Devinci Spartan Carbon - Review

Dec 4, 2017
by Vernon Felton  



It’s been almost four years since Devinci rolled out the Spartan, and while you’d be hard pressed to call the original Spartan “long in the tooth,” enduro bikes have evolved over the past four years. Devinci felt it was time for the Spartan to do the same, which explains this purple and yellow beast right here. Devinci team riders wanted a bike that retained its downhill prowess, yet pedaled more efficiently. Since just about every bike redesign since the dawn of time has generally aimed to make the latest model lighter and stiffer than its predecessor, Devinci went that route with the new Spartan as well. We’ll get into the specifics in a minute.

Devinci Spartan Carbon X01 Details
• Intended use: enduro
• Wheel size: 27.5"
• Front-suspension travel: 170mm
• Rear-wheel travel: 165mm
• 65º or 65.4º head angle via a flip chip
• Boost 110/148 hub spacing
• Sizes: S / M / L / XL
• Complete weight: 29.25 pounds
• MSRP: $6,999 USD
www.devinci.com, @devinci

For 2018, there are six complete Spartan models—four of them are full-carbon versions, ranging in price from $4,369 to $8,199 (USD). The remaining two aluminum-framed models bear $3,369 and $3,999 price tags. Devinci also offers the Spartan in frame-and-rear shock packages. A carbon Spartan frame runs $2,999. The aluminum frame sells for a grand less, at $1,999. The Spartan Carbon X01|Turbine R30 model shown here sits second-from-the-top in the 2018 line up. The top-tier model is nearly identical, save for a carbon wheelset that'll mug your bank account of an additional $1,200.


Devinci Spartan Review by Vernon Felton
Very clean routing throughout. Cables poke their heads from big ports in an orderly fashion. These built-in guides are also a nice touch.
Devinci Spartan Review by Vernon Felton
The new Spartan can accommodate 27.5x2.6 tires. It comes stock with a Minion DHF 2.5 up front and a Minion DHR II 2.4 out back.

Frame Design

Devinci has long been a proponent of the Split Pivot design and that remains the case with the latest Spartan. This new version, however, features an updated suspension layout that includes a vertical shock mount. It seems like a minor detail, but Devinci insists that it actually helped them reduce frame flex by allowing for higher seatstays, a more open rear triangle and improved lateral stiffness. Devinci claims that their new suspension layout and link also better isolate the rear shock from side loads than the previous configuration, which should help extend the RockShox’s lifespan. Last but not least, the vertical shock configuration also opened up real estate within the front triangle, allowing you to squeeze a full-sized (24-ounce) water bottle in there.

Devinci opted to equip the Spartan with a metric-flavored springy bit. Going with a trunnion-mounted RockShox Super Deluxe RC3 helped the company lower the bike’s standover height a bit as well…always a good thing. Speaking of shocks, the Spartan frame also plays nice with coil-sprung shocks.

If you look a bit closer, you might notice that the new carbon-framed Spartan now boasts carbon chainstays (its ancestor sported aluminum stays). Devinci says that going carbon on the chainstays lopped 160 grams from the frame. There’s another 150 grams of weight-saving frame tweaks in play here as well. Bottom line: the new carbon Spartan frame weighs a respectable 7.14 pounds (3,240 grams).

Devinci Spartan Review by Vernon Felton
Still Split Pivot, but this time around the Spartan goes Metric. Oh, and it also plays nice with coil-sprung shocks.


In keeping with the times, the new Spartan rocks Boost front and rear ends. You might have expected the company to increase the rear travel a bit, but it stays the same at 165 millimeters. The company did bump front travel slightly to 170 millimeters—not a huge change, but one the company thinks gives the bike a more balanced feel. There are plenty of subtle, but noteworthy changes to the Spartan frame. A lower seat mast, for instance, makes medium, large and x-large Spartan frames compatible with 170-millimeter dropper posts. Similarly, there's now enough room between the chainstays to squeeze in a set of 27.5x2.6-inch tires. If the stock 34-tooth chainring doesn't provide you with high enough gearing, you can now run up to a 36-tooth chainring on the Spartan. Finally, if you want to go the Di2 route, the Spartan now makes that easy with a big ol' hatch on the downtube that's perfect for mounting a Di2 battery. Not into electronic shifting? Well, that big hatch also makes routing cables a lot easier. Win-win.

I’ve written “longer, lower and slacker” so many times over the past couple years that it makes me kind of nauseous, but…yeah, here we go again. Devinci grew the reach on the Spartan 31 to 33 millimeters (depending on the Flip Chip setting), slackened the head angle about a degree and shortened the rear center by a couple millimeters. Overall wheelbase on a size large grew 40 millimeters (the slacker head angle and longer front-center are responsible for that).

Devinci’s Split Pivot bikes have long had Flip Chip geometry adjusters, but, in truth, I've always set them to the slacker position and never fiddled with them again. This time around, however, you might actually set the Spartan in the “High” position—at least that's true if you’re looking to use the Spartan as something other than a dedicated park bike or shuttle beast. The bottom bracket on this thing is fairly low (337mm/13.2 inches in the Low setting) and pedal strikes are going to be a thing, even for people who aren't pedaling like goons through the rough. In the High setting, the new Spartan's head angle is a still-fairly-relaxed 65.4 degrees, so it's not as if you are turning it all kinds of twitchy if you opt for the High setting. Of course, if you are going to reserve your rides to the pure-downhill variety, you'll be happy with this thing in Low. In other words, you have options here. If you're pining for more numbers, there’s a handy-dandy chart directly below.

devinci spartan



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Specifications
Specifications
Release Date 2018
Price $6999
Travel 165MM (rear)
Rear Shock ROCKSHOX SUPER DELUXE RC3 DB 205X65
Fork ROCKSHOX LYRIK RCT3 27.5 BOOST 110 SOLO AIR 170MM
Headset FSA ORBIT 1.5 ZERO STACK
Cassette SRAM X01 EAGLE 12S
Crankarms SRAM X01 EAGLE 34T BOOST 148
Chainguide E13 TRS RACE SL CARBON ISCG05
Bottom Bracket SRAM BB92
Rear Derailleur SRAM X01 EAGLE 12S
Chain SRAM X01 EAGLE 12S
Shifter Pods SRAM X01 EAGLE 12S
Handlebar RACE FACE NEXT R 35 20MM RISE 800MM
Stem RACE FACE TURBINE 35*50MM
Grips DEVINCI PERFORMANCE W/LOCK-ON
Brakes SRAM GUIDE RSC
Wheelset RACEFACE TURBINE R30
Tires MAXXIS MINION DHF 27.5
Seat SDG FLY MTN
Seatpost ROCKSHOX REVERB STEALTH





