Devinci's New Troy - Crankworx Whistler 2015

Aug 12, 2015
by Mike Levy  
Devinci Troy


Troy Gets Rebuilt


Canadian company Devinci is updating their 140mm travel Troy platform to better suit more aggressive riders. The basic lines will look familiar compared to last year's bike, but every element of the frame has been re-designed in a search for increased chassis rigidity and updated geometry that includes a much longer front end than Devinci's bikes have featured in the past. Devinci will offer both carbon and aluminum versions of the new Troy when the bike becomes available this coming November, as well as a frame-only carbon fiber and aluminum options for those who want to build it up to their own preferences.

Devinci Troy Details

• Intended use: trail / all-mountain
• Rear wheel travel: 140mm
• Wheel size: 27.5"
• More progressive suspension
• All new frame
• Carbon and aluminum options
• Longer reach, shorter rear end
• Internal cable routing
• ISCG 05 chain guide tabs
• Carbon frame 1X only



Devinci Troy
A new, wider down tube is said to greatly increase frame stiffness.
Devinci Troy
The front end looks very Spartan-esque, including the ports for the Troy's internal cable routing.



Longer and Stiffer


With the original Troy, Devinci found that the 140mm travel bike was often being ridden by downhillers as an aggressive trail machine, something that led these riders to spec the bike with things like shorter stems and wider handlebars than what it originally came stock with. It was clear that the next generation Troy would need to be designed with these points in mind, and that's exactly what Devinci have done. So while the old medium sized bike featured a 415mm long reach in the 'LO' setting, the new Troy sports a 440mm reach and will come from the factory with a short stem and either a 780 or 800mm wide handlebar depending on the model. The 67 degree head angle remains the same as last year, though, as that number suits the 140mm travel bike's intentions as a burly trail machine - if you want slacker and more capable, the 165mm travel Spartan is what you should be considering. The new Troy's rear end is also slightly shorter at 426mm, with 4mm removed compared to last year due to the carbon bike's dedicated single chain ring design that provides a touch more clearance.


Devinci Troy geometry


Devinci was also on a quest to greatly increase chassis rigidity, and they say that they've been able to do that thanks to the massive carbon tubes that make it clear that the bike is closely related to the longer travel Spartan. The rear end is also all new, with burlier carbon seat stays, new aluminum chain stays, and a stiffer rocker arm that are all said to contribute to a big jump in lateral rigidity. All that adds up to a slightly heavier frame, with the new version coming in a 6.13 pounds compared to 6.07 pounds for the old bike, a bump up that Devinci clearly feels is well worth it.


Devinci Troy
  The new Troy features the same 140mm of rear wheel travel, but tweaks to the design provide added bottom-out resistance.



Suspension Updates


The re-designed Troy still employs Dave Weagle's Split Pivot suspension design that lets the dropout pivot rotate concentrically around the axle, and it's said to allow the braking neutrality to be tuned independently of chain induced suspension forces. In short, active braking combined with good pedalling performance. But comparing the previous iteration of Troy to the new bike will reveal slightly different pivot locations between the two, and especially when talking about the new and stiffer rocker arm. We might only be talking about a few millimeters difference here and there, but the end result is a more progressive stroke that, along with new shock tunes from RockShox, is said to make for more bottom-out resistance compared to the original design. Again, this news should keep more aggressive riders happy.




MENTIONS: @devinci




125 Comments

  • 91 2
 ''Longer and Stiffer'' ... giggidy Smile
  • 5 2
 Incoming hurry can of innuendos . . . . As in "Troy's getting longer and stiffer" . . .

Pardon the innuendo and hurry can of puns tho.
  • 9 0
 "Hurry can": Is that deliberate?
  • 6 0
 If you look at the second picture they added girth as well
  • 21 0
 This period of MTB development should become known as "The Viagra Effect"
  • 5 1
 Article by: Ron Jeremy
  • 2 8
flag yoshiro (Aug 12, 2015 at 15:03) (Below Threshold)
 And look, the head angle is 67 degrees. Looks like Troy's "tip" angle is 67 degrees.

