Spartan vs Spartan: Devinci Enduro Team Bike Checks

May 23, 2017
by Pinkbike Staff  
Devinci Enduro Team Bike Checks Madiera EWS
  Damien Oton and Theo Galy's Devinci Spartans

Devinci's two French riders, Damien Oton and Theo Galy have become staples in the upper portion of the results sheet at the EWS events and Madeira was no different. Damien finished the massive weekend of riding in third while his teammate, Theo finished off in seventh. The two were riding the Devinci Spartan and their bikes are decked out with gear from SRAM and Rockshox, but there are some differences between their setups.

Bike Details
• Devinci Spartan
• Rockshox Lyrik
• Rockshox Monarch Plus RC3
• Race Face Turbine Wheels
• SRAM Guide Ultimate brakes
• SRAM X0 cranks
• E*Thirteen TRSr guide
• Maxxis tires



Damien Oton sports the black armband in memory of his friend and Devinci teammate.
Theo Galy all smiles after a very long day.

Damien Oton
Height – 5'7" / 170cm
Weight – 68kg / 150lbs
Riding Style (according to Theo) – Fast and precise but collects soil samples too often.

• Frame Size – Medium
• Tire choice/size – Front: Maxxis Minion DHR2 2.4 3C DH casing. Rear: Aggressor 2.3 TR DD casing
• Tire pressures – Front ~21psi / Rear ~25psi

Devinci Enduro Team Bike Checks Madiera EWS
Oton was running a Maxxis DHR2 up front with a DH casing.


Suspension
• Travel – Front 170mm / Rear 165mm
• Pressures/Coil – Front: Air w/ 66psi, 3 tokens / Rear: 135psi, 6 bands
• Damper settings – Front: Compression open / Rebound 7 clicks out
• Rear: Rebound – Slower than usual


Cockpit
• Bar height – 20mm under the stem, 20mm rise bars
• Roll – Neutral
• Bar width – 750mm
• Stem length – 40mm

Devinci Enduro Team Bike Checks Madiera EWS
15mm of spacers under the 40mm stem.


• Saddle position – Centred/Neutral on rails
• Tilt – Pretty neutral for trail riding
• Dropper – 125mm

• Brake lever position – Flat, very flat.
• Lever throw – Quick bite
• Lever extension – Closer to the grip
• Rotor size – 180mm front and rear
• Chainring/Cranks – 36t ring on 170mm cranks



Devinci Enduro Team Bike Checks Madiera EWS
Damien's brake levers are really flat.


Any customizations or peculiarities?
• Levers are among the flattest in the EWS
• Prototype Foam/Rubber grips
• Grip tape on levers and triggers
• Tubeless front and rear
• Prefers to stash spare tube in jersey
• Runs his rebound in the fork 1–2 clicks slower in the wet
Theo Galy
Height – 5'8" / 173cm
Weight – 72kg / 159lbs
Riding Style (according to Damien ) – Fast and smooth. Way better at memorizing stages than me

• Frame Size – Medium
• Tire choice/size – Front: Minion DHF 2.5 3C DD casing. Rear: Aggressor 2.3 TR DD casing
• Tire pressures – Front ~23psi / Rear ~25psi

Devinci Enduro Team Bike Checks Madiera EWS
Theo opted for the Minion DHF in the front and went with the DD casing.

Suspension
• Travel – Front 170mm / Rear 165mm
• Pressures/Coil – Front: Air w/ 68psi, 2 tokens / Rear: 140psi, 6 bands
• Damper settings – Front: Compression open / Rebound 7 clicks out
• Rear: Rebound – Slow but little faster than Damien


Cockpit
• Bar height – 15mm under the stem, 20mm rise bars
• Roll – Neutral
• Bar width – 750mm
• Stem length – 50mm

Devinci Enduro Team Bike Checks Madiera EWS
Theo's front end is a little lower and longer than Damien's.


• Saddle position – Little back on rails
• Tilt – Neutral for trail riding
• Dropper – 150mm

• Brake lever position – A touch flatter than average
• Lever throw – More modulation with a bite fairly far the grip
• Lever extension – Neutral not too close not too far
• Rotor size – 200mm front and rear
• Chainring/Cranks – 34t ring on 170mm cranks


Devinci Enduro Team Bike Checks Madiera EWS
Theo's levers are a little flatter than average, but there's nothing wild here.