Devinci Spartan






Climbing

The original Spartan wasn’t exactly a mountain goat on the climbs. You could argue that a bike with this much travel isn’t supposed to fly up hill and dale, but Devinci is billing this thing as the ultimate enduro machine, and while no one is trying to set uphill records on the transfers, you don’t want to lug a big, bouncy bike up the mountain only to find yourself shattered when it comes time to race the clock on the descents. Accordingly, the new Spartan was also tweaked with an eye to improving its ascending abilities.

Okay, the Spartan is still not a mountain goat, but it proved surprisingly good on the pedaling-efficiency front, even when I was running a healthy 30 percent sag on the bike. Yes, you can overwhelm the low-speed compression damping if you are dancing on the pedals and climbing out of the saddle, but on seated climbs the Spartan gains elevation pretty damn quickly. The bike's relatively light weight is a plus. Our size large tips the scales at just 29.25 pounds—that’s lighter than Devinci actually claims, which is a nice change of pace from the way things generally work in the bike industry.

Top 10 Ridden US Biking Destinations in July

What’s more, the bike’s traction over roots and rocks is outstanding. I routinely cleaned tricky uphill sections that stymie me on plenty of other bikes that, if you just looked at the spec sheet, should be better climbers. Of course, if your uphills are dotted with incredibly tight switchbacks, you’ll find the long wheelbase to be a bit of a soul crusher, but that’s true of so many “enduro” bikes in this age of long and slack. Setting the Super Deluxe shock in its middle, low-speed compression damping setting helps here, as it helps the bike sit a bit higher in its travel and that, in turn, gives you a slightly steeper head angle to help steer through those tight uphill turns. Since we're on the subject of angles, the Spartan rocks a fairly steep seat tube angle (74.9-degrees in the High setting), which means you spend little time squatting on the nose of your saddle and punishing your taint. Thank you, anonymous frame designer.

I realize most people who are looking at the new Spartan probably aren’t considering the bike because of its uphill abilities, but it’s worth noting that the new Spartan is significantly better than its predecessor and easily on par with most of its "enduro" competitors when suffer time looms ahead of you.

Devinci Spartan Review by Vernon Felton


Descending

The original Spartan debuted as Stevie Smith’s race rig at the 2013 DH World Championships….which sort of tells you everything you need to know about the Spartan’s proclivities. The bike’s strong suit was always on the downhills. The new Spartan is a better climber…and it’s still an absolute bulldozer on rocky descents. Both ends of the Spartan are almost unbelievably good at obliterating whatever your wheels are passing over. Smooth, controlled, precise…the Spartan is ridiculously fun when you are blasting through the rough. The bike gives you a shitload of margin for error. The ample reach, long wheelbase and supple and absolutely dialed front and rear suspension led to much cackling whilst riding trails that normally have my sphincter clenched tighter than a snare drum.

Having said all of the above, the Spartan really wants to hug the ground. The Devinci has a very glued-to-the-trail feel to it. I spent the first month or so feeling a bit like a passenger on a very smooth and purple space ship that had been set on auto-pilot mode. The Spartan is not, in other words, a particularly “poppy” bike. If launching off every little trail feature is your gig, you’re going to have to put a bit more effort and body English into your rides aboard the Spartan. Bump up the aggression and exaggerate the body movements, however, and the Spartan will happily comply.

In short, the Spartan is a fun bike—it let’s you get away with a hell of a lot and it feels great doing that—but “playful” and "nimble" wouldn't be the top two adjectives I'd use to describe it. If those are two traits you're particularly fond of, and you are a fan of the Split Pivot design, this bike's 140-millimeter travel sibling, the Troy, is probably more your game; that Devinci model is quite similar, in terms of its reach and smooth, deep-feeling suspension, but also features a considerably shorter wheelbase. Primarily looking to demolish downhill records, yet you never want to rely on a shuttle vehicle or chairlift? The Spartan is your speed.

Devinci Spartan Review by Vernon Felton


Component Check

Devinci Spartan Review by Vernon Felton
At this price, you probably expect name-brand cockpit components. The 50mm Race Face Turbine 35 stem and 800mm Next R bars are nice touches.
Devinci Spartan Review by Vernon Felton
You can blow another $1,200 and get a carbon wheelset, but I can't find a reason to "upgrade" from the aluminum Race Face Turbine R30 wheelset


• RockShox Reverb Stealth: The Reverb was a revelation when it debuted and while this dropper post still has its strengths, I'm frustrated by the Reverb's tendency to get air trapped between the floating piston and the oil column. RockShox has attempted to fix the problem of squishy Reverb droppers over the years with several updates to the floating piston, but some posts (including this one) still suffer from the problem. It's a drag.

• SRAM Guide RSC brakes: People love or hate Guides. The Guide Rs that come stock on a lot of bikes definitely leave something to be desired, but the RSC's have been consistent performers for me. While some riders (particularly in warmer climes) have had legitimate problems with swollen master cylinder pistons and stuck levers on early-production Guides, I'm still running a set of first-run Guide RSCs that have required zero bleeds or attention (other than pad swaps) after three seasons. Good power, great modulation. The RSCs on the Spartan were flawless.

• RockShox Super Deluxe RC3 shock: I walk away from this review genuinely impressed by how well the trunnion-mount, metric Super Deluxe performed. I was sure I'd want to experiment with a coil, but never could find a reason to even bolt one on.


Devinci Spartan Review by Vernon Felton
Absolutely zero complaints about the SRAM X01 Eagle drivetrain, which continued banging out precise shifts all summer and fall.
Devinci Spartan Review by Vernon Felton
Big fan of the 170mm-travel RockShox Lyrik RCT3 fork--nice and supple off the top, consistent damping, great end-stroke performance.