Unlimited Pun Works, yeah.
  • 3 1
 @yoshiro stop with the pun, you need to get back to Reality Marble Wink
  • 21 1
 adds length and rigidity. someone is having me on here.
  • 10 17
flag WAKIdesigns (Aug 12, 2015 at 1:43) (Below Threshold)
 So does frequent sex
  • 9 0
 "A new, wider down tube is said to greatly increase frame stiffness", yeah no kidding. That thing is massive!!!
  • 2 0
 Hopefully not a noodle anymore like last model. But yeah, appears you could also use it to knock in the odd fence post quite easily.
  • 13 0
 Will they make the same changes to the Spartan?
I find myself between what most manufacturers deem medium and large, always wanting the length of the large but the seat tube height of the medium.
I for one am happy with the way geometry trends are going. The fact that the bikes ride and handle so much better is maybe just a bonus that comes with it, haha!
  • 6 0
 which is why you ride a yeti ya? Im the same way, Im pushing 5'11'' and my SB66's geo is so perfect. Long top tubes FTW
  • 3 0
 Seat tubes should be shorter, similar to kona, especially once the new droppers come out that have longer bases. ( proper authority- ks is workn on this)
  • 6 1
 Guerrilla Gravity Megatrail. Long TT (635mm) right size ST (457mm) on a medium. Choose from a progressive or linear "Trail Mode" (150mm travel, 66.5 HTA), or a progressive or linear "Gravity Mode" (160mm travel, 65.5 HTA). Frickin' love mine.
  • 2 1
 I have a megatrail for sale. Know anyone who is interested
  • 6 0
 Long 6" bikes are great if you want a full on downhill bike that climbs occasionally. Many, maaany people want that, and have possibilities to use that, but... These are NOT trail bikes. "Enduro" bike in 2010 had more to do with trail/AM, but these days the tendency is to get it as close to DH as possible. One simply must be aware of the trade offs and hidden increased demand on riders skill and physique.
  • 1 0
 Again that's why the Yeti's (and other modern enduro rigs) are so amazing. I feel just as comfortable, if not more, on the gnarly stuff with my SB66 vs. my Glory yet the thing can actually pedal up the damn hill. With the proper suspension set up there isn't much out there that a proper 6" bike cant handle. I prefer my SB almost 70% of the time honestly. But its nice to have the glory on standby Smile
  • 2 1
 Considering that recent mainstream invention is to setup your bike hard as hell, we may see
Next gen of DH bikes get down to 7" of travel or so. I have a 5" frame with 6" fork and it is plenty capable when you set it hard and put 2ply tyres on. If I lived near proper mountains, since I am such an amateur and suspension on 6" bikes got so good at climbing, I'd buy something like Kona 167, Spes Enduro or Trek Slash and stuff it with Fox Float 36 180. Set it at 260 travel for general riding and 180 for park. Bikes are amazing these days
  • 1 0
 again^^^^ Word
  • 2 0
 I could see dh bikes going down to 7'' as well. I have a spartan and its the first time ive finally felt just as comfortable on an AM/enduro bike as I do on my DH bike.

Makes me wonder about the m16
  • 15 0
 Good job specing 800mm bars on a 140mm bike. All bikes should really come with super wide bars and let users cut to their preferrence.
  • 9 23
flag Sycip69er (Aug 12, 2015 at 8:40) (Below Threshold)
 The last thing I want to do is cut carbon bars. I barely trust them in the first place.
  • 4 1
 Lots of wastage here.
  • 2 0
 @Sycip69er
Barely trust them? Do you own some? But sleep with one eye open?