Any customizations or peculiarities?
• ODI Ruffian grips
• Grip tape on levers and triggers.
• Tubeless front and rear
• Prefers to stash spare tube in jersey
• Both Theo and Damien are running the OneUp EDC in the steerer tube

Devinci Enduro Team Bike Checks Madiera EWS
Theo runs his brake lever reach closer than Damian, but his levers aren't as high/flat.
Devinci Enduro Team Bike Checks Madiera EWS
Theo's brake levers are still flatter than average but don't have the same aggressive angle as Damien's.

Devinci Enduro Team Bike Checks Madiera EWS
Damien prefers the feel of the Mallet DH pedal...
Devinci Enduro Team Bike Checks Madiera EWS
While Theo prefers the Mallet E.

Devinci Enduro Team Bike Checks Madiera EWS
Damien runs a little more coverage in the fender department...
Devinci Enduro Team Bike Checks Madiera EWS
and Theo is fine with a regular Marsh Guard.



MENTIONS: @devinci




96 Comments

  • 128 1
 Damn, those levers are as flat as Florida.
  • 116 5
 As flat as the Earth
  • 12 2
 And these color schemes are to match old retiree shirts in Florida (still killer bikes though)?
  • 6 6
 Flat is the way to go for steeps
  • 5 0
 @mtbakerpow: My hands and 99% of the other riders would generally disagree... Blank Stare
  • 1 1
 @seraph: yup I ride mine not quite vertical probably around 75 degrees. What ever allows me to have a straight wrist (kinda like how some one should punch). If mine are too high I bend at the wrist and it hurts. Flat levers for steeps as a rule would be a more old fashioned form with rear over the tire. I adopt a more top of sternum over bar technique (still a bit forward for "proper" position. )
  • 1 0
 have always had hand pain when riding.....changed my levers to flat and it all went away. took some time to get used to but killing sore hand is worth the akwardness
  • 48 12
 guys often say about Jared Graves or Rude, 'oh they're not that big, i'm a 200 pound dude!'. yes, but this is bicycle racing, and no matter if it's going up or going down, on skinny tires or fat, bicycle racers are generally small. look at the size of these elves! just wee ones! i love the sport, but it sure doesn't favour my body type or size. the little guys in my group smoke me straight up. little fuckers....
  • 29 0
 The 2 most successful World Cup DH racers are both huge though
  • 15 1
 If you're saying you're tall, don't worry, Pole's got you covered, and in a season or two everyone else will as well. If you're saying you're heavy (like me, 250lb), yeah you're f*cked.
  • 2 5
 @kleinblake: But thats gravity. Enduro is sometimes against gravity
  • 6 14
flag VTwintips (May 23, 2017 at 23:18) (Below Threshold)
 Small = more athletic, less strength. Big = less athletic, more strength. When you get people that have both abilities, they excel.

Andy Schleck won the Tour at 6'1".

Martin Soderstrom was exceptional at slopestyle despite his size.

Lebron James is huge and strong, but also more athletic. That is why he's one of the GOAT.
  • 4 0
 The size of jockeys...
  • 6 0
 Aaaah yes, Greg Callaghan sure is a midget. Josh Carlson etc. etc. I wouldn't think it matters too much. People assumed for ages that sprinters had to be small and stocky and then along came bolt. The right guy with the right skill set and effort in training will win, regardless of body type.
  • 4 3
 anyone who has seen Peaty walking around pits would see that this guy would never do well in basketball due to poor coordination. Give him a bike and off he goes. But he is still somewhat woody as compared to not so short Bryceland. He just managed to max out the advantages of his physique instead of falling to its shortcomings. I think it's Seasons movie where he goes over a huge boulder at speed and wheels are barely leaving the ground, while Sam Hill is just flying from it.
  • 1 2
 @vesko: I agree because I just made that point, only in a more specific way.