Devinci Spartan Review by Vernon Felton


Pinkbike's Take:
bigquotesThe latest Spartan is a marked improvement on what was already a hell of a descender. The bike is lighter, stiffer and a significantly better climber than its predecessor. Though it's not the most playful bike out there, the Spartan is ridiculously capable on the rowdiest descents. Not digging the Stryper-influenced graphics? The Spartan is also available in a stealthy black matte/gloss finish.. Vernon Felton





About the Reviewer
Stats: Age: 45 • Height: 5'11” • Inseam: 34" • Weight: 175lb • Industry affiliations / sponsors: None •
In 1988 Vernon started riding mountain bikes—mainly to avoid the people throwing cans of Budweiser at him during his road rides. At some point, roughly when Ronald Reagan was president and Hüsker Dü was still a band, he began loving mountain bikes on their own terms. Vernon Felton spends most of his time riding bikes, thinking about bikes, thinking about riding bikes and then riding some more around Bellingham, Washington. If it has a greasy chain and two wheels on it, he’s cool with it. Except for recumbents. Well, okay, maybe those too. Nah, forget it. No recumbents.



216 Comments

  • + 125
 I wish Pinkbike reviewers would experience the setbacks and issues with Sram brakes that everyone else experiences. Maybe Sram would finally fix the issues in a timely manner for their customers. Meanwhile, I sent my brand new Sram RSC brakes to be warrantied in August, and still don't have them back yet. Brakes that don't function, followed up by the worst warranty turnaround I've experienced, doesn't leave me with much confidence in brand new builds that feature the same products.
  • + 26
 I am sad to hear that. I personally find my Guide RSCs okay for me and my riding level. They are two seasons old now and still have not bleed them. May be I am just lucky.
  • + 15
 Tons of people were having problems with Guides this summer - myself included. Mostly 2015 models. They just stopped working in the heat. They clamp down on your rotors and won't let go. I think sram was flooded this summer which resulted in the long turn-around times. To Sram's credit, they are warranty repairing Guide brakes well outside of the warranty period because of the severity of the failures. I sent mine off, got them back with Guide RS levers instead of Rs. They STILL didn't work. I sent them off again and they came back with RSC levers. I haven't picked them up yet, so I'm hoping for the best.
  • + 7
 Two sets, two warranties, one warrantied set re-warrantied. Amazing that no reviewer has seen or had this issue...
  • + 14
 I had the same issue on 2015 Guide R's. SRAM said they were out of warranty and the replacement part was going to be ~$100/brake. I picked up brand new XT's for not much more and haven't looked back since.
  • + 6
 @Klainmeister: I had the same issue....on third failure they denied me, claimed the issue was fixed, ha ha! I'm back to XT!!
  • + 4
 @jayacheess: 10 $ service kit solves the problem, or trimm internals slightly to solve
  • + 11
 My first generation Guide RS have been flawless. I like the feel better than Shimanos. It’s disappointing to hear that some sets have issues.
  • + 3
 @GlassGuy: the irony is that I had a set of failed XTs too, haha. Hence I ended up switching over to Magura. So far so good, haven't rebled or warrantied a thing.
  • - 2
 Agreed. Sram warranty fixed mine in Whistler last year, didn't bleed them properly and I had a huge accident on the first lap of A Line resulting in a cracked wrist bone. Having said that, the Guide Ultimate's on my '17 Jeffsy have been spot on.
  • + 4
 @clownpnd: Why is sram's own warranty service not doing that, then?
  • + 10
 Every brand has issues with quality control. I am sending back my Hope V4 front brakes soon, because they move closer and closer to the fingers that are holding the handlebar. It only happens when I brake. Otherwise they look sweet!
  • + 8
 I've had the same set of guides since March 2015 and they still run perfectly.

I much prefer them to the on/off shimano feel.
  • + 1
 Exactly! I've had 2 pairs of guides and had major problems with both...i actually just got a tour of sram a few weeks ago and asked about the problems with the guides and they acted like it was no big deal...kind of blew me away
  • + 1
 I have, but they warranted them in Moab and chile pepper. Was riding in two hours. None of my local shops offered.
  • + 9
 I'm still running Elixer's with no problems.
  • + 6
 You guys know that theres a lot of failed XTs too, right!?

Never had any problems with my RSC (think they are 2015)... I thought that was only a problem on R or RS but not on RSC!? I now have them on my fatbike so they will never overheat anyway, but I really miss that Guide modulation when I ride with my Shimano Saint brakes during the summer!! Frown Probably try Hope E4 on my next bike!
  • + 2
 that's really unfortunate. i have guide RSCs on my MY 2015 canyon strive and they worked flawlessly for 2 seasons up until this spring when they started with stuck levers while riding in warm conditions. my LBS called sram in germany and they sent me 2 new levers MY2017 for free despite already being out of warranty. awesome service by sram in my book!!
  • + 1
 Same here, had three pares of srams over the last year and they all went to shit. One of them took two months to get fixed and back from servicing.
  • + 6
 Just get some hope's
  • + 2
 The guides on my 2017 remedy have cracked calipers where the pin holding the pads goes through. I see the updated caliper is thicker in this area. This could cause a catastrophic crash so needless to say I'll be taking them back
  • + 10
 @gbeaks33 I hear you, which is why I mentioned the problem of swollen master cylinder pistons/stuck levers, even though I haven't experienced it myself--even with early production Guide RSCs. I'm guessing the fact that I live in Western Washington, where temperatures rarely exceed 90-degrees Fahrenheit has something to do with that.
  • + 1
 I see the heat issues with the Guides seem to have not been resolved. Are these same issues evident on the new Codes as well?
  • + 3
 sounds like more of an issue with whoever you used to send your brakes back, the few times we have had to send brakes back for warranty it was maybe a week if not less to receive new levers from sram. If you had a local shop warranty your levers I would get a hold of them and try to find out where they sent them, if you bought a bike direct from somewhere like YT I hope you didnt send your brakes back to them.
  • + 2
 @vernonfelton: I work in a shop a couple hours south of you and still get a few customers with this issue.
  • + 1
 @jayacheess: My experience was the same as you but the warranty wast fast for me and the new brakes work great.
I guess I got lucky.
  • + 2
 @Tr011: That's exactly what happened, haha. I blame YT way more for the delays on my brakes being fixed, but Sram is still an issue. Although I sent my brakes in August, I suspect they didn't actually get to Sram until the end of September, and they've had them since. So still a significant delay.
  • + 2
 @vernonfelton: Totally, I lived in Vancouver for the first half of 2017 and didn't have any issues but they stopped working exactly when I moved to the interior BC (which was basically on fire all summer). I've read tons of bike reviews and articles from guys who test in Moab, Nevada, etc, and no negative reports there either.
  • + 3
 Shimano Deore, best brakes i ever used. Got them for $32 a set.
  • - 1
 Get Magura's and don't look back! The 4pots are crazy, but even the 2pots easily outpower Guides and XTs.
  • + 1
 2015 Guide RS (bougth mid july 2015), i only had slight problems with the rear brake after i, like a genius, opened the bleed port on the caliper instead of on the lever to let out some oil during a pad change (apparently some water comes into the system and increases the volume, meaning it's not possible to push the pistons all the way back in). I was faced with a bit of 'stiff lever while in the sun' problem mid last summer, but it was okay this year.