And I think you're right about wide bars @j-t-g, makes me wonder though, have they pretty much ended full X-ups? Only see them on dj edits now.
  • 4 0
 I currently own a 2014 Devinci Troy XP it's an extremely capable bike. Not as capable at cross country as I thought as pedaling up hill blows but the descents on this bike are fricken bonkers the rear suspension is just unbelievable and the pike up front is perfect. I agree with previous comments about the length of the bike they better dial it in!
  • 12 5
 I would really like to troy that bike, Looks sweet!
  • 11 4
 no. no. no. no. too many puns on this website
  • 4 8
flag Danielrifum (Aug 12, 2015 at 2:40) (Below Threshold)
 What why? It's not about the result as long as you troyed your best that is all that matters
  • 4 1
 thats quite a spartan approach to the topic
  • 23 0
 you can fit a small army in that down tube...
  • 7 4
 I own a 2015 Troy. It's quite stiff and relatively heavy for a carbon frame, so I'm not quite sure why they added more stiffness. The length though is a bit of an issue. I'm 177 cm tall with an 81 cm inseam, and after swapping the stock 70 mm stem for a 50 mm, the bike handled better but was not as comfortable. I've since adapted, and it's still much longer than competing Santa Cruz models (but not the Nomad M3). That being said, the reason to buy this bike, regardless which model, is its impeccable rear suspension kinematics. For a mid to long travel trail bike, the Troy arguably has the best suspension kinematics on the market; an impressive combo of low anti-rise (break squat), well balanced anti-squat through out the stroke, and a moderately progressive leverage ratio through the stroke.
  • 2 1
 The suspension design is nicely refined. I just wish that level of refinement carried over to the rest of the bike. I feel like it falls a little short in terms of weight and aesthetics, and the press fit BB is a bummer too. I guess the price somewhat excuses the weight, but Santa Cruz aluminium frames are comparable in weight and $600 cheaper with threaded BBs.
  • 2 1
 Why are people against press-fit BBs? BMX bikes have been using press-fit for over a decade. They're similar, lighter, cheaper, etc. Threaded comes with the risk of cross-threading or damage due to impact or over-tightening.
  • 6 0
 Mainly because I can easily install and remove them myself at home without any expensive, obscure tools. Plus, if you take care to get the torque right, avoid cross threading, and keep the threads clean, threaded BB frames should last longer than press fit, because installing and removing press fit BBs will eventually start to bore the frame out. So you can probably save money in the long run by not needing a bike shop or special tools to change your BB and with better frame longevity. As a bonus, threaded BBs have a reputation of being less prone to creaking.

I do 95% of the maintenance on my bikes, including rebuilding and revaling my dampers and building and truing my wheelsets. Pretty much the only thing I won't do myself is press or remove pivot bearings, headsets, or press fit BBs since I'm afraid I might damage the frame if I try to do it myself especially if I don't have the proper tools, which cost hundreds of dollars.
  • 4 2
 my alum. commencal meta sx is only 1lbs heavier then my buddies carbon spartan. not impressed with the weight saving of carbon on the devinci's.

also the "special" tool can be made with a length of thin wall alum and a dremel......

also you would have to swap out pressfit bb's a few hundred times before you start boring the frame out.
  • 4 1
 I'm aware of the MacGyver methods, but I'd rather just pay a LBS to do it for me with the proper tools than risk damaging my $3000 frame. IMO, that's acceptable for headsets and pivot bearings, since you rarely have to change your headset, and threaded pivot bearings aren't really a viable option. But for the BB, press fit is inexcusable in my opinion. The extra cost and a few extra grams are well worth it for threaded BBs, and pretty much all of the professional mechanics I've talked to would agree. To each their own though I guess. Already seems to be a losing battle for threaded BBs, unfortunately.
  • 6 0
 Press fits are the devil.
  • 2 0
 Agree, I have a pressfit BB and it's a nightmare...my bike is like a squeaky bed! I tried a couple of thing without success. My next move is to replace the shitty SRAM GXP pressfit made of plastic by a aluminium Wheel Manucfacturing BB. Hope this will solve my problem. My advise, Stay away from pressfit BB!
  • 1 0
 @cptstoney,

While I'll be the first to say the advantages of carbon over alum don't begin and end with weight savings, I do expect there to be a notable difference for the added cost.
  • 2 0
 Always wanted to test ride a devinci troy next to my remedy. I really enjoy the trail category, but have often felt a bit under-biked on tough descents (harsh bottom-outs and a lot of bouncing while i find myself taking the fetal position to keep far enough back from the bars to not endo). I wonder if these would feel more capable or less, or pretty much the same. I should probably just move up to 150, but enduro bikes often sacrifice having real fun on anything not seriously steep and gnarly. On my rem I have fun riding flow trails with my wife.

still looking for a perfect do-it-all i guess. . .
  • 3 1
 All this new talk about longer and stiffer makes it seem like all the best bikes released in 2011-2013 are totally crap which is BS. I have fun with my 2012 all mountain bike and I don't need an inch of geo change to convince me that my bike is shit.
  • 9 4
 Colour: Hate Black