Why am I getting neg'd?

yes ... jockeys are a good counterargument but the horses are kind of the athletes just like rowers to coxswain.
  • 1 0
 I think any size is a good size for mountain biking. Different sizes of people generally use different techniques when riding with taller people generally riding a significantly longer, more planted bike with technique that is more subtle when compared to the shorte rider on a shorter bike who has to move their body more in order to shift the mass of the bike. I think that shorter riders (sub 6 foot) have adapted well to the enduro bikes of today but one doesn't have to look far to see the rise of significantly longer bikes (pole evolink, nicolai geometron, etc) coming in the near future. I think the trend towards 29ers in enduro (the trek slash for example) will help facilitate many more 6 ft + riders to the podium. Hopefully not too quickly though as I'm 5'7 and I'd like a slice of that podium too!
  • 3 0
 I disagree being tall has its benefits just play to them. Get a 29er and longer cranks. You can run a bigger dropper making the bike feel smaller. I have a tall friend who claims I have an unfair advantage hiking lol. That being said there's a lot of stylish shorter riders
  • 3 2
 @islandereh: shorter people in almost all acrobatic/stylish sports, not just biking. That's (again) why when a tall person can move 3-dimensionally, as well as a small person, they dominate. This is true in every sport from track and field, to football, to basketball to lacrosse, to soccer, to downhill ski racing. Usain bolt is probably the best example. Nobody thought there would be a fast sprinter of his size, but his turnover is the same as the smaller guys. Think about if that were to happen in baseball! You'd have guys throwing 105mph fastballs.

It all comes back to the physics concepts of power, and moments. When a guy with short arms benches 200 pounds, he only has to move the weight half of the distance as a long armed guy, and he won't have such large moments acting on his joints either. Big guys have it tougher in that sense, in all sports. When they adapt to that - if they are more like larger scale models of smaller guys, then they are pretty much unstoppable. There are of course freakish exceptions - (I mean Kevin Durant's in basketball are useful for specific reasons to that sport as well), but he is undeniably better/faster laterally than anybody else at his height in the NBA right now, which is a huge part of why he is so good.

Not sure what you disagree about what ryan said though. You both said that for tall people in enduro, 29'ers and new technology are the answer.
  • 6 1
 @VTwintips: great points. The only thing to consider in MTB is that the tracks are the same for everybody. Danny Hart will THEORETICALLY always rail a berm faster than Greg Minnaar because A his center off mass is lower and B, his physique will manage forces better according to your tall/short guy deadlift. But when it comes to riding big chunky bump of all sorts it will be Greg who has THEORETICAL advantage as his body can provide more vertical displacement for the bike. Shorter and lighter rider will always brake better. Riding berms faster makes you carry more speed, you can jump over bumps etc. However THEORY goes out of the window as soon as you see these guys riding in person. RedBull TV does NOT give a good picture of how it looks like in real life. I am talking about how differently these top guys ride bikes. There are only two guys I saw in action with my own eyes who have similar style and that is Minnaar and Vergier, they are THE smoothest guys out there, to the point where they look slow, but their ability to keep the bike on the ground is just ridiculous. Danny turned his super messy style into a piece of straight-lining art. Gwin is a bit similar in that respect, except that this straight lining and bouncing off tops of obstacles is super unique. I doubt if there is any rider who is less on the ground than he is. Then we get Gee who is a mix of Greg and Gwin, depending on section of the track. While Gwin turns DH track into whoop section, Troy Brosnan is on a giant pumptrack doubling and trippling rollers, that dude flies.

With all that sheer athleticism in mind, there can't be too much talk about wheel size. There just can't. It's far down the list of priorities. It's a tiny help making these guys get the edge. In Downhill as in no other discipline of MTB, suspension will always play a major role in performance. Obstacles are so big that at some point the wheel has to get out of the way. Now people spend way too much time pondering the wheel size thing from performance perspective, and have completely missed the suspension development since like 2010. It's just ridiculous. The first moment I landed my latest bike to flat off a drop at speed and bike just glued to the ground as if it had too much rebound, and then it launched off a root as if it had too little of it, and then stayed stable through a rock garden, I knew I was in another world of bike technology. It was almost like installing disc brakes or the dropper post from the first time. I rode through a set of whoops in a bike park, and the bike just freaking went through it. On third run I was affraid if I have enough respect to this section because if I go over the bars it will be catastrophical. None of my previous bikes could do that.
  • 1 0
 @WAKIdesigns: you're still riding the Antidote?
  • 1 0
 @JustYourAverageJoey: yea, looking at it ATM while drinking beer on the balcony, thinking of the week that we spent together riding every day, from lifts through XC to some trials, jumping on boulders and shit, and thinking to myself: what a f*cking great bike, what a beast
  • 22 0
 black arm bands for Stevie?
  • 17 0
 Cool idea with the comparison!!
  • 14 0
 It's really satisfying how Galy is only slightly larger than Oton and their bike setups reflect that in equally small proportions.
  • 14 1
 "Theo's front end is a little lower and longer than Damien's."