No bleeding (even after that issue, i'm too lazy to buy/borrow a bleed kit), just pad changes. And virtually no problems, maybe some performance missing after long descends, but i am on 200/180 rotors and i am fairly light.

Would definitely buy again. And will.
  • + 10
 SRAM does not need to fix anything. Take a look around, they are probably responsible of 30% of the ads on any bike site. Plus the "tech camps" aka free vacations for writers. Ever read a bad review on Sram/RockShox? They are almost always the "benchmark"....
  • + 1
 @jayacheess: have no clue, fixed mine with spare seals at sram dear, since brakes was purchased as a part of bike from another shop
  • + 1
 Running the Sram RSC on both my bikes for three years now ( on my Dh bike i run theme with Code calipers) i really never had an issue with them and like bleed them once a year just so there is fresh fluid in there. I ques u just had bad luck, my friend, there are also tons of people where there Shimano brakes don't work. My buddy rides with Hope brakes and there customer service is amazing so maybe that's the way for u to go ow yeah and there brakes are also awsome Wink
  • + 1
 @urbanwax: Same here with my RS brakes. Though I did have an issue with one going soft. My LBS hooked it up and got me a warranty upgrade to RSC levers for both brakes. Also came through on a warranty to my X1 derailleur. I've had pretty good luck with SRAM products, and when they've failed, SRAM has been awesome in standing behind their products. YMMV
  • + 1
 @gbeaks33: I would suggest going through your lbs if you have any issues with warranty, YT is probably going through their Taiwanese supplier for warranty lol
  • + 2
 @Coldspringer: A bike without Hope brakes is a bike without hope.
  • + 4
 @joni0001984: they move closer and closer to the bar when you brake? Seems like they’re working as they should then! ????????
  • + 3
 Did you deal with an LBS? Our shop has warrantied a shit ton of Guides in the past months (including my own). Average turn around is probably 5-7 days. They normally just send out a new lever and your LBS installs it for you. SRAM is one of the easiest companies to deal with warranty-wise. Generally the service you get from them is excellent. I would still run RSC's over XT's any day because they modulate so much better and the issue has been fixed.
  • + 4
 If you want super reliable, reasonably priced, and easy to repair components....perhaps look to the other brand. Not to get political, but there's a a reason I ride Shimano. In over 20 years I've never had a component fail or be warrantied. I'm sure it happens but an RSC $205 per brake, XT $90 per brake, or Zee for $120 (a fairer comparison to RSC). I've just never understood why pay twice as much for something that doesn't work as well?
  • + 1
 I have the brand-new Code RSCs and they're wonderful. Just built up a new bike and did a lot of research on brakes. I've had the dreaded piston swell issue on Guide Rs and RSs. The fix is actually pretty easy, so that's what I did. Anyway... It seems to me that every brake out there has its pluses and minuses. Each one has quirks you've got to learn to live with or fix/workaround. I went with the "enemy I know" theory.
  • + 0
 @clownpnd: Yup, I trimmed mine.
  • + 1
 @jramusicman: It's a No Hope-er.
  • + 1
 @frojoe: Weird that more people don't talk about the newer Maguras. Mineral oil eliminates the "yearly-or-worse" DOT bleed and stays pretty much the same whether your bike is in storage or being heat cycled on the downhills.
You can use lighter weight mineral oil in them, like Pentosin or even Shimano, Magura blood feels pretty thick and slows down the lever action IMHO. The 4 piston calipers with the individual pads per piston has so much bite, power, and modulation that I wouldn't even bother trying other manufacturers until they're on mineral oil and individual pads on their quad calipers. I used to use all manner of brakesets when I worked in shops, I bought new, used, warrantied, upgraded, now my bike just has MT5s and I don't care about other brakes anymore. It's been over 5 years, I'm not looking back. Magura!
It ain't cheap though - Shimano has you covered in that department but I've found the average entry-level mtb'r glazes those organic pads on the cheap sets in as little as one ride. Plenty cash saved if you are good on your pads and wear maintenance.
  • + 1
 just buy new brakes
  • + 2
 two sets of Guide brakes and no issues .
  • + 1
 @CaptainSnappy: been running the same Elixir CR's from 2011 here too with no probs!
  • + 1
 @urbanwax: It's cos we live in the UK and it's never as consistently hot I reckon. I also have Guide RS 2016's and love them, no issues here in the UK at all, never fade.
Had XTs prior and these are sooo much better, in another league
  • + 1
 We are still dealing with this problem too. We have 2018 bikes with defective Guide brakes so this so called, first generation issues, doesn't apply.
  • + 1
 Ive been running shimano on all my bikes for more than atlaest 2 years and none have failed me. Will say the the guide ultimate has a pretty good feel on it
  • + 1
 @Timo82: I have gone through 5 or 6 XT M785 levers because they all leak, suck in air, become inconsistent and need frequent bleeds or replacement.
  • + 4
 @gbeaks33 I wish PB comments would stop focusing on the brakes on a Bike review
  • + 4
 I have stock RSC ultimates and as good as anything outthere
  • + 2
 Sram Guides are junk. 2 pairs over two seasons. Totally unreliable performance. Garbage. If Sram concentrated on making quality product instead of making quantity profit they might be someplace
  • + 2
 @gbeaks33: I warrantied my 2015 Guide RSCs twice this summer, each time the turnaround with my LBS was about four days.
  • + 1
 @Timo82: I had a failed front brake on lower end deore. Was clearly damaged in a crash and they still accepted the warranty and I had a replacement in less than 5 days.
  • + 4
 The best repair is to buy Shimano brakes
  • + 1
 I have warrantied 4 sets of Guides at this point, the newest of which were Feb 2017. It's a PITA, but I really like the feel and modulation of them, so it's a price I'm willing to pay. That being said, my LBS has been turning around warranties in a day, so it's more of a minor inconvenience than anything.
  • + 1
 warranty through your local shop it seems to work more smoothly
  • + 2
 Sounds like you need to find a new shop. While I've seen plenty of SRAM issues on the new product, most of them have related to sloppy line cuts with no bleed or poor factory bleeds. A good shop (or even one capable of following a youtube video) should be able to bleed those and make them feel great. Past that, if it is REALLY a warranty issue, your shop most likely isn't advocating for you all that hard. A phone call and a firm push from a shop that sells SRAM product well might get you an upgrade instead of a multi-month long wait time.
  • + 1
 @CaptainSnappy: you got those limited edition unicorn tear filled elixers. I've heard the legends. Never seen one IRL
  • + 1
 @freestyIAM: only Shimano brakes are filled with unicorn tears. It would be a total waste to put them in Scram brakes.
  • + 1
 @foggnm: yep! No sex appeal at Shimano. Just straight performance. Scram sram.
  • + 1
 Anybody is worried about the lateral movement of the triangle attached to the rear shock? Movement that can lead to premature unsure of the shock. Those two triangle aren't link together by any welded part.
Thanks for your advice
  • + 1
 @foort: you mean that the rocker is only two unconnected plate? I don't think it's much of a problem, the seatstays are connected right above the tyre, that should prevent any rotation of one plate in regards to the other. Maybe the pivot axle is even keyed to add stiffness.