The colour every mtb should be.
  • 11 1
 Yeah that would be exciting huh
  • 9 1
 Black is the new black.
  • 6 0
 Way too much white on it
  • 6 1
 For those who are curious, this model has the Boost axle spacing standard.
  • 5 0
 I just threw up. On my dog.
  • 1 0
 Pressfit and boost.? F that. No wonder they conveniently glossed over that crap in the review.
  • 1 0
 Can someone explain what is wrong with the Boost axle spacing standard? In honest terms, not "I totally hate it" terms.
  • 3 0
 Hi hope that they will do the same with the Atlas. long top tube and slack the geo to compet with the Kona Process 111 etc. this would be a great bike.
  • 1 0
 I have replaced several bb's on my Gf's and mines plastic Troy's with zero issues. Have a Spartan on its second bb, again no issues. Wish the bb's would last a little longer buts that's the price you pay when you ride in the mud and hose down your bike of afterwards. Replacing them is super easy though maybe a 15 minute job? Don't get me wrong I have seen some press fit bb bikes that were creaky nightmares, however these Devinci's seem to be fine.
  • 1 0
 Making a trail-bike even more downhill orientated, more towards the spartan. Strange! The troy wasn't a do-it-all bike and certainly isn't a do-it-all bike anymore.
Or will Devinci be releasing a short-travel trail-bike (650b) soon? 125mm/5 inch rear travel?
  • 1 1
 I've actually kind of wondering this myself. I've been seriously looking at finding a slightly less travel trail bike, with a still "fun" feeling geometry. It seems that nobody makes it. I'm thinking something similiar to a GT sensor, and maybe even a little steeper and shorter. But I don't want a 100mm, 70degree HA bike either...

Whats out there? Any bikes between a norco sight and a full suspension XC bike???
  • 1 0
 Have you had a look at the Transition Scout @alexisfire? It might hit your desired numbers.
  • 5 1
 Looks good. Seat don't match though so I can't buy it.
  • 1 0
 Valvecaps. It matches the valvecaps lol. Why have they done that?
  • 2 0
 question: how come bikes like these (including YT's) chain stay is made of aluminum when everything else is made of carbon fiber?
  • 8 0
 The chain stays are done in aluminium as it brings the overall cost down a little. Also, i think, because the chainstays are the most prone to rockstrikes etc so the aluminium allows for a little deformation.
  • 2 1
 so what does this mean for bike companies who make every part of their frame in carbon fiber including the chain stay?
  • 4 0
 It means they spared no expense or gram.
  • 7 0
 It means my carbon Bronson has massive chips all over the leading end of the chainstay pivot.
  • 1 0
 A lot of companies claim that there's little difference in weight between aluminum & carbon stays as well, so it's not really worth the effort. You do hear that less often than a few years ago when most companies didn't do carbon stays, though...
  • 4 1
 I cant see, how the Split Pivot here is different from simple single pivot?...
  • 2 1
 Removes ALL brake effect from the suspension
  • 2 0
 Just reduces the brake squat. High single pivots usually have very high brake squat. With the split pivot the figure is much reduced. It is a really nice system because they can control the leverage ratio with the linkage, maintain high anti squat, and still have manageable brake squat.
  • 1 0
 Yepp i had a Devinci wilson. It was super calm under hard braking in choppy terrain, probably one of the best
  • 1 4
 I don't know, I think that the reach is a little much for what's supposed to be a trail bike, not an Enduro race machine. I think that you'll be sacrificing some maneuverability for speed. Most of the competition in this class (SB5, HD3, etc.) have shorter reaches. I'm 6ft. and find a 430mm reach with a 50mm stem and 760 bars to be the sweet spot for trail riding. Also, the DW link is the premier suspension design that Weagle makes. Ride this back to back with an HD3 or Turner and form your own opinion.
  • 2 1
 If you're asking how is it different mechanically: www.pinkbike.com/news/Split-Pivot-Devinci-explained-Dave-Weagle-2011.html