heh
  • 10 1
 Those seem surprisingly normal pressures in the forks for people racing at this level!
  • 2 2
 they dont weigh much though. they are really small.
  • 1 8
flag danny222 (May 24, 2017 at 3:01) (Below Threshold)
 @DJTC: they understand the most basic of suspension set up, spring weight/air pressure is ALWAYS set according to rider weight. 20% sag out front and 30% out back. Once sag is set the compression damping is adjusted to the needs of the rider.
  • 2 0
 @danny222: which is precisely why they have "surprisingly normal pressures in the forks for people racing at this level"
  • 2 0
 @DJTC: They weigh about the same as I do, and are right within the Rock Shox recommended pressures for their weight (basically running about the same as I do, and I'm very much a normal rider).

I guess I'm comparing to DH racer setups, where the WC guys seem to often be running really low sag to deal with the force they're putting through the bike.

Mainly interesting to note that maybe EWS racers don't do the same (perhaps due to the long days on the bike) - that might mean that EWS racer setup is actually a lot more useful for normal riders to learn from, whereas DH pro setup is generally pretty meaningless for those of us who aren't hitting things at those speeds.
  • 1 0
 @danny222: @danny222: Bruh do you even know suspension? If you did you would know that sag is to be ignored, you do not set your pressures or spring size/preload to achieve your perfect sag. Sag is useful when you first get on and you use it to get a general spring rate, but it is not the be all to end all and 20-25% front 30% rear is most definitely not going to work for everyone. I can guarantee that Aaron Gwin does not jump on the scales then pick up a shock pump and set up his suspension according to his weight, doing so would mean it is not correct for his style. When it comes to setting suspension up properly, forget sag completely, use it only to get a base then adjust until it feels right for you, otherwise you are doing yourself no favours.
  • 2 0
 @Callum-H: Working with many riders in the top fields of New Zealand motor cross and mountain biking to develope suspension settings has been a key part of what we do here at suspensiontech. This is going back to the fundamentals of how to get the most out of a bike. When working with riders no matter how much we have tested using different sag setting and changing compression and rebound damping, riders have always been fastest with the correct sag settings. When a frame manufacturer suggests running 30% sag in the rear shock it is because they have designed the suspension kinematics in a way that the first 30% of the travel is made be pedalled in, generally speaking this entails a rearward axle path to create chain tension and minimise pedal bob, but say running incorrect sag such as say 20% will mean that when hitting small bumps such as roots and small rocks the suspension will be inside of the first 30% of the travel meaning there is more chain tension and therefore will be much stiffer than running correct sag. Generally running too stiff of a spring will severely decrease traction because of this. I understand that for the average rider that doesn't have access to custom tuning and or doesn't want to spend the money, that simply increasing the air pressure might be the best option, but for riders with such support they would be far better off keeping their sag optimised for pedalling and traction. If they are using too much travel with the correct sag they can add volume reducers to the air can or what I believe to be a better solution in most situations, add compression damping in the form of shims to the face of the piston. Simply adding air pressure for these guys is far too much of a compromise to traction.
  • 1 0
 Just want to be clear I don't want this to turn into some ugly argument, I'd much rather prefer a knowledgeable and polite conversation, so I apologise for my rudeness in my first comment.
I'm not debating the manufacturers recommended settings, rather the use of sag strictly to find the correct spring rate. As for using air or compression, at the first EWS Rototua round, PB did a bike check on Nico Vouilloz, and found that he uses a lower than normal spring rate, yet relies heavily on compression to keep his suspension in the manufactures' "butter zone", compare this to Aaron Gwin who used to, but has since softened a little, run a famously and incredibly high spring rate, and obviously with little compression dampening to keep his suspension in the recommended zone. There is always more than one way to skin a cat.
  • 7 1
 Do you ever get the impression mountain bikers are a little pedantic? It is fun to experiment but is one extra spacer here or a 1 degree offset on the fork really going to affect the way you ride?