Regardless, there isn't much freedom of movement that would put additional stress on the shock compared to other designs.
  • + 1
 @Primoz: yes that is what I mean, thanks for your answer, read premature usure in the problem description.
  • + 2
 @Etolier: For sure. I'm surprised to come back and see my comment -2.. Magura's just have the power & weight right there. Not to mention forethought like the same individual pads which work on both 2pot and 4pot calipers. I've never needed more stopping power on my Altitude than 2pot Magura's with 180 rotors.. I even have a 180 rotor on the back of my dh bike with 4pot Magura's and it's enough. Oh well.
  • + 26
 @vernonfelton I think you just called snare drummers tight assed!
"riding trails that normally have my sphincter clenched tighter than a snare drummer."
Maybe you meant the drum but I'd watch your back. Snare drummers are not a group to piss off.
  • + 13
 This is what happens when I stop drinking coffee. Oi. Correction made.
  • + 11
 To be fair we are tight assed
  • + 2
 @MT-Biker1: what the fork is a snare drummer Big Grin
  • + 2
 @themountain: A bunch of tight asses.
  • + 1
 @vernonfelton: What has 3 legs and a c*nt?
A drummer's stool.
  • + 22
 stryper is yellow and black, and they freakin can play... Purple and yellow is more along the lines of some kind of MoPar Hemi-Cuda from the 1970s muscle car era. but for the record, I dig it.
  • + 4
 I was thinking A+ for the Stryper reference.
  • + 3
 Yeah, that kind of Loudness in a paint scheme usually doesn't make me want to partake in Rock n Roll Crazy Nights, but on this bike — and classic Mopars — actually works.
  • + 9
 True. That band had a thing for purple stage lighting though, which is what made me immediately think of them when I saw the bike. Dunno. Maybe it was just time for a Stryper reference.
  • + 2
 @vernonfelton: and I love you for it sir
  • + 2
 Just Googled Stryper... Wow....
  • + 4
 @excavator666: Yeah, has to be seen to be believed. All I can say is that there was a lot of cocaine floating around during the 1980s--it made a lot of things possible.
  • + 3
 Plum Crazy was the colour!!
  • + 2
 @excavator666: To Hell With The Devil!
  • + 1
 @vernonfelton: Googled Stryper...OMG!!! I'm not sure if my eyes or ears are burning more...
  • + 1
 double post Frown
  • + 1
 I'd rock it.
  • + 6
 @vernonfelton: Stryper reference FTW! Those boys didn't need coke, they were flying high on pure, uncut Jesus' love!
  • + 14
 Looks like another great bike from Devinci! Yes, I'm a fanboy... Split Pivot for life!
  • + 4
 I just got mine the other day in the matte black color. 2 rides in and so far it is stellar!
  • + 6
 @carraig042: Got my 2018 Alloy Spartan Frame coming to me in a couple of weeks. Cannot wait! The new MRP Ribbon Coil fork 170mm will be going on it.
  • + 1
 Effective seat angle WAY too slack
  • + 15
 Husker Du was a great band....Styper, not so much.
  • + 3
 Agree on both counts. However, breaking out a Stryper reference at all is a stroke of brilliance.
  • + 4
 But can the Spartan set a Land Speed Record?
  • + 6
 @endlessblockades: If it can, that would definitely be a New Day Rising, and you'd Flip Your Wig.
  • + 2
 I really never thought anyone took Stryper seriously, but alas they seem more popular than I ever remember. I'm really not sure what Husker Du had in common with them, but I had "New Day Rising" on cassette when it came out my senior high school year. Great song and album.
  • + 3
 @TheR: I'd probably ride my Metal Circus over to the Zen Arcade
  • + 14
 Anyone else find the irony in naming a $7k bike "Spartan"?
  • + 2
 yea man, you made my day. For instance somebody like me who earns 20 000$ annualy would definately enjoy the irony.
  • + 12
 "At this price, you probably expect name-brand cockpit components. The 50mm Race Face Turbine 35 stem and 800mm Next R bars are nice touches."