it may not be obvious, but there's a pivot in the area that the rear axle passes through. I agree with the people above that it's one of my favorite suspension designs, after riding a few bikes using it.
  • 2 0
 @slodownu, have u tried the dw delta(evil) to compare?
  • 1 2
 No, I haven't tried the delta. However, its a link-driven single pivot, so I would expect it to perform similar to other link-driven single pivots in general, although I'm sure the kinematics have been designed to perform as per Evil's specs. Boo if you want, but the DW is widely regarded as the best performing of his designs, but the most expensive to manufacture and design into a bike.
  • 1 2
 Boo all YOU want, @SlodownU , but having ridden split-pivot, ABP, Horst, VPP, various linkage-driven single-pivots, & some old school vanilla single pivots, Split-pivot(& ABP by extension if we're being honest) doesn't feel like any single pivot I've ever ridden, especially under braking. I'd rate it above the Horst implementations I've ridden, in that respect, & I'd rate it better than VPP for suspension bob. That concentric axle pivot may not offer a huge amount of chainstay length change, but it seems to be enough to make the bikes ride fantastic, which is all that really matters at the end of the day.
  • 2 6
flag SlodownU (Aug 12, 2015 at 12:30) (Below Threshold)
 Opinions are like a*sholes, everyone has one. I was talking about the delta. And having ridden split-pivot in its many incarnations, I would rate it above some horst implementations, but not others, depends on the manufacturer. And its not better than DW-link (which is what I stated originally) in any incarnation. I would take a Mojo HD3 or Burner over this any day of the week. Bottom line is its cheaper to design and manufacture a bike around Split-Pivot vs. DW-link. I know people get butt-hurt around here when someone doesn't love their favorite brand of bike, but get over it.
  • 6 1
 If opinions are like a*sholes, what does that mean about the guy who dropped into a thread about HOW the suspension design is different from single pivot, to complain about the bike's REACH numbers & to talk shit about any bike that isn't DW link?
  • 2 0
 @groghunter Out of curiosity, how could a split pivot possibly perform better than a Horst Link at Braking? Or have less bob than VPP? That doesn't make any sense. I guess a really badly designed HL/VPP against a really well designed split pivot? But as far as suspension kinematics go a split pivot is just a leverage activated single pivot. Split Pivot may be WAY better than older single pivot designs, but the only thing it's better at than HL/VPP is cost. And even that not so much cause you got to pay DW for the split pivot when you can now do a HL for free! Smile
  • 1 0
 I would say that axle pivot helps decouple the braking forces, since it separates the chainstay from the seatstay. Also, single pivots have a desirable characteristic under braking, at least for some: squat. still having squat(which you don't have as much with horst) while decoupling the braking forces so it doesn't lock up the rear end is a pretty desirable suspension trait. a lot of people liked some of the old single pivots with floating brakes for the same reason.
  • 1 0
 It doesn't have less brake squat than the HL, and it doesn't have less bob than the VPP. It has less brake squat than the VPP and less bob than the HL.
  • 1 0
 I said it had more squat than Horst(I acknowledge that the way I wrote it is slightly opaque, however.) Now that I think back on it, pedal bob is a tuning thing on VPP, though: I've ridden VPP bikes that would actually almost lock up the suspension under pedaling(Blur) all the way to bikes that had me tumbling into the bushes from scraping pedals every time I tried to get some cranks in (M6.) They all had some weird quirk to them, but all the split pivots I've ridden just did what you want & disappeared underneath the rider. I'd take a session or a Wilson over that M6 I have right now any day, I'll tell you that.
  • 2 0
 I work for a Norco, Devinci, and Intense dealer, so FSR, Split Pivot, VPP, and have spent a lot of time on all of them, and I prefer the Split Pivot as well. I think most of the guys at the shop prefer VPP, so just like we can't all agree on Shimano vs Sram, Fox vs RS, a lot of it probably is just personal comfort and preference.
  • 1 0
 That's interesting, as I would say that it's been the Intense VPP bikes that I've liked the least. If I worked at your shop, I'd be on one of the other two brands(& likely it would be the Devinci.)
  • 1 0
 I prefer the intense vpp the least as well. We also do GT and id take AOS, frs, or anything DW over vpp. But im in the minority in my area
  • 1 0
 Maybe I don't know jack about suspension squat. Smile But my point was that a split pivot is only a brake decoupler. It's not doing anything for the actual suspension action over any other leverage activated single pivot. A horst link is a brake decoupler, AND that pivot location affects the suspension kenmatics.