Saying that, I always ride with a vernier in my pocket.
  • 4 0
 Kind of, but small changes can be very noticeable e.g. especially 10mm stem length or or on/off your bars, it can make real improvements to your riding position.

That said their setups are pretty similar really as you'd expect what with them both being about the same weight/size
  • 2 0
 I agree mtb'rs are pedantic and sometimes to a fault. BUT... I can feel a 5mm diff in bar height without question. Not just in seated position but in the balance of front wheel pressure when descending and climbing to ease of lift. I really like to dial that in so I'm balanced on the bike.
  • 1 0
 I think that you could ride a lot of different set ups effectively and get down the track, yes. But if we're talking about racing and making the rider feel "at home" and comfortable on the bike, then those small set up preferences can make a big difference.

I don't think 10mm here or there is the "key" to making someone faster, but having a bike that is set up specifically for that rider goes a long way. There's also something to be said for knowing your set up so you can compare it/transcribe it to another bike.
  • 8 0
 Hey devinci, is there a new spartone carbone coming anytime soon?
  • 3 0
 I heard Crankworx
  • 3 2
 @jaydawg69: any idea as to where that info is coming from?? Would love to see a slightly slacker bike geo for the new spartan... running my current spartan with an adjusted head angle headset 1° slacker.
  • 3 0
 Hopefully after I sell mine!
  • 3 0
 heard it may fit a water bottle inside the frame , but no idea when it is out .
  • 2 0
 Initial word was June. Now I've heard it will be as late as august if not later. New bike will be a complete redesign, boost, metric shock spacing, longer top tube and a completely different frame shape. Which is a shame. This bike has the best line son the EWS circuit.
  • 4 0
 Love seeing this.

Have progressed from an alloy to carbon Spartan this year. Also large to XL. Running a 150 dropper I have had 20mm trimmed from the seat tube of the carbon XL so I have XL reach and large frame seat position. Stem has come down from 75mm with rise to 60mm flat.

Burgtec RideWide 800bars.

6'2" 185lbs

Lyrik 170 three spacers. 19%sag
Vivid Air zero spacers. 32% sag
2FO

Spartan is such a solid no-nonsense bike. Never lets me down.
  • 1 0
 did you cut your seat tube? Was thinking of trimming it but gave up as was worried it may mess up integrity of the frame. and how is 170mm up front?

Agreed, Spartan is an absolutely awesome bike.
  • 6 0
 Damn. Your own custom molded mud guard? That's when you know you're the man!
  • 6 0
 Lead up to the new spartAn release?
  • 5 1
 How are these guys setting up their Maxxis DH tires tubeless? Just curious.. the DHF DH casing are a pain in the ass.
  • 5 0
 maybe they got the newly announced Tubeless Ready DH casing tires. Not for sale yet.
  • 2 0
 Looks like they are Double Down casings
  • 4 0
 I always ran my maxxis DH tires tubeless, you just need a good rim combo
  • 2 0
 Run a tube in the tire for a couple hours to help it form to the rim. And get a valve core tool. Helps with the compressor to get more air in
  • 2 0
 Spank rims , with rim tape and Stan,s race sealant , they sat for 7 mths with Maxxis tires and did not go flat , dropped maybe 5 lbs .
  • 1 0
 Maybe they're doing ghetto tubeless with a split tube. I ran that way for years, with zero/little trouble. I don't think I've run a Maxxis DH tire tubeless since I switched to the tape method & modern rims, as I haven't really run a DH bike much, & even on my Spartan, I rarely flat even EXO tires. I'm just not a tire/rim abuser, even when I come into things hamfisted.
  • 9 0
 They don't. Their mechanic does.
  • 2 0
 Interesting. I am exactly the same size and shape as Oton but was recommended 175mm cranks and I sometimes think they feel wrong. I am sure my riding will improve dramatically when going down 5mm.
  • 1 0
 Big Grin good one
  • 3 0
 I hate the way 175's are specced on most bikes - I am a short arse and need tiny cranks which took me a while to work out. 165's FTW!
  • 2 0
 How are people getting perfect psi numbers in there fork?
I'll get my forks up to 70 psi, but after taking the shock pump off i lose a few psi sometimes more , so i can never get an exact number.
  • 2 0
 Simple. Good shock pump. There are patents to prevent air leak when the pump is detached from the shock/fork. You will loose only 1 psi with a good pump. Also buy electronic one with a certificate that the pressure presented by the pump is actually the real one.
  • 17 1
 No you are not losing any air when you disconnect your pump. The hissing you hear is the air from the pump hose escaping, not from your fork. You lose air only when you are attaching the pump, because the air from the fork goes INTO the pump to give you that reading. usually about 3-5psi. also if you want accuracy, either just use the same pump all the time or get yourself a topeak digital gauge. cheers
  • 4 0
 normally the valve is already closed when you take the pump off.
  • 3 0
 @denomerdano: Thank you. I didn't know that.
All makes sense now Smile
  • 3 0
 @denomerdano: doesn't the shock/fork matter? The Vivid Air manual says you lose 10 lb of pressure releasing the pump so you have to give it that much extra, while the Pike doesn't.
  • 2 0
 @Rubberelli: Generally no, it doesn't matter.
If you are running over 300psi in your shock, there is a possibility that some air could escape while disconnecting but it is unlikely and at those pressures, irrelevant.
  • 1 0
 one of these:

www.amazon.com/Airchecker-Digital-Presta-Schrader-Pressure/dp/B001OMQK6Q/ref=sr_1_1?s=sporting-goods&ie=UTF8&qid=1495664441&sr=1-1&keywords=sks+guage

www.amazon.com/Topeak-60100005-D2-SmartGauge/dp/B0051LQ0X4/ref=pd_sim_468_1?_encoding=UTF8&pd_rd_i=B0051LQ0X4&pd_rd_r=FRMSRFCD7Z213BJVWB53&pd_rd_w=nGVzC&pd_rd_wg=zezZj&psc=1&refRID=FRMSRFCD7Z213BJVWB53

I've played with pressure in my fork enough to tell you that digital accuracy is worth it. just recently, I bled off some pressure, without checking it, while out on a ride because the fork felt harsh. got it feeling alright, get back home, check it to record the new pressure? all I bled off was 2 PSI. If you're spending 1000s on a bike, but not $30 on a device to make sure you're getting accurate tire/shock pressure, you're screwing yourself.
  • 2 0
 @denomerdano: If you are running over 300 psi you need a coil shock
  • 5 0
 Cool, bikes.
  • 3 0
 still no water bottle cage, wish i had one. anyone know of any fixes for that dilemma?
  • 2 0
 ohh...this was really enlightening!!! you forgot to mention, one is running #2 and the other #18...
  • 1 0
 I think that Spartan needs to be re-designed. Devinci have had the Django and Troy recently refreshed. The flagship needs a little boost as a reply to competitors offers.
  • 1 0
 Is there any particular reason they run the shock that way around? On the spartans that is never seen it that way on any other bikes
  • 2 0
 The oil reservoir would interfere with the frame if it was mounted the other way. I have one and can confirm this fact.
  • 1 0
 @cueTIP: So that's the only reason no performance benefit or anything like that? If you turning it upside down would it not fit the opposite way?
  • 2 0
 Great Details! Really love the time this. #makesmebetter....
  • 2 0
 Sweet - lets see if for the specialized team!
  • 12 0
 Jared Graves' bike will have a punctured Specialized tire. I kid... i kid... don't rant on me Jared.
  • 1 0
 They won't disclose tire pressures.....top secret.
  • 1 0
 ohhhh man I missed these bike checks
  • 2 2
 Not too many pros running bars over 750 mm. Also fairly low tire pressures, wonder if they are running any sort of inserts.
  • 2 0
 Did you catch their weight?
  • 1 0
 @saso: Yes I saw that. Still surprised at the low pressures.
  • 1 0
 @salespunk: they have the tecnique to avoid punctures due to bad line choice.....
  • 1 0
 Does anyone know why they have the tape/bands round their arms?
  • 1 0
 That's hot.
  • 4 5
 thanks src28, i needed a paris hilton reference.
  • 1 0
 @upchuckyeager: is that what that was? Ignorance is bliss as they say...
  • 1 0
 @VwHarman: no I just like the bikes
  • 1 0
 Bicis de gitanos
Below threshold threads are hidden

Post a Comment



Copyright © 2000 - 2020. Pinkbike.com. All rights reserved.
dv56 0.023953
Mobile Version of Website