What?! This is a $6999 bike!
  • + 2
 I puzzled over that too. I think it means that Devinci delivers on the spec you'd expect at that price.
  • + 5
 It seems to me that ground hugging control would ultimately be more desirable on a race bike. Every Devinci I’ve had worked better the faster I went, in fact I’d say in every case I was the limiting factor. Easily my favorite color way of 2018!
  • + 9
 This is a Magic Johnson Special edition colour way.
  • - 1
 ...and its still as ugly as it was in the 90ths.
  • + 4
 I absolutely LOVE my 18 Spartan. Coming from a regular 2-3x/week riding joe-schmoe intermediate rider...this bike is amazing. I owned the older model Spartan as well and yes, it does climb better and descends just as good but differently. The new geometry is definitely geared towards tire traction meaning this bike wants to hug the terrain at all times. That said, it is not as nimble and poppy as the review states. Jumping requires a little more effort and it's not as easy to fling around...which is fine with me because my descents are "bombing-approved". Great bike.

As far as the brakes. I hatred my SRAMs. I added a simple solution. Hope Tech 3 E4 upgrade.
  • + 1
 I know they have a lot of modulation but how's the power on them? Braided or standard hose?
  • + 2
 @Timo82: I have the standard hose on my DH and trail bikes. The braided is sexy looking, but a bit heavy and I feel unnecessary. I am 168, two trip to Whistler each year, ride everything there, etc. Hope that helps. (sorry for the pun)
  • + 1
 @bman33: Didn't even think about the weight of those... gonna look for that! But I thought that you needed those to have enough power! Their standard hose are a little bit ''soft'' so better use the braided ones to help. That's what I heard though..
  • + 2
 @Timo82: I am 43, raced semi-pro BMX and DH for most of the 90's and early 2000's. That should give you an idea of my skill set and how I ride, especially DH. I am not the fastest uphill anymore, but can hole my own with much younger going down/fast and I ride pretty aggressively at times. The set on my DH bike has seen 3 Whistler trips so far without issue. My Trail bike set is 2 years old, several Whole Enchilada runs in Moab, plus normal Colorado riding without issue. Braided hoses do have a cool bling factor. But in my opinion are not needed.
  • + 1
 @bman33: Cool! Thanks for your opinion! Smile
  • + 0
 @bman33: Hole your own? Hmmm
  • + 3
 @lightsgetdimmer: I got skills! Haha
  • + 1
 @bman33: I'll take your word for it. Hahaha
  • + 3
 ^^^That's what I did, too.

The previous Spartan actually climbed very good for a 6 inch bike... (mine still does). I don't what they could do to make it descend better actually. Maybe a coil?
  • + 1
 Just put a dhx2 coil on my 2015. Only a few rides on it, but the midstroke is improved, eats the bumps much better and seems more or less equally as poppy. Makes me wonder why I rode the stock monarch for so long.
  • + 2
 I’ve just done the same DHX2 with climb switch on. Feels like a totally different bike
  • + 2
 Not sure where these comments on climbing are coming from. I have 2017 Spartan (carbon) and it climbs extremely well and descending is so superb. Different league to my old Giant Trance 2014. Components (except shock) are the same as I've just swapped them. What's up with the pricing though?! almost the same range as Yeti?! +£1.5k vs last year's model. Makes me love my 2017 even more :-)
  • + 1
 The Spartan carbon eagle gx is the best deal in my honest opinion and is what I have. Msrp is $5300 us and retail at bike shops here in the Pacific nw is $4999 us.
AND honestly I think if they are putting carbon race face bars on a bike like this they should be Sixc not the next.
  • + 3
 My opinion is the 2018 Spartan carbon is a quiver killer. After i rode and compared all most a dozen other bikes before replacing my 2015 Spartan.
Everything the old Spartan was just allot better
#purplerain
  • + 2
 Hmm trunnion mount rear shock. Says it plays well with coil but I’m not sure how well it would play with a non trunnion mounted rear shock. Think float x2 standard mount. I don’t know if I’d go coil but I would be going fox for both front and rear. I’ll need to put my hands on one to check spacing first.
  • + 1
 Your coil will need to be trunnion mount aswell, unless you have access to custom hardware.
  • + 2
 Lynn Valley Bikes in North Van has one built up the way you mentioned; and they love it.

36 up front and X2 out back. Check their Instagram for pics. It's possible to use either with the right hardware..
  • + 1
 Awesom. Thanks. I don’t have insta but it’s good to know. @mbudgen:
  • + 2
 Been waiting on this review to come out for a while. I guess my anticipation had my expectations too high. Was hoping to hear more about handling, since that steel bike review came out and said this is the best handling bike on the market. Was hoping to hear more about how this bike could be a quiver killer as reviewers found themselves reaching for it on rides where the numbers wouldn’t justify it. I feel there should/could be more substance on comparisons between this bike and the ND4, HD4 or new Patrol. Hopefully the reviews from the other sites will fill in some of those blanks.
  • + 2
 Bible of bike tests should be out before too long for 2018 that may help with your decision. I have a couple of rides in my new Spartan and so far I am impressed overall.
  • + 2
 I love the attention to detail with the cable management on this bike. While the Spartain isn’t the right bike for me, the one I’d really love to buy has mostly external cabales which, on a high-end bike, just looks cheap to me. This Spartain looks like someone really took their time and things like those cable managers didn’t get axed by the bean counters. Good work Devinci.
  • + 1
 Looking at the new pricing, it has increased significantly over the last generation Spartan. I wonder how this will impact sales. When I bought my 2015 Spartan, the reasonable price is what sealed the deal over other top Enduro race bikes.
  • + 1
 What is too much pedal kick back? When you get bucked off the bike or your ankles snap? I've never experience too much pedal kick back so I'm just asking the question. I've never ridden a bike, any bike, and thought to myself this thing would be perfect with less pedal kick back. But I've ridden plenty of bikes where I'm dissatisfied with its support while pedaling. What would be some examples of bikes with high pedal kick back? And I do average size drops up to 10 feet with semi flat landings in some cases, I'm not bragging by any means, just explaining that I'm not riding 120mm XC bikes down fireroads.
  • + 4
 " The quiver ending, last bike you'll ever need" Until we redesign it next year.
  • + 2
 On the bright side Devinci doesn't seem to be in a hurry to redesign the bike constantly. I think this one has some staying power, although I would be interest in a 29 inch Troy.
  • + 3
 Stryper? Good lawd! I suppose the colorway could work if you're a Vikings fan too though. I'd say Prince, but the yellow kind of throws it off.
  • + 3
 Devinci Spartan. A mix between a mad scientist and Greeks with anger issues.
  • + 2
 Ok, that was pretty good.
  • + 3
 @vernonfelton what bikes do come to mind for playful and poppy in this category?
  • + 3
 probably a very long list these days, but transition patrol and yt capra come to mind first. and of course, there's always a compromise somewhere... I'd like to know how this spartan cornered compared to the previous model -- maybe I missed it but cornering should definitely be mentioned in every review. solid work otherwise.
  • + 2
 The process 153 quickly comes to mind.
  • + 1
 This x 1000!! EVERY SINGLE bike reviews I read seems to say the same thing.... I guess if we want that, we have to check for 130/140mm bikes?! Frown Or bikes that are too firm for my liking? I want good traction but a poppy/fun feel! Smile
  • + 0
 Slayer pops to mind!
  • + 4
 @speed10 New Kona Process 153 immediately comes to mind. Cheers.
  • + 1
 The new process wasn't on my bike list anymore... don't remember why but I guess I'll have to read again that review, maybe I'll change my mind!! I knew the Slayer was a super good bike but didn't think poppy either!
  • + 2
 @Timo82: air up your shocks
  • + 1
 @vernonfelton: Am confused by your comment about the Spartan shock.....if the suspension is not a poppy then how can it suit a coil?
  • + 2
 @Travel66: you are confused because his comment was "Speaking of shocks, the Spartan frame also plays nice with coil-sprung shocks."