Any design magic DW comes up with in pivot placement for a leverage activated single pivot can also be used by a HL. AND you'd still have the chain stay pivot placement to make it that much better... Now that there is no legal reason DW can't make HL's it will be interesting if someone asks/pays him to develop one.

I think the problem with VPP/Dual link bikes is whatever you do to make them pedal better takes away from the plush. Sometimes this makes them harsh, better bikes it's just "controlled", but it never seems as smooth or OPEN as HL/SP bikes??? (edit/ which is why low speed compression dampening is important on HL/SP bikes! Smile )
  • 3 3
 My mama says "don't say nothing if ya can't say something nice" but I'm underwhelmed by the industrial design execution on this new bike, especially the link, seat stays, and head tube. Clunky and unrefined. Probably rides great but you know, "look fast to go fast". Compared to the previous year's model the carbon surfacing is a step backward. Though I suppose if they are trying to communicate "stiffer bigger heavier more solid" that's the impression I get.
  • 2 0
 As an ID guy I would have to agree somewhat. I get an overall impression of stiffness and solidity when I look at the bike with fresh eyes, but some of the details - like the crease under the top tube/seat tube brace and the area between the down and top tubes (it almost looks like there's a weld in there)) seem to mimic other types of manufacturing besides carbon which is an interesting line of thought.

But I'd love to ride one nonetheless!
  • 4 0
 I could really do with more length and rigidity. Wait, wrong website...
  • 2 0
 Really like it, maybe my next bike if i like the built of the lower range model.
  • 3 1
 Looks like an awesome bike but then they ruined it with a boost rear hub.....
  • 2 1
 Won't that allow the owner to run a 26+ if they so desired? Boost=2 for 1
  • 3 0
 Nice!
  • 5 2
 Looks like a cube stereo
  • 6 5
 I'm bored with every bike's geometry taking the same approach. Is it just me or are they all starting to all seem the same?
  • 2 1
 i can't see where they're going to go with geometry. Everythings now long/low/slack as possible
  • 1 0
 Had the 2014, not sure there's enough change to make me give the Troy another try.
  • 1 1
 Looks like a trek remedy rear end just the floating shock difference. The lower chain stay looks identical. Also looks like a session Wink
  • 1 0
 rocker link looks cheaply made , seatstay- rockerlink pivot also not tidy.
  • 2 0
 Whats up with the seat stay pivot ? Looks a right mess in 3rd pic down
  • 2 0
 Could be grease
  • 2 0
 so... my 2015 troy not good anymore?
  • 3 1
 Press-Fit... this bike was over before it started.
  • 2 0
 And boost. It's a ride once throw in garbage world these days. Evem debinci is on the throw away bike bandwagon
  • 1 0
 Good to see some robust bikes verses anemic frames trying to shave every gram.
  • 4 4
 Too many bikes look the same right now. I'm guessing they have settled on what works but damn it's boring. I need variety!
  • 4 0
 All kinds of 90's garbage in the Buy Sell that doesn't work very well, but looks unique. Have at er!
  • 1 2
 And one of the things I like about my 2015 troy is the short cockpit. They also came stock with a short stem and 780mm bar so I dont know what they are talking about there.
  • 1 0
 Looks like sh*t. just sayin
  • 1 0
 ...........................
  • 1 0
 @devinci any word on frame only pricing in Canuck bucks?
  • 1 0
 Nice
  • 1 1
 Looks like a Trek....Slash..
  • 1 1
 Aaand here it goes...again...hahahah...after a few comments under last new bikes it looks like every new bike looks like a trek...hehehe.;-)
  • 1 0
 I think you're missing his joke, they actually use the exact same suspension platform.
  • 1 1
 looks like a Troy....
  • 2 2
 More plastic.....I'm ecstatic beyond words.
  • 5 6
 Schwalbe?!, really?! There´s no stones in Canada?
  • 2 0
 Can't tell if your using sarcasm or not....
  • 1 2
 looks like a Troy......
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