
  • + 2
 Can't wait for the police report /insurance claim that your django was stolen from your garage despite being chained up
  • + 2
 Am I the only one who only gets a disturbing image of Jamie Foxx in a prissy blue velvet suit and not one of a ripping bike.
  • + 2
 pressfit bb, that sucks maybe ill use my headset for a BB then. I wonder if there are deep cups for he BB?
  • + 3
 Why wouldn't you bring a gun to a knife fight?
  • + 1
 I'd bring a flame thrower
  • + 2
 we have around 300mm travel in our hands ????
  • + 2
 Those are some huge hands you got there!
  • + 1
 Thanks for modernizing the seat angles. Now just drop the main pivot to 100% AS and it's perfect!
  • - 2
 It looks like a great bike. I noticed locally a big portion of the off-road areas have been changed into "nature reserves" and dog parks, where you're not even supposed to go off of the path. A lot of people don't need a big crazy full suspension bike, or are being segregated into a situation where they don't.
  • + 1
 Next frame pro model Quentin tarantino)))

Devinci Django ?
Devinci Misfit ?
Devinci Horror ?
  • + 1
 Here's video of these bikes being ridden buy the boys from Church 1 and 2.


www.youtube.com/watch?v=OP2VV5kDOHk
  • + 2
 I read not as good as a scout
  • + 2
 The D is silent asshole!
  • + 2
 Came here to say that
  • + 2
 i still prefer corbuccis original with franco nero...a machine gun in a coffin, hell yeah
  • + 1
 Next Model - Devinci Schultz Wink
  • + 1
 Django.......unchained. Someone had to say it!
  • + 4
 Perfect bike for Gwin to ride...
  • + 1
 Great looking bike, with nice geo. Good to see another proper XL size.
  • + 1
 Love the engineering and company vision of Devinci Cycles.
  • + 1
 This is nearly 100% certain to be my next bike.
  • + 1
 Here comes the revival of slalom/4-cross bikes- the most fun category!
  • + 1
 Did Devinci's homepage crash?
  • + 0
 Throw a 140 airspring in that PIke and like all short travel 29ers you just know this bike will come alive!
  • - 1
 They named this bike 'Django' because once you buy it, you become a slave to the bike industry's pointless 12x148mm "standard".
  • + 4
 you need to watch more movies.
  • + 1
 Troy is to Django as Connecticut is to Pennsylvania.
  • + 1
 The D is silent
  • - 1
 is every company making short travel trail bikes
  • - 1
 DAMN, DJANGO, DAMN!
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