He is not saying the bike is suited for a coil shock at any point what he is implying is for those out there who prefer a coil shock that the frame design allows for room for a coil shock.
  • + 1
 On a bike this light, with this much travel - playful and poppy comes more the from the rider, not the bike. With a 40lb bike, playful and poppy frame characteristic is much more a factor. Unless you're osteoporosis riddled lightweight with not much strength, I don't see it as a detriment one way or another. They need to come up with some modern criteria... or something.
  • + 3
 @2bigwheels: Precisely. Devinci says coil is an option on the Spartan (whereas some brands will say that their models are too linear to accept a coil--that those bikes must use an air-sprung shock to get the proper degree of progressivity). I was happy to keep the Spartan air sprung, but I know some readers are dedicated coil fans and will want to know if you can install one on the Spartan without the thing bottoming out like crazy. In this case, yup, you can go the coil route. Again, I think the new RS Super Deluxe is very well suited to the Spartan, but you know...some people just have to have coil.
  • + 1
 @vernonfelton: so basically it’s technically ok to use a coil, but in a practical sense you would be mad to use anything other than an air shock?
  • + 1
 @Travel66: Depends on the thing you put the most priority on. It's a huge preference thing. But what Vernon is getting at is that because the newest crop of Air shocks all have gotten much better at delivering a more linear feel the Designers at Devinci were able to create a suspension platform that can play nicely with both air and coil sprung shocks without diminishing the feel depending on what you choose.

Devincis I have ridden have all felt like they have a nice ramp up at the last bit of the stroke so this will definitely lend a hand to coil shock users.
  • + 1
 @2bigwheels: You know without some proper suspension analytics its incredibly hard to put any of this into context. Saying the bike isn't poppy with a quality air shock and then saying it works well with a coil shock doesn't stack up IMO, although i can see how its technically possible. It would have to be frame with decent progression that just happens to have a very linear air shock. If that's the case why has this full-bore weapons-grade Enduro bike even got an air shock on it?

@vernonfelton
PB needs to up its game on suspension analytics. Its dull only having VitalMTB doing this analysis. It would be great to have different opinions from different sites based on some proper analytics.
  • + 1
 I can verify the Process 153, as well as the 134. Had the redesigned troy. It was a great bike, I still miss it every once in a while and would buy another, however the process was noticeably "poppier' in the sense that it wanted to launch off everything, and felt very nimble in the air. The split pivot on the troy felt a little more "grounded" to me, but was plusher overall, and much more progressive at the end of the stroke. Not sure if these thoughts translate into the spartan, however. I've only parking-lot pedaled it.
  • + 1
 The only Kona retailer near me will have a large 29er process 153!! I'm so happy but it will be a long 5-6 months before I can try it! Frown

I can't try a 2018 Patrol though... Do you think the 64° HA, 160/170mm, 2018 Patrol will be as much poppy and a good climber as the older one or will now be a little bit like the sentinel, more grounded, roll through everything bike?

Transition would be cheaper for me (and better color option for my liking) but if it changed a lot, maybe I would be better on a Process.
  • + 0
 @Travel66: Why wouldn't you put an Air shock on Enduro bike that 90% of that go out their doors our sold to just common folk like you and I and not Racers. Why would you spec a bike with a coil shock which will only work for someone in a certain weight range. If the bike is air sprung front and back it allows for a much larger range of riders to hop on it and be riding right out the shop doors right away. Coil suspension is great for people who build bikes for themselves... not for shops to have on their sales floor.

As for this bike, and all Devices they have a pretty decent ending stroke progressiveness which is noted in almost every review of their bikes that they all have a "bottomless" feel.

Looking at graphs with spring rate curves and leverage ratios is pretty useless as when you get the bike you can add volume spacers and or air to your suspension get pretty much whatever feel you are looking for.... Just look at the Fox X2 over the past few months. Every Time that shock is on a bike the reviewers make a comment that after adding a shit ton of spacers they got the feel they were looking for.... so Really the shock plays as much of a roll in feel as the geometry does....

So what does this all mean? it means that all we can rely on is the reviewer to express in words how he felt the ride was. If it means he felt it was poppy or not is up to them... it's a review not a technical breakdown of the f*cking machine it's a review written by a person who has a certain way they like things.... like well any and all other reviews.

Why anyone would take a review and read it like it is some kind of religious text is ridiculous, go out and try the bike, that's the best way to decide if you want one. The review just helps people with answering some certain questions thats it thats all.
  • + 2
 I noticed in the photo of the chainstay what looks to be mastic tape...does this bike come stock with proper guards in this area?
  • + 3
 Yes it's very well thought out. The only thing I added to mine was clear 3m tape on the rear arms outer surface to protect against heal rub and a strip on the down tube
  • + 2
 Love that bass boat purple color...if only the ugly green wasn't added in to make it look like the Joker's bike.
  • + 3
 classic stucture works best!
  • + 2
 As if the vertical shock mount is new to Devinci!? Remember it's proven in the Troy.
  • + 1
 I'm not against metric but now every company use a different lenght and stroke, they are killing aftermarket, shame on you
  • + 2
 I don't want ...... I NEED
  • + 1
 Vernon rock'n the best knee guards in mountain biking: Scott Grenade Pro EVO's!
  • + 3
 Dope arse paintjob
  • + 1
 That trident shaped portion of the rocker link looks like is extra willing to break. Yikes.
  • + 1
 can someone tell me the difference between DW Link and Split Pivot? I know they are both made by Dave Weagle.
  • + 2
 DW link uses two links (one upper and one lower by the bottom bracket) between front triangle and the rear triangle sorta like VPP but rotating in the same direction rather than in opposite directions like VPP. Split Pivot is a modified link activated single pivot with an additional pivot co located with the rear axel.
  • + 1
 Still love my Shimano Slx brakes bought used by a friend for 100€ the pair.
  • + 1
 Can anyone explain Split Pivot to me? Looks exactly like Trek's suspension layout.
  • + 2
 In fact, Trek copied Dave Weagle on the split pivot. Dave tried to poursuit Trek for instance, but without any success. www.bikeradar.com/news/article/dave-weagle-awarded-split-pivot-patent-27186. The main purpose of the Split Pivot is to maximize the braking capabilities and the pedaling efficientcy of the bike, without having effect on how the suspension works.

Hope this reply helps! @tgent
  • + 0
 And nothing in the review about the apparent pedal-kickback from the video? Also no words about performance under braking? Come on you can do better.
  • + 3
 Decepticon Constructor!
  • + 1
 I didn't think of that!
I was going with #purplerain but now I may have to change it to Devastator or one of the constructicons names
  • - 2
 All review photos should be taken with the chain on the smallest rear cog thus showing how much chain slap will be generated, because clutch systems do not solve the whole issue when things start to get a bit worn and the trails get rowdy.
  • + 2
 Avid mechanicals. I have never had to bleed them. Not even once
  • + 1
 too much or too little pedal kickback, can't tell from the pics.
  • + 2
 Such a nice bike Drool
  • + 1
 TRP Quadiems for 2 years. Still run like the day i got them bedded in.
  • + 0
 "At this price, you probably expect name-brand cockpit components. " 7000 bucks bike, okay then :-D
  • + 2
 This dude is WACK
  • + 1
 If the Joker rode a mtb, this would be his ride.
  • - 3
 "The bottom bracket on this thing is fairly low (337mm/13.2 inches in the Low setting) and pedal strikes are going to be a thing, even for people who aren't pedaling like goons through the rough."

That is just stupidly too low!
  • + 1
 I was looking at Guerrilla Gravity bikes lately and some have a 12.9 or 13.0 inches bbh!! I don't know if people think that we all ride some A-Line trails but I don't have anything like that at home....but we have plenty of rocks and roots so I don't want anything below, at least, 13.4 inches!! That's what I have and I still have some pedal strikes.
  • + 1
 Makes me miss my purple 5spot
  • + 0
 where's the 'looks like a session'?
  • + 1
 looks like a dixon
  • + 1
 Looks like a Troy really.
  • + 1
 @Zfisher: my Dixon wreck
  • + 1
 Je l'aime
  • - 1
 Excuse me, but you've got some poo on your rear shock. No, on the other side. There, ya got it!
  • - 1
 absolutely despise the colour choice
  • + 5
 The matte black option is a nice alternative--worth going to the site and checking out. I'm a fan of Darth Vader-esque paint jobs. If it were up to me, all bikes would come in varying shades of black. But that's, clearly, just me...
  • + 1
 @vernonfelton: I don't mind colour but I just think purple and green are two colours that are not meant to be together especially when the whole frame is screaming lime green and purple.
  • + 0
 Can't out-ride the ugly
  • - 1
 yeah I will buy one off pinkbike in a year for half that price!
  • - 1
 color is sh*******
  • - 2
 Only 1000g heavier than a Scott Genius frame.
  • + 35
 And 4 fewer cables to make the suspension work.
  • - 6
flag jclnv (Dec 4, 2017 at 8:59) (Below Threshold)
 @ryan83: You could add a lock-out to the Devinci for similar performance but it'd be even heavier.
  • + 1
 @jclnv: linkagedesign.blogspot.ca better AS than any 6 inch Scott I've seen!
  • + 0
 @justincs: True, but then there's more pedal kickback to go with it.
  • + 0
 @justincs: I'm happy with low anti-squat. I ride a road bike so I don't have an issue with active bikes.

People like Ryan83 don't understand that if you do one thing kinematically you affect another. Does he and others actually think that Scott couldn't build in more anti-squat to the design of a bike? The reason they don't is it'll have less pedal kickback and the lower instant centre gives better small bump. Same reason Specialized do the same.

Anyway all I was talking about was weight. That Devinci is a pig! I know Scott are at the cutting edge with carbon but holy shit 1000g lighter! That's an XC hardtail frame lighter.
  • + 1
 @jclnv: How much is the Scott? lighter bike/lighter wallet?
  • + 0
 @justincs: Yeah I don't think they're cheap! Then again I ride a Specialized (which I luckily get a deal on) which probably isn't much cheaper!

Outrageous how light that Scott is though. 26.5lbs medium for a 150mm 29" with a Fox 36! That's the same weight as the bike I race XC on.
  • + 3
 I've never read a single review that made a compelling argument for all the wizardry that Scott brings to the table on the Genius. Most people comment on the additional maintenance of that setup in addition to a bike that sits in the middle of the performance spectrum. I've found that keeping mountain bikes simple with fewer proprietary parts serves me better in the long run. With that said, if you are out riding and having fun, to hell with the critics.